20/05/2014 Midlands Today


20/05/2014

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degrees. A bit of cloud and the risk of a few showers. That's

:00:00.:00:22.

Fare dodging on the increase ` unions claim up to 20%

:00:23.:00:27.

of rail passengers are travelling without a ticket.

:00:28.:00:29.

pioneering cancer research at a Birmingham Laboratory.

:00:30.:00:36.

The key role of a Birmingham University professor

:00:37.:00:38.

at the world famous CERN research centre in Geneva.

:00:39.:00:43.

By Royal Approval ` it's gold once again for Birmingham

:00:44.:00:45.

And, there were showers today but at least it was warm,

:00:46.:00:51.

so the build`up to a break down in the weather may be gradual this

:00:52.:00:55.

Fare dodging on the railways is on the rise.

:00:56.:01:13.

Rail unions claim that, on some routes in the West Midlands,

:01:14.:01:17.

a fifth of passengers could be travelling without tickets.

:01:18.:01:19.

Rail operators insist the true figure is lower.

:01:20.:01:21.

It comes as London Midland, one of the worst performing

:01:22.:01:24.

in the country, is cutting the number of ticket inspectors

:01:25.:01:27.

Here's our Transport Correspondent, Peter Plisner.

:01:28.:01:33.

The daily commmute a costly experience, Caroline

:01:34.:01:35.

Hornburger pays ?1,200 a year for her season ticket from Droitwich.

:01:36.:01:39.

But she's concerned that some of her fellow passengers might not

:01:40.:01:42.

There certainly is a lack of visibility of people checking

:01:43.:02:04.

Here's one possible reason ` at Birmingham's New Street station

:02:05.:02:07.

tickets are both on trains and at stations, and that way you will miss

:02:08.:02:10.

people. I've also heard

:02:11.:02:11.

about one train guard who collected more than ?500 in fares in just one

:02:12.:02:16.

day from passengers who'd boarded Rail unions warn that

:02:17.:02:19.

it could get worse. London Midland is reducing

:02:20.:02:23.

the number of ticket inspectors We think it is madness to get rid of

:02:24.:02:36.

so many revenue staff. What is crucial for London Midland and for

:02:37.:02:42.

the railway in this area is to collect as many fares as possible.

:02:43.:02:42.

But London Midland maintains that even with fewer staff it'll still

:02:43.:02:47.

If we can work more flexibly, we can cover more stations, more stations

:02:48.:02:58.

and more hours, and give more benefits than have ever been able to

:02:59.:03:15.

before to our passengers. It could mean that decisions about investment

:03:16.:03:19.

art scaled down because these revenues are not recorded.

:03:20.:03:23.

Satisfaction levels are still below where they should be. Satisfaction

:03:24.:03:28.

scores are at 73%, which is not good enough. Passengers want punctual,

:03:29.:03:33.

reliable services, and we feel that these could be better. Despite that,

:03:34.:03:38.

London Midland still increased fares on some routes yesterday with

:03:39.:03:41.

minimal publicity, something that has further angered passengers.

:03:42.:03:46.

With us now is London Midland's Head of Communications

:03:47.:03:48.

Can we start with that point ` fares went up yesterday and not

:03:49.:03:55.

The only says that went up were the super discounted fares, and the

:03:56.:04:06.

advertise those at the stations where it applied. Regular first did

:04:07.:04:11.

not change. But some passengers will resent this, won't they? We don't

:04:12.:04:17.

like putting up our fares, but we tend to do so and those heavily

:04:18.:04:20.

discounted fares where we think we are getting too many people on some

:04:21.:04:24.

trains. If you travel the route from Stoke to London comedy will seen

:04:25.:04:28.

just how busy some of those off`peak trains are. The unions are selling

:04:29.:04:35.

up to 20% of passengers are going on trains without paying for tickets.

:04:36.:04:40.

That is an astonishing figure. It is an open system, and clearly we need

:04:41.:04:42.

to get better at checking fares, collecting fares, and that is why we

:04:43.:04:47.

are talking to our staff and our trade unions about working more

:04:48.:04:55.

flexibly silly can cover more trains, more stations, more hours.

:04:56.:04:59.

You can understand why some passengers would be angry that some

:05:00.:05:04.

people are getting away without paying. Absolutely. But you are

:05:05.:05:10.

cutting back on numbers, on staff, so surely you will find it more

:05:11.:05:16.

difficult? What we have found is we work in flexible, so the number of

:05:17.:05:20.

people we have got, it is not about having more people. If we could get

:05:21.:05:23.

more revenue back by having more people, we would do it. But we need

:05:24.:05:29.

to be more flexible to cover more stations and more hours. If you are

:05:30.:05:33.

a cheat, you know when we don't check on trains and you can work

:05:34.:05:39.

around that. We penalty fare 1600 people every month at the moment.

:05:40.:05:45.

Let's go to some viewers who got in touch with us. One man says, how can

:05:46.:05:52.

you justify increase on fares when you throw so much money away? The

:05:53.:05:58.

need to make it harder for people to dodge fares, and that is what this

:05:59.:06:02.

discussion with the unions is about. Richard says, "why are you not

:06:03.:06:07.

installing barriers and oyster style cards? ". Barriers are expensive to

:06:08.:06:14.

put in place, so you put them in places where a lot of people pass

:06:15.:06:17.

through. It is about the economic of it. He would not spend ?1.01 to get

:06:18.:06:29.

?1 back in revenue. A small station that doesn't get many passengers,

:06:30.:06:32.

which is also open, you would have to look at the whole structure of

:06:33.:06:35.

the building, it would be expensive to cover and close it. Mike says,

:06:36.:06:43.

why should we pay for a service with similar cancellations and delays

:06:44.:06:48.

when you are cutting staff? On some routes, we have had some of our best

:06:49.:06:51.

performances for over two years. We have been working hard to improve

:06:52.:06:56.

our performance, and that is our main focus. Passengers expect a

:06:57.:06:59.

reliable service and that is what we focus on everyday. Thank you for

:07:00.:07:01.

joining us. Thanks for joining us here

:07:02.:07:03.

on Midlands Today this evening. With two days to the Euro elections,

:07:04.:07:06.

our guide to how your vote counts in picking the

:07:07.:07:10.

West Midlands seven MEPs. The fight

:07:11.:07:17.

against advanced lung cancer is being led here in the Midlands,

:07:18.:07:19.

with a new national clinical trial. It's been launched by

:07:20.:07:22.

Cancer Research UK and the Regional Scientists there say there's been

:07:23.:07:25.

a huge increase in the number of people being tested for family

:07:26.:07:30.

cancer genes following recent high In March 2011, Lyn Barrington,

:07:31.:07:33.

a former nurse from Stafford, I was only in my 40s, I am fit and

:07:34.:07:55.

healthy and have never smoked. I could not believe it was happening

:07:56.:07:56.

to me. She's alive,

:07:57.:08:00.

thanks to medical advances I think we are heading in the

:08:01.:08:10.

direction that you even if you are in an advanced stage like myself, it

:08:11.:08:14.

can become less of a death sentence. And there could be further hope

:08:15.:08:19.

for patients like Lyn, with a new clinical trial targetting

:08:20.:08:22.

advanced lung cancer. Rather than a

:08:23.:08:24.

"one drug fits all" approach, researchers at the regional genetics

:08:25.:08:27.

lab in Birmingham will take genes from lung tumours and select drug

:08:28.:08:30.

treatment programmes accordingly. If we can put in place this sort of

:08:31.:08:38.

screening and choose more appropriate drugs, people will get

:08:39.:08:42.

better responses and there will be better patient outcomes.

:08:43.:08:45.

Genetic medicine is expanding rapidly, making treatments available

:08:46.:08:47.

now that even a couple of years would have seemed impossible.

:08:48.:08:50.

And the genetics lab, the largest in the country, is under increasing

:08:51.:08:54.

When the actress Angelina Jolie revealed she'd undergone

:08:55.:08:57.

a double mastectomy to reduce her chances of getting cancer,

:08:58.:09:00.

We had more than a doubling in referrals, particularly for breast

:09:01.:09:11.

cancer referrals, from about 200 a month to a peak of 500 in one

:09:12.:09:17.

month. This is part of a DNA sequence

:09:18.:09:18.

from one patient. There are 10,000 letters

:09:19.:09:21.

in just one gene and it's just one of them, that mutation there,

:09:22.:09:24.

that means the patient is She's shopping

:09:25.:09:27.

for her daughter's wedding. I am shopping for a hat or

:09:28.:09:38.

accessories. I never thought I would see this day, so it will be very,

:09:39.:09:40.

very emotional. A 74`year`old man has been arrested

:09:41.:09:44.

on suspicion of murder after an elderly woman was found

:09:45.:09:47.

dead at a house in Market Drayton. A body was found in Millfield Drive

:09:48.:09:50.

this morning. It's believed to be

:09:51.:09:53.

75`year`old Beatrice Bennett. Police say they're not looking

:09:54.:09:55.

for anyone else. The airline Flybe has announced a

:09:56.:10:12.

new routes from Birmingham Airport. It carries 1.5 million passengers

:10:13.:10:16.

every year. It will offer new destinations including Oslo and

:10:17.:10:19.

hamburg, and will introduce year`round flights to a number of

:10:20.:10:23.

destinations currently only available in the summer.

:10:24.:10:28.

The Commonwealth Games baton relay will pass through Birmingham

:10:29.:10:30.

The announcement was celebrated by baton bearers Mimi Cesar,

:10:31.:10:35.

Pritesh Pattni and Adam Ruckwood earlier today.

:10:36.:10:37.

It's now just 64 days to the start of the games in Glasgow.

:10:38.:10:40.

Local elections take place this Thursday and also elections

:10:41.:10:43.

for our European Members of Parliament, MEPs.

:10:44.:10:45.

But there are important differences from the system used in council or

:10:46.:10:51.

Here's BBC WM's Political Reporter Kathryn Stanczyszyn.

:10:52.:11:02.

These are the West Midlands MEPs. We conservatives, one Labour, one Lib

:11:03.:11:10.

Dem and two who were UKIP, but now have their own parties. Unlike your

:11:11.:11:14.

local MP, all of these represent the whole region. In this Birmingham pub

:11:15.:11:22.

there are more than 350 European BS on offer, and a big choice means a

:11:23.:11:26.

big menu, as there will be at the polling booths this Thursday. But do

:11:27.:11:30.

we understand how the Euro voting system works? No. No, I don't know.

:11:31.:11:38.

Not very well. I'm not even going to try actually. It is whoever gets the

:11:39.:11:45.

most votes percentage`wise. Well, the answer is not simple. It doesn't

:11:46.:11:51.

only rely on who gets the most votes. It is a formula devised by a

:11:52.:11:57.

Belgian mathematician. Basically, the system is weighted to give

:11:58.:12:00.

smaller parties a chance, instead of the big hitters like Labour and

:12:01.:12:04.

Conservatives getting all the seats. The most important difference from

:12:05.:12:07.

our other elections is that you vote for a party and not a person. So,

:12:08.:12:13.

why do we have this different system for the Europeans? It is a long

:12:14.:12:16.

established system which is widely used in, including in some domestic

:12:17.:12:22.

elections in Europe. It is complicated and gives a lot of power

:12:23.:12:26.

to the parties. There are 11 party standing in the West Midlands, so a

:12:27.:12:30.

pretty long ballot paper. It might seem congregated, for voters it is

:12:31.:12:35.

one cross in one box. Dash`macro it might seem complicated.

:12:36.:12:40.

Fare dodging on the increase ` unions say up to 20%

:12:41.:12:44.

of rail passengers are travelling without a ticket.

:12:45.:12:46.

Another warm day today ` the forecast for tomorrow to come

:12:47.:12:49.

The glory days of cinema and plans to bring them back

:12:50.:12:54.

And, find out how our teams from the West Midlands have done at the

:12:55.:13:04.

Chelsea Flower Show. I will have the results.

:13:05.:13:11.

I'm sure many of you will have heard of the CERN

:13:12.:13:14.

laboratory in Switzerland, a crucial ingredient in the Dan

:13:15.:13:17.

It's nearly two years since the large hadron collider

:13:18.:13:21.

there discovered the elusive "Higgs Boson", much smaller than an

:13:22.:13:25.

atom ` it's basically the glue which holds everything together.

:13:26.:13:29.

But what's happened since and what will CERN do in the future?

:13:30.:13:32.

Well, that's largely down to a scientist from Birmingham.

:13:33.:13:36.

We can cross live to CERN now in Geneva and our science

:13:37.:13:39.

This sounds like a huge honour for the Midlands, David ` one of our

:13:40.:13:44.

It is indeed. Let me explain about where we are. This is the control

:13:45.:13:56.

room. Atlas is the largest experiment here and it is one of the

:13:57.:14:03.

ones that led to the Higgs Boson, as you mention are the first programme

:14:04.:14:07.

to ever broadcast live from this control room. But we have got

:14:08.:14:11.

friends in high places. First of all, we have some computer graphics

:14:12.:14:14.

to show you to explain how things work here. CERN accelerate particles

:14:15.:14:24.

around it and smash them together at certain points. One of those points

:14:25.:14:29.

is here at Atlas. The experiment is deep underground, and Atlas's job is

:14:30.:14:36.

to use it laboratory to understand what happens after its collision.

:14:37.:14:40.

That is what they set out to do. Now they have done it, what are they

:14:41.:14:46.

going to do next? Well, that will be down to the University of Birmingham

:14:47.:14:49.

scientist who has been elected by the 3000 scientists here to decide

:14:50.:14:54.

the future direction of the science that they do here. It will all start

:14:55.:14:59.

right under my feet. 90 metres below the ground. Welcome

:15:00.:15:07.

to the Atlas detector. Professor David Charlton is from the

:15:08.:15:11.

University of Birmingham. He is in charge of the largest experiment at

:15:12.:15:17.

CERN, Atlas. In July 2012 we announced the discovery of the Higgs

:15:18.:15:20.

Boson. They were discovered in the centre of the detector. The whole

:15:21.:15:26.

exam and weighs 7000 tonnes, which means Atlas is slowly sinking over

:15:27.:15:30.

the course of time. They have special jacks to lift it back up.

:15:31.:15:37.

Professor Charlton was elected by his fellow scientists to be the

:15:38.:15:41.

person in charge of Atlas. He is the first British person to head up the

:15:42.:15:46.

expanded, which involves 3000 different researchers. He spends his

:15:47.:15:50.

time down with the experiment, but also in lots of meetings. Having

:15:51.:15:53.

discovered the Higgs Boson, why are they carrying on? What do they still

:15:54.:15:58.

want to discover? We want to understand how the universe is made,

:15:59.:16:02.

what the fundamental components of the universe are. It is read to try

:16:03.:16:06.

to understand what everything is made of and how things work and fit

:16:07.:16:10.

together. It is almost a cultural thing. To continue the search, CERN

:16:11.:16:15.

is being made much more powerful. It is looking for new things, and also

:16:16.:16:20.

to learn more about the Higgs Boson. With such a large experiment, we

:16:21.:16:24.

want to cover the huge range of the physics am so when we come back of

:16:25.:16:29.

the energies of the collisions will be much higher and we will have the

:16:30.:16:33.

capability to see if there are new things starting to show up. We will

:16:34.:16:39.

also look in great detail the Higgs particle that we have discovered. We

:16:40.:16:44.

want to make sure we understand it. Next year, all eyes will be on Atlas

:16:45.:16:49.

and Professor Charlton to see what they find next.

:16:50.:16:58.

As you said, everyone here is focused on getting things back up

:16:59.:17:01.

and running for next. Because everything is not switched on at the

:17:02.:17:04.

moment, it means we can get inside and show you bits of CERN you would

:17:05.:17:09.

not normally see, including the pieces that were made in the

:17:10.:17:12.

Midlands. They turned out to be really vital to the future of this

:17:13.:17:17.

experiment. More on that tomorrow. In the meantime, if you would like

:17:18.:17:20.

to visit CERN you can do so, and it is free to get in. They have

:17:21.:17:26.

thousands of visitors every year. Tomorrow, the King of Belgium will

:17:27.:17:30.

be visiting! I have put all the details on my Facebook page. There

:17:31.:17:41.

is even a local airline with direct flights to Geneva. To have a look at

:17:42.:17:42.

my blog. Over the last seven years,

:17:43.:17:51.

the UK has seen 330 new cinema screens opening and the industry

:17:52.:17:55.

seems in pretty good health. It's a change from the days

:17:56.:17:57.

when cinemas were shutting or being Satnam Rana reports from Shropshire

:17:58.:18:01.

now on plans to revive a former 1930s art deco picture palace and

:18:02.:18:07.

make it the heart of the community. Come here and you can buy shares

:18:08.:18:15.

in the proposed Each person expressing an interest

:18:16.:18:29.

can pledge a minimum of ?10. This is what the initial ?500,000

:18:30.:18:43.

will buy back into the community. The former Clifton cinema and

:18:44.:18:49.

adjoining shop. There is nothing beyond further full`time education.

:18:50.:18:53.

There is no for arts people to gather, to meet, to interact and

:18:54.:18:57.

enjoy each other's work, and there is nowhere for the public to get

:18:58.:19:00.

into the wider arts that they may not experience through the more

:19:01.:19:06.

popular shows that go on in many of the auditoria around here. The

:19:07.:19:15.

Clifton cinema first opened in 1937. The evacuation of the troops from

:19:16.:19:19.

Dunkirk was completed... During World War II, local people watched

:19:20.:19:24.

newsreels here. It finally closed in 1987. Local students could come down

:19:25.:19:31.

to Wellington, instead of travelling far. Dewsbury brought theirs back

:19:32.:19:37.

will stop yes, it would be nice to have the old cinema back.

:19:38.:19:44.

Campaigners are hoping memories rekindled will encourage people to

:19:45.:19:50.

pledge their money. Save far, ?23,000 has been raised, and the

:19:51.:19:54.

community share offer is open until the end of the year. This is an

:19:55.:19:57.

ambitious project, and the Clifton campaigners have a long way to go.

:19:58.:20:02.

But this is a project rooted in community spirit, with a belief that

:20:03.:20:07.

arts and culture needs to be made accessible to the people here and

:20:08.:20:08.

the surrounding areas. For the third successive year,

:20:09.:20:15.

Birmingham City Council has won Its exhibit, developed in

:20:16.:20:18.

partnership with the Royal British Legion, pays tribute to the city's

:20:19.:20:24.

involvement in World War One. The Queen was among those who

:20:25.:20:27.

admired the winning display. And it's not our only garden

:20:28.:20:30.

to get a medal this year. Our reporter Amy Cole is in

:20:31.:20:33.

Kings Heath Park in Birmingham with Our teams have done

:20:34.:20:36.

very well indeed. Now Birmingham City Council is

:20:37.:20:43.

in charge of a number of open spaces so it has a lot

:20:44.:20:45.

of horticultural expertise ` just what you need when you're putting

:20:46.:20:49.

together an exhibit for Chelsea. And they've done it again, another

:20:50.:20:53.

gold for the third year running for their exhibit which is based on

:20:54.:20:56.

the city's links to World War One. Yesterday, it had

:20:57.:21:01.

a very famous visitor, the Queen. She was seen walking through

:21:02.:21:06.

the trenches and Now after Chelsea, the City Council,

:21:07.:21:09.

who's worked with a number of sponsors, says the exhibit will

:21:10.:21:19.

be coming back to Birmingham. We are very lucky to have people who

:21:20.:21:32.

are able to sponsor the city. Every feature that we will use will be

:21:33.:21:38.

used again in Birmingham throughout the summer and the next four years.

:21:39.:21:44.

I've been told that the trench and the planes the Queen saw will be

:21:45.:21:48.

The Council wasn't the only team from our region to triumph.

:21:49.:21:53.

There was a gold for David Austin Roses,

:21:54.:21:55.

What was really lovely is that yesterday there were three

:21:56.:21:59.

generations of the Austin family at Chelsea ` the first time that's

:22:00.:22:02.

They were launching a new variety of rose,

:22:03.:22:06.

which has been named after David Austin junior's daughter, Olivia.

:22:07.:22:11.

The company now has 18 gold medals that its won

:22:12.:22:14.

Stoke on Trent City Council got a silver gilt, which I'm told is

:22:15.:22:22.

Its display cost a staggering ?450,000 and took 18

:22:23.:22:27.

And the team from Leamington Spa, which has featured quite heavily

:22:28.:22:35.

on Midlands Today, got a silver for their garden display.

:22:36.:22:39.

Sarah Horne was one of the designers, and she told me it

:22:40.:22:42.

was her first time working on such a large exhibit.

:22:43.:22:48.

So, really good results from some of our teams.

:22:49.:22:54.

Just to let you know that Birmingham City Council's exhibit

:22:55.:22:59.

will feature will as part of the Gardeners World road show at the NEC

:23:00.:23:03.

from 12th June before it's broken up and exhibited around the city.

:23:04.:23:07.

I guess it won't be too long before they start planning for next year.

:23:08.:23:27.

Thank you, Amy. I am glad it has stopped raining. It has been another

:23:28.:23:39.

warm day today, but can it go on? We will see more heavy showers

:23:40.:23:42.

through this evening, but there we could have done with those holding

:23:43.:23:46.

off until tonight, it does look as though tonight is going to be drier

:23:47.:23:51.

and Sarah. If you thought that the showers today were ferocious, we

:23:52.:23:55.

have got more heavy rain to come through Thursday. This will affect

:23:56.:24:00.

parts of Hereford, central parts and the south`east of the region. There

:24:01.:24:07.

is an early warning for that. Tomorrow we will be in between

:24:08.:24:14.

systems, and that means it will be fresher and cooler, and also drier,

:24:15.:24:18.

before this monster moves in from the south`east for Thursday. Right

:24:19.:24:24.

now, for this evening, we see, conditions across southern counties,

:24:25.:24:27.

but these heavier showers are gravitating towards the North. It

:24:28.:24:36.

will be much drier across the region during tomorrow. For towns and

:24:37.:24:40.

cities, temperatures will be a bit lower than last night. The coolest

:24:41.:24:47.

spot of the region is in Herefordshire and Worcestershire

:24:48.:24:51.

with lows of five Celsius. Even cooler than that in the countryside.

:24:52.:24:53.

There could be some pockets of missed developing into the morning.

:24:54.:24:59.

That will disperse very quickly as the sun gets to work. 20 of it

:25:00.:25:04.

around tomorrow. It is a much drier day with the odd isolated shower in

:25:05.:25:10.

places. If you are caught by those showers, they could be on the sharp

:25:11.:25:15.

side. Temperatures will still reach 18 or 19 Celsius. Through tomorrow

:25:16.:25:23.

night we see that area of very heavy rain come a torrential in places,

:25:24.:25:27.

starting to spill up from the south`east. Ahead of that, the cloud

:25:28.:25:35.

will thicken up, and it is going to be warmer tomorrow night, and then

:25:36.:25:36.

very wet for Thursday. The US coastguard agrees to resume

:25:37.:25:42.

its search for four missing British Average houses prices rise by 8%

:25:43.:25:46.

over the last year ` could they be Fare dodging on the increase `

:25:47.:25:51.

unions claim up to 20% of rail passengers are travelling

:25:52.:25:55.

without a ticket. And, the pioneering lung cancer

:25:56.:25:57.

research taking place Just before we go, congratulations

:25:58.:26:15.

to Worcestershire, who have now gone to the top of the tale in the

:26:16.:26:24.

championship. Talking about cricket, Schurrle and care are just of 12.

:26:25.:26:30.

Dash`macro Schuler and cut. Have a great evening. Bye`bye.

:26:31.:26:52.

Some people don't think real change in Europe is possible.

:26:53.:26:57.

Some people don't think real change is necessary.

:26:58.:27:00.

Some people don't think it's worth fighting for.

:27:01.:27:04.

But we want to make Europe work for Britain,

:27:05.:27:07.

and give you the final say with an in-out referendum in 2017.

:27:08.:27:12.

have made Britain's economy stronger and more competitive.

:27:13.:27:17.

a record number of people in work. And we're predicted to be

:27:18.:27:22.

the fastest-growing economy in the G7 this year.

:27:23.:27:27.

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