24/10/2011 Midlands Today


24/10/2011

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Welcome to Midlands Today. The headlines.

:00:10.:00:15.

How important is Europe to the West Midlands? We talk like to the MDP

:00:15.:00:18.

that triggered the debate going on now in the House of Commons.

:00:18.:00:23.

son is about ordinary people instigating this new process to

:00:23.:00:28.

force a debate in Parliament. 1 in 10 sixth-formers are thinking

:00:28.:00:33.

about -- thinking twice about university. I am thinking about

:00:33.:00:38.

doing a course from home so that I get a qualification at the end but

:00:38.:00:42.

I don't go to university to get into debt.

:00:42.:00:45.

JCB invest �5 million in an exhibition to tell potential

:00:45.:00:47.

customers exactly what they are about.

:00:48.:00:57.
:00:58.:00:59.

The secret world of the wild ponies Good evening and welcome to

:00:59.:01:04.

Monday's Midlands Today from the BBC. Tonight:

:01:04.:01:09.

The Midlands MEP who's forced the biggest debate on Europe for years.

:01:09.:01:11.

Nikki Sinclaire became a Member of the European Parliament purely to

:01:11.:01:16.

push for a referendum on whether we should be in or out of Europe.

:01:16.:01:20.

We'll speak to her in just a moment, but first Sarah Falkland has been

:01:20.:01:22.

talking to Black Country businessmen to weigh up the pros

:01:22.:01:30.

and cons. What does Europe do for She's travelled the length and

:01:30.:01:33.

breadth of the country for this. A moment of victory for Nikki

:01:33.:01:36.

Sinclaire as she hands in another 20,000 signatures to add to the

:01:36.:01:42.

100,000 already delivered to Downing Street. In pushing for a

:01:42.:01:44.

referendum on Europe, the independent MEP has sparked

:01:44.:01:52.

possibly the biggest rebellion of the prime minister's leadership.

:01:52.:01:55.

The ripples are felt 100 miles away in the Black Country. Garrick

:01:55.:01:58.

Groves runs a plastic bag manufacturing firm and, in his view,

:01:58.:02:03.

it's far from rosy in the European garden. When he invested in new

:02:03.:02:05.

machines, like this printer, he qualified for a European grant,

:02:05.:02:15.

albeit a small one. We spent �1.5 million and we had about a quarter

:02:15.:02:18.

of a million pounds in grants against capital equipment. If we

:02:18.:02:25.

had a comparison of Eastern Europe, they would get three or four times

:02:25.:02:28.

as much grant as we would. He wants Britain to claw back some of its

:02:28.:02:31.

powers from Brussels. Down the road at Merry Hill, at one time Europe's

:02:31.:02:37.

biggest shopping centre, shoppers are divided. Parliament has lost

:02:37.:02:40.

its powers and everything is being dictated to us by the European

:02:40.:02:44.

Union, which wouldn't be so bad if the other countries in the union

:02:44.:02:50.

actually abided by the Rules. They don't. I want to be part of the

:02:50.:02:54.

Union but no so financially tied up with it. We are only a little

:02:54.:02:59.

island, so it is good. I think we should take a leaf out of France's

:02:59.:03:04.

book. What they do is say, yes, we like that, no, we don't like that,

:03:04.:03:08.

and they don't take any messing. Eurosceptics say the huge cost of

:03:08.:03:11.

the EU is now outweighing the advantages for Britain. So how much

:03:11.:03:18.

do we pay? Some organisations say That's thousand pounds per man

:03:18.:03:28.

women and child. -- that's �1,000. What is fact is that between 2007

:03:28.:03:30.

and 2013, the West Midlands will receive �345 million from the

:03:30.:03:39.

But some business experts agree with the PM and say now is not the

:03:39.:03:47.

time. Certainly not now. Not in this economic climate. And

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certainly not whilst the banks are frightened of their own shadows and

:03:52.:03:58.

while the industry is considering whether or not to help development

:03:58.:04:02.

and growth. We need calm and collected thinking. Europe paid for

:04:02.:04:04.

better roads around Merry Hill to avoid snarl-ups. Could pulling out

:04:04.:04:08.

of the EU bring us as a nation to a standstill?

:04:08.:04:12.

As you can see, the debate continues right now in the House of

:04:12.:04:15.

Commons and will continue right up until the vote at 10 o'clock. Rebel

:04:15.:04:17.

Tory MPs are expected to include Aldridge Brownhills' Richard

:04:17.:04:20.

Shepherd, Stone's Bill Cash, The Wrekin's Mark Pritchard, Dudley

:04:20.:04:22.

South's Chris Kelly, Tewkesbury's Laurence Robertson and Dan Byles,

:04:22.:04:29.

the MP for north Warwickshire and Bedworth. Labour's Edgbaston MP

:04:29.:04:39.
:04:39.:04:41.

Gisela Stewart also intends to vote in favour of a referendum. We hope

:04:41.:04:47.

to talk to Nikki Sinclaire later on. After their second consecutive

:04:47.:04:52.

defeat, Villa manager Alex McLeish urges fans to be patient.

:04:52.:04:56.

A survey of more than 1,000 A-level students for the BBC suggests one

:04:56.:04:59.

in ten are being put off university by higher tuition fees coming in

:04:59.:05:03.

next year. Half of the students questioned said they would think

:05:03.:05:06.

about studying closer to home, while two-thirds said they would

:05:06.:05:10.

consider an apprenticeship. The survey is released on the day UCAS,

:05:10.:05:13.

the admission service for students, said the number of applicants to

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West Midlands universities for next year had fallen by 11%. Jackie

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Kabler reports. It might not be the high-flying

:05:24.:05:27.

fashion career she once wanted, but Zoe Jackson decided against

:05:27.:05:31.

university and couldn't be happier. The 18-year-old from

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Worcestershire's working in a supermarket and has no worries

:05:34.:05:41.

about debt. Financially, it was a good decision because it means I'm

:05:41.:05:46.

getting money in for Christmas and stuff, and I want to go travelling

:05:46.:05:51.

next year as well. I am thinking of doing a course from home for events

:05:51.:05:54.

planning so that I get a qualification at the end but don't

:05:54.:05:58.

go to university and get into debt. So, for Zoe, no university was the

:05:58.:06:00.

right decision. But a survey commissioned by BBC Inside Out

:06:00.:06:03.

suggests more than 80% of students still believe the benefits of a

:06:03.:06:12.

university education outweigh the costs. Are they right? One person

:06:12.:06:17.

that disagreed was Coventry born Pete Waterman. He paid a visit to

:06:17.:06:20.

Staffordshire University to argue his case. Pete thought university

:06:20.:06:23.

was a waste of time with many degrees not equipping students to

:06:23.:06:25.

get jobs. Lecturer Ellis Cashmore disagreed and introduced him to

:06:25.:06:29.

students, graduates and their prospective employers. So did it

:06:29.:06:38.

work? I think that learning is vitally important. And, in fact,

:06:38.:06:43.

there is not enough learning in this country. I believe we are too

:06:43.:06:46.

focused on universities and not focused enough on general education

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of. What can you do? You present evidence and hope people change.

:06:50.:06:55.

When they don't, you think, they are entitled to their opinion.

:06:55.:06:58.

going to university can be done on the cheap. Shropshire student

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Harriet Moore is doing her degree in Slovakia, where the cost of

:07:01.:07:06.

living is so low she spends only �100 a month. I am trying to save

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money on my flight, so hand luggage it is! Financial expert Alvin Hall

:07:11.:07:16.

says it's a great way to avoid university debt. And Harriet agrees.

:07:16.:07:22.

If you're considering it, go for it. It is worth doing. Get on a plane.

:07:22.:07:25.

So while debt's a big worry, there are options - combining work and

:07:25.:07:28.

study like Zoe, apprenticeships, studying abroad. But most, it seems,

:07:28.:07:35.

still think university is And there'll be more on university

:07:35.:07:39.

tuition fees on Inside Out tonight. The programme also looks at a

:07:39.:07:43.

support group which helps twins when a sibling dies. That's on BBC

:07:43.:07:47.

One at 7:30pm. A Staffordshire company with a

:07:47.:07:50.

major contract for work at London's Olympic Village has closed with the

:07:50.:07:54.

loss of 150 jobs. Parry Bowen, a building cladding specialist based

:07:54.:07:56.

at the Burntwood Business Park in Chasetown, has ceased trading with

:07:56.:08:00.

a view to going into administration. A spokeswoman blamed what she

:08:00.:08:03.

called the "dreadful state" of the construction industry for the

:08:03.:08:13.
:08:13.:08:15.

company's collapse. Now, let's take you back to the big debate over a

:08:15.:08:18.

referendum on Europe going on right now in a House of Commons.

:08:18.:08:22.

Listening to the debate has been the West Midlands MEP Nikki

:08:22.:08:26.

Sinclaire who led the campaign for it to take place. She joins us now.

:08:26.:08:32.

Good evening to you. Good evening. You are an MEP working in Europe,

:08:32.:08:37.

supposedly for our benefit. Why I use a passionate about it? I am

:08:37.:08:40.

working for the benefit of the West Midlands and the first thing I said

:08:40.:08:45.

when I was elected is that I was working for the redundancy of every

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other MEP and former M. I think that we have been arguing about

:08:49.:08:53.

Europe for all of my adult life and the debate has been going on and on.

:08:54.:08:58.

What I would like to see is a full national debate about the pros and

:08:58.:09:02.

cons of our membership of the European Union and a binding

:09:02.:09:06.

referendum so we can decide our future. Three years ago our The

:09:07.:09:10.

Politics Show did some fact-finding on you and it was interesting. It

:09:10.:09:13.

was found the West Midlands got more out in the EU grants then we

:09:13.:09:20.

put in and it has created 15,000 jobs between 2007-2013. That is not

:09:20.:09:26.

true and I will give you are example. We lost more than 2000

:09:26.:09:30.

jobs because the EU subsidised the jobs in Pershore and send them to

:09:30.:09:36.

Slovakia. I would challenge them again. I would love to come on your

:09:36.:09:40.

programme to argue that because I have got the fact that refute those

:09:40.:09:47.

figures which are bogus. What about that this is not the right time?

:09:47.:09:51.

This petition was started one year ago but there is always a crisis in

:09:51.:09:59.

Europe. We cannot negotiate our membership because if we do, you

:09:59.:10:05.

have to have a unanimity of 27. But is one of the problems. We took

:10:05.:10:09.

invoke Article 15 which allows withdrawal and you need the vote of

:10:09.:10:18.

this place. The people... Polls show that 66% of people want a

:10:18.:10:22.

referendum and 52 want to leave the European Union with only 30%

:10:22.:10:26.

wanting to stay in. Why are they so afraid of the people? The

:10:26.:10:32.

politicians... Let me ask you this. Isn't this black-and-white? People

:10:32.:10:37.

don't want to say yes or some to magnetic everything you.

:10:37.:10:42.

understand that. All I am talking about is a national debate about

:10:42.:10:50.

the pros and cons. I'm not -- I have called for a national debate

:10:50.:10:54.

about the pros and cons to let the people decide. We employ these

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people behind us and I am employed by the people, not the other way

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around. Trust the people with this to a decision. If the motion is

:11:02.:11:06.

going to be defeated, haven't you set back the cause for this

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referendum? No, because we will start another petition tomorrow and

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we will keep going because in 1996, only 8% wanted to leave the

:11:15.:11:20.

European Union and it is now 50%. We will leave the European Union

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one day, and we will make sure it is sooner rather than later.

:11:24.:11:26.

Digger maker JCB has opened a multi-million pound exhibition

:11:26.:11:29.

designed to generate new business across the globe. It's hoped the

:11:30.:11:32.

permanent display will be pivotal in helping the company win orders,

:11:32.:11:36.

particularly in emerging markets. Our Staffordshire reporter Liz

:11:36.:11:39.

Copper has been to see the exhibition at the company's World

:11:39.:11:44.

Headquarters. This exhibition charts the

:11:44.:11:46.

company's industrial heritage, beginning in Staffordshire in the

:11:46.:11:51.

1820s. But, as the chairman explained, it's not just a museum,

:11:51.:12:00.

chronicling history. Its purpose is to win new business for the future.

:12:00.:12:04.

It shows you have been in business for a long time and been through

:12:04.:12:08.

all sorts of recessions, and products have developed through

:12:08.:12:13.

that time. In our case, we managed to compete and win all around the

:12:13.:12:16.

world as well. This is a �5 million investment at the firm's

:12:16.:12:19.

headquarters in Rocester. It's taken a year to construct and

:12:19.:12:22.

involved craning in diggers through the roof. The models on show go

:12:22.:12:29.

right back to the company's roots. In the early 19th century, the

:12:29.:12:33.

Panthers were blacksmiths. This exhibition highlights the work of

:12:33.:12:39.

Bamford Ltd, famous as agricultural engineers. Henry Bamford famously

:12:39.:12:44.

sacked his nephew by sending him a note saying his services were no

:12:44.:12:47.

longer required. Of course, Joe Bamford's subsequent success led to

:12:47.:12:50.

the founding of a company which now employs ten thousand workers around

:12:50.:12:53.

the world. It's not just been a family business for the Bamfords,

:12:53.:12:57.

though. This family, the Boots, can trace their history at the firm

:12:57.:13:01.

through four generations. Today, they were amongst the first to view

:13:01.:13:09.

the exhibition and reflect on more than 400 years' combined service.

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In the early years, Mr Bamford himself was involved. He was always

:13:13.:13:18.

on the shop floor. He was the sort of man that would never ask you to

:13:18.:13:22.

do something he couldn't do herself. My great-grandfather -- great-

:13:22.:13:29.

grandfather started, helping Joe out. I am the 4th generation, still

:13:29.:13:32.

carrying it on. It's expected 20,000 business visitors a year

:13:32.:13:35.

will view this exhibition. There'll also be some opportunities for the

:13:35.:13:37.

public to see the attraction, which it's hoped will secure lucrative

:13:37.:13:47.
:13:47.:13:50.

Still to come, the orchestra at putting their classical

:13:50.:13:55.

performances to one side and going on tour with Nineties chart act but

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And it has been a link to eventually almost all day but does

:14:00.:14:10.
:14:10.:14:13.

that mean we are next in line? Find Autumnwatch is in full swing on BBC

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Two and all this week we will be joining in with a series of films

:14:16.:14:21.

looking at wildlife in the region as it prepares for winter.

:14:21.:14:23.

Today our environment correspondent joins us from Sutton Coldfield.

:14:23.:14:30.

What are you looking at tonight? are here in a Sutton Park because

:14:30.:14:34.

here the landscape all around me is partially shaped by a herd of wild

:14:34.:14:38.

Exmoor ponies that were brought here at more than 10 years ago. We

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thought we would come back for Autumnwatch to try to film the

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ponies become -- because it is the best time to film them. Let us try

:14:48.:14:51.

and find them in some of the secret places they go due to get away from

:14:51.:15:01.
:15:01.:15:04.

some of the human visitors to this This is something most people never

:15:05.:15:14.
:15:15.:15:17.

see. It is a place of refuge. A lot of the time, especially in the

:15:17.:15:22.

summer, you get flies, or they are skittish and get spooked. They tend

:15:22.:15:27.

to go in there and that they will spend hours and there. Sutton Park,

:15:27.:15:33.

north of Birmingham, is home to the largest herd of Exmoor ponies

:15:33.:15:37.

outside of Exmoor itself. There was a lot of opposition when I first

:15:37.:15:40.

drew up the scheme and it took a lot of convincing to persuade

:15:40.:15:50.

people that this was the right thing to do for the park. 14 years

:15:50.:15:52.

since they first arrived and the parkland it is now flourishing.

:15:52.:15:57.

That is thanks to the herd of 30 at small ponies. The Spencer is

:15:57.:16:00.

designed to keep the ponies away from a nearby road but it also

:16:00.:16:05.

allows be to show you the difference between the grazed aside

:16:05.:16:11.

and the and grazed side here. It is covered with tough grass. You can

:16:11.:16:16.

see the positive impact the ponies have all over the park. Around the

:16:16.:16:21.

water's edge, you can see the different indents in the mud, it is

:16:21.:16:29.

called poaching. It creates a great habitat for dragonflies.

:16:29.:16:33.

In autumn, the ponies are getting ready for winter, laying down fat

:16:33.:16:38.

reserves and growing a winter coat. It is almost like a weatherproof

:16:38.:16:43.

Pope. It is durable and keeps them warm -- weatherproof coat. It is

:16:43.:16:49.

ideal for the conditions. They are twice the size as they are in the

:16:49.:16:56.

summer months! Bhopal on the weight and that takes them through the

:16:56.:17:01.

winter. -- they pile on the weight. If you are lucky, you might stumble

:17:01.:17:06.

on this, their secret place, where they go after a hard day looking

:17:06.:17:10.

after the landscape. Of course, you might just as easily walk right

:17:10.:17:18.

past and never see them at all. Beautiful film! On a completely

:17:18.:17:21.

different subject, I understand you have an update on something we

:17:21.:17:26.

asked our viewers to help with last year? This was back in June last

:17:26.:17:31.

year, on a Springwatch. We asked viewers to tell us what they were

:17:31.:17:35.

feeding their garden birds. We did a report on research by the

:17:35.:17:40.

University of Birmingham that appeared to show that birds had

:17:40.:17:44.

fewer eggs and fewer checks obviously if people put out food

:17:44.:17:49.

for them. Hundreds of youth took part and that is going to be really

:17:49.:17:54.

useful for the researchers. experiment is really about why we

:17:54.:17:58.

feed garden birds and the effects upon their reproductive biology.

:17:58.:18:02.

This questionnaire has provided us with lots of details about the

:18:02.:18:05.

extent of garden bird feeding and whether what we are doing

:18:05.:18:08.

scientifically reflects what is going on on the ground for the

:18:08.:18:13.

general public. The advice is still to keep feeding your garden birds.

:18:13.:18:17.

But longer term, the research might come up with smarter bird feeding

:18:17.:18:20.

plans for our garden to make sure we are not doing them any harm.

:18:21.:18:28.

There is more on my block including a full analysis. -- on my block.

:18:28.:18:37.

Tamara, we look at crayfish. A moody setting. Very spooky. But

:18:37.:18:42.

it does not Hallowe'en yet. Now the sport.

:18:42.:18:46.

The Villa manager Alex McLeish is asking the fans for patience after

:18:46.:18:49.

they were beaten at home why we as Bromwich Albion for the first time

:18:49.:18:54.

in 32 years. Several thousand supporters were back at the Lampard

:18:55.:19:00.

this morning to watch a training session. -- back at Villa Park.

:19:00.:19:04.

Patience is usually in such as the -- short supply in football. All

:19:05.:19:09.

the more heartening that so many turned up to watch the training

:19:09.:19:13.

session despite the home defeat on Saturday. We were not very happy

:19:13.:19:17.

with it but that is the way it goes. We are looking onwards and upwards

:19:17.:19:23.

to the next game. They had no fight about them. It was not for the

:19:23.:19:28.

first time. I am not worried. My son is! The men are worse than the

:19:28.:19:31.

women. You have got to stand by your club and you will always

:19:31.:19:36.

support them. You win some, you lose some. Many of those at Villa

:19:36.:19:41.

Park were not around when Albion first one at the tail-end of the

:19:41.:19:48.

70s. Darren Bent scored a penalty but this was the moment that's

:19:48.:19:53.

caught at -- changed the fortunes. Chris Herd was sent off. Villa will

:19:53.:19:57.

try to get that overturned. We have been told that it was not a good

:19:57.:20:03.

decision so we are going to appeal it. We think we have got a

:20:03.:20:07.

watertight case. Even there are being missed the resulting penalty,

:20:07.:20:12.

they went on to dominate with goals either side of half-time. That

:20:12.:20:16.

ended the long wait for a victory. I am so delighted for the

:20:16.:20:20.

supporters because we get amazing support, especially away, and it is

:20:20.:20:30.
:20:30.:20:30.

a decent result. You could see their celebrations! Hopefully, we

:20:30.:20:35.

will get the understanding and a bit of patience. It is about

:20:35.:20:40.

results, I know that as well as anyone else. Attendance was also

:20:40.:20:45.

down on last year's equivalent game. That makes building community ties

:20:45.:20:50.

through games like this even more important for the future.

:20:50.:20:56.

What about Wolves? You have covered them since Mick McCarthy has been

:20:56.:21:02.

there. You know him well. How is he going to feel about fans screaming

:21:02.:21:10.

his name? When he arrived at Wolves back in delighted 1006, he

:21:10.:21:20.
:21:20.:21:20.

appointed initials M M and said he was not known in addition. --

:21:21.:21:25.

Merlin magician. He believes he deserves more respect. Surely, the

:21:25.:21:31.

fans are frustrated. But when his own supporters started singing, you

:21:31.:21:37.

are getting sacked in the morning. He must have been very angry indeed.

:21:37.:21:42.

They were trailing when he made his substitution. But then they drew

:21:42.:21:48.

the match. It was not a bad outcome. We will hopefully hear from a Mick

:21:48.:21:52.

McCarthy on Midlands Today tomorrow. Birmingham City have now five wins

:21:52.:21:56.

on the spin with two home games coming up, Leeds United a Wednesday

:21:56.:22:01.

and then Brighton on Saturday. Chris Burke scored both the Blues's

:22:01.:22:07.

golds. The manager Chris Hughton said we are on a roll right now and

:22:07.:22:11.

who knows how long it will continue. The Blues are now four points

:22:11.:22:15.

outside the play-offs with at least two games in hand on all their

:22:15.:22:19.

promotion rivals. You can watch extended highlights of all our

:22:19.:22:24.

football league teams. Have a look at the BBC football website.

:22:24.:22:27.

The format Villa boss Martin O'Neill is the bookie's favourite

:22:27.:22:31.

to replace then Goran Eriksson as manager of Leicester City. We will

:22:31.:22:38.

have more on that tomorrow. Interesting! A classical orchestra

:22:38.:22:42.

are swapping Beethoven for some good old rock and roll. The

:22:42.:22:45.

Orchestra of the Swan from Stratford upon-Avon have been hand-

:22:45.:22:49.

picked to tour with a Nineties indie rock band James. They are at

:22:49.:22:53.

the Symphony Hall in Birmingham tonight.

:22:53.:22:59.

Or inspiring, isn't it? I think it is one of the best concert halls.

:22:59.:23:02.

They are used to having classical bombers is here and a number of

:23:02.:23:11.

bands. It is rare to have both on the same night. -- used to having

:23:11.:23:15.

classical performances here. I have been finding out how this

:23:15.:23:25.
:23:25.:23:28.

It is not often that classical and rock musicians perform together but

:23:28.:23:31.

when James take to the stage at the Symphony Hall in Birmingham this

:23:31.:23:36.

evening, they will do it with a choir and a 25 piece chamber

:23:36.:23:40.

orchestra from Stratford upon-Avon. It is sounding fantastic. We stand

:23:40.:23:45.

there, sometimes you can see band members peering up, getting very

:23:45.:23:50.

moved. There is more emotional heft with an orchestra, with a choir,

:23:50.:23:55.

with the violins, the cellos. You get carried away. It is easier to

:23:55.:24:02.

lose yourself. The idea came about when James and an orchestra played

:24:02.:24:08.

a one off charity concert two years ago. The Orchestra of the Swan were

:24:08.:24:10.

specifically selected by the man who has written all of the

:24:10.:24:16.

arrangements for this -- these songs. They are a lot of hard

:24:16.:24:19.

working great classically-trained orchestras of which this orchestra

:24:19.:24:23.

is one. I have worked with them in the past. I love their spirit and

:24:23.:24:26.

their playing and everything about the way they go about the business.

:24:26.:24:30.

I thought they would be an ideal group to work with. It is something

:24:30.:24:35.

different to get our teeth into. We always tried to find a different

:24:35.:24:41.

edge on it so working with James is great because it allows us to work

:24:41.:24:50.

-- let our hair down. If # Sit down. This is a long way from the early

:24:50.:24:54.

Nineties when it James were at the height of their success. For

:24:54.:24:57.

Orchestra of the Swan, it is a chance for them to play it some of

:24:58.:25:04.

the biggest of its -- concert halls in the country. It is very

:25:04.:25:08.

different compared to having music on the page. It is very liberating.

:25:08.:25:12.

A they are having great fun and I think they are enjoying being

:25:12.:25:18.

taking it out of the penguin suit straitjackets. Just how much fun

:25:18.:25:22.

the audience at the Symphony Hall will have, we will find out later.

:25:22.:25:27.

With me is the artistic director of Orchestra of the Swan. How big is

:25:27.:25:32.

the orchestra? This is a UK-wide tour, finishing up in the Albert

:25:32.:25:38.

Hall. It does not get any bigger than that. It does not get any more

:25:38.:25:43.

beautiful than Symphony Hall. It is great to collaborate with James.

:25:43.:25:49.

puts you on the map, doesn't it? The orchestra has a growing

:25:50.:25:54.

national and international reputation. I hope the audience

:25:54.:25:56.

tonight will hear the orchestra and a break down some ideas about what

:25:56.:26:02.

an orchestra really is. It should be a great night in Birmingham.

:26:02.:26:11.

We have escaped the rain today. The focus has been on Wales, Cornwall

:26:11.:26:17.

and Devon. They have had torrential downpours there. Low-pressure is

:26:17.:26:23.

dominating this week so you will find it is unsettled. The winds

:26:23.:26:28.

will increase and decrease as the France move across. We have some

:26:28.:26:32.

rain to come tonight. It will clear later on. The question is how much

:26:32.:26:37.

we will get an where it will fall? It is still raining quite heavily

:26:37.:26:42.

across Wales. As the band up news our way, it will become lighter.

:26:42.:26:46.

Parts of Hereford and Worcestershire will get persistent

:26:46.:26:54.

rain this evening. As it take so East with, it will clear. -- as it

:26:54.:26:58.

heads eastwards. It will be relatively mild overnight, with

:26:58.:27:03.

minimum temperatures of 11 degrees. There will be a fair breeze blowing

:27:03.:27:07.

overnight. The winds will be higher tomorrow. It will be quite dusty,

:27:07.:27:12.

especially over the hilltops. To start with, it will be dry with

:27:12.:27:17.

some sunshine. Then at the cloud will increase from the south-west,

:27:17.:27:21.

introducing a scattering of Light showers. Temperatures only up to 15

:27:21.:27:25.

degrees. In combination with the dusty winds, it will feel colder

:27:25.:27:31.

than today. The outlook, cold and clear. More showers on Wednesday.

:27:31.:27:35.

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