27/09/2013 Midlands Today


27/09/2013

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Good evening. Tonight: death rates following hip operations down by

:00:06.:00:16.

nearly 100 patients a year at one of our biggest hospital trusts. The

:00:16.:00:23.

work ethic has completely changed. We will hear why operating within

:00:23.:00:27.

two days is a key reason for success.

:00:27.:00:30.

More than 600 jobs to go at Warwickshire County Council as part

:00:30.:00:35.

of £92 million of savings. Most of those have come from natural wastage

:00:35.:00:39.

but I cannot rule out that there will be some compulsory

:00:39.:00:43.

redundancies. The Prime Minister tells us why he is determined the

:00:43.:00:45.

high—speed rail project will go ahead, despite doubts from Labour.

:00:45.:00:51.

How a Warwickshire holiday home beat of the competition to win Britain's

:00:51.:00:55.

biggest architecture prize. And will it be an award—winning

:00:55.:00:58.

weekend for the weather? It is not looking too bad but will it be

:00:58.:01:03.

broadly is at the ready? The full forecast later.

:01:03.:01:12.

A remarkable turnaround at one of the region's biggest hospital

:01:12.:01:17.

trusts, after a sharp rise in survival rates for hip surgery. Just

:01:17.:01:21.

eight years ago, around one in five patients who went to the Heart of

:01:21.:01:25.

England NHS Trust for hip surgery died. But major investment in

:01:25.:01:29.

specialist care means that by last year that figure had been reduced to

:01:29.:01:35.

less than one in 15. That means around 90 patients a year are now

:01:35.:01:38.

walking out of hospital who previously would have died. Our

:01:39.:01:41.

health correspondent, Michele Paduano, has this report.

:01:41.:01:48.

She's made a textbook recovery and 77—year—old Pauline Poole is going

:01:48.:01:51.

home today after just ten days. Women are more likely to break their

:01:51.:01:54.

hips because they live longer and more and more are in their 80s and

:01:54.:02:02.

90s. Once I had the accident, the next thing I release new, I was

:02:02.:02:06.

waking up on the ward, operation over and done with and being looked

:02:07.:02:12.

after by the lovely girls —— the next thing I really knew. Elderly

:02:12.:02:15.

patients are often very sick. At Heart of England they had a terrible

:02:16.:02:19.

survival rate so they've invested £2 million. That means five junior

:02:19.:02:22.

doctors employed to monitor patients more closely and more specialists in

:02:22.:02:29.

elderly care. The statistics are showing we are third from the bottom

:02:29.:02:34.

out of 200 hospitals, so we had to change and people realised that. The

:02:34.:02:39.

work ethic has completely changed. That has improved quite

:02:39.:02:42.

considerably. So how have they changed the culture? They operate on

:02:42.:02:46.

patients seven days a week and 85% of patients now have their operation

:02:46.:02:50.

within two days. The monitoring ensures there are fewer

:02:50.:02:57.

complications like infection. One of the major changes is operating at

:02:57.:03:01.

the weekend. If a patient came in on a Thursday, they might not be

:03:01.:03:04.

operated on until the following Monday. Weekend operating at

:03:04.:03:06.

Heartlands has reduced deaths of patients admitted at the weekend by

:03:06.:03:10.

two thirds. According to national statistics, the best hospital in our

:03:10.:03:14.

region is New Cross in Wolverhampton with 4.3% overall mortality. The

:03:14.:03:16.

George Eliot Hospital in Nuneaton still has 10.4% of patients dying

:03:16.:03:20.

and the Gloucester Royal's 11.1% is the highest. The Heart of England

:03:20.:03:25.

NHS Trust isn't complacent. Good Hope's figures could improve and the

:03:25.:03:28.

level of pressure sores in Heartlands is nearly twice the

:03:28.:03:36.

national average. We have some work to do on pressure sores, that is

:03:36.:03:41.

improving, it has improved successively. It is a consequence of

:03:41.:03:47.

dealing with very frail people. But having one of the poorest

:03:47.:03:50.

communities in the country on their doorstep, this turnaround is

:03:50.:03:51.

impressive. I am joined now by our health

:03:52.:03:55.

correspondent, Michele Paduano. A broken hip is so much more serious

:03:55.:04:00.

for all the people than just a broken bone. —— for older people.

:04:00.:04:08.

That is right and when they go to hospital, they are very frail. In

:04:08.:04:12.

some of these operations they have to have a new ball joint and it can

:04:12.:04:17.

be dangerous. In 2002, a quarter of all people who went to Good Hope

:04:17.:04:21.

Hospital died from this operation. The change has been to render it ——

:04:21.:04:28.

been tremendous. It is a shame there has to be a target but they target

:04:29.:04:33.

has worked. The improvement at the weekend is staggering. Two thirds

:04:33.:04:38.

less people died if they were operated on at the weekend. I'd Good

:04:38.:04:44.

Hope it was a third less. More people die at weekends and over

:04:44.:04:48.

holidays. We need to get into a culture where hospitals are working

:04:48.:04:52.

seven days a week. Is there more that can be done to improve survival

:04:52.:04:56.

rates? Some of these hospitals squeeze things down to the bones,

:04:56.:05:00.

excuse the pun. Certain people are going with heart attacks and strokes

:05:00.:05:04.

and almost incidentally breaking a hip as part of that process. Each

:05:04.:05:11.

year the figures are getting better. Last year the people admitted to an

:05:11.:05:15.

orthopaedic ward within four hours fell for the first time and that is

:05:15.:05:18.

because of the winter pressures. If you have another bad winter, there

:05:18.:05:27.

is always that possibility. Coming up later in the programme:

:05:27.:05:30.

Transformed from a ruin into a luxury holiday home — a prestigious

:05:30.:05:33.

award for an old Warwickshire castle.

:05:33.:05:36.

More than 600 jobs are to go at Warwickshire County Council as the

:05:36.:05:39.

authority aims to save £92 million in the next four years. The council

:05:39.:05:43.

says the cuts are due to a drop in government grants, inflation and an

:05:43.:05:46.

ageing population. Our reporter Sarah Falkland is in Warwick for us

:05:46.:05:53.

tonight. Sarah, do we know which departments will be hit by this?

:05:53.:06:00.

They haven't given any great detail but they have said that no

:06:01.:06:05.

department will be untouched. I would say it is looking extremely

:06:05.:06:09.

likely tonight that Warwickshire fire service, which cost something

:06:09.:06:15.

like £20 million a year to run, will merge with Hereford and Worcester

:06:15.:06:18.

Fire and Rescue Service come it has been talked for five or six years.

:06:18.:06:24.

Apart from that, jobs are the other big saving. They have already lost

:06:24.:06:28.

1500 jobs in Warwickshire County Council. That is just in the last

:06:28.:06:32.

couple of years. A lot of that with natural wastage. Now we are looking

:06:32.:06:39.

at compulsory redundancies. We are looking at up to a maximum of 627

:06:39.:06:43.

losses over the four—year period. Most of those, I hope, will come

:06:43.:06:48.

from natural wastage but I cannot rule out that there will be some

:06:48.:06:51.

compulsory redundancies over the four—year period. At this point I

:06:51.:06:59.

can't quantify those. What has been the reaction to this announcement?

:06:59.:07:04.

The unions have not said a lot, they are meeting with the council on

:07:04.:07:08.

Monday. The leader of the Labour Party on the County Council is

:07:08.:07:12.

concerned about social care. It eats up a whopping quarter of the £350

:07:12.:07:17.

million budget that the County Council has. There is a ready talk

:07:17.:07:20.

about looking after people in their homes for longer than putting them

:07:21.:07:25.

into care homes. She's worried this is taking David Cameron's big

:07:25.:07:31.

society idea one step too far. He seems to think this country can rely

:07:31.:07:35.

on volunteers and when we start talking about volunteers to look

:07:35.:07:37.

after elderly relatives and neighbours, I think things have got

:07:37.:07:43.

to come to a halt. Does this level of cuts mean council tax in

:07:43.:07:48.

Warwickshire will remain frozen? High as these cuts are, 92 million

:07:48.:07:55.

is based on having a council tax rise of 2%. The council is keen to

:07:55.:07:58.

hear what the bill say about these cuts and council tax levels. We

:07:58.:08:02.

asked people, would they be prepared to pay more council tax if it meant

:08:03.:08:08.

preserving council services? I would rather take the 2% rise and have

:08:08.:08:14.

less cuts. Services are important. Council tax is better. I pay more as

:08:14.:08:21.

it is. You have to be prepared to pay for the services that you want.

:08:21.:08:27.

A 2% rise is probably a fairly small price to pay. The economy doesn't

:08:27.:08:33.

work on frozen because you are forcing things and there will be a

:08:34.:08:38.

big bubble afterwards. Give us an idea of when final decisions will be

:08:38.:08:43.

made. Public consultation running over the next couple of months in

:08:43.:08:46.

the autumn, a final decision in early Fabri next year. —— February

:08:46.:08:50.

next to. A prolific burglar from Birmingham

:08:50.:08:56.

has been jailed for 12 years for running over a West Midlands police

:08:56.:08:59.

officer. 50—year—old Carl Anderson knocked down PC Peter McGinn as he

:08:59.:09:02.

tried to escape following a burglary in Erdington in June. The

:09:02.:09:05.

44—year—old police officer has undergone multiple operations for

:09:05.:09:07.

serious leg injuries but he's hopeful of returning to duties

:09:07.:09:14.

within two years. A statement was read on his behalf outside

:09:14.:09:19.

Birmingham Crown Court. I am glad that Anderson pleaded guilty and

:09:19.:09:22.

acknowledged his actions on the day, I am pleased that justice has been

:09:22.:09:27.

concluded today and I can now concentrate on my recovery, which is

:09:27.:09:31.

going to be a lengthy process. I would like to take this opportunity

:09:31.:09:36.

to thank my wife, my family, friends and colleagues for all their help

:09:36.:09:40.

and support. A coroner has criticised organisers

:09:40.:09:43.

of a fell—running event after they failed to realise a competitor from

:09:43.:09:46.

Staffordshire had fallen from a cliff and died. 63—year—old Brian

:09:46.:09:49.

Belfield, from Leek, slipped down a mountain near Buttermere in the Lake

:09:49.:09:52.

District in April last year and died of hypothermia. Cumbria's deputy

:09:52.:09:55.

coroner Robert Chapman heard race officials had wrongly counted the

:09:55.:09:58.

number of finishers and that their walkie—talkies had failed.

:09:58.:10:04.

Union leaders have written a letter of no confidence in the governing

:10:04.:10:09.

body of a Birmingham school where a boy threatened other children with a

:10:09.:10:12.

knife. Concerned parents gathered at Saltley School this afternoon to

:10:12.:10:16.

find out what action's going to be taken. The pupil had been

:10:16.:10:18.

permanently excluded until governors reversed the decision. The school

:10:18.:10:21.

says the incident was dealt with through due process, but the GMB

:10:21.:10:24.

union says school support staff are concerned. Primarily we are

:10:24.:10:35.

concerned about health and safety of our members but also the pupils

:10:35.:10:40.

within the school. We want to seek assurances from the school, what

:10:40.:10:43.

they are doing to protect our staff, our members and the pupils

:10:43.:10:46.

within the environment that they look after on a day—to—day basis.

:10:46.:10:50.

Promises of a review of High Speed Rail by an incoming Labour

:10:50.:10:53.

government have been dismissed by the Conservative leader David

:10:53.:10:56.

Cameron. The Shadow Chancellor Ed Balls told his party conference the

:10:56.:10:59.

project could be scrapped if the estimated costs continued to rise.

:10:59.:11:02.

But, as he prepared for his party conference in Manchester, the Prime

:11:02.:11:05.

Minister reaffirmed his strong support for it. He was talking to

:11:05.:11:08.

our political editor, Patrick Burns, who joins us now. He's still

:11:08.:11:11.

confident about it despite Labour's doubts? I think after the events of

:11:11.:11:20.

the past few days, David Cameron is, if anything, even more determined

:11:20.:11:25.

than ever. He was cataloguing the considerable economic advantages to

:11:25.:11:30.

parts of the country like ours. I think he feels that intriguingly, if

:11:30.:11:37.

push comes to shove, even Labour themselves would not turn their

:11:37.:11:42.

backs on this project. We need to build a new railway line. The West

:11:42.:11:46.

Coast mainline is full. The only question for us is do we build

:11:46.:11:50.

another Victorian style railway, or do we build one of these new

:11:50.:11:54.

high—speed ones. Of course it costs a lot of money but we will be

:11:54.:11:59.

spending three times as much in the next Parliament on other transport

:11:59.:12:04.

schemes, including rail schemes, as we will on HS2. It is not taking up

:12:04.:12:07.

all the budget and it is vital for our economic future. Ed Balls's

:12:07.:12:14.

speech was attacked, what have local MPs had to say? A Black Country

:12:14.:12:20.

Labour MP who chairs the all—party business select committee, I put it

:12:20.:12:25.

to him that Labour's intervention would deter important investment in

:12:25.:12:29.

potential high—speed rail projects. He said if anything was likely to

:12:29.:12:32.

deter investors, it is the coalition's handling of this. The

:12:32.:12:37.

current government has totally failed in its bid to convince the

:12:37.:12:41.

country that it is the best way to spend this amount of money.

:12:41.:12:47.

Secondly, the costs have escalated. What the Labour Party is saying is

:12:47.:12:52.

yes, we are still committed to this. Certainly in the West Midlands,

:12:52.:12:57.

leaders and members of Parliament are. We can't give the operators and

:12:57.:13:03.

open cheque. What else did you talk to David Cameron about? It was a

:13:03.:13:09.

wide—ranging interview, we touched on acute services at Stafford

:13:09.:13:14.

Hospital. And all those marginal seat and the issues which David

:13:14.:13:17.

Cameron thinks will cut through at the next general election, welfare

:13:17.:13:21.

reform, education reform and the improving condition, he says, of the

:13:21.:13:24.

economy generally. And you can see Patrick's interview

:13:24.:13:28.

with the Prime Minister in full in this weekend's Sunday Politics from

:13:28.:13:31.

11:00am here on BBC One. This is our top story tonight: death

:13:31.:13:34.

rates following hip operations drop by nearly 100 patients a year by

:13:35.:13:41.

operating within two days. Your detailed weather forecast to

:13:41.:13:44.

come shortly. Also in tonight's programme,

:13:44.:13:46.

drumming up support for Stoke — season tickets back on sale after a

:13:46.:13:51.

dip in crowd numbers. And recreating the trial of the

:13:51.:13:54.

Prince of Poisoners — one of the country's most notorious villains.

:13:55.:14:04.

It may be getting on for 1,000 years old, but a manor house in

:14:04.:14:09.

Warwickshire has landed the country's top prize for contemporary

:14:09.:14:13.

architecture. The transformation of Astley Castle, near Nuneaton, into a

:14:13.:14:16.

modern holiday home has won its designers the coveted Stirling

:14:16.:14:21.

Prize. The award was presented to architects firm Witherford Watson

:14:21.:14:24.

Mann at a ceremony in London last night. Being recognised early is one

:14:24.:14:36.

of the most important things about these awards. It allows you to

:14:36.:14:41.

communicate your ideas. It may not translate into huge business

:14:41.:14:45.

improvement but it is certainly really important to get ideas out

:14:45.:14:48.

there. Supporters of the restoration project have gathered at Astley

:14:48.:14:51.

Castle tonight to celebrate the award. Our reporter Joanne Writtle

:14:51.:14:54.

has joined them. Joanne, how important is this prize to people

:14:54.:15:03.

there in North Warwickshire? It is a cause of huge celebration. This

:15:03.:15:07.

award is a bit like the Oscars of British architecture. How beautiful

:15:07.:15:12.

it is. They are all having a huge party. Let's chat to one or two of

:15:12.:15:17.

the locals who have gathered here. Sharon is housekeeper here, she

:15:17.:15:21.

lives in the village. Tell me what you do. We maintain and get it ready

:15:21.:15:28.

for the guests. Meet and greet them sometimes. We meet lovely people. A

:15:28.:15:33.

wonderful place to work. What about Leonard. You have lived in Astley

:15:34.:15:38.

all your life, you have had lots of celebrations, what has happened in

:15:38.:15:43.

the past? The wedding receptions for a brother and four sisters. And it

:15:43.:15:49.

was wonderful. Always had great times in Astley, lived here all my

:15:49.:15:55.

life. That is when it was a hotel in the 50s. The Landmark trust lets

:15:56.:16:00.

this out as a holiday home and a short time ago, a group of eight

:16:00.:16:04.

friends staying here from Herefordshire and Bristol, let me

:16:04.:16:08.

disturb their dinner progressions to give me a quick tour of what is now

:16:08.:16:10.

their award—winning holiday house we have this wonderful staircase and

:16:10.:16:25.

on that floor, and open space. This wonderful large room which would

:16:25.:16:28.

have been the grand Hall in medieval times, it has been transformed into

:16:28.:16:34.

a modern living area. Very exciting to be in such a grand and

:16:34.:16:38.

award—winning plays. A medieval castle with a difference. It's only.

:16:38.:16:46.

How about that? We are joined by Caroline Standford, historian from

:16:46.:16:51.

the Landmark trust. Congratulations. In 1978 this was a scene of ruins

:16:51.:16:55.

after a fire what would have happened if you did not take it on?

:16:55.:17:00.

Had the Landmark trust not stepped in, it would have fallen away and

:17:00.:17:04.

become unrecognisable, despite being grade to listed. —— two listed.

:17:04.:17:13.

Inside it is ultramodern, did you preserve any of the original

:17:13.:17:18.

features? Sadly it was so far gone that there was nothing left of the

:17:18.:17:22.

internal features to restore in a conventional sense. We have kept as

:17:22.:17:26.

much as we can but nothing to restore. Who is one of the most

:17:26.:17:33.

famous residents? Elizabeth would feel was the White Queen and lived

:17:33.:17:36.

here in the middle of the 15th century were just before she married

:17:36.:17:39.

Edward IV and became the White Queen of England. People here tonight can

:17:39.:17:45.

feel like their own king and queen of their own castle just for the

:17:45.:17:48.

day. Thank you. Dan's here with the sport. And

:17:48.:17:51.

concern at Stoke City about falling attendances?

:17:51.:17:56.

They are trying to do something about it. For many fans, Stoke

:17:56.:18:02.

City's impressive start to the season has raised eyebrows. If they

:18:02.:18:05.

beat Norwich on Sunday it will be their best ever start in the Premier

:18:05.:18:09.

League but their home crowd is down by 7% and the club is determined to

:18:09.:18:12.

win back the hearts and minds of their fans.

:18:13.:18:16.

Something was missing from the last home game at the Brit. Not just

:18:16.:18:20.

goals but a full compliment of Stoke City supporters, because the gate

:18:20.:18:23.

was 2,000 down on the same game last season. The Britannia Stadium has or

:18:23.:18:29.

has been a fortress, loud and proud of its reputation as the Potters'

:18:29.:18:35.

12th man. When 2000 Stoke City fans fail to renew their season tickets

:18:35.:18:38.

in the summer, the alarm bells started ringing. Chief executive

:18:38.:18:43.

Tony Scholes hates to see hundreds of empty seats. It's costing the

:18:44.:18:50.

club thousands of pounds. So when Stoke fans told him they wouldn't

:18:50.:18:53.

pay good money to watch uninspiring football, he cut the price of season

:18:53.:18:56.

tickets to tempt them back. These have been pretty austere times in

:18:56.:18:59.

the potteries, is football feeling the pinch? We are very aware of that

:18:59.:19:03.

and our pricing reflects the fact that we are in difficult environment

:19:03.:19:05.

at the moment, and we live in an area that is not the wealthiest. We

:19:06.:19:10.

haven't put the prices up since we got promoted to the Premier League.

:19:10.:19:14.

The Britannia is not thought any more, why is that? I suppose it is

:19:14.:19:20.

down to price. Change the style of football which you would have

:19:20.:19:22.

thought would be more attractive to watch. I don't know why they are not

:19:22.:19:26.

coming. Are you getting value for money? I think so. They are one of

:19:26.:19:31.

the cheapest in the Premier League will stop a friend of mine went to

:19:31.:19:35.

the Emirates and it was over £40 for a ticket. Mark Hughes' job is to

:19:35.:19:40.

make Stoke City more watchable. But he knows money's too tight to

:19:40.:19:43.

mention for many fans, So he'll never take their loyalty for

:19:43.:19:46.

granted. I think people are encouraged by what they are seeing

:19:46.:19:50.

and the way we are playing. We think that will add a few to the crowd.

:19:50.:19:55.

Are you a big fan of Sunday lunchtime football? Not

:19:55.:20:01.

particularly, only when you win. Watching football doesn't get much

:20:01.:20:04.

cheaper than this. But if Stoke beat Norwich on Sunday, it'll be their

:20:04.:20:07.

best ever start in the Premier League. And 2,000 Potters fans may

:20:07.:20:10.

well tempted to reconsider their decision.

:20:10.:20:15.

England's netball team take on South Africa in front of a sell—out crowd

:20:15.:20:20.

at the University of Worcester tonight. It's a vital part of their

:20:20.:20:23.

preparations for next summer's Commonwealth Games where they're

:20:23.:20:27.

aiming to win gold. But these players have to combine sporting

:20:27.:20:30.

excellence with holding down a full—time job. Nick Clitheroe

:20:30.:20:34.

reports. Six in the morning and England's

:20:34.:20:37.

captain Pamela Cookey is meeting up with her team—mates for the first

:20:37.:20:47.

training session of a long day. It is very early in the morning.

:20:47.:20:51.

Sometimes it is good, you get out of bed and have to get on with it. You

:20:51.:20:55.

don't how hard you are working sometimes. If I don't put my all

:20:55.:21:00.

into it, the girls will wonder why. Sometimes you are tired and you are

:21:00.:21:04.

struggling but you have to help each other get through. Although she's

:21:04.:21:07.

from Birmingham, Pamela has moved to Bath, where the national team are

:21:07.:21:11.

based, to pursue her sporting dream. There's not enough money in the

:21:11.:21:14.

sport to be a full—time professional, so once training

:21:14.:21:17.

finishes it's off to her day job at an aerospace company. England have

:21:17.:21:20.

won Commonwealth bronze in the last two games but recent performances

:21:20.:21:23.

have seen them set their sights even higher for Glasgow next year. We

:21:23.:21:29.

actually want more, we want to come away with a different medal, and

:21:29.:21:37.

that is driving force. The Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, we

:21:37.:21:40.

are aiming for the final, that is where we want to be. I definitely

:21:40.:21:44.

think we are in a position to challenge for the gold medal.

:21:44.:21:50.

For Pamela that means when her fellow workers head home at the end

:21:50.:21:55.

of the day she's back in they gym for more training. But it will all

:21:56.:22:00.

be worth it if there's a gold medal hanging round her neck next summer.

:22:00.:22:03.

Decent crowds expected at the netball — let's hope the numbers

:22:03.:22:06.

pick up at Stoke. Elsewhere this weekend it's Manchester versus the

:22:06.:22:09.

Midlands. In the Premier League tomorrow Aston Villa are at home to

:22:09.:22:12.

Manchester City while West Bromwich Albion are at Manchester United.

:22:12.:22:14.

There is nothing to lose, the pressure is off both teams. The odds

:22:14.:22:20.

against them both winning, 66—to one, it perhaps says it all.

:22:20.:22:29.

Before I go, don't forget we're looking for nominations for our BBC

:22:29.:22:32.

Midlands Unsung Sporting Hero Award. We're looking for an individual or

:22:32.:22:35.

pair aged 16 or over who give their time on a voluntary basis to help

:22:36.:22:39.

others to participate in sport. You can download a nomination form on

:22:39.:22:42.

the BBC Sport website or you can ring 0845 308 8000 and we'll send

:22:42.:22:44.

one to you. pair aged 16 or over who give their

:22:44.:22:47.

time on a Calls cost up to 5p a minute from a landline, but may be

:22:47.:22:49.

more from mobiles. can download a nomination form on

:22:49.:22:49.

The closing date is October 14th. A Stafford Threatre Company has

:22:49.:22:57.

taken over the town's former Crown Court to recreate the trial of one

:22:57.:23:00.

of the county's most notorious villains. Rugeley doctor William

:23:00.:23:09.

Palmer is thought to have killed at least 15 people in the mid—19th

:23:09.:23:12.

century. He was finally convicted for the murder of a close friend in

:23:12.:23:16.

1856. Laura May McMullen has been to see Victorian justice in action.

:23:16.:23:19.

June 1856 and the trial of Dr William Palmer gripped the nation.

:23:19.:23:31.

Are you guilty or not guilty? Not guilty. He was tried for the murder

:23:31.:23:36.

of his friend John Parsons Cook, but it's alleged the doctor — also known

:23:36.:23:39.

as the Rugeley Poisoner — killed at least 15 people, including his wife

:23:39.:23:44.

and children. Now, his trial has been recreated by a Staffordshire

:23:44.:23:46.

theatre company with members of the audience making up the jury. We have

:23:47.:23:55.

done this four times. It seems a very popular one. Whether Stafford

:23:55.:24:01.

people are more morbid than others, who knows? I suppose he was one of

:24:01.:24:06.

the first mass murderers in British history and until that time, he

:24:06.:24:09.

probably killed more people than anybody. His trial was due to take

:24:09.:24:15.

place in this courtroom in Stafford, but such was his notoriety it was

:24:15.:24:23.

moved to the Old Bailey in London. It is fascinating. I was on the jury

:24:23.:24:26.

last time I was here, some years ago. It is interesting to see the

:24:26.:24:35.

history of what happened. I live in Rugeley, it is more interesting than

:24:35.:24:40.

it would be for other people. In 1856, it was the custom to make a

:24:40.:24:44.

death mask after someone had been executed. After studying his cast

:24:44.:24:47.

the phrenologist said "the head was altogether the worst kind". William

:24:47.:24:55.

Palmer, you have been found guilty of the heinous crime of murder. More

:24:55.:24:59.

than 30,000 people gathered outside Stafford Prison to witness the

:24:59.:25:02.

hanging of one of history's most notorious villains.

:25:02.:25:12.

How very grizzly. Can we squeeze more sunshine out of

:25:12.:25:19.

the last days of September? Rebecca has the forecast.

:25:19.:25:25.

Yes, we can, but it is a bit of a North—South divide. It will be

:25:25.:25:29.

pleasant for pretty much all of us. We will have strong winds to content

:25:29.:25:35.

with. It will be generally dry, with the sun coming out at times but also

:25:35.:25:39.

with temperatures above average for the time of year so feeling very

:25:39.:25:44.

pleasant. It is because of this area of hide pressure to the east of us

:25:44.:25:48.

are managing to keep weather fronts at bay but also keeping things

:25:48.:25:54.

settled. We have had a good day with good spells of sunshine. Still a

:25:54.:25:57.

little to come through late afternoon. Overnight we will see

:25:57.:26:01.

largely clear skies. The cloud will start to fill in but it will be a

:26:01.:26:07.

dry night for most of us. Under that cloud the temperatures will manage

:26:07.:26:11.

to stay just into double figures but it will still be colder in rural

:26:11.:26:15.

spots and a chilly night to come. It means Saturday will start off dry

:26:15.:26:21.

and bright for most. Strong easterly winds so we will get breaks and

:26:21.:26:26.

sunshine. Further South we will see the cloud thicken and we can't rule

:26:26.:26:29.

out the odd shower across Gloucestershire and Herefordshire.

:26:29.:26:35.

They will blow through. Temperatures getting up to 18 or 19. Where the

:26:35.:26:41.

sun is out they could get into the low 20s. More sunshine to come

:26:41.:26:44.

through the afternoon, a few more showers but they will blow through

:26:44.:26:47.

quickly and it will be a similar picture to tonight. A few clear

:26:47.:26:52.

spells but temperatures managing to just stay into double figures.

:26:52.:26:57.

Sunday is a very similar picture to Saturday. Dry and bright with good

:26:57.:27:03.

spells of sunshine. The winds are picking up so that will take the

:27:03.:27:09.

edge off temperatures. Still 18 or 19 so not too bad. The high pressure

:27:09.:27:14.

is sitting with us as we move through Sunday into Monday. Perhaps

:27:14.:27:19.

more cloud by Tuesday. For late September it is not looking too bad.

:27:19.:27:22.

More sunshine left in last few days of September?

:27:22.:27:28.

Let's recap tonight's top stories: The BBC has learnt that uncertainty

:27:28.:27:32.

about who was in charge of responding to the attack on a Kenyan

:27:32.:27:36.

shopping centre may have helped gunmen to prolong the siege.

:27:36.:27:38.

And death rates following hip operations down by nearly 100

:27:38.:27:41.

patients a year by operating within two days.

:27:41.:27:44.

We'll be back at 10:00pm. Have a great weekend. Goodbye.

:27:44.:27:46.

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