01/08/2014 Look East - West


01/08/2014

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with each side blaming the other. That's all from the BBC News at

:00:00.:00:25.

It's a bad day, a black day for Northampton Museum.

:00:26.:00:27.

Made in a garden shed for jtst a few pence but it made them thousands.

:00:28.:00:30.

A couple face jail for selling fake bomb detectors

:00:31.:00:33.

The work of war poet Siegfried Sassoon goes online.

:00:34.:00:40.

And remembering a famous big brother.

:00:41.:00:42.

Leon Hendrix talks guitars and life with a star.

:00:43.:01:02.

Its sale sent shockwaves through the art world.

:01:03.:01:04.

The Northampton Sekhemka, an ancient Egyptian statue sold

:01:05.:01:06.

off by the borough council for a record`breaking sum,

:01:07.:01:08.

Today, as punishment, two museums in the town havd been

:01:09.:01:12.

struck off by the Arts Council, losing their accreditation `nd

:01:13.:01:15.

putting an end to extra funding for the next five years, but thd borough

:01:16.:01:20.

It needed the money because of budget cuts.

:01:21.:01:25.

That is a small museum at the centre of a global row. The sale h`s been

:01:26.:01:45.

criticised by the Egyptian ambassador and now today,

:01:46.:01:50.

sanctions, the museum ostracised for the next five years at least. But

:01:51.:01:53.

the council say they made the right decision.

:01:54.:01:58.

The Sekhemka statue, described by Christie's as the most ilportant

:01:59.:02:00.

For its museums, it meant punishment.

:02:01.:02:06.

We do need to put this into some context.

:02:07.:02:10.

We don't receive huge amounts of money every year from thd

:02:11.:02:13.

Arts Council for the museum service and this was

:02:14.:02:15.

part of the decision we had to make when we decided to sell the statue.

:02:16.:02:18.

Actually, now we've got ?8 lillion, we can invest

:02:19.:02:21.

Well, we've got the Arts Cotncil statement here.

:02:22.:02:23.

They speak of their dismay, they speak of negative consdquences,

:02:24.:02:27.

Clearly, if the accreditation doesn't mean that the museul closes,

:02:28.:02:33.

and the museum will continud to open its doors and carry out

:02:34.:02:36.

the service it does tomorrow, it begs the question, what hs

:02:37.:02:38.

Northampton Museum today at the start of its exclusion,

:02:39.:02:43.

Losing its accreditation, the museum is now unable to dip into

:02:44.:02:50.

certain pots of money, eithdr from the Arts Council or the Herhtage

:02:51.:02:53.

Lottery Fund, but the museul's open today, it'll be open tomorrow.

:02:54.:02:57.

It matters a lot, says Ruth Thomas, who worked the museum and c`mpaigned

:02:58.:03:03.

It's a bad day, it's a black day for Northampton Museum and

:03:04.:03:11.

We used to be the leading mtseum in this region.

:03:12.:03:20.

We were the first to get accreditation some years ago and

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being deprived of it means that we fall behind all the other mtseums.

:03:24.:03:28.

Sekhemka was a powerful man, an Egyptian royal chief,

:03:29.:03:32.

Acquired by the second Marqtis of Northampton, in 1880,

:03:33.:03:39.

it was gifted to the town and sold in July for nearly 16 million,

:03:40.:03:46.

a sale that prompted Egypti`n protests and today, sanctions.

:03:47.:03:56.

It will have an impact on their ability to raise ftnds

:03:57.:03:59.

It will have an impact on their ability to engage with

:04:00.:04:02.

the wider museum community which, in turn, will have an impact on

:04:03.:04:05.

what can be offered to the public and the people of Northampton.

:04:06.:04:08.

And, I suppose, ultimately, we're very saddened that thhs will

:04:09.:04:10.

have an effect on the peopld of Northampton, of course.

:04:11.:04:16.

For more than 100 years in Northampton, it was public property,

:04:17.:04:22.

now gone, sold to a private collector. The council say, do the

:04:23.:04:31.

maths. ?8 million will pay for the museum to be doubled in sizd. The

:04:32.:04:39.

arts Council have given to payments over last few years. It might be

:04:40.:04:47.

financial but is ethical? Abi Hunt is from the

:04:48.:04:51.

Anglia Ruskin University. She has a background in Egyptian

:04:52.:04:52.

archaeology and a PHD I put it to her that with the

:04:53.:04:55.

Northampton case, it was desperate Well, I would slightly disagree in

:04:56.:04:59.

that I think it's a short`tdrm fix to funding issues and I would argue

:05:00.:05:06.

that there are real issues when you Of course, there are ethical issues

:05:07.:05:11.

with it, but I'm not sure it's really a sustainable way of sorting

:05:12.:05:18.

out funding problems, and I think museums should really consider their

:05:19.:05:22.

funding, their public engagdment activities,

:05:23.:05:28.

carefully to be more sustainable. It Do you think that there's

:05:29.:05:32.

a risk that other museums are going to follow suit,

:05:33.:05:36.

ditch the ethics and grab the cash? This isn't the first time that

:05:37.:05:42.

a museum has sold an item from its collection to raisd funds

:05:43.:05:45.

and I'm sure it won't be an isolated case but I think it s

:05:46.:05:48.

not a long`term fix. It's a very quick fix to thd

:05:49.:05:55.

situation and I think if museums took a more businesslike approach to

:05:56.:05:58.

their work, then maybe they could become more sustainable in the

:05:59.:06:02.

future, so look at different ways of funding, different ways

:06:03.:06:06.

of working operationally Abi Hunt,

:06:07.:06:09.

thank you very much indeed. Maternity services

:06:10.:06:15.

and children's care WILL relain That's according to health

:06:16.:06:22.

bosses who are looking to m`ke The assurances follow weeks

:06:23.:06:26.

of speculation and anger th`t services at the hospital will be

:06:27.:06:31.

seriously downgraded but despite today's announcement,

:06:32.:06:35.

the hospital's future is sthll This baby is just three days old. He

:06:36.:06:51.

is one of more than 3000 babies born here every year but the closure of

:06:52.:06:59.

this and the children's award is being seriously considered. Patients

:07:00.:07:03.

would have to travel to othdr hospitals instead. We have one of

:07:04.:07:10.

the best hospitals in the area. It's a growing population. To have a

:07:11.:07:15.

hospital that has reduced a knee, no paediatrics and no birth is a

:07:16.:07:25.

growing sign of this size. One of the highest scoring options includes

:07:26.:07:29.

the closure of the maternitx and children's departments. Thex are

:07:30.:07:38.

just ideas the now. I can rdassure you that we want what is best for

:07:39.:07:43.

our patients. We can't carrx on as we are and we are looking to find

:07:44.:07:48.

the most sustainable future for Bedford Hospital which will include

:07:49.:07:54.

inpatients and emergency services. And maternity and children's care?

:07:55.:08:00.

Is that a guarantee? I will not stand up and say otherwise. The

:08:01.:08:06.

hospital is under financial pressure. There is a greater demand

:08:07.:08:10.

for care and limited funding to meet it but the chief executive says

:08:11.:08:14.

changes have already been m`de while keeping key services. Things were

:08:15.:08:19.

not as good as they could h`ve been. We had a review that brought

:08:20.:08:27.

in an external new Doctor. Now we have got a service that meets or

:08:28.:08:31.

national standards. Some of our doctors work in the community. We

:08:32.:08:37.

have visited `` visiting consultants as well. It seems as though these

:08:38.:08:42.

changes will affect patients and where they get treatment. There will

:08:43.:08:47.

be a public consultation in the winter, where people would be

:08:48.:08:52.

invited to comment on plans, but final decisions would be made until

:08:53.:08:53.

after the general election next May. Two men have been jailed for

:08:54.:08:59.

the murder of a snooker club worker Jamie McMahon, who was 26, died from

:09:00.:09:02.

head injuries after he was `ttacked Michael Francis was sentencdd to

:09:03.:09:06.

a minimum of 26 years, A couple from Dunstable havd been

:09:07.:09:10.

found guilty of making fake bomb detectors in their garden shed,

:09:11.:09:16.

selling them all over the world The devices, they claimed,

:09:17.:09:18.

could also track down drugs and find The couple, Samuel and Joan Tree,

:09:19.:09:25.

called it the Alpha 6 and it cost A deal has been signed to hdlp

:09:26.:09:55.

develop the north`west area of Cambridge. Works have already begun

:09:56.:10:00.

to build a new road junction, homes and shops. His latest deal hs

:10:01.:10:11.

between the University of C`mbridge. Back to that story about thd fake

:10:12.:10:14.

bomb detectors. Our reporter, Liza Hampele,

:10:15.:10:15.

has been following the case They made these devices in their

:10:16.:10:28.

garden shed and made them ott of black plastic which they imported

:10:29.:10:32.

from China. It only cost ?5 each one and they used bits of paper and glue

:10:33.:10:40.

and an antenna stuck on the top and they said these devices could find

:10:41.:10:45.

my new substances including explosives, drugs and even lissing

:10:46.:10:54.

people. The company said `` the man said he could find Madeleind McCann.

:10:55.:10:57.

The prosecution said they m`de outlandish claims but they said they

:10:58.:11:03.

were not guilty because thex believed they worked. This thing

:11:04.:11:10.

sounds pretty unbelievable! How did they get away with it for so long?

:11:11.:11:15.

They did some years and it was said in court that it was remark`ble that

:11:16.:11:21.

only one person returned anx of these devices. They sold about. .

:11:22.:11:26.

Hundreds of them. They made hundreds of thousands of pounds and the

:11:27.:11:33.

public were gullible and believed they were sold all around the Middle

:11:34.:11:35.

East and in many countries. Now we can join Stewart and Susie

:11:36.:11:41.

for the rest of the programle. which started 100

:11:42.:12:34.

years ago this coming Mondax. And today in Essex there has been

:12:35.:12:35.

a special ceremony to pay tribute to In a moment, we will have ddtails of

:12:36.:12:47.

Monday's First World War centenary The last known words of Private

:12:48.:12:50.

Herbert Columbine He was telling

:12:51.:13:01.

his comrades to escape during With an isolated gun, he held off

:13:02.:13:07.

several attacks for several hours, which his mother donated to the

:13:08.:13:15.

town. Now, almost 100 years later, his

:13:16.:13:33.

home town is remembering his bravery It stands in the Marine Gardens

:13:34.:13:37.

overlooking the sea front. Among those paying tribute `

:13:38.:13:45.

the Bishop of Chelmsford, the Light Dragoons, the Roy`l

:13:46.:13:49.

British Legion and his relatives. It is obviously sad

:13:50.:13:54.

as well that he died very bravely And so it is sad but also a day that

:13:55.:13:57.

really marks the sacrifice that officers and ordinary soldidrs

:13:58.:14:04.

like Herbert made in World War I. It is the first time

:14:05.:14:10.

a private soldier has been honoured Private Columbine was, I thhnk,

:14:11.:14:16.

very typical of those young men who came and served and actuallx had to

:14:17.:14:23.

give their lives. This is not

:14:24.:14:28.

a makeover to make him look good. This is what the real man w`s

:14:29.:14:31.

like and I think it is a grdat, It has taken three years and nearly

:14:32.:14:35.

?60,000 to build the statue. The inspiration to build it came

:14:36.:14:43.

from a local man called Mikd Turner, I was never really passionate

:14:44.:14:47.

about it in the beginning. And as it came along, not jtst

:14:48.:14:53.

because Mike died, we got to understand it mord and

:14:54.:14:57.

began to get the feeling of it and we felt that

:14:58.:15:00.

it would mean something. That maybe

:15:01.:15:07.

people would look at it and stop us having these terrible war for years

:15:08.:15:10.

to come. but the power of the story still

:15:11.:15:12.

inspires and now the town has a perm`nent

:15:13.:15:15.

tribute to Private Columbind The anniversary is actually

:15:16.:15:20.

on Monday the 4th of August. Some events have already st`rted

:15:21.:15:30.

and we're making a weekend of it. Shaun Peel is in charge

:15:31.:15:33.

of our centenary coverage. Let's start with a big

:15:34.:15:36.

announcement today in Cambrhdge The announcement is about Shegfried

:15:37.:15:49.

Sassoon, one of the great W`r poets. He actually signed up on dax one. He

:15:50.:15:54.

wrote quite graphically abott the war, no holds barred. 4000 pages.

:15:55.:16:01.

But the announcement by the University of Cambridge library is

:16:02.:16:04.

that his entire collection has been digitised so that we can all look at

:16:05.:16:09.

it. It can be seen online throughout the world. The public could not

:16:10.:16:12.

touch it before because it was thought brittle. But becausd it is

:16:13.:16:19.

online, we now can. It even has traces of the ground from the

:16:20.:16:20.

storm. The mud is really clear

:16:21.:16:23.

on the digitalisations. It's not a great deal of mud,

:16:24.:16:25.

we have to say. There are ridges

:16:26.:16:29.

on the bindings and bits of mud It is minute quantities

:16:30.:16:32.

but it is the journal he was keeping Lots of commemorative events,

:16:33.:16:51.

services. We are going to bd in Colchester at the warm Oriel from

:16:52.:16:57.

6:30pm. So many to mention. At the stadium they are having a p`rade and

:16:58.:17:01.

a service and a release of 000 balloons. Most war memorials

:17:02.:17:07.

throughout the day on Mondax there will be something happening in

:17:08.:17:11.

villages, towns and cities. And very quickly, what is the lights

:17:12.:17:14.

out? In the evening, we are all being

:17:15.:17:19.

asked to switch off our livds between 10pm and 11pm to mark a

:17:20.:17:23.

period of darkness because before the start of the war, it was said we

:17:24.:17:29.

were entering a period of d`rkness with the lights never let again We

:17:30.:17:35.

are asked to symbolically m`rked that by turning off our namds. ``

:17:36.:17:39.

are lights. It's been another day of medals

:17:40.:17:43.

for the regions athletes Once again gymnast Max Whitlock was

:17:44.:17:46.

on the podium, winning There was also success in the lawn

:17:47.:17:49.

bowls and tonight 19`year`old athlete Jessica Judd from C`nvey

:17:50.:17:53.

Island could add to her growing With two golds and a silver in the

:17:54.:18:05.

bank, Max has a Phil said. He entered the competition with a

:18:06.:18:09.

bronze on the parallel bars. `` ended the competition. Five medals

:18:10.:18:14.

in a row, it has been a dre`m competition. COMMENTATOR: Ydt

:18:15.:18:21.

another medal. I am so happx and I was very much looking forward to

:18:22.:18:27.

this final. To finish on a good routine and a bronze, it was good

:18:28.:18:32.

fun. I was first up so I was quite nervous but I got to watch `ll the

:18:33.:18:36.

other athletes so it was am`zing. For Scotland, Daniel Keatings was

:18:37.:18:41.

going for number three but hnstead landed flat on his back to finish

:18:42.:18:48.

sixth. Gold was one yesterd`y in the lawn bowls for the women and the

:18:49.:18:56.

men's team had to settle for silver with Scotland winning. They played

:18:57.:19:01.

well but I am disappointed hn our own performance. We did not play as

:19:02.:19:05.

well as we could. Another mddal heading back to Essex might come

:19:06.:19:11.

from a diver. She has already struck gold but is currently in action in

:19:12.:19:15.

the springboard final. If she gets eight she will go top of thd

:19:16.:19:22.

leaderboard. And in this Sqtash just two wins from a gold mddal in

:19:23.:19:29.

the men's doubles. The beat New Zealand, with still be trying just

:19:30.:19:32.

about every shot in the book. Thankfully, no harm done. Sdlby had

:19:33.:19:41.

his fun at courtside and he is currently on court now against

:19:42.:19:46.

another English couple. In badminton, the singles playdr is

:19:47.:19:52.

into the doubles, eating his training partner from Scotl`nd. And

:19:53.:20:01.

tonight, on track, there ard high hopes for Jessica Judd, a

:20:02.:20:05.

19`year`old, in the 800 metres. Her final is at 8:45pm, prime thme for a

:20:06.:20:12.

medal. We have done fantastically.

:20:13.:20:13.

I know, it has been amazing. Jimi Hendrix is described

:20:14.:20:16.

in the official Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as "arguably

:20:17.:20:21.

the greatest instrumentalist She is always reading that book

:20:22.:20:23.

I know this one also! Rolling Stone said he was rock

:20:24.:20:33.

music's greatest guitarist. When he died

:20:34.:20:35.

in 1970 he was just 27 years old. These days, his brother Leon

:20:36.:20:38.

carries on the family name. Next week he's playing in C`mbridge

:20:39.:20:40.

and earlier today, he spoke to His spirit is always so strong with

:20:41.:21:00.

me. He has been taking care of me all this time. I did not get any

:21:01.:21:04.

money from the lawsuit and H did not have a job. I got this vision, he

:21:05.:21:12.

gave me this vision, and sahd all you have is a guitar. " Plax it " I

:21:13.:21:18.

times now. Because of him. What are times now. Because of him. What are

:21:19.:21:27.

you expecting from England? What can we expect from you? We can only see

:21:28.:21:33.

how it goes. I heard you guxs are pretty critical over here, because

:21:34.:21:38.

you have seen every great b`nd in the world. They came from you. And

:21:39.:21:44.

we have seen it Jimi Hendrix. How much pressure does that put on?

:21:45.:21:45.

None. Is England somewhere you have always

:21:46.:22:02.

wanted to come? No, I am not going to follow in his that steps. I

:22:03.:22:08.

barely play my brother's music because I wanted to be in a rock 'n'

:22:09.:22:12.

roll band myself as a child but my father forbade it. He said that he

:22:13.:22:18.

already had one idiot playing guitar, he did not need to Lac. So I

:22:19.:22:23.

did not play until after I was 0 years old. If your brother was in

:22:24.:22:30.

the crowd, what would he make of it? Ewood Park bubbly say it was good to

:22:31.:22:34.

be home. Would he be proud of his little brother? Yes, becausd I was

:22:35.:22:49.

bad and I am breaking good. I saw Jimi Hendrix, you know? Digit.

:22:50.:22:52.

Yes, I did. And you can see Leon in concert

:22:53.:22:54.

at Downing College in Cambrhdge on Monday, and at the Cambrhdge

:22:55.:22:57.

Rock Festival a week tomorrow. We're going to take you on ` tour

:22:58.:22:59.

of the Swiss Garden. It's part of the Shuttleworth

:23:00.:23:04.

Collection site in Bedfordshire It's spread out over nine acres

:23:05.:23:06.

and boasts beautiful grassy glades It's just re`opened to the public

:23:07.:23:09.

after a landscape renovation The garden manager Corinne Price

:23:10.:23:12.

explains the background. The Lord created the first garden

:23:13.:23:28.

in the 1830s and it was later embellished by

:23:29.:23:32.

Joseph Shuttleworth in the 0870s. And the idea was that he was

:23:33.:23:35.

creating, or recreating, a landscape that he might have seen on his grand

:23:36.:23:38.

tour of Switzerland, for ex`mple. And as Jane Austen put it

:23:39.:23:41.

in a letter to a friend at that time, everxbody was

:23:42.:23:44.

in Switzerland. You can see the buildings,

:23:45.:23:46.

ponds and landscape do emul`te For a nine acre garden, it has been

:23:47.:23:49.

an enormous restoration project So what we have today

:23:50.:23:57.

and what we have restored as part of this project are two wonderful

:23:58.:24:00.

historical layers of landsc`pe. Thanks to ?2.8 million Heritage

:24:01.:24:12.

Lottery funding, we have bedn able to restore all of the buildhngs

:24:13.:24:16.

and artefacts in the garden using specialist consultants and lots

:24:17.:24:19.

of craftsmen using traditional techniques and skills to restore

:24:20.:24:24.

them to their former glory. I have got a big charity golf day

:24:25.:24:45.

tomorrow so I want good weather and you are doing things with dtcks

:24:46.:24:48.

I have a duck injured in thd duck race.

:24:49.:24:53.

I am feeling the pressure. Ht is hard to relieve it is the 1st of

:24:54.:24:58.

August already. A quick look back at July. Interestingly, warmer, sunnier

:24:59.:25:02.

and wetter than average and it has been the eighth month in thd role ``

:25:03.:25:09.

in a row that we have recorded warmer than average temperatures.

:25:10.:25:12.

Today has been pretty good. We have had an area of low pressure moving

:25:13.:25:15.

up from the South West which has not really affected us but it h`s

:25:16.:25:20.

brought rain across the Midlands and out towards the south`west. If you

:25:21.:25:24.

live in places like temperature and Northamptonshire, you might just

:25:25.:25:28.

catch a shower this evening. For most of us, it is a fine end to the

:25:29.:25:33.

day and are still quite warl. `` voices like Cambridgeshire `nd

:25:34.:25:37.

Northamptonshire. It is overnight that we will start to see some rain

:25:38.:25:42.

arriving but that is after ` dry stored. Some thunderstorms possible

:25:43.:25:46.

mating from France but it whll be an all or nothing event. Some places

:25:47.:25:51.

will get absolutely no rain but others will get a deluge into the

:25:52.:25:55.

early hours of tomorrow morning with some flashes of lightnhng and

:25:56.:26:02.

thunder around. It stays quhte warm. We start tomorrow with a bit of

:26:03.:26:06.

cloud around and actually some are in for some of us, first thhng. It

:26:07.:26:10.

will start to brighten up and does not look like a bad day. Thdre is

:26:11.:26:15.

the risk of showers but thex do not fall everywhere. Some of yot may end

:26:16.:26:19.

up with a completely dry dax for tomorrow and wonder what thd fuss is

:26:20.:26:24.

about and others might have some heavy downpours throughout the

:26:25.:26:27.

afternoon. It will be quite warm throughout tomorrow afternoon, maybe

:26:28.:26:32.

even up to 25 Celsius. Another thing you might notice is that through the

:26:33.:26:36.

afternoon and evening the whnd speed will pick up. This is bringhng lots

:26:37.:26:40.

of warm and humid air up from the south`west. Looking ahead, this

:26:41.:26:48.

is... Well, just to summarise the weekend. On Saturday, the rhsk of

:26:49.:26:53.

showers but not for everyond. Look how it starts to settle itsdlf down

:26:54.:26:58.

for Sunday. Some long spells of sunshine and some really settled

:26:59.:27:02.

starts to next week. Temper`tures overnight not too warm. Quite a good

:27:03.:27:04.

start to next week. We'll be back later

:27:05.:27:07.

on with the late night bulldtin And it's about time

:27:08.:27:10.

that I did something about that I leave the ashram, travel halfway

:27:11.:28:29.

across the world to find my father,

:28:30.:28:34.

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