03/07/2014 Look East - West


03/07/2014

Latest news for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Milton Keynes and Northants.


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The choice to die with dignhty ` a husband backs

:00:00.:00:10.

the assisted dying bill aftdr watching his wife's painful death.

:00:11.:00:20.

I could easily have put her into it. Nobody would have known. But I

:00:21.:00:27.

couldn't break the law. That is another thing that I regret.

:00:28.:00:28.

8,000 jobs in the pipeline at Silverstone on the eve

:00:29.:00:31.

We'll be here later in the programme with the story that's got t`lking.

:00:32.:00:36.

Taking the children out of school for holidays `

:00:37.:00:51.

We're at the opening ceremony for the Tour De France in Yorkshire

:00:52.:01:01.

First tonight ` the husband who lost his wife to cancer, his regret that

:01:02.:01:04.

he was unable to end her suffering And his campaign to change the law.

:01:05.:01:08.

Steve Riley's wife Tracy didd at their home in Milton Keynes.

:01:09.:01:11.

It was less than a year between diagnosis and death

:01:12.:01:14.

but he wishes he'd been abld to end her life earlier.

:01:15.:01:17.

He is giving his backing to a new bill on assisted dying.

:01:18.:01:21.

It will go before the Lords in two weeks' time.

:01:22.:01:24.

But the bill has plenty of opponents, including the

:01:25.:01:26.

because of fears it would be open to abuse.

:01:27.:01:31.

Doctors would be able to prdscribe lethal doses

:01:32.:01:34.

of drugs to terminally ill patients who want to end their lives.

:01:35.:01:39.

Their professional wedding video shows a bride and groom likd any

:01:40.:01:57.

other. But for tracing and her family, this is also a farewell She

:01:58.:02:02.

lost her battle against somd `` stomach cancer. Everybody in the

:02:03.:02:11.

room knew that Tracy was dyhng. But they did not know how ill she was.

:02:12.:02:16.

She had to get a doctor in on the day because she was vomiting so

:02:17.:02:33.

much. The drugs were not working. Tracy had for some time said that if

:02:34.:02:38.

it didn't work out, she wanted to control how and when she didd. But

:02:39.:02:42.

eventually, which talked about it, she said she did not fear ddath she

:02:43.:02:47.

feared how she might die. So we talked about dignitaries, bdcause

:02:48.:02:52.

that is the only option. Tr`cey s condition deteriorated before

:02:53.:02:56.

arrangements could be made. Steve says it is not her only regret. She

:02:57.:03:04.

said she had a fantastic life and the best ten years of age h`d been

:03:05.:03:10.

with me. She said, I really want to die now. I can't stand it any more.

:03:11.:03:16.

I'm ready to go. And I knew that she wanted to die and I could e`sily

:03:17.:03:21.

have put into it, and nobodx would have known, but I couldn't do it. I

:03:22.:03:26.

couldn't break the law. And that is another thing that I regret. He

:03:27.:03:30.

believes the time has come for a change in the law. Nobody should

:03:31.:03:36.

suffer like my wife suffered. Nobody should be denied the right. You

:03:37.:03:41.

could use when you marry, when you work, when you live, you can choose

:03:42.:03:44.

whether you have children or not. What car you drive, where you go on

:03:45.:03:50.

holiday. But when it comes to death, you are denied that right to

:03:51.:03:54.

self`determination. And there is no logic to that argument. Steve is now

:03:55.:04:00.

trying to rebuild a life without Tracey. He is determined her memory

:04:01.:04:05.

will live on. He says he will continue to campaign for a change in

:04:06.:04:09.

the law so that others do not suffer like she did. Our reporter joins us

:04:10.:04:23.

now. A very emotional argumdnt in favour of this bill. But pldnty of

:04:24.:04:28.

people have concerns, don't they? Yes, many people fear that `ssisted

:04:29.:04:34.

dying of all kinds are open to abuse particularly when it comes to the

:04:35.:04:39.

vulnerable in society. That is the concern of the British Medical

:04:40.:04:42.

Association, who are also concerned that it goes against their criminal

:04:43.:04:46.

that their professional ethhcs to prolong life, not reduce it. Others

:04:47.:04:55.

feel it would lead to degradation of our morals and how society views

:04:56.:05:01.

killing. But David Tanner s`ys that the majority of people `` the

:05:02.:05:07.

campaign says that many people would not choose it. That is exactly the

:05:08.:05:11.

same argument as the lobby `gainst it. This will not be the last debate

:05:12.:05:18.

before this comes before thd Lords later this month.

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Now, on the eve of the Brithsh Grand Prix, Silverstone has unveiled major

:05:22.:05:24.

plans to bring thousands of new jobs to Northamptonshire

:05:25.:05:26.

The county is already at the heart of "Motorsport Valley .

:05:27.:05:29.

Currently there are around 0,20 companies linked to motorsport based

:05:30.:05:33.

in Northamptonshire and togdther they employ up to 20,000 people

:05:34.:05:39.

It's estimated that these companies generate ?131 million for

:05:40.:05:45.

But after today's announcemdnt, those figures could rocket.

:05:46.:05:52.

A company called MEPC is pl`nning to develop this ` Silverstone Park `

:05:53.:05:56.

which could be home to another 00 motorsport and high perform`nce

:05:57.:06:00.

If that were to happen, thex could generate 8,000 new jobs by 2025

:06:01.:06:09.

Michael Fallon is the Minister of State for Business.

:06:10.:06:12.

I spoke to him earlier about the significance of this development.

:06:13.:06:23.

This could be hugely import`nt. For the whole country. Motorsport has

:06:24.:06:31.

suddenly become one of our biggest industrial sectors. It avoids 4 ,000

:06:32.:06:36.

people, there are 4000 comp`nies. Most of the Formula one teal is

:06:37.:06:41.

here. Most of the global research and development into motorsport is

:06:42.:06:44.

now done in Britain. By concentrating it in a clustdr around

:06:45.:06:48.

Silverstone, we have the opportunity to capitalise on that and m`ke

:06:49.:06:54.

ourselves the global leader. So you are saying that Silverstone is going

:06:55.:06:58.

to be to the high`tech engineering industry what Cambridge alrdady is

:06:59.:07:02.

to the biotech and pharmacettical industries? Yes, the potenthal is

:07:03.:07:09.

that order. There is a huge opportunity there for to celent its

:07:10.:07:15.

place as the epicentre of this really important industry. Ht is no

:07:16.:07:20.

longer a sport, it is a major winner for Britain in the innovation and

:07:21.:07:25.

technology that it develops. So how is the government going to support

:07:26.:07:30.

it? We have already been supporting high`tech performance companies in

:07:31.:07:35.

the area. We have been supporting the new university technical College

:07:36.:07:40.

and Silverstone itself. There has been a significant investment in the

:07:41.:07:44.

area and next week, we are going to announce a local growth deal for the

:07:45.:07:49.

area. I can't give you detahls tonight but I hope that invdstment

:07:50.:07:54.

next week will show the importance the government attaches to the

:07:55.:07:58.

development of this kind of high`tech industry right across

:07:59.:08:02.

Northamptonshire. Despite that, I have to tell you that the ldader of

:08:03.:08:06.

the county council feels th`t the government could be doing more. You

:08:07.:08:11.

guilty of perhaps sitting b`ck and waiting for private enterprhse to

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step in? Absolutely not. It has always been a partnership. Xou have

:08:18.:08:21.

to create the right conditions for private enterprise to flourhsh. This

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is a perfect partnership between private investment developing the

:08:26.:08:29.

park, the government taking a city seeks new and ready to back up the

:08:30.:08:32.

industry where it can. This could be hugely import`nt. For

:08:33.:08:36.

the whole country. Motorsport has suddenly become one of our biggest

:08:37.:08:38.

industrial sectors. It avoids 4 ,000 people, there are 4000 comp`nies.

:08:39.:08:41.

Most of the Formula one teal is here. Most of the global research

:08:42.:08:44.

and development into motorsport is A children's doctor who worked

:08:45.:08:47.

in Cambridge will appear in court in the morning charged with a number

:08:48.:08:50.

of sexual offences against boys Doctor Myles Bradbury,

:08:51.:08:52.

41 and from Herringswell in Suffolk, worked as a paediatric haem`tologist

:08:53.:08:54.

at Addenbrooke's Hospital. The offences are alleged to have

:08:55.:08:57.

taken place between December Eight charges relate to offdnces

:08:58.:08:59.

against boys between the agds It is not known whether the alleged

:09:00.:09:03.

abuse took place at the hospital. Addenbrookes has set up a special

:09:04.:09:10.

helpline for families with concerns. A campaign is underway to try and

:09:11.:09:18.

encourage more people to kedp bees ` Ten per cent

:09:19.:09:24.

of the honey bee population was lost last winter ` and there are real

:09:25.:09:28.

fears for their future. A Government minister has bden

:09:29.:09:31.

in Leighton Buzzard today to One of nature's finest, which the

:09:32.:09:50.

government want to encouragd. Nature can exist alongside a very busy

:09:51.:09:54.

railway line, alongside highways, alongside farming. It is re`lly

:09:55.:09:59.

important that we do make the effort to look after our biodivershty, in

:10:00.:10:06.

this case our wonderful wild flowers and our bees and pollinators. It is

:10:07.:10:13.

very important to give nature by two people, particularly if you don t

:10:14.:10:16.

have a car and can't access a wildlife site. You should bd able to

:10:17.:10:22.

access a wild flower site. H want to give wild flowers back to children.

:10:23.:10:28.

This hive in Bedfordshire is home to up to 30,000 bees. But keepdrs are

:10:29.:10:33.

worried about threats to thd colony from viruses, pesticides and loss of

:10:34.:10:38.

habitat. There is a real long`term problem with beads. Honeybeds

:10:39.:10:44.

certainly, but all sorts of these and other pollinators, and ht is

:10:45.:10:51.

really serious. It has been argued that there has been a decline of 30%

:10:52.:10:56.

in numbers over the last ten years of other sorts of these. Figures

:10:57.:11:01.

show that at the end of the Second World War, there were 1 million

:11:02.:11:05.

managed to be colonies in Britain. By 2006, that had dropped to

:11:06.:11:11.

250,000. There are not any dxact figures over how many there are

:11:12.:11:15.

today, but there are real concerns in the future there may not be

:11:16.:11:18.

enough to pollinate our fruht and vegetables. Campaigners say that

:11:19.:11:23.

more money needs to be found and more money `` and more needs to be

:11:24.:11:28.

done to protect bees if we `re to secure our future.

:11:29.:11:34.

code France cyclists. And we are behind the scenes at the

:11:35.:11:55.

British Grand Prix. All this week we've been looking

:11:56.:12:01.

at the issue of taking holidays We know from all the calls `nd

:12:02.:12:04.

e`mails we've had that it's an issue As you may know,

:12:05.:12:08.

the Government changed the law and from September last year head

:12:09.:12:12.

teachers could only grant ldave Today the Department of Education

:12:13.:12:14.

told us that the changes ard working with 130,000 fewer pupils mhssing

:12:15.:12:20.

school regularly. Home time at college. Here, they are

:12:21.:12:34.

strict about taking days off in term time. Exceptional means

:12:35.:12:38.

exceptional. At the moment this line shows that

:12:39.:12:46.

we are around 94.5. The assistant principal shotld mean

:12:47.:12:52.

that attendance now stands `t 9 .5%, all down to the hard work of parents

:12:53.:12:56.

and pupils. There is a link between attdndance

:12:57.:13:00.

and a young person's achievdment. The better attendance they have the

:13:01.:13:04.

more likely they are to reach their potential.

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And number of you contacted us to say that schools seem to want to

:13:10.:13:16.

have it both ways. One man said "if schools fine parents, who do the

:13:17.:13:21.

parents find when teachers go on strike?

:13:22.:13:34.

And this comment from Mrs Jones Terry Kemp, former headteacher,

:13:35.:13:49.

e`mailed us to see that the change of law was no more than the

:13:50.:13:52.

government trying to win brownie points.

:13:53.:13:58.

Tinted a's society when there are a lot of pressures on family,

:13:59.:14:03.

financial and emotional, holiday with mum and dad or mum or dad, is a

:14:04.:14:09.

really good thing. I don't think schools should have the right to

:14:10.:14:12.

dictate to parents that thex cannot take their children away.

:14:13.:14:19.

On Monday many schools are closing because of the Tudor France. We

:14:20.:14:22.

contacted most of the skills and Kim Richard which are closing. Safety

:14:23.:14:30.

was quoted as the main reason. Next week there is a planned teachers'

:14:31.:14:35.

strike, sure to go down badly with most parents, but back in the school

:14:36.:14:40.

they plan to stay open. We do every single thing we can as

:14:41.:14:45.

do most schools to have every single pupil in. Schools do not have a

:14:46.:14:50.

choice with the strike, it hs a legal national action and wd did the

:14:51.:14:56.

best we can in the circumst`nces. And the school they say atthtudes

:14:57.:15:00.

are changing and as a result standards are improving, but is that

:15:01.:15:03.

enough for hard`pressed pardnts This afternoon I spoke to

:15:04.:15:05.

Karen Wilkinson from a group campaigning for parents

:15:06.:15:06.

to have a say over policies that I asked what parents were

:15:07.:15:09.

telling her about this issud. They want to be seen as being the

:15:10.:15:23.

primary carers for their chhldren, and a clear understanding from

:15:24.:15:30.

government that parents do have their children's best interdsts at

:15:31.:15:34.

heart. We understand why thd government came up with this policy

:15:35.:15:37.

because they are concerned `bout persistent absenteeism, and this

:15:38.:15:41.

came up because of the Tottdnham riots and the missing millions from

:15:42.:15:45.

skills that it was blamed on, but they have not looked at the whole

:15:46.:15:49.

issue properly and have not considered for instance that

:15:50.:15:52.

children who are persistently absent are in fact the children who are

:15:53.:15:57.

least likely to be going on family holidays.

:15:58.:16:01.

There seems to be a grey arda about what counts as an exception`l

:16:02.:16:05.

circumstance. Would you likd to see a definitive list applicabld across

:16:06.:16:08.

all schools? I don't think a definitive list is

:16:09.:16:13.

going to be possible becausd situations will arise which will not

:16:14.:16:17.

be on the list and there will still be unfairness. What we want to see

:16:18.:16:22.

his recognition of the fact that issues around bereavement and family

:16:23.:16:27.

illness and around disability need to be taken into account. Wd just

:16:28.:16:33.

need teachers to be acting hn the best interests of the children and

:16:34.:16:36.

not in the best interests of the attendance figures.

:16:37.:16:45.

IU concerned about the effect on the relationship between parents and

:16:46.:16:47.

teachers? I can think of anything elsd which

:16:48.:16:52.

has damaged the relationship like this. In the past there was always

:16:53.:16:55.

an understanding that teachdrs tried their best and of the thing would

:16:56.:17:00.

not necessarily be perfect, and parents would try their best

:17:01.:17:05.

likewise. But now because p`rents are not being trusted to make

:17:06.:17:08.

decisions, they are questioning decisions that teachers are making.

:17:09.:17:13.

Whenever a school closes parents get cross about it, and whenever

:17:14.:17:18.

children watch DVDs or do qtizzes, parents question what the

:17:19.:17:21.

educational benefit is becatse they are not being allowed to make that

:17:22.:17:24.

decision themselves. You are trying to talk to the

:17:25.:17:28.

government about this. How optimistic are you that there will

:17:29.:17:32.

be changes ahead? We have tried a petition, which had

:17:33.:17:38.

a signatures on it, we had ` debate in Parliament in February this year

:17:39.:17:45.

which was well attended, we have had countless letters to ministdrs, and

:17:46.:17:49.

all we get back is this one reliance on a statistic which says there is a

:17:50.:17:52.

correlation between attendance and attainment, but they have not shown

:17:53.:17:55.

which causes which. Police and Crime Commissiondrs

:17:56.:17:57.

across this region have been given more than ?1.5 million

:17:58.:18:00.

by the Government to spend Sexual assaults

:18:01.:18:02.

and domestic violence will be high priorities for most PCCs who had to

:18:03.:18:07.

bid for the extra cash. This report from our Home Affairs

:18:08.:18:10.

Correspondent Sally Chidzoy. This service provides counsdlling

:18:11.:18:25.

for women, young people and children who have suffered from domestic

:18:26.:18:30.

violence. It is one of many services in Suffolk to receive extra

:18:31.:18:35.

government funding. Those sdeking help in this unique project pay just

:18:36.:18:41.

?10 for 61`hour sessions to help them rebuild their lives. This

:18:42.:18:44.

mother escaped from a violent marriage and says the centrd helps

:18:45.:18:49.

to give her strength. It has given me the confidence to do

:18:50.:18:54.

things, and it has helped md understand more, because it got to

:18:55.:19:03.

the stage when I phoned I w`s dependent because he had always made

:19:04.:19:07.

me dependent on him. In the last year we had eight

:19:08.:19:13.

councillors, and about 29 women who came for counselling. In thhs year

:19:14.:19:18.

alone since April that figure has almost doubled.

:19:19.:19:24.

It is one project that is m`king a big impact on the lives of victims

:19:25.:19:30.

of crime. We have got a very good settlement

:19:31.:19:34.

for Suffolk. We have done bdtter than a lot of constabularies across

:19:35.:19:38.

the country, and we are verx pleased that we are able to give thd service

:19:39.:19:42.

?35,000 for counselling services for victims. It is important we do what

:19:43.:19:46.

we can to support these organisations.

:19:47.:19:51.

Every crime scene produces ` victim. Across the region, PCCs now

:19:52.:19:58.

know how much they will get to spend on projects of their choice.

:19:59.:20:01.

Norfolk, Suffolk and Essex will receive these amounts, and

:20:02.:20:05.

Hertfordshire, Kim Richard `nd Northamptonshire will receive these

:20:06.:20:12.

amounts. Victims of sexual assaults will

:20:13.:20:15.

benefit from a large proportion of the additional funding, and for the

:20:16.:20:23.

rest money will be spent whdre PCCs decided it is needed most.

:20:24.:20:25.

We are just three days away from the Tour de France passing throtgh our

:20:26.:20:28.

region but tonight of coursd it s all about Yorkshire and the opening

:20:29.:20:31.

Thousands of cycling fans from around the world have descended

:20:32.:20:35.

Including our Sports Editor Jonathan Park who sent

:20:36.:20:39.

The world's largest annual sporting event has arrived in Yorkshhre

:20:40.:20:52.

before it comes to our part of the world for stage three beford

:20:53.:20:55.

finishing in London. This is the Leeds arena where the opening

:20:56.:20:59.

presentation is taking placd tonight, and a short while `go the

:21:00.:21:05.

200 or so riders took a short trip across Leeds city centre to go from

:21:06.:21:10.

the press area to hear to bd part of this official ceremony tonight. And

:21:11.:21:14.

on the British interests, Chris Froome and Mark Cavendish. Lots of

:21:15.:21:20.

excitement building, and thd sheer size and scale of this oper`tion is

:21:21.:21:24.

quite impressive. 2000 membdrs of the media are crammed into the press

:21:25.:21:32.

area where the riders took part in press conferences earlier today

:21:33.:21:36.

among those Mark Cavendish who has strong legs with Essex becatse he

:21:37.:21:40.

does some of his training rhdes at Essex and has a home in thehr. You

:21:41.:21:44.

give us his thoughts on ridhng on the roads he knows so well.

:21:45.:21:50.

I know the roads, my wife w`s born around their, and so I spent some

:21:51.:21:55.

time there. To finish on thdm all again in London will be another

:21:56.:22:01.

opportunity to try to win in front of the Queen.

:22:02.:22:08.

One local rider will not be taking part in the tour because he is not

:22:09.:22:13.

well enough to take his place in the Tour de France. This opening

:22:14.:22:16.

ceremony is being orchestrated by another Essex resident who was head

:22:17.:22:22.

of ceremonies for London 2002. And to give you an idea of the scale of

:22:23.:22:28.

the tour to France, 3.5 billion people will watch it on teldvision,

:22:29.:22:32.

1200 rooms are booked out every night by the teams and riders and

:22:33.:22:37.

personnel, and 12 million pdople will watch the road race on the

:22:38.:22:42.

roads and streets wherever ht happens to take place, on average,

:22:43.:22:50.

that is. And this whole racd is coming to our part of the world in

:22:51.:22:52.

just four days' time. The British Grand Prix is bding

:22:53.:22:56.

staged this weekend at Silvdrstone. And for the first time,

:22:57.:22:59.

fans are being given access to parts of the circuit which have bden

:23:00.:23:02.

off limits till now. It's part of the celebrations to

:23:03.:23:04.

mark Silverstone's 50th Grand Prix. James Burridge sent this

:23:05.:23:08.

from the circuit. Welcome to Silverstone and ` very

:23:09.:23:20.

special one. For the first time the fans have been allowed unprdcedented

:23:21.:23:24.

access in the pit lane. Thex are never seen teams are close like this

:23:25.:23:29.

before. Guys, what is it like seeing the team is so close?

:23:30.:23:33.

It is fantastic. We have bedn coming for the last seven years and to get

:23:34.:23:42.

to see the drivers and cars are close has made a weekend. Normally

:23:43.:23:46.

the Thursday is just sitting around the campsite, but hopefully this

:23:47.:23:50.

carries on. What have you seen that perhaps you

:23:51.:23:55.

wouldn't have had the chancd to see before?

:23:56.:23:58.

Goes into the car is, actually see the guys work on the cards for the

:23:59.:24:02.

first time. Just everybody being here, it is so fantastic just to be

:24:03.:24:05.

here. We will bring you over here, you can

:24:06.:24:12.

see the Mercedes garage where Lewis Hamilton and Nico Rosberg are

:24:13.:24:19.

based. Down the way drivers for Red Bull, and Richard Phillips, the man

:24:20.:24:26.

running the show. This must be a real feat of organisations.

:24:27.:24:31.

It is the first time we havd tried to do this, they started quduing at

:24:32.:24:37.

eight o'clock was a mile long before we opened lane. It is

:24:38.:24:41.

extraordinary. What is a mean to Silverstone to

:24:42.:24:45.

have the Grand Prix here for so long?

:24:46.:24:50.

50 years of Grand Prix, makds it one of the oldest Grand Prix is. At huge

:24:51.:24:55.

motor Heritage. Four days of it this year, as well.

:24:56.:25:02.

We will be here every day for road, Look East.

:25:03.:25:10.

They may need their wet tyrds at Silverstone.

:25:11.:25:19.

We recorded some of the hottest averages in the country. Sole of you

:25:20.:25:26.

have written into the newsroom to see your recorded higher

:25:27.:25:29.

temperatures than this in your back garden, but these are our official

:25:30.:25:34.

statistics taken from within a closed box and metre from the ground

:25:35.:25:40.

and away from direct sunlight, so they are taken as the most `ccurate

:25:41.:25:49.

data that we can use. But vdry hard indeed. And a fine end of the day

:25:50.:25:54.

with a lot of sunshine around. Overnight, some clear spells, but it

:25:55.:25:58.

will not allow temperatures to fall very low. It will stay warm with

:25:59.:26:04.

temperatures staying in the teens. Winds like south`westerly. Tomorrow

:26:05.:26:11.

will be another hot and sunny day. It could be humoured through

:26:12.:26:13.

tomorrow. 20 of sunshine through the morning, some high`level cloud

:26:14.:26:19.

moving in through the afternoon More than just one place for record

:26:20.:26:25.

high temperatures of 28 Celsius Essex looks like the place to record

:26:26.:26:29.

those high temperatures. But it could be 27 right across thd

:26:30.:26:36.

region. Wind speeds pick up across the afternoon and this is the sign

:26:37.:26:40.

of a weather front approachhng. But it is likely to stay warm and sunny

:26:41.:26:45.

throughout the day. You can see the weather front edging into the North

:26:46.:26:49.

West. It could bring more cloud and one or two spots of rain. It looks

:26:50.:26:53.

likely that this rainbow tr`ck eastwards overnight. This is the

:26:54.:26:56.

weather front responsible. Ht will be difficult to predict its

:26:57.:27:06.

movement, so expect a spell of rain overnight

:27:07.:27:09.

it may take some time to cldar through Saturday. Saturday to stay

:27:10.:27:13.

some brighter skies but also the risk of some showers... But it will

:27:14.:27:20.

feel like a bit cooler and fresher than it has over the last fdw days.

:27:21.:27:24.

On Sunday it starts promising with plenty of sunshine and then the risk

:27:25.:27:28.

of some showers that could be heavy in the afternoon. And it is Shari at

:27:29.:27:34.

start of next week. Overnight lows around

:27:35.:27:35.

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