26/01/2018 World News Today


26/01/2018

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This is BBC World News Today.

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I'm Samantha Simmonds.

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Our top stories.

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Donald Trump tells world leaders -

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it's America first -

but NOT at the expense

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of the global economy.

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What Brexit Differences?

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The UK minister in charge denies

a government split on how to handle

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the departure from the EU

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Also in the programme.

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Paris braces itself for more

flooding with water levels set

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to peak this weekend.

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Hello and welcome

to World News Today.

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"America First does not mean

"America alone", that's the message

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from Donald Trump speaking

at the World Economic Forum

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in Davos in Switzerland.

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He told an audience of business

and political leaders that the US

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was doing "fantastically well"

and was "open for business."

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But he hit out at what he called

other countries' "predatory"

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trading practices.

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Earlier, the President said

he would be prepared to apologise

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for sharing social media posts

by the far-right

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group Britain First.

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Our North America Editor

Jon Sopel reports.

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Wherever Donald Trump has gone

in Davos, the crowds

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have gone with him.

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And wherever the cameras have

been, the President has

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been pleased to oblige.

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I hope we're going to bring

back many billions of

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dollars into the US.

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I think that will happen.

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It's already happening.

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But billions of dollars is coming

back into the US and I think

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that will just continue.

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How much today?

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How much?

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Probably a lot.

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And that was the theme

of his speech.

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America first, yes, but an America

welcoming the world.

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I will always put America first,

just like the leaders

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of other countries should

put their country first also.

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But America first does

not mean America alone.

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When the United States

grows, so does the world.

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But at the end of a week

in which the US imposed extra

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charges on some imported goods

from China, he played down

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talk of a trade war.

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Nevertheless, there was a warning.

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We cannot have free and open trade

if some countries exploit the system

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at the expense of others.

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We support free trade,

but it needs to be fair,

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and it needs to be reciprocal.

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Because in the end, unfair

trade undermines us all.

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Some stood to applaud,

but it wasn't the ovation given

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to President Xi of China last year.

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This hasn't been a complete meeting

of minds, but then again

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it was never going to be.

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That said, Donald Trump has been

more conciliatory than many

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would have expected,

and the audience have

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reacted more warmly.

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It may be that Davos 2018 turns

out to be a win-win.

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And the President was in

conciliatory, almost repentant mood

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over those Britain First anti-Muslim

retweets from last year that

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brought him to blows

with the Prime Minister.

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There's a lot they liked

about what Donald Trump said,

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and who would disagree

with his central message,

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that a booming US economy is good

for the global economy?

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Jon Sopel, BBC News, Davos.

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Well, President Trump

took a lot of credit

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for the robustness of the US

economy, claiming the share-market

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has risen by almost

50% under his tenure.

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That's not completely accurate,

but for the Dow Jones at least,

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it's a claim that isn't too far

off the mark.

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Let's bring in the

BBC's Yogita Limaye,

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who joins me from New York.

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Welcome to you, Yogita, let's get

first, the talk about the speech

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Davos, what did you make of the more

conciliatory tone that the President

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struck?

Most people noticed that it

was restrained. He was going to

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Davos literally after signing in the

US the approvals on the increase on

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the tariffs of sodas and in some

cases it was over %, quite a lot of

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money imported into the US.

Sores, that is sort of going to

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largely affect countries like China

and South Korea. So the actions were

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strong, quite harsh and questions

were put to him about whether or not

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he would trigger a trade war, then

goes to Davos to have a speech. Not

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a long speech. He stuck to the

script and when he spoke about

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America no longer turning a blind

eye to unfair trade practices, it

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was restrained in the sense he

talked about America first but

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specifically, he said that this is

not America alone. If we grow, so

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does the global economy. So it will

benefit everyone. So making a case

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and defending his stance.

In terms of the message of

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protecting American manufactures, we

are apacting an announcement on

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Bombardier, the plane industry,

explain that to us?

Yes, that's

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right. In about half an hour we are

expecting the international Federal

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Trade Commission in the US to vote

on that. The US commerce department

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has told them, or recommended to

them that Bombardier jets, when they

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are sold in America, that is a

Canadian company, that when their

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aircraft is sold in America, they

should have a 300% tariff imposed on

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them. At the centre of the dispute,

really, is a deal that Bombardier

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signed with delta airlines in 2016,

where they ordered 75 jets. Boeing

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777, a rival company, an American

company, they have disputed that,

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saying that Bombardier was able to

sell the jets cheaper, more than 30%

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cheaper than the market price

because of illegal subsidies that

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they received from the Canadian

government. But Bombardier are

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disputing that, saying it is not

uncommon for the companies that make

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aircraft to receive subsidies from

the government simply because of the

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costs involved in the operations.

And tell us about the American

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economy. They have had figures but

not quite the growth that Donald

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Trump was hoping for?

That's right,

they were expecting that the growth

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in 2017 would come in at 3% but the

number we have seen today is 2.6%.

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So it misses that streak that they

were hoping for. It would have been

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three-quarters of more than 3%

growth. We did hear Donald Trump

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talking of successes there on the

economy, on unemployment, which at

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4.1% is at a 17-year low. But many

contest this was a situation, that

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this was a position that the US

economy was reaching anyway and that

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the President shouldn't take credit

for it.

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For example, in jobs, he spoke about

creating lots of jobs in America but

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to give you a comparison, in 2016,

that was the last year of the Obama

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presidency, the US economy created

2.1 million jobs, in 2017, it was

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2.2 million jobs. So not a huge

increase. Unemployment, it was at

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4.8%. Yes it is down to 4.1% but

many say these are underlying

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factors that are there and we are

only seeing the outcome of it now.

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Meanwhile back in America -

reports in several newspapers claim

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President Trump tried to fire

the man investigating alleged

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collusion with Russia during

the 2016 Presidential election.

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It's alleged Mr Trump was only

stopped from sacking Robert Mueller

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by White House advisers.

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It's a claim the President addressed

head - on, in Davos.

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Did you want to fire Mr Mueller?

Fake news. It's called New York

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Times, fake news.

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It's called New York

Times, fake news.

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A short time ago I asked

the BBC's Gary O'Donoghue

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who might have leaked this

information, and why?

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There were stories at the time last

year that the President had

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considered firing Robert Mueller,

the special counsel and since then,

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what Robert Mueller has been doing

is interviewing a bunch of people,

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we are told that 20 staffers from

the White House have been spoken to

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by the special council and spoken to

Jeff Sessions, the Attorney General.

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So it is not entirely surprising if

some of that stuff started to leak

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out. We have seen the flat denial

from the President if he considered

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that but what is new is the idea

that when they floated or supposedly

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floated the idea last June that it

was the

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was the White House council --

council, the most senior lawyer,

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that he was the one that threatened

to resign and this is the new piece

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of information. It has everyone

concerned again whether or not he is

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still thinking about doing that. And

Democrats have been through to

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introduce legislation on Capitol

Hill that would prevent him from

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doing that, even though the legal

position suggests he would have a

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hard time doing it anyway.

You mention the Democrats, and there

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have been some political opponents,

say if he were to fire the counsel

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it woulding crossing the line and an

abuse of the perhap shall power? It

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looks like he would have to get

someone else to fire him for him. It

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could be the deputy general. He

could refuse to do that, then Donald

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Trump could fire the deputy general

and keep firing people until he

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finds someone to fire the special

counsel. But casting your mind back,

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Richard Nixon fired special

prosecutor during the Watergate

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affair and that didn't do him any

good at all.

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Now breaking news. Canadian

pharmaceutical billionaires Barry

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and Honey Sherman were murdered. The

couple were found hanged in their

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home. Officers ruled out the murder,

believing Mr Sherman killed his wife

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and hung her before hanging himself.

The coup's children disputed this

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and hired private investigators. Now

the police say that they agree.

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No-one has been charged with their

deaths.

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-- couple's.

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Britain's future relationship

with the European Union is again

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causing tensions in the country's

governing Conservative Party.

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The Chancellor of the Exchequer

Philip Hammond has suggested

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the relationship post-Brexit might

only be a little different from now.

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That's sparked an angry reaction

from those in the party who want

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a clean break from Europe.

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The minister in charge

of Brexit has denied a split

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and today outlined the government's

plans for the transition period

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after Britain leaves the EU.

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Alex Forsyth reports.

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In Teesside today, the Brexit

secretary was trying to calm

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troubled waters. Surrounded by

businesses, dependant on EU trade he

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promised certainty and continuity

when we leave. David Davis set out

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the government's plans for a

transition period of up to two years

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after Brexit.

This is a bridge to a new future

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partnership. When crucially, the

United Kingdom is outside of the

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single market and outside of the

customs union.

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He said that there would be no

dramatic change but the UK would

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start to talk trade with other

countries, or to be negotiated with

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the EU but for now it is comments by

his Cabinet colleague causing

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possible levels. The Chancellor

saying that there could be modest

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changes but if the Cabinet can't

agree on its position, how can you

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negotiate with Brussels?

I'm in

politics. People debate and have

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different views and diversive views

on the subject in all parties, it

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doesn't mean that we don't have or

can't have a coherent and forceful

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view in the interests of the United

Kingdom.

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Ministers don't always want their

divisions laid bare but the

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Chancellor insisted he would back

the Government's view.

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I was speaking about our trade

relationship with the EU. It is the

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Government's policy to maintain the

maximum possible access to markets

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and the minimum friction at our

borders.

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But the businesses Brexit will

affect say that the political

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discord is damaging. This car parts

manufacture in Redcar relies on

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being aim to import and export to

the EU, and the boss wants a are

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more clarity from the Government

about the long-term Brexit plan.

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I think it has been shambolic. I

want them to get on with it. From

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the contrary statements coming out

and the infighting that is happening

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I don't know what they are expecting

to achieve. I don't know what the

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targets are. It is just Werby washy.

Businesses like those here which

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rely heavily on trade with the EU

crave certainty. I Government says

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that is what the transition phase

will offer, the trouble is that the

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Conservative Party cannot agree on

what should come beyond. And as

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talks approach future trade

relation, what has been a packagile

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truce among the Tories looks rocky.

-- fragile.

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-- fragile.

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Let's take a look

at some of the other

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stories making the news.

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Residents in the South African city

of Cape Town have been warned

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to "save water as if your life

depends on it" to avoid

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the supply being shut off.

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A severe drought has seen

consumption limited to 50

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litres per person per day.

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Now officials are urging people

to switch off their toilet

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cisterns and limit flushing

to conserve water.

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Formal coalition talks

have begun in Germany

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to try to break four months

of political stalemate

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following September's

inconclusive elections.

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Chancellor Angela Merkel's

conservatives are seeking to form

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a government with the country's

second-biggest party,

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the centre-left Social Democrats.

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Top chefs from as far afield

as the US and Japan have

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attended the funeral in France

of one of the prime exponents

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of their art, Paul Bocuse.

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They filled Lyons cathedral

in their hundreds, dressed

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in their chefs' whites,

to pay homage to a man nicknamed

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the Pope of French gastronomy.

0:15:140:15:20

South Korean officials

are investigating a fire that

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swept through a hospital,

killing as many as 40 people.

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It took firefighters several

hours to put it out.

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The fire is the country's

deadliest in almost a decade.

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It's now emerged the building didn't

have any sprinklers -

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even though it was built only

a few years ago.

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Laura Bicker reports from Seoul.

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Black smoke billowed

from the emergency wing,

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as firefighters tried to get

to patients trapped inside.

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There were nearly 200

people in the building.

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Many were elderly.

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Those who escaped needed

urgent treatment.

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Others died on their

way to hospital, most

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from smoke inhalation.

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Firefighters said they did

everything they could.

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TRANSLATION: We prevented the fire

from spreading to the second floor

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in the early stages,

so that we could secure the second,

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third, fourth and fifth floors.

0:16:110:16:13

As crews inspect the blackened

shell of the hospital,

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it was revealed that no water

sprinklers had been installed.

0:16:190:16:21

This is the deadliest blaze

in a decade in South Korea,

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and the government said

there would be a thorough

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investigation.

0:16:260:16:29

TRANSLATION: The president has

ordered an investigation to figure

0:16:290:16:31

out the exact cause of the fire

and come up with measures to prevent

0:16:310:16:35

more fires at building complexes,

as well as preparing support

0:16:350:16:37

measures to promptly cope

with the personnel and property

0:16:370:16:40

damage caused by this fire.

0:16:400:16:43

Just last month, 29 people

were killed in a fire

0:16:430:16:46

in a sports centre in Sejong.

0:16:460:16:48

An inquiry found there were too

few emergency exits,

0:16:480:16:50

and it had been built

with flammable materials.

0:16:500:16:54

Questions are now being asked

about safety regulations

0:16:540:16:56

in South Korea, and what needs to be

done to prevent something

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like this happening again.

0:16:590:17:00

Laura Bicker, BBC News, Seoul.

0:17:000:17:08

It's been nearly four months

since the Kurds in Iraq held

0:17:080:17:11

a referendum on independence

for their oil-rich region.

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The referendum's result came

with an overwhelming majority

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voting for separation

from the rest of Iraq.

0:17:150:17:16

But things quickly deteriorated

from then, as the Iraqi forces took

0:17:160:17:20

control of the city of Kirkuk

from the Kurdish fighters.

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The Kurds had felt emboldened

in recent years due to their role

0:17:260:17:29

in the fight against so-called

Islamic State.

0:17:290:17:31

But it now seems as though they have

missed their moment in history.

0:17:310:17:34

Shaimaa Khalil sent this report

from Kirkuk with this report.

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On the road to Kirkuk, now back in

the hands of the Iraqi forces. For

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the last three years, the city has

been under the control of the

0:17:490:17:56

Kurdish Peshmerga fighters but then

lost it in a matter of hours a few

0:17:560:18:00

months ago. The Kurds here say that

they now live in fear. This is a

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25-year-old actress, saying that

prospects are bleak for the Kurds

0:18:060:18:08

after they voted for independence.

TRANSLATION: Things were stable and

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we used to feel safe in Kirkuk, then

the Iraqi Army and the popular

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mobilisation forces came in October

and we live in fear since then.

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We have had to leave home.

Who do you blame?

I blame the

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politicians for how we ended up. Our

political leaders did not act

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responsible.

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responsible. If

The once thriving

Iraqi/Kurdish region is now

0:18:470:18:52

suffering after the fierce response

to the referendum.

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The Kurds were involved in a key

role that in the battle against the

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so-called Islamic State. They

thought that they finally had their

0:19:000:19:04

moment but it was not meant to be.

Until recently, a Kurdish flag flew

0:19:040:19:10

here but it has been replaced by an

Iraqi one when the government forces

0:19:100:19:15

took control. Things have changed

dramatically for the Kurds after an

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independent vote. What seemed an

historic moment, turned out to be a

0:19:200:19:25

political gamble that the leadership

took and lost. The outgoing Kurdish

0:19:250:19:30

President, however, remains defiant.

TRANSLATION:

I said before and I

0:19:300:19:37

will say it again, I don't regret it

I don't regret the vote of 3 million

0:19:370:19:43

people.

You say it's been successful but in

0:19:430:19:47

reality it has not as the Kurdish

people suffered after the referendum

0:19:470:19:50

and you didn't do what you wanted?

TRANSLATION:

What is happening now

0:19:500:19:59

is the result of Baghdad and the

budget for the Kurdish people of

0:19:590:20:04

2014. Also, the fight against Daesh

came at an expense and the dramatic

0:20:040:20:12

cut in the oil prices has cost us a

lot. Remember, we

0:20:120:20:23

lot. Remember, we also have around 2

million

0:20:230:20:26

INAUDIBLE

So why call this a failure. Many

0:20:260:20:31

people in the Iraqi Kurdistan are

now struggle to make ends meet.

0:20:310:20:39

Welders in the workshop come from

there different ethnicities, Kurds,

0:20:390:20:47

Arabs and Turkmen.

Like many in Iraq's Kurdish region,

0:20:470:20:51

they have learned to live with

conflict and sun certainty.

0:20:510:21:00

Hundreds of people have been

evacuated from their homes in Paris

0:21:000:21:02

as the city braces itself

for more flooding.

0:21:020:21:04

Tunnels and roads have been sealed

off and the bottom floor

0:21:040:21:07

of the Louvre was closed.

0:21:070:21:08

Residents of this suburb

in the south of the city

0:21:080:21:10

were among the worst affected.

0:21:100:21:12

It follows the wettest

January in Northern France

0:21:120:21:14

for over a century.

0:21:140:21:15

And it's not over yet -

flood waters are expected

0:21:150:21:17

to peak this weekend.

0:21:170:21:18

The BBC's Hugh Schofield has been

stepping out to bring us the latest.

0:21:180:21:26

For the second time in a

year-and-a-half Paris is waking up

0:21:260:21:29

with its feet in the water. It was

June 2016, we were reporting almost

0:21:290:21:36

exactly the same story - heavy rain

upstream from Paris, the train wares

0:21:360:21:43

of the filling up with water, and

then this mass of water coming down

0:21:430:21:50

here to create localised flooding

here in the 16arondissement. Here

0:21:500:21:57

the ground flats have been boarded

up. These were flats. People lived

0:21:570:22:02

here, they have had to move out.

Across here, the commuter Network

0:22:020:22:10

Rail work comes in. This has been

shut down as it is flooded.

0:22:100:22:18

And the museum, the Louvre have once

again started to move precious item

0:22:180:22:24

from the basement to higher levels.

Every time there is a inadequate in

0:22:240:22:28

Paris, they ask if this is the big

one, there is a bigger one. Like in

0:22:280:22:34

1910. This peaked at six metres, it

is the norm, it is not the big one.

0:22:340:22:41

it is not the big one.

0:22:410:22:42

In just under a month's time,

the winners of this year's

0:22:420:22:45

British Academy Film Awards

will be announced.

0:22:450:22:46

Incredibly, former students

from just one British School have

0:22:460:22:49

received ten individual BAFTA

nominations - for films

0:22:490:22:51

including Darkest Hour,

Star Wars and Bladerunner 2049.

0:22:510:22:52

The BBC's Chi Chi Izundu went

to the National Film

0:22:520:22:55

and Television School to meet some

of the nominees

0:22:550:22:57

and current students.

0:22:570:23:04

The 1979 release of Alien,

the first film a graduate

0:23:040:23:07

from the National Film

and Television School

0:23:070:23:13

won a BAFTA for.

0:23:130:23:15

Skip forward to 2018 -

studying their craft

0:23:150:23:18

is very hands-on.

0:23:180:23:22

The courses here are so practical

93% of graduates get

0:23:220:23:24

a job in their specialism

within the industry,

0:23:240:23:27

just like Jessica Jones,

who graduated in 2016,

0:23:270:23:32

and is now nominated for a BAFTA

that's part of the music composition

0:23:320:23:35

team for Darkest Hour.

0:23:350:23:39

Lots of people don't know about it,

and it's sort of tucked away

0:23:390:23:42

in the middle of the country and,

yeah, but I think it used to be

0:23:420:23:46

studios so it is definitely the kind

of place where you meet

0:23:460:23:49

lots of different people

and you learn your trade

0:23:490:23:51

and you meet people learning

their craft, so you'll

0:23:510:23:53

meet cinematographers

and producers and editors,

0:23:530:23:55

and I'm still really close

with all those people now.

0:23:550:24:00

Our island, whatever

the cost may be...

0:24:000:24:02

Then there's the alumni.

0:24:020:24:03

The school maintains links

with those working in the industry

0:24:030:24:05

who regularly come back

to teach, like Oscar-winning

0:24:050:24:07

composer Dario Marianelli.

0:24:070:24:11

But I think the uniqueness

of the film school is

0:24:110:24:13

that the composition students

will work alongside the production

0:24:130:24:15

students and the director

students, and the writers.

0:24:150:24:23

Think of every big

British blockbuster,

0:24:240:24:26

from the Harry Potter franchise

right through to the Wallace

0:24:260:24:28

and Gromit animation series.

0:24:280:24:31

This school and its students

have had a hand in it.

0:24:310:24:33

The students even get to learn how

to build a set like this.

0:24:330:24:37

So far, graduates have managed

to scoop ten Oscars and 129 BAFTAs,

0:24:370:24:39

but for the first time the school

itself will be acknowledged

0:24:390:24:42

for its contribution.

0:24:420:24:49

It's not just film

and TV production.

0:24:490:24:52

Gaming, animation and model-making

are also points of pride

0:24:520:24:54

for staff and students.

0:24:540:24:59

To win the Outstanding Contribution

to Cinema Award, it's unbelievable,

0:24:590:25:01

and it's such a vote

of confidence in the school.

0:25:010:25:04

You know, for 47 years we've really

worked hard to provide the people

0:25:040:25:07

of the future of the film,

television and now games industries.

0:25:070:25:12

Britain still attracts

foreign film investment,

0:25:120:25:14

which is largely thanks to the broad

skill base of British movie-makers

0:25:140:25:18

which this school plays

a crucial role in providing.

0:25:180:25:21

Chi Chi Izundu, BBC News,

at the National Film

0:25:210:25:23

and Television School.

0:25:230:25:29

A discount on Nutella has led

to violent scenes in a chain

0:25:290:25:32

of French supermarkets,

as shoppers jostled

0:25:320:25:33

to grab a bargain.

0:25:330:25:40

Intermarche

0:25:400:25:43

supermarkets offered a seventy

percent discount on the

0:25:430:25:46

chocolate hazelnut spread.

0:25:460:25:48

Similar scenes have been reported

across France, with some

0:25:480:25:51

being described as "riots".

0:25:510:25:59

Don't forget you can get

in touch with me and some

0:25:590:26:05

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