10/02/2017 Newsround


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10/02/2017

Topical news magazine for children.


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Good afternoon, Ricky here with Friday's Newsround.

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First, hospitals are really busy at the moment, and lots of people

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think that's a big problem.

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So what does it mean for children who have to go there?

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Jenny's got the full story.

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It's the middle of winter, which means it's a very

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busy time of the year for the National Health Service,

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otherwise known as the NHS.

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People are worried it's now getting too busy

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and overcrowded in hospitals, and this means they're having

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to wait a really long time to be seen by a doctor.

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I've come to Sheffield Children's Hospital to meet a doctor who works

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in the emergency department to find out what's going on.

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Is it true, are hospitals getting busier, and especially

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at this time of year?

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Yes, they are getting busier, and year on year we see

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bigger numbers coming, but there is also an increase

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in the winter, which is part of the winter pressures,

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but we are prepared for those, we know they're coming.

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How does this affect children?

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If you're seriously injured, will you still get seen?

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Of course, we have a system called triage, which basically means

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sorting, so when you come through the door you're put

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into a category depending on how severe the nurse or doctor

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thinks your problem is.

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If you were to come to our department tomorrow

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and you were seriously ill or injured, you'd be

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seen straight away.

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If you came with a less urgent problem you might wait a while,

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but you would definitely get seen.

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OK, yes, hospitals are getting busier, but that doesn't

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mean that you won't get seen.

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So what's it actually like having to come into hospital?

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Meet Lily and Jake.

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Jake had to come into hospital when he thought

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he'd broken his thumb.

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And Lily came in after getting bitten by a dog.

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What's it like coming to the hospital?

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Well, when I came there weren't too many people there,

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there were a few seats taken but generally it was quite quick.

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Within ten minutes I was into the x-ray room

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with the doctors and stuff.

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It was quite a different experience for you, though, Lily.

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Can you tell us what happened?

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I got bitten by a dog out of a car window.

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It took quite a long time to get here, then it was quite busy.

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All the chairs were full up.

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There were a lot of people there because it was on a weekend

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and it took quite a long time to get seen, but I eventually did get seen.

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So, what can be done?

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Well, the Government have been criticised by doctors,

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who argue that part of the problem is that patients who are well enough

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to leave hospital can't because they aren't being given

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enough support on the outside.

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The Government say they know that hospitals are very

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busy at the moment but that, despite this, the hospitals

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are coping pretty well.

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Next, rescuers are trying to save 100 pilot whales that have

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become stranded on a beach in New Zealand.

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Around 400 of the animals became stuck and sadly

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many have died.

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Rescuers have been working through the night to try to save the rest.

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It's the worst case of this type the country has ever seen.

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It's not uncommon for these animals to become beached like this,

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but why does it happen?

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Beaching is when whales becomes stuck on sand,

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and it can be very dangerous.

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Marine scientists don't have one clear reason

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to explain why it happens.

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Here are some of the theories.

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It's thought some whales become stranded because they are sick

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or injured and pushed in shore by currents or are

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simply too old to swim.

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Whales rely on something called sonar to work out where

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they are and where they are going.

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They send out sound waves or pulses which bounce

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back off surfaces.

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Some ships use sonar pulses too which have been linked to whales

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getting stranded and marine scientists think if the two cross

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paths the whales could become confused and injured.

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It's thought changes in the environment can cause them

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to behave differently too.

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Perhaps food stocks are low, temperatures are unusually

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high or low or the water they are in has become polluted.

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And even whales make mistakes.

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It's thought they can sometimes lose their way into shallow waters

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by accident while travelling to warmer waters to mate.

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Whales are very sociable creatures and often travel

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in large pods or groups.

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But marine scientists think if one is affected by any of the last four

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reasons then others travelling with it will copy them.

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After 112 years Dippy the Dinosaur has finally left his home

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at the Natural History Museum in London.

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He had to be taken apart bone by bone by a team of six people and,

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just in case you're wondering, that's 292 bones in total,

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so it took them quite a bit of time.

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He will now be cleaned and repaired before starting

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a tour of the UK in 2018.

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Goodbye for now, Dippy.

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That's all from me.

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