Hay-on-Wye 18 Bargain Hunt


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Hay-on-Wye 18

Antiques challenge. Tim Wonnacott presides over the action in Hay-on-Wye. The red and blue teams are joined by experts Charles Hanson and Jonathan Pratt.


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Today we're in Hay-on-Wye,

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a town more commonly known for its bookshops, rather than its antiques.

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So, today's swashbuckling adventure story

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features the highs and lows of finding treasures

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against all the odds.

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Are you ready for chapter one?

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Right, let's go bargain hunting! Oh, yes.

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In amongst this town of books,

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our Red and Blue teams have just one hour and £300

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to find their three bargains.

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Let's have a quick peek at what's coming up.

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Today's teams aren't keen on their expert's suggestions.

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-We don't like it.

-Not particularly, no.

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I think it's hideous, but, if it's going to make us money, I love it.

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But who will prove victorious at the auction?

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Let's meet the teams.

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On Bargain Hunt today, we have two happily-married couples.

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We have Ryan and Jane for the Reds and Maggie and Neil for the Blues.

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-Hello, everyone!

-ALL:

-Hello!

-Hello. How lovely to see you.

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Now, Ryan, you've had an incredibly successful career in education.

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Tell us all about it.

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Well, I became head, eventually, in the school where I had been a pupil.

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But you got an award for your services to education.

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-Tell us about that.

-Well, I had an OBE,

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but I have to say that whatever success we had as a school

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was due to an awful lot of people, as is very often the case.

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You're very sweet to spread the praise around others.

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-Now, Jane, you're retired.

-I am.

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What did you do before you hung up your boots?

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Well, I worked in a bank

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and, then, when I had the children, I went and worked

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in a very well-known high street store for 25 years.

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-25 years there?

-25 years.

-Very good.

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And, so, why are you two going to make such a great team for us today

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-on Bargain Hunt?

-Well, after almost 40 years of marriage,

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and we've known each other longer than that,

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we're about to get it together.

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It's taken that amount of time, but we think we've got something going.

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-Right.

-So we'll do all right today, I think.

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OK, well, we'll hold you to that. I'm sure you'll do incredibly well

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and it's lovely to see you on the show today.

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Now, Blues, apparently wood plays a big part in your life.

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-Is that right, Neil?

-It is. Certainly, yes, yes.

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I was a full-time wood sculptor for quite a few years.

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And do you carve on commission or do you do it speculatively to sell?

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At the moment, I do it speculatively.

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I'm sort of keeping my hand in at the moment.

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-Keeping your blade in, really, aren't you?

-Yes, I am. Yes.

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That's cutting-edge stuff.

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-Now, Maggie, you've been married to Neil for five years.

-Yep.

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Tell me about your interest in environmental biology.

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I used to teach. I love learning.

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The one qualification I hadn't got was a first degree,

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so I went to uni as a slightly mature student,

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thoroughly enjoyed my three years

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and got a degree in environmental biology.

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So, will you be shopping for green things today on Bargain Hunt?

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Not necessarily. It would be nice to find something wood for Neil.

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I'm going to make all the decisions and he's going to agree with me.

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-OK, fine.

-Very true.

-Well, that seems to be organised. Good.

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-Now, the money moment. Here's your £300. £300. There we go.

-Thank you!

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You know the rules. Your experts await, and off you go!

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Very, very, very good luck.

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Environmentalists, eh?

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Now, let's meet our experts.

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Trying to uncover hidden profit for the Reds is Jonathan Pratt.

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And horsing around with the Blues is Charles Hanson.

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So, what's on the shopping list today?

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Well, I'm going to go... I think we're both going to go

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-for things that we like.

-Something good.

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Something that people will want.

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Well, after 40 years of marriage, I've learnt

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- as long as I agree with what she's got, then we're OK.

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Find a very cheap piece of Lalique and sell it for thousands.

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OK, teams, your 60 minutes starts now.

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And, with plenty on offer in the shops here,

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you'll be spoilt for choice.

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Now, what have the Reds spotted here?

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-It's the chair that's £35, I think.

-It's the chair that's £35.

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I thought it was a bit of value.

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Wishful thinking, Jane.

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That's my first mistake.

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Fear not, it happens to all of us.

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Now, are the Blues doing any better?

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That wonderful mirror down there, and the heart shape.

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To reflect the romance. You've been married... What now? Four years?

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-Five years.

-Five years.

-Just five years.

-Yes.

-It's Victorian.

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-Would you like to have a look?

-Is it quite expensive?

-It's about £800.

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-Say again.

-£800.

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Perhaps, on reflection, that's just a bit too pricey for our budget.

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Now, someone put the kettle on.

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It seems Jonathan and the Reds think it's time for tea.

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This is something which looks rather nice and very modern still.

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-No, I like that.

-It's white, which is fashionable now.

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-Yeah, I like white.

-It's Shelley. Really good potters.

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They started producing at the start of the 20th century.

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I mean, you wouldn't necessarily drink a great deal out of it,

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but it's complete with a teapot. It's pretty, isn't it?

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-Is it the set?

-It's the set, yes.

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So you've got two, four, six, so six cups.

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Six cups and saucers, presumably a cream jug, milk jug, a teapot.

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I mean, it's quite a complete thing and...

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ANTIQUES RATTLE

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And a broken ladle if you're not careful, JP.

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If we could get the whole set for, gosh, £60, you know,

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that would be a good deal. Do you want to have a look or do you want

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-to start seeing if you can find a price?

-I'd like that.

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You'd like that? OK.

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So, time to get into haggle mode.

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-Hi, Glenys.

-Hello.

-Would you...

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-Hello.

-Jane's spotted this little tea service.

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It's a nice Shelley service, but we've noticed you've priced it up

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all individually, as well as...

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-Presumably, you have a price for the whole lot.

-I'll...

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This isn't mine, but I can find out off the owner

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what she would do for the complete set.

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If you could you could give her a call.

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Ideally, what we'd like to make an offer is...

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We'll be cheeky to start with

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-because she doesn't have to accept it. We'll say £60.

-OK.

-OK?

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-I'll find out for you.

-Thanks very much.

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Are you happy with that?

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That's a great tea service for £60. It really is.

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While Jonathan and the Reds await price news,

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how the Blues getting on further down the street?

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-I wasn't planning on looking at jewellery at all today.

-Really?

-Yes.

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-Why?

-Because it never seems to do well at auction.

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-How much is it, out of interest?

-It's £95.

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Yes, and, again, it's lovely

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and that's a really good retail buy, but, at auction, it could be slippy,

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-Neil, and you know what slippy means, don't you?

-Yes.

-What's that?

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It means that the price is a lot lower

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-than what you would expect it to be.

-Yes, exactly. Exactly. But gorgeous.

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-Gorgeous. Yes.

-OK, let's keep going.

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Yeah, keep on going, Blues.

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Meanwhile, Glenys has some breaking price news.

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The best price is £85.

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Oops! A little bit more than they were hoping for.

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Oh, right. Let's have a think about that.

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You might see something else you really like more than this,

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but, if you don't, then you say, "I really want that.

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"Let's see if we can get it for 70."

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Time to move on, Reds.

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Down the street, Charles and the Blues are stirring up some action.

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Paul, there's a pair of spoons in that cabinet along there.

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May we see them very quickly before we go? They were quite nice.

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I think they're German or French, but they're European, for sure.

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-Here we go.

-Yeah, they are nice.

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Now, if I was going to put my oar into this shop...

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These are quite nice spoons.

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I was hoping they were English, but the hallmarks on here,

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-they are foreign.

-They're very light.

-They are.

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They're marked 830, which means 830 parts of 1,000 are silver.

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-Rather than the English 825.

-Exactly.

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And they're marked Arts & Crafts silver spoons, maker "GU",

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and they're circa 1900. They've got a nice organic feel about them.

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-They're quite tactile, aren't they?

-They are.

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They've got a really sort of planished feel about them,

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and, if I said to Paul in that superb red jacket...

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-Who's looking very handsome.

-Very handsome man.

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What's your best price?

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-How much is on them?

-Eh?

-£78.

-I would like to bid £40.

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39. Because of the prices in auction, if they do hit the 40...

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We'll, at least, get a pound profit.

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Good bit of haggling, team.

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-39 and a hug.

-OK, yeah.

-Give the man a hug! There we are!

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-Thank you very much!

-Good man.

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And, with that, you've bought your first item.

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Back to the antique centre,

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and the Reds have spotted something interesting.

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It's a little card and bridge scorer.

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This isn't a bad thing to pick up. It's functional.

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It's very nice. There's a lot of people who play bridge.

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It's very useful, but, then, the inside is

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nicely made, but it is, you know, plywood.

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I think it's just a neat bit of shedwork.

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Perhaps it's a card player who is also a handy person with timber

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and it's something he wanted and he's made it for himself.

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Would it make any money, do you think?

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It's £38, which I would think's quite...

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£25. £25, you'll get 45 for it.

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You know, it's £38.

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I think, even if you bought it on face value,

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at auction, you could stand a chance of a small profit.

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-I think we need to ask Glenys again, don't we?

-Right.

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-Glenys!

-Yes!

-Hi! Could we borrow you?

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We need to keep the lovely Glenys, not just borrow her.

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This little piece here, which is the little card and bridge scorer,

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they're asking £38 and I think Jane would like to ask...

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I was going to say 15.

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-I could do 20.

-So it's yours, is it?

-It is, yes.

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That's a stroke of luck.

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-We now have... We can...

-We'd make a profit on 15, though, I think.

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Yeah, well, I think it will on 20, actually, wouldn't you?

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-What about 17?

-Go on, then.

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-Oh, great.

-Shake the lady's hand.

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It's a contract.

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Well done, Reds. That's your first purchase. Thanks, Glenys.

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So, it's now one all.

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The Blues are rushing over to another shop

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to see what treasures may be lurking elsewhere.

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We're now a third of the way through shopping time,

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but what's Charles found here?

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In this letter... Little box here,

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you've got the Gothic style with the quatrefoil motifs.

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It would up have had a panel here,

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perhaps with a message on or whatever else.

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Maybe even a mirror, who knows?

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But, of course, it's nice,

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Gothic lancet dividers for your letters to go within.

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-Is it old?

-Yeah, I think it is.

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I think it would probably date to around 1900-1910,

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so it's what you might call Edwardian, perhaps late Victorian,

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and it just has a real style, and what I like, Neil,

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knowing your interest in wood, look at that grain.

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-Yes.

-Isn't that wonderful?

-It is.

-Which is?

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-Oak.

-Quartersawn.

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-Quite right.

-Quartersawn oak, yeah.

-God, you are getting technical now.

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-Sorry! That's what caught my eye.

-Quartersawn oak.

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Get you, Mags.

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It isn't cheap, because it's priced at £125.

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Yeah, it's not grabbing me at that price, I'm afraid.

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At what price, Madam, could you grab this man at?

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-Take a chance.

-75.

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Oh, I say! That's good. That's really good.

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If I was buying that for myself, that's the kind of price I would pay

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for this because I can appreciate all the work and the carving.

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Pure and simply and objectively, if it goes to auction,

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it would make, probably, between £60 and £90, so...

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There's a chance of a profit.

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There's the chance of a profit at 75.

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-And there's no wincing at all?

-No.

-There's no begging whatsoever?

-70?

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-No! No!

-No, no.

-It's a gorgeous box.

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-Shall we walk round the shop?

-Yes!

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Have a think, Blues.

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I know I've said this before,

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but this shopping lark is always much harder than it looks.

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Time is ticking.

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Oh, dear.

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We've got, literally, 20 minutes to go.

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We've done half of downstairs, do the other half.

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-We've got two things to find, Neil.

-Yes.

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Then, we can go and have a look in one of the other two shops.

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Let's make a move, OK?

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The Blues are off again. Watch out, Reds, they're coming your way.

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Time for a team chat with JP.

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We've had 42 minutes now and we have only got the one item.

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-It's not as easy as you thought, is it?

-It is not as easy as I thought.

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OK, but you have seen the tea service

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and I think, probably, what I'll do is

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- I'll leave you just to have a little look around,

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I'm going to find Glenys and see if I can get it down a little bit more,

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maybe, see if you can agree.

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If we can, then we've got two items and I think, then,

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we should wander off and maybe have a look in another shop.

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-What do you think?

-Great.

-OK, right, have a good look around,

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shout if you think you need me, OK, otherwise I'll be off.

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-Right.

-Great.

-Lovely.

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Good thinking, JP.

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-That's quite nice, team. Look at this, Neil.

-Blimey.

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-It's French porcelain.

-Right.

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-JP, stop snooping!

-Look at that.

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KNOCK ON WINDOW

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Oh! Jonathan Pratt! Get out of here!

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-What have you got?

-Get out of here!

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You know, technically, JP, like me, is a serious hunter, OK,

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and we hunt until the hour's kill is done.

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Bargains can be found if you look hard enough.

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It's a shame. Can you see we've got some flaking of the enamel,

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but what I like about this is you've got a really rich floral arrangement

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on a wonderful silver ground and, to me, it oozes quality.

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It's French porcelain.

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You've got this old scratch mark through the body

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of this really high-fired hard paste and Paris porcelain, like Chinese,

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is a very glassy paste and that, to me, just has quality.

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I would say to you, "It's only priced at £15.

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"It's almost too cheap." I'm not a cheap guy. I want to buy quality.

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-Yes!

-Am I a cheap guy?

-No.

-No.

-Thanks a lot.

-No. Not at all.

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-Look at that jacket.

-Exactly. Thanks a lot.

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So, you know, that could be a tenner,

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and, to me, at auction, it's probably worth £30 or £40.

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-Really?

-Yeah, I do. Yeah. What flowers are they?

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-Fuchsias.

-Are they really?

-Yeah, I've got lots of them in my garden.

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I've got a couple of pots. They're the only flowers I've got.

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I like fuchsias! I like roses!

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I think it's hideous, but if it's going to make us money, I love it.

0:14:580:15:01

Don't hold back then, Mags. Just speak your mind, love.

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Shall we see if we can, perhaps, buy it for £10,

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and at least it gives us one more in the bag.

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-Yes.

-Yes.

-One less.

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So, while Neil goes off to get a price,

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what's happening with the Reds?

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OK, chaps.

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-Anything here?

-No.

-No, OK.

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Come on, JP. Spit it out.

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The short of it is

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- £80 is the lowest offer she's willing to accept.

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-And time is running out.

-We'll go for it.

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-Yes?

-Yes.

-OK, fab. I'll find Glenys and we'll say yes to that.

-Yes.

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Two down, we need one more to go

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and I think we need to run to another shop, yeah?

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-Yes.

-Fab. Come on, then.

0:15:420:15:43

Sounds like a plan, JP. So, the Reds make their second purchase.

0:15:430:15:47

Well done.

0:15:470:15:48

But what's the price news on the Blue's porcelain bowl?

0:15:480:15:51

-Is it your plate?

-It is.

-Is it? Oh, it's not! Is it really? Yes.

0:15:510:15:55

-Country of origin?

-I don't know, being honest.

-OK, OK, j'adore.

0:15:550:16:00

-That's a clue.

-French.

-Je t'aime. I love you and the plate.

0:16:000:16:04

-You old smoothie.

-What's the best price on that?

0:16:040:16:07

-What have I got? 15?

-15.

0:16:070:16:10

-I'll do 10 for you.

-There we go. I think that's a dead cert.

0:16:100:16:14

With time now down to ten minutes, I would say, "je t'aime".

0:16:140:16:17

-You're in a rush.

-Thank you! Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:16:170:16:23

Well done, Blues. That's your second purchase in the bag.

0:16:230:16:26

With ten minutes to go, the Reds are looking very cool and calm

0:16:260:16:29

as they head to the shop the Blues were in earlier.

0:16:290:16:32

Will they spot the letterbox

0:16:320:16:34

or find something else they might be more suited to?

0:16:340:16:37

Look at this. Portly old gent.

0:16:370:16:40

That's rather a polite way of saying...

0:16:400:16:44

Jane doesn't look that impressed.

0:16:440:16:47

People buy them for their dressing rooms.

0:16:470:16:50

It's got some age.

0:16:500:16:52

It's been used and it's for a tailor.

0:16:530:16:55

You wouldn't see those now, would you?

0:16:550:16:57

Well, the stripe and stuff on it, it's quite stylish,

0:16:570:17:00

and if you have, if you imagine, you've got a large house

0:17:000:17:03

and you've got a dressing room and, if you just put this on a side table

0:17:030:17:06

or if you had it on a stand, you just slip your jacket off

0:17:060:17:08

and it's there to hang your jacket on.

0:17:080:17:11

You could put your jacket on here, Ryan.

0:17:110:17:14

She's picking on you, Ryan.

0:17:140:17:15

What do you think, Ryan?

0:17:170:17:19

Didn't immediately grab me, but the more you say what you're saying,

0:17:190:17:23

the more it's growing on me, but I'm still not entirely convinced.

0:17:230:17:27

The question is - will it make some money?

0:17:270:17:29

If you got it at £80, you have a chance.

0:17:290:17:32

Could be a slim chance, JP.

0:17:320:17:34

Now, what's Charles found here?

0:17:340:17:36

Turn of the century, a boxed and complete...

0:17:380:17:40

Knowing your sculptural qualities,

0:17:400:17:43

before the checkmate in the hour, look at that. Isn't that nice?

0:17:430:17:47

-A little chess set.

-It is.

-What timber's that?

-Looks like it's a...

0:17:470:17:51

-Sycamore.

-..prickwood or sycamore. It's very light.

0:17:510:17:54

I wasn't sure, judging from these pieces, how old they are,

0:17:540:17:57

but look at the bases. They've got some age.

0:17:570:17:59

To me, if it's complete, it's quite a pretty set,

0:17:590:18:03

albeit in a wrong box, but the box comes with it, as well.

0:18:030:18:08

If I said to you, team, do you prefer this chess set

0:18:080:18:11

-or the Gothic letterbox, your answer would be...

-The letterbox.

0:18:110:18:15

-Because we've got six minutes to go. Yours would be...

-Letterbox.

-Really?

0:18:150:18:19

-Yes.

-What about you?

-I quite like this, if the price was right.

0:18:190:18:22

This belongs to a lady called Sarah. Just echo the word Sarah!

0:18:220:18:25

-Sarah!

-Sarah!

-Sarah!

0:18:250:18:27

Like a good game of chess, this needs a tactical approach.

0:18:270:18:30

-Hello. We love your box...

-Thank you.

-..of chess pieces.

0:18:300:18:34

-Can I ask you the famous question which is...

-What's your best offer?

0:18:340:18:38

-What's on it?

-65.

0:18:380:18:40

-What were you thinking?

-As little as possible.

0:18:400:18:43

-What's your best price? Sarah, we're just humble people.

-50?

0:18:430:18:48

The pressure's mounting, Blues, and, with time fast running out,

0:18:480:18:51

the Reds haven't ruled out the portly manikin.

0:18:510:18:54

-Hi, is it Sally?

-It is.

-Hi, Sally.

-Hello.

0:18:540:18:57

Ignoring this label here, really, an offer of £60...

0:18:570:19:02

Would you accept £60?

0:19:020:19:04

If it's a no-no, then we need to find something else,

0:19:040:19:07

but, quite honestly, we are not likely to spend £60.

0:19:070:19:09

And you wouldn't do 70? It just gives me a little bit of profit.

0:19:090:19:14

65?

0:19:140:19:15

I'll stick to 70, I'm afraid.

0:19:150:19:17

-You don't like it?

-Not particularly, no.

0:19:170:19:22

You're not saying much, Ryan. Now, have the Blues reached a stalemate?

0:19:220:19:27

This, to me, has more secure investment

0:19:270:19:30

if it could be around £40.

0:19:300:19:33

-45.

-45. OK.

0:19:330:19:35

You've got this at 45 or the box at 75.

0:19:350:19:41

-I still prefer the box.

-Do you really?

-Yeah.

0:19:410:19:46

Time's almost up. You need to make a decision.

0:19:460:19:48

We've got two minutes, we're standing here, so...

0:19:480:19:51

Do you think that it'll...

0:19:510:19:52

I don't want to have to eat my words,

0:19:540:19:56

but I think it'll be all right, which is why I stopped at it.

0:19:560:20:00

Right. Well, we'll listen to the expert. Woe betide you.

0:20:000:20:06

Well done, Reds. All three items bought.

0:20:060:20:08

If it's still there, then get that bought, otherwise...

0:20:100:20:13

-Let's go box-hunting!

-We've got two objects.

0:20:130:20:16

-We went Gothic when we got married! We'll go Gothic now!

-Move! Move!

0:20:160:20:19

Let's go! Let's go! Quick!

0:20:190:20:22

-Quick, quick, quick!

-Right, come on!

0:20:220:20:24

-It's this way!

-This way and down there! You two run! You two run!

0:20:240:20:28

I'll catch you up!

0:20:280:20:30

Look in the window!

0:20:300:20:32

Yeah, it's still there! It's still there!

0:20:320:20:35

In the nick of time, The blues make it back to the shop.

0:20:350:20:38

-So, Sally, your very best price is...

-75.

0:20:380:20:41

-Look at me.

-75.

0:20:410:20:42

-We'll take it. Thanks a lot.

-Wahey!

-Wahey! The hour's done!

0:20:420:20:46

Thanks a lot. Thanks a lot.

0:20:460:20:48

-Can we have a cup of tea now?

-Course we can. Yeah. Milk and sugar.

0:20:480:20:52

I think I need some sugar, personally. Come on.

0:20:520:20:55

You've done it, Blues. Well done. Time waits for no man.

0:20:550:20:59

Your time is up.

0:20:590:21:02

Let's check out what the Red team bought, eh?

0:21:020:21:05

They're gambling on this pollard-oak and coromandel-veneered games box

0:21:050:21:10

which was acquired for £17...

0:21:100:21:12

..the Shelley white dainty-shaped part tea service was £80...

0:21:130:21:18

..and, finally, they fashioned £70

0:21:200:21:23

on this 19th-century retailer's bust.

0:21:230:21:26

-Well, team, that was fun, wasn't it?

-Yes. Great fun.

-Did you have fun?

0:21:260:21:29

-Lots of fun.

-Which is your favourite piece, Ryan?

-The mannequin.

0:21:290:21:33

How come, because you were incredibly dubious about that,

0:21:330:21:36

-weren't you?

-My wife says it reminds her of me.

0:21:360:21:39

Well that's nice, isn't it?

0:21:390:21:41

-That's my favourite item.

-OK.

0:21:410:21:42

-And which is going to bring the biggest profit?

-Oh, the mannequin.

0:21:420:21:46

-The mannequin.

-LAUGHTER

0:21:460:21:48

What are you like, eh?

0:21:480:21:49

-OK, fine, and how much did you spend?

-167.

-Very nice number.

0:21:490:21:52

-I'd like £133, please...

-There you go.

-..leftover lolly. Thank you very much.

0:21:520:21:56

Lovely. £133 going over to JP. It's your favourite moment.

0:21:560:22:00

-Thank you very much. Yes, it is.

-What are you going to buy, JP?

0:22:000:22:03

I'm not going to blow the lot, but I've got a few, I don't know,

0:22:030:22:06

-maybe a few moves I can use.

-Oh, really? Moves.

-A few moves.

0:22:060:22:09

-We need those moves.

-We'll try and decode that for a minute or two.

0:22:090:22:13

Meanwhile, why don't we check out what the Blue Team bought, eh?

0:22:130:22:16

This pair of Norwegian silver dessert spoons cost them £39.

0:22:170:22:21

The late 19th century Paris porcelain display bowl

0:22:240:22:27

set them back £10.

0:22:270:22:29

And finally, the oak Gothic revival country house letterbox was

0:22:320:22:36

a first-class delivery at £75.

0:22:360:22:39

Well, what fun, hey?

0:22:390:22:41

-Yes. Absolutely brilliant.

-I'm glad you enjoyed it.

-We did.

0:22:410:22:44

-Good on you, Neil. Now, Mags, which is your favourite piece?

-The spoons.

0:22:440:22:48

And are they going to bring the biggest profit?

0:22:480:22:50

-I think they are, yes.

-Oh!

0:22:500:22:53

-OK, fine, brilliant. Now, how much did you spend?

-£124.

0:22:530:22:58

-I would like £176 of leftover lolly, please.

-OK, there's 100...

0:22:580:23:03

-..and there is the extra pound.

-OK. Well, there we go, Charles.

0:23:040:23:08

-Thanks, Tim.

-Spend it wisely.

0:23:080:23:10

Are you anticipating any particular purchase or

0:23:100:23:13

are you just going to go out there freestyle?

0:23:130:23:15

Tim, we've had a hoot, and I'm thinking something flowery

0:23:150:23:18

and something that might just ebb and flow a bit at auction.

0:23:180:23:22

Sorry.

0:23:220:23:24

-Really?

-Yes.

-Oh, how airy fairy can you be, Charles?

0:23:240:23:27

Anyway, good luck, my dear friend.

0:23:270:23:29

Right, let's head off to Shropshire, as I want to show

0:23:290:23:32

you something very special.

0:23:320:23:34

I'm outside the Shrewsbury Museum, in the heart of Shropshire.

0:23:400:23:44

Did you know that once upon a time this county was celebrated

0:23:440:23:48

as a centre for the production of ceramics and porcelain?

0:23:480:23:52

And behind these walls is a prized collection of Caughley porcelain,

0:23:520:23:57

the first produced in this county.

0:23:570:24:00

Together with Coalport,

0:24:000:24:01

a name still celebrated around the world today.

0:24:010:24:05

Let's have a quick bird's eye, shall we?

0:24:050:24:07

You might think this looks somewhat familiar.

0:24:110:24:13

Curator Emma-Kate Lanyon can tell us more.

0:24:130:24:17

Now, as far as Caughley is concerned, I have to say, if we look

0:24:170:24:21

at the contents of this cabinet, it looks remarkably like Worcester.

0:24:210:24:25

It is very similar, it's that beautiful blue and white.

0:24:250:24:29

And in fact Thomas Turner, that established the porcelain works,

0:24:290:24:33

-came from Worcester.

-So, Emma-Kate, what have we got here on the table?

0:24:330:24:36

Well, we've got a lovely large piece of Caughley here that is

0:24:360:24:41

one of their oriental patterns, the Nanking pattern, which was named

0:24:410:24:45

after the port in China where all the Chinese wares were coming out of.

0:24:450:24:49

Caughley, of course, were copying these in transfer printed,

0:24:490:24:52

-and wanted to give them the cachet of the name, I think.

-Very clever.

0:24:520:24:55

-The piece next door looks very continental to me.

-It does indeed.

0:24:550:25:00

This is where Caughley start to move away, in the sort of 1760s, to

0:25:000:25:05

more continental designs,

0:25:050:25:08

so they were copying some of the French porcelain factories, like Chantilly.

0:25:080:25:12

And what do you call that particular piece?

0:25:120:25:15

This is called a monteith, and what you would do is you would fill

0:25:150:25:17

the middle with ice, and to rinse and cool your glass down

0:25:170:25:21

you would just place it in these little folds round the edge,

0:25:210:25:25

-and that would cool your glass down nicely for you.

-Very nice, too.

0:25:250:25:29

I'm feeling thirsty at the thought. So what happened to Caughley, then?

0:25:290:25:33

Well, after the Continental styles, they started to move into more

0:25:330:25:37

decorative wares and go for colours, but they lost their way a little bit.

0:25:370:25:42

And eventually, in 1799, Thomas Turner decided to call it a day

0:25:420:25:47

and he sold the works to John Rose, who then establish Coalport.

0:25:470:25:52

And talking of Coalport...

0:25:520:25:54

Coalport, as a factory, basically ran from the

0:26:000:26:03

1790s until the 1920s.

0:26:030:26:06

-And the look of this stuff is very different, isn't it?

-It is.

0:26:060:26:10

We are now going into really colourful, elaborate wares,

0:26:100:26:14

and really no country house was complete without a piece of this.

0:26:140:26:18

And they're on a huge scale

0:26:180:26:20

-and manufactured to the absolute top quality standards, right?

-Yes.

0:26:200:26:26

If you look at the workmanship in just modelling,

0:26:260:26:29

let alone the painting, it's quite incredible.

0:26:290:26:32

No, absolutely drop-dead gorgeous.

0:26:320:26:34

So, Emma-Kate, what is so special about this Coalport pot?

0:26:380:26:41

This beautiful piece was decorated by John Randall.

0:26:410:26:44

He was known as the Grand Old Man of Shropshire,

0:26:440:26:47

and he worked for Coalport from 1835 onwards.

0:26:470:26:52

And ornithology was his speciality, was it?

0:26:520:26:55

It was one of his many specialities.

0:26:550:26:57

He was very interested in birds and studied them.

0:26:570:27:00

He was also quite a keen biologist

0:27:000:27:04

-and even went on to run a post office, locally.

-Did he really?

0:27:040:27:07

-Multifaceted gentleman.

-What's amazing is his skill as an artist.

0:27:070:27:12

It's not always recognised for being somebody who just painted ceramics.

0:27:120:27:17

-Exactly.

-He was incredibly talented.

0:27:170:27:19

If he'd been an artist in watercolour or oil on canvas or something,

0:27:190:27:24

-he could have gone to a completely different place.

-Indeed.

0:27:240:27:26

Anyway, it's been fascinating to talk to you.

0:27:260:27:29

Thank you very much for our tour of Shropshire porcelains.

0:27:290:27:33

It's been fascinating.

0:27:330:27:34

But right now, I think it's time for us to shove off to the auction.

0:27:340:27:38

We're still in Shrewsbury

0:27:460:27:47

and at Halls saleroom with auctioneer Andrew Beeston.

0:27:470:27:51

-Andrew.

-Hello, Tim.

-Nice to see you.

0:27:510:27:54

What a mixture we've got here. First up is this

0:27:540:27:57

1930s games box.

0:27:570:28:01

Mmm. A little bit scratch-built.

0:28:010:28:04

-With veneered ply board.

-And made by a man in a shed.

0:28:040:28:08

Basically, yeah.

0:28:080:28:10

The nice thing about it is you've got your suit changer here,

0:28:100:28:13

haven't you, which is quite nice. It's nicely made.

0:28:130:28:16

-What's your estimate?

-30 to 50, as an attractive,

0:28:160:28:19

-probably sort of desk ornament, or something like that.

-Exactly.

0:28:190:28:22

That's perfect because £17 was paid, so that was cheap enough at £17.

0:28:220:28:26

Next is a whole group of this Shelley white ware.

0:28:260:28:31

You've seen the group. Is this saleable, this plain, white stuff?

0:28:310:28:35

N... If it didn't say Shelley on the bottom we'd be struggling,

0:28:350:28:38

-we really would.

-Oh, right.

-So we are hoping the brand will sell it.

0:28:380:28:42

-The pattern and colour won't.

-OK.

0:28:440:28:46

Well, it looks remarkably dull to me.

0:28:460:28:48

-What's your estimate on this group?

-Quite wide. 50 to 100.

0:28:480:28:52

Well, they paid 80.

0:28:520:28:54

-I think we seriously have to cross our legs here.

-We will.

-We will.

0:28:540:28:57

Anyway, talking about crossing things,

0:28:570:28:59

how did you get on with this tailor's dummy?

0:28:590:29:02

Proportions look quite large, but I measured it at 43 inches,

0:29:020:29:06

which is actually slimmer than me.

0:29:060:29:09

-I was a little bit worried by that.

-HE LAUGHS

0:29:110:29:13

-So, 43 inches across the chest?

-Yeah.

0:29:130:29:16

OK, fine. How much is it going to bring, do you think?

0:29:160:29:18

I think 40 to 60.

0:29:180:29:20

Something that is useful for displaying a sort of tweed

0:29:200:29:24

-jacket... In any vintage outfit....

-Exactly.

0:29:240:29:28

So it's a shop fitting, really. Anyway, the team paid £70.

0:29:280:29:33

So it seems to me they may have paid a bit too much for that and a bit too much on the Shelley,

0:29:330:29:36

in which case they are going to need their bonus buy, so let's go have a look at it!

0:29:360:29:40

Right then, team. This is fun, isn't it?

0:29:410:29:43

You gave the lovely JP £133 of leftover lolly.

0:29:430:29:47

-JP, what did you buy?

-Here it comes.

0:29:470:29:50

'Aye, aye, that's the chess set the Blues nearly bought!'

0:29:520:29:55

The shape of it is sort of Staunton style, and

0:29:550:29:58

Staunton style is a bit of a classic, a chap called Howard Staunton, in the 19th century.

0:29:580:30:01

And I think I'm right in saying, JP, that the

0:30:010:30:04

Staunton pattern is a favourite pattern for chairmanship play, isn't it?

0:30:040:30:08

-Yes.

-How much did you pay?

-Well, how much did you leave me, again?

0:30:080:30:12

133, I think it was.

0:30:120:30:15

If I told you it cost me...

0:30:150:30:18

-£43.

-Oh, I like it.

-What?!

0:30:180:30:20

-I like it.

-Well done.

-£43?

-£43.

0:30:200:30:24

-I wouldn't have liked it if it was 133.

-For £43,

0:30:240:30:26

and I think this is a little bit of a steal for £43.

0:30:260:30:29

I'd pay £43 for them every day of the week for myself.

0:30:290:30:32

-Well done.

-Just ask him how much he thinks he's going to make.

0:30:320:30:35

Yeah, how much do you think it's...

0:30:350:30:37

-Yeah, good, nice questions...

-Yeah, an excellent question actually!

0:30:370:30:40

Uh...this is a no-brainer and I think you could double your money.

0:30:400:30:43

-Ooh!

-Right, so that's £80.

0:30:430:30:45

-There's a nice prediction, isn't there?

-Fantastic.

0:30:450:30:47

-An exciting object and everybody's keen.

-Yes, really pleased.

0:30:470:30:50

Now for the audience at home,

0:30:500:30:51

let's find out whether the auctioneer is that keen.

0:30:510:30:54

A Staunton Pattern schoolroom chess set,

0:30:570:31:00

accredited to Nathaniel Cook in 1849,

0:31:000:31:04

but this is a later example, turn of the century.

0:31:040:31:07

The chess pieces have got that used well-worn look,

0:31:070:31:12

which actually can be popular.

0:31:120:31:14

-I'm hopeful on this one.

-Oh, good.

0:31:140:31:17

-What's your estimate?

-70 to 100.

0:31:170:31:19

Oh, JP will love you forever.

0:31:190:31:21

£43 he paid.

0:31:210:31:24

And, you never know,

0:31:240:31:26

that could result in a knockout blow for the Reds,

0:31:260:31:28

which would be marvellous.

0:31:280:31:30

Now for the Blues, with their Norwegian spoons.

0:31:300:31:33

Only two of them and because they're Norwegian,

0:31:330:31:36

I don't think they're particularly special, do you?

0:31:360:31:38

-No...and 830 grade silver, it's low-grade silver...

-Low-grade.

0:31:380:31:42

..it doesn't come up to British assayed standards.

0:31:420:31:45

-Not British standards, no, no.

-No, not at all.

0:31:450:31:47

Absolutely right.

0:31:470:31:49

-No, we soon dissed that lot then. Great!

-Ha-ha.

0:31:490:31:52

-What's the estimate?

-Uh, 40 to 60.

-Really?

0:31:520:31:55

They're decorative, um, maybe a bit hopeful, but we will see.

0:31:550:31:59

Hope springs eternal. They paid £39.

0:31:590:32:03

-Hopefully on the money.

-OK, fine.

0:32:030:32:05

Well, it's going to be a close call.

0:32:050:32:07

Next is the Paris porcelain plate,

0:32:070:32:10

painted with those lovely flowers.

0:32:100:32:12

-Do you rate that?

-I did...

0:32:120:32:15

But on closer inspection not as much now.

0:32:150:32:18

I originally put, you know, quite a punchy estimate on this, but...

0:32:180:32:22

-What was your estimate?

-It was 50-70, but...

-No!

0:32:220:32:25

Yeah... but having looked at it now,

0:32:250:32:27

there's lots of scratching...

0:32:270:32:30

-You've gone off it a bit.

-Yes, basically.

-OK.

0:32:300:32:33

-Do you want to revise your estimate?

-I'm thinking, sort of, £20-£30.

0:32:330:32:37

Are you? That's OK, Andrew, honestly.

0:32:370:32:40

£20-£30, they'd be so chuffed with that

0:32:400:32:42

-cos they only pay £10 for it.

-Oh, well. It stands a chance.

0:32:420:32:44

Exactly. And Charles led them into this and he'd be delighted.

0:32:440:32:47

Anything north of £10 and you'll have cheers from the audience.

0:32:470:32:50

-I would hope we'll get there.

-Exactly.

0:32:500:32:52

Now, finally, we get to the Gothic style letterbox

0:32:520:32:56

and these are very popular bits of country house kit, aren't they?

0:32:560:33:00

They are and a good one will do really well.

0:33:000:33:03

-Like hundreds?

-Oh, yes.

0:33:030:33:05

I think the most I've sold one for is about 1,500.

0:33:050:33:10

-Really?

-Yes.

0:33:100:33:11

So this one's going to make 1,500, is it?

0:33:110:33:14

A good one will do well, um...

0:33:140:33:16

Is this a good one?

0:33:160:33:17

-Unfortunately not.

-Oh, dear.

0:33:170:33:19

This isn't Pugin. It really isn't.

0:33:190:33:21

No, no. It's, um, possibly off the end of a pew.

0:33:210:33:24

And what's that panel for at the back?

0:33:240:33:26

That is for the times when the post is collected by

0:33:260:33:31

the butler and run down to the post office, basically.

0:33:310:33:35

OK, fine. Well, there it is. It is what it is, it's in oak.

0:33:350:33:38

-What do you think it is worth?

-£40-£60.

-OK, £75 paid.

0:33:380:33:42

So that could be a bit light.

0:33:420:33:45

On the other hand, if people get really excited about the Paris plate like you did

0:33:450:33:48

and the Norwegian spoons,

0:33:480:33:51

they may get out of trouble and not need their bonus buy,

0:33:510:33:54

but I fancy they are going to need it,

0:33:540:33:56

in which case let's go and have a bird's eye.

0:33:560:33:58

-Now, Maggie, Neil, this is exciting, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:33:590:34:02

You gave Charles £176. Whatever did you find, Charles?

0:34:020:34:06

Tim, I always like to spend the majority

0:34:060:34:08

and sometimes you find a really good buy

0:34:080:34:11

and I think this is a really good buy. There.

0:34:110:34:14

-The case is wonderful.

-What is it?

-That's lovely.

0:34:140:34:17

You think, "What's within?" Hold your eyes, it will sparkle.

0:34:170:34:20

-Oh, wow.

-Look at that.

-That's pretty.

0:34:200:34:23

I just can't believe this.

0:34:230:34:25

It's hallmarked for London, 1883,

0:34:250:34:29

a complete christening set with christening cup

0:34:290:34:32

in the aesthetic style,

0:34:320:34:35

with the fork and spoon, as well, in this wonderful case,

0:34:350:34:39

gilded interior to the cup...

0:34:390:34:42

-Look.

-And I couldn't believe it, Tim, for 125.

-125?

0:34:420:34:45

-125? Beautiful.

-Is a profit in it?

0:34:450:34:48

Well, that's key...

0:34:480:34:51

-There must be.

-And I quite agree with you, I would like to think,

0:34:510:34:55

hand on heart,

0:34:550:34:57

it will make between, I hope,

0:34:570:34:59

£150 and £200.

0:34:590:35:03

Because if this was in London,

0:35:030:35:04

-in an arcade and it was Christmas time...

-Yes.

-..it could be £750.

0:35:040:35:09

-It's beautiful.

-Well done, Charles.

0:35:090:35:11

And, of course, the case,

0:35:110:35:13

-the interior of the case does go with your hair.

-It does.

0:35:130:35:15

That's why I quite liked it, yes.

0:35:150:35:18

Anyway, let's find out, for the audience at home

0:35:180:35:20

right now, what the auctioneer thinks about Charles' christening set.

0:35:200:35:24

Now, Andrew. What do you make of this?

0:35:240:35:26

Er, London hallmark for George Mosley Jackson,

0:35:260:35:31

dated 1883.

0:35:310:35:33

That was the first year

0:35:330:35:35

that they were having silver assayed as silversmiths,

0:35:350:35:38

so it's an early piece for that silversmith.

0:35:380:35:42

So we've got a spoon and a fork and this little mug.

0:35:420:35:45

Just the job for a christening present.

0:35:450:35:47

I have to say it's a particularly nice example. What's your estimate?

0:35:470:35:51

I like that in at 100 to 150.

0:35:510:35:53

100 to 150, very good.

0:35:530:35:55

-Well, Charles paid £125 which is probably bang on the money.

-It is.

0:35:550:35:59

And, who knows, they may turn a small profit on it

0:35:590:36:02

-if the team decide to go with it.

-Yep.

0:36:020:36:04

Brilliant, thank you very much, Andrew.

0:36:040:36:06

We'll look forward to the auction in a moment

0:36:060:36:08

with, um, nervous anticipation.

0:36:080:36:10

Bidding starts.

0:36:110:36:13

At 460...465...

0:36:130:36:15

-Brian, Jane. This is exciting, isn't it?

-Very.

0:36:180:36:21

First up is your games box.

0:36:210:36:23

And here it comes.

0:36:230:36:25

Lot number 176, the pollard oak

0:36:250:36:28

and coromandel veneered games box,

0:36:280:36:31

lot number 176.

0:36:310:36:33

Start the bidding £20. 20?

0:36:330:36:35

20? 20 bid, £20. 25, 30...

0:36:350:36:39

-Hey.

-'35.'

-Look at this!

0:36:390:36:40

BRIAN: Keep going.

0:36:400:36:42

-40, 45, 50...

-'Yes.'

-£50 gets you now.

0:36:420:36:45

Another bid, 55. 55 standing, 60 on the internet.

0:36:450:36:49

Fantastic.

0:36:490:36:50

£60, internet bidder, make no mistakes,

0:36:500:36:53

you're out in the room... At 65, well done.

0:36:530:36:56

Well done, fantastic.

0:36:560:36:59

65, out on the net, 70? 70.

0:36:590:37:01

Thank you, anyway. £70, Internet bidder.

0:37:010:37:05

At £70...sold.

0:37:050:37:08

So you have plus £53.

0:37:080:37:10

£53! That's amazing.

0:37:100:37:14

Now, the dainty tea set.

0:37:140:37:15

Straight away I am bid 30, £35. At £35 for the Shelley,

0:37:150:37:19

I'll take 40. At 40, well done.

0:37:190:37:21

-Good, good. Keep going.

-'50.'

-Oh!

0:37:210:37:23

50, 55, it's Shelley. Another five?

0:37:230:37:27

At £55, bid with me at 55?

0:37:270:37:31

-That's minus £25...

-We should have got our colouring pencils out!

0:37:310:37:34

..which means you are plus £28.

0:37:340:37:36

-You're still plus 28.

-Yes.

0:37:360:37:39

Now, here comes the bust.

0:37:390:37:41

For the mannequin, start the bidding, £20, 20?

0:37:410:37:44

20... Find another, £20.

0:37:440:37:47

20, you don't see these every day.

0:37:470:37:49

25 on the internet. BRIAN: Oh, we're going.

0:37:490:37:52

Internet bid, 25.

0:37:520:37:53

£25 bidding, 30 on the internet.

0:37:530:37:55

5?

0:37:550:37:57

40 on the net.

0:37:570:37:58

-Another bid?

-Come on!

0:37:580:38:00

40, it's an internet bid at 40. At £40, at 40?

0:38:000:38:04

Which is minus £30. You had plus 28, now you are minus two.

0:38:050:38:09

-We've got the chess set, come on.

-It has been a slow decline.

0:38:090:38:12

-Yes, indeed.

-What are we going to do about the chess set?

0:38:120:38:15

-There is only one move to make here, isn't there?

-Yes, indeed.

0:38:150:38:17

-Definitely.

-We go for it.

-We're going with the chess set.

0:38:170:38:20

I can tell you the auctioneer's estimate is £70-£100.

0:38:200:38:22

He rates this chess set.

0:38:220:38:24

-You paid £43, JP, this should be your vindication.

-Oh, I hope so.

0:38:240:38:28

Oh, I hope so, too. And here it comes.

0:38:280:38:30

Start me 50... £50 for the chess set.

0:38:300:38:33

£50? Nope? 50...£30?

0:38:330:38:35

£30, £30 is bid.

0:38:350:38:37

At 35? 35, internet bidder at £35.

0:38:370:38:41

£35, make no mistakes... Fair warning at £35.

0:38:410:38:48

£35.

0:38:480:38:50

-Well, it's less than a third of his estimate.

-Yeah.

0:38:500:38:52

35 to 45 is minus eight.

0:38:520:38:54

It was minus two, that means minus ten. There you go, kids.

0:38:540:38:58

A disappointment, I have to say, on the end,

0:38:580:39:00

but it could still be a winning score.

0:39:000:39:02

Let's be optimistic.

0:39:020:39:03

-Don't say a word to the Blues.

-Not a word.

0:39:030:39:05

Now, Maggie, Neil.

0:39:100:39:12

-Do you know how the Reds got on?

-BOTH: No!

0:39:120:39:14

Good, we don't want you to know.

0:39:140:39:16

Now, first up are the Norwegian spoons and here they come.

0:39:160:39:19

Ooh, here we go.

0:39:190:39:20

We will start the bidding at £20, 20.

0:39:200:39:22

-Come on, let's go.

-'£20 at the start.'

0:39:220:39:24

£20 bid, take the five.

0:39:240:39:26

At 25 on the internet.

0:39:260:39:28

-'£25 internet bidder.'

-Go on!

-Just one more.

0:39:280:39:30

At £25, make no mistakes, at £25.

0:39:300:39:35

25 is minus 14, OK.

0:39:350:39:38

Now, let's not burst into tears about it,

0:39:390:39:41

cos here comes the Paris porcelain plate.

0:39:410:39:43

Start the bidding £30, 30?

0:39:430:39:46

'20 to start me.'

0:39:460:39:47

-Come on!

-Let's go.

-'20?'

0:39:470:39:49

Who's got £10?

0:39:490:39:51

-I don't believe it.

-'£10 to start the bidding.'

0:39:510:39:53

£10 on the internet. Internet bidder at ten.

0:39:530:39:56

15 on the internet.

0:39:560:39:58

Come on, net.

0:39:580:40:00

At £15, bidding on the internet, at 15.

0:40:000:40:04

Plus £5.

0:40:050:40:07

OK, you were minus 14, you're now minus nine.

0:40:070:40:09

-Perfect.

-You're climbing.

0:40:090:40:11

-Now...

-Climbing, yes.

-You're reducing your losses.

-We are.

0:40:110:40:13

Now here comes the letterbox.

0:40:130:40:15

-'Commission bid...'

-Come on, let's go!

0:40:150:40:17

-'30, 5, 40...'

-Come on!

0:40:170:40:19

45, at £45, 50 I'll take it.

0:40:190:40:22

45. 55 on the internet

0:40:220:40:25

60 on the net.

0:40:250:40:27

£60, internet bid at 60, clears the commission bids at 60.

0:40:270:40:31

Internet bidding at £60, at 60.

0:40:310:40:35

Minus £15. Sorry, team, that is minus £24.

0:40:350:40:39

Now, what are we going to do about the christening set?

0:40:390:40:41

-Are we going to go with it?

-We started with nothing...

0:40:410:40:44

-We'll go home with less.

-We'll go home with even less.

0:40:440:40:46

-We have faith in Charles.

-Let's wet the baby's head, Tim, let's wet it.

0:40:460:40:49

I love it. I think it's beautiful. Yes.

0:40:490:40:51

Well, the decision is made, the die is cast and thanks, team.

0:40:510:40:54

I just have to tell you the auctioneer's estimate is 100-150.

0:40:540:40:57

-He sees your 125 sitting in the middle...

-Middle, yep.

0:40:570:41:01

..of his estimate, so that's fair enough. Now, here we go then.

0:41:010:41:04

We're going with the bonus buy and here it comes.

0:41:040:41:07

Start the bidding nice and quickly, £60.

0:41:070:41:09

-'60?'

-Come on!

-'Should be in at that.'

0:41:090:41:12

£60. 60 I'm bid. It's in 5, 70, 75...

0:41:120:41:17

-Come on!

-'75 for the internet bid.'

-Oh!

0:41:170:41:20

£80, well done, £80 right at the back.

0:41:200:41:23

-85 on the internet.

-'Ooh!'

0:41:230:41:25

Let's keep going.

0:41:250:41:26

'Internet bid at 85.'

0:41:260:41:28

£85, internet bidder, make no mistakes...

0:41:280:41:30

-Going!

-'Fair warning...'

-I don't believe it.

0:41:300:41:32

..at 85...

0:41:320:41:34

-It's gone.

-Gone.

-Sorry.

-Minus £40...

0:41:340:41:36

-It's all right.

-..which means overall you're minus £64.

0:41:360:41:39

MAGGIE SIGHS

0:41:390:41:40

Which means, after today's performance,

0:41:400:41:42

that could be a winning score.

0:41:420:41:44

So say nothing to the Reds and all will be revealed in a moment, all right. OK.

0:41:440:41:47

Very sporting of you. Thank you, team. You're very sporting people.

0:41:470:41:50

-It's OK.

-Give us a hug.

0:41:500:41:52

OK, chaps. Have you been chatting to one another about the scores?

0:41:570:41:59

-ALL: No, not at all.

-Just as well,

0:41:590:42:01

because I'm afraid we're not handing out any dosh today, all right?

0:42:010:42:05

-Come on!

-There are no profits today.

0:42:050:42:06

-Come on!

-It's just a question of the scale of the losses

0:42:060:42:09

and the team that have got a whopping great lump of loss,

0:42:090:42:13

I'm afraid, are the Blues.

0:42:130:42:15

THE REDS: Yeah! THE BLUES: Oh!

0:42:150:42:17

-THEY ALL LAUGH

-OK?

-Yeah.

0:42:170:42:19

-Minus £64.

-Oh!

-Oh, dear.

0:42:190:42:22

Despite making a fiver on your Paris bowl,

0:42:220:42:25

nothing was going to save you from the avalanche of losses,

0:42:250:42:28

-really, was it?

-ALL: No.

0:42:280:42:30

And does it really matter?

0:42:300:42:31

-No!

-Not terribly.

-It's a shame.

-We've had great fun.

0:42:310:42:34

-You've had great fun? That is, frankly, what it's all about.

-It is.

0:42:340:42:37

Your oppos, over here,

0:42:370:42:39

have managed to survive with only £10 worth of losses.

0:42:390:42:42

-MAGGIE:

-Yay, well done.

0:42:420:42:44

They started out with £53 of profits

0:42:440:42:46

and gradually eroded your way through that little nest egg, right?

0:42:460:42:51

-Yep.

-And finish up as victors today

0:42:510:42:53

by only losing £10.

0:42:530:42:55

-Is that cool?

-That's brilliant.

-Fantastic.

-A huge relief.

0:42:550:42:59

-I think it's seriously cool.

-Huge relief!

0:42:590:43:01

I think it's so cool, we've had such a great time,

0:43:010:43:03

why don't you join us soon

0:43:030:43:04

-for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:43:040:43:06

Bargain Hunt heads to Hay-on-Wye to scour the town's antique shops. Tim Wonnacott presides over the action and the red and blue teams are joined by experts Charles Hanson and Jonathan Pratt.

Tim also finds time to visit Shrewsbury Museum before heading to auction.