05/01/2017 Look East (West)


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05/01/2017

Latest news for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Milton Keynes and Northants.


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Hello, welcome to Thursday's Look East.

:00:10.:00:12.

Coming up in the programme, sent home from A,

:00:13.:00:14.

found dead hours later, the hospital apologises

:00:15.:00:16.

Kind and gentle, tributes to two young Cambridgeshire men killed

:00:17.:00:24.

It's not something that I wanted to believe.

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And now it's something, I'm going to miss them both.

:00:30.:00:33.

Access issues, are there enough disabled facilities on the region's

:00:34.:00:35.

And I will be exploring one of Cambridge's hidden treasures.

:00:36.:00:40.

Very little has changed in this terraced house

:00:41.:00:42.

First tonight - she went to A complaining of leg pains -

:00:43.:00:54.

But she was sent home with painkillers, only

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An inquest today heard that Joan Hawes actually had

:01:00.:01:05.

Addenbrooke's Hospital has apologised.

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Our reporter Mike Cartwright is there now - Mike.

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Last July, Joan Hawes arrived here with a swollen knee and in terrible

:01:15.:01:21.

pain. She thought correctly it was caused by a blood clot but staff

:01:22.:01:27.

here did not find it. Instead, they discharged and advised her not to

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climb stairs. The next morning, downstairs in her home, they found

:01:32.:01:32.

her dead. Joan Hawes, 77, who told nurses

:01:33.:01:35.

the pain in her knee But instead, ligament

:01:36.:01:37.

strain was misdiagnosed Arriving at the inquest,

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her daughters and a family friend. Steven, her son, drove his mother

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to Addenbrooke's that morning. She was in terrible pain,

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he said, her knee swollen. His mother repeatedly telling staff,

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a blood clot was to blame. The inquest told a nurse had

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ordered blood tests to look for a deep vein thrombosis -

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a clot, but when Joan saw nurse practitioner Andrew Carr,

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there was no information If he had known there

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were concerns about clots, he said he would have referred Joan

:02:13.:02:18.

to other medical staff. But instead, he gave her

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painkillers and sent her home. Later learning blood tests had been

:02:23.:02:25.

ordered, he cancelled them. Their solicitor today

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spoke for them. The family are understandably deeply

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distressed at what has happened to Mrs Hawes -

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an otherwise fit and healthy woman. They were looking to the inquest

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for answers and in some respects, the admissions from Addenbrooke's

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have gone a long way But the inquest still has

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an important function to perform and the conclusions will help

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further illuminate this tragedy. The hospital Trust says

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an investigation was carried out to make sure lessons could be

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learned from what happened to Joan and a detailed action plan put

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in place to improve the way deep vein thrombosis is

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recognised and treated. Their mother died at home

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sometime during the night. Her death brought on by a blood clot

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that medical staff failed to find. Joan had been a healthy person,

:03:13.:03:26.

today, the coroner concluded she died of natural causes, but in that

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conclusion, he also noted that when she arrived at Addenbrooke's with a

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painful knee, he said she was not referred to a member of the medical

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team and the deep-vein thrombosis in her left calf went undetected.

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Friends of the two men killed in an apparent hit and run incident

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near Peterborough have been paying tribute to them today.

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The victims who have been named locally as Thomas Northam

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and Thomas Fletcher were walking along the B1091 near

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Yaxley on Tuesday morning when they were struck by a BMW.

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Today the local vicar said the men will be remembered

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in a service this Sunday. Stuart Ratcliffe reports.

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Two days on from this apparent hit and run,

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and tributes are still being laid at the scene where two men named

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locally as Thomas Fletcher and Thomas Northam, were killed.

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It is no exaggeration to say that there is still a real sense

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of horror here in Yaxley at what took place on Tuesday.

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And from the people I have spoken to, it is clear that both young

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men were well known, well liked and well loved.

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Earlier this afternoon, I spoke to Thomas Fletcher's mum,

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who told me she still can't believe what has happened.

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And she told me that her son had only just returned from holiday

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The two men were walking between Yaxley and Facet

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The driver of which then fled the scene on foot.

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And for friends of the men, emotions are understandably

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Tom Northam was the best friend I've ever had.

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We spent birthdays together, went on holiday together,

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always talked, spent a lot of time together.

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Tom Northam was funny, he always knew how to make everyone smile.

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When I found out, I finished work and my friend told me straight away,

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It is not something I wanted to believe.

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And now it is something, I'm going to miss them both.

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Yaxley has a strong and vibrant community spirit.

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And this weekend, prayers will also be said in the village church.

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It is just desperate, desperate sadness.

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We didn't know the families at the time but now we know

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who they are, just a desperate sense of loss and just a desire to reach

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out to these families, we will be offering to support them

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and as I said already, we will be praying for

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them and doing whatever we can to support them.

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Earlier this week, a 38-year-old man was arrested 80 miles away in Essex

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on suspicion of causing death by dangerous driving

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He is now being questioned by officers in Cambridgeshire.

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Next tonight, the new study which suggests that living

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near a busy road might lead to an increased risk

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The study, which was carried out in Canada, followed more

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than six million people over a decade.

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It found that those who lived within 50 metres of a major traffic

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hub were up to 12% more likely to be diagnosed with Alzheimer's

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The findings suggest exhaust fumes and traffic noise may be factors.

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Alzheimer's Research UK is based in Cambridgeshire,

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How do fumes and traffic noise affect the brain to such

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an extent that Alzheimer's disease could develop?

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We have just been able to find out there is a link between the two,

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between living by a road and potentially having a higher risk of

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dementia. It could be something like noise disrupting sleep which could

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be important for brain functions, perhaps some of the air pollutants

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can aggravate some of the processes that go on in the brain. We don't

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know yet from this research. Should we be wearing

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breathing masks, getting Bib the risks that they found was

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small and we still don't quite understand what they mean. What we

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do know about dementia is that there are other risk factors people can

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modify, things like heart health, keeping mentally and physically

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active, not smoking, a balanced diet. Those risk factors may have

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more benefits for people. Do you know where the traffic factor plays

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in with those others? Is it more likely to have a factor than smoking

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or obesity? Age is the biggest rip factor -- risk factor for dementia.

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We can't do anything about that. Things like smoking, controlling

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high blood pressure, they are probably the factors that have the

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best evidence behind them, where this fits in, at the moment, much

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lower down and still more to really fully understand what it means. On

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the traffic factor, it could be a bit of a rich- poor divide. People

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living in an urban area might not have the money to move? There are

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many factors why people live where they do and social factors can be an

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important one, and can also influence the risk of dementia.

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There is little people can do about that so I think for us and

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Alzheimer's research UK, yes we need to understand the risk factors but

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we also need to understand those we can do something about more easily

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and help to encourage people to do those kinds of things. This latest

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research carried out in Canada but how will it feed into the work you

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are doing in Cambridge? We're funding research all the UK and we

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are now launching a prevention fund as well which is looking at how we

:09:09.:09:12.

can fund research into these risk factors and potentially modifiable

:09:13.:09:15.

risk factors so any new research that comes out helps to grow the

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evidence base that will inform future research in this area. Do big

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headlines help you get funding? They do, people talking about dementia,

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large and robust studies like this help is to identify trends, they are

:09:30.:09:33.

very important because they get people talking about dementia and

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identify new avenues to explore. So we need to encourage more and more

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research to be done. Thank you. An inquest has heard how a husband

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was caught on camera shooting his wife in the head.

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Stephen Muncaster killed his wife Allison at their home

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near King's Lynn. His body was found in the garden

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of the property with Today a coroner concluded

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Mrs Muncaster was unlawfully killed. Allison Muncaster's cousins leave

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today's inquest in Norwich with perhaps some sense of closure,

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knowing she was unlawfully killed. Late one night last year,

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in the remote village of Magdalen, neighbours heard gunshots

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at the home where she lived A tent covers the spot

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where his body was found. Allison, who was 48,

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was found dead inside the house. At the inquest, Detective Constable

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Jeremy Pitt said CCTV cameras installed in the house had recorded

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the last fateful moments. Just before midnight,

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both appeared to be very upset. Moments later, Stephen

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is seen retrieving his A minute later, he entered

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the sitting room and aimed it Allison tried to run

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but was shot in the head. It is thought he then left the house

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before turning the gun on himself. There was no audio on that CCTV

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recording so we don't know why the couple appeared to be so upset

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shortly before the fatal shooting. What we do know is that

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Stephen Muncaster had placed the shotgun under a bed earlier that

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day, so there is every indication that this may well have been

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a premeditated killing. I think we can conclusively say that

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Stephen Muncaster killed Allison, He has got a firearms

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shotgun licence. That shotgun was within the house

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and it was recovered by Stephen Stephen Muncaster was the uncle

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of Michael Carroll and he was at the dustman's side when he picked

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up his multi-million pound Mr Carroll was then living

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in Magdalen with him and Mr Muncaster's first wife

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Kelly, pictured here. He was said to be very

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close to the couple. After a short inquest,

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the coroner concluded that Allison Muncaster had been

:11:45.:11:47.

unlawfully killed and and extended her sympathies

:11:48.:11:51.

to Mrs Muncaster's family. The inquest into Stephen Muncaster's

:11:52.:11:53.

death is expected to take The Government has announced

:11:54.:11:56.

a ?100 million investment in the Cambridge-based

:11:57.:12:04.

British Antarctic Survey. The money will be used to upgrade

:12:05.:12:07.

its Rothera Research Station, The base will be home

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to the new research ship - That's it from me -

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let's join David and Susie And I doubt you'll ever have

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seen a home like this. I will be exploring the hidden

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treasures inside this terraced house in Cambridge, preserved since late

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Victorian times. On Tuesday, we featured the story

:12:40.:12:42.

of paralympian Anne Wafula Strike. Anne is a wheelchair

:12:43.:12:46.

user and was on a train But the disabled toilet was out

:12:47.:12:50.

of order and she had to wet herself. Anne's story provoked

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a big reaction from you on the subject of disabled

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facilities on trains In a moment, we'll hear some

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of your comments, but first He had a stroke nine years ago and

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that is why Mick now uses a wheelchair. His partner is Elaine

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and together they often travelled by train from the home in Suffolk. They

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often find toilet facilities out of order. On occasions Mick has had to

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use a bottle. We have to ask if we can use the disabled toilet even

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though we know it is out of order just for privacy. They are out of

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order for a reason, usually covered in European, but we still have to do

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it because it's the only place you can go in private. I'm anxious. It's

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embarrassing. On Tuesday we brought you the story of Anne Wafula Strike

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who found the disabled toilet out of order and on a long train journey

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was forced to wet herself. I knew as a human being I needed that

:14:09.:14:13.

facility, I needed to use the toilet. It scared me. A similar

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thing happened to Alan White. He was travelling from London Liverpool

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Street on a Greater Anglia train to Witton. Alan is not disabled but

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found two toilet out of order. In a panic, he was also forced to wet

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himself. I do hope that other people who have found themselves in a

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similar situation will come forward, because the more people that do,

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hopefully Abellio will stand up and take notice and do something about

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these toilets. Greater Anglia have apologised to Alan and in a

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statement today, the companies said they would like to reassure all

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customers that on an average day, only a small percentage of toilets

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are out of order. For some, like they learn who lives near Cambridge,

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there is only one option, not to use the trains at all. She has a

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daughter who needs to be changed on a regular basis and that can mean

:15:17.:15:21.

using the floor of a toilet. We tend not to use the train much now that

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she is older than a standard baby changing area. We just, there is

:15:27.:15:36.

nowhere for anyone bigger than a baby to change. Sadly for disabled

:15:37.:15:41.

people trying to use the trains, toilets are just one issue, there

:15:42.:15:47.

are others, broken lives, grumpy staff. That aside, can it really be

:15:48.:15:52.

right that people like Nick cannot find a toilet to use in this day and

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age. So it seems clear that

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Anne Wafula Strike's experience We had an email from Rosie Barber

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from Stowmarket in Suffolk. She's a wheelchair user and travels

:15:59.:16:01.

to London on the train five Rosie says, "It is not unsual

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to find the wheelchair accessible Rosie also says train

:16:05.:16:09.

companies simply stressful and potentially

:16:10.:16:14.

embarrassing the lack of a disabled toilet can

:16:15.:16:18.

to be to their customers. Gillian Wilkinson-Brown emailed

:16:19.:16:20.

from Great Bentley near Colchester. Gillian is also a wheelchair user

:16:21.:16:23.

and says there are design issues She says they are very "public

:16:24.:16:26.

and have passengers seated nearby." And on Facebook, Nicole Karimi say,

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"This isn't just about trains. It's about time our shopping malls,

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big stores and public buildings think about the facilities

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they provide so that all citizens are treated equally

:16:40.:16:42.

with respect and dignity." We always love to hear

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from you and don't forget that you can contact us via email,

:16:47.:16:49.

twitter or facebook. All this week, our correspondents

:16:50.:16:51.

are looking at what 2017 has the changes ahead

:16:52.:16:59.

for local government There they signed the devolution

:17:00.:17:04.

deal and this May, they'll Devolution is going to

:17:05.:17:07.

have a big impact on how Our political reporter

:17:08.:17:11.

Tom Barton has the details. We are all used to elections for

:17:12.:17:28.

Parliament, for councils and more recently for police commissioners,

:17:29.:17:31.

but this may, in Cambridgeshire fair will be an election that has never

:17:32.:17:36.

been held before. At the moment in most parts of the country, there are

:17:37.:17:41.

two tiers of local government. District councils look after issues

:17:42.:17:45.

like housing and waste collection while bigger county councils are

:17:46.:17:49.

responsible for social care and most roads. But in Cambridgeshire, a new

:17:50.:17:56.

devolution deal will see the introduction of a third tier of

:17:57.:18:01.

local government. An elected mayor. People say it is a new layer of

:18:02.:18:09.

government but some faces bureaucrat in Whitehall has been making these

:18:10.:18:17.

decisions. -- faceless. It will be a local voice now. That will be making

:18:18.:18:21.

decisions about some big issues. They will have the power to spend

:18:22.:18:27.

millions on building new homes. They will get control over the local

:18:28.:18:32.

training budget. And they will have power and money for new transport

:18:33.:18:37.

projects. What do the people who will elect the new mayor think? We

:18:38.:18:42.

have enough people in all the local councils so why can't they manage it

:18:43.:18:48.

between them? I liked the idea. Especially if he knows Cambridge

:18:49.:18:53.

well, it can be good for us. What we are doing is adding a layer of cost

:18:54.:18:58.

without providing a full democratic freedom. The mayor will work with a

:18:59.:19:03.

combined authority made up of all the council leaders in

:19:04.:19:07.

Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It met before Christmas to start laying

:19:08.:19:11.

the groundwork for the election. Local business also has a voice and

:19:12.:19:16.

their representative sees the new mayor as a vitally important figure.

:19:17.:19:20.

This is the spokesperson for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough. It

:19:21.:19:28.

gives us access to a global audience and therefore one person. We have

:19:29.:19:33.

seen how the Mayor of London is represented. We see a similar model

:19:34.:19:39.

here. All eyes are now focused on the election when Cambridgeshire

:19:40.:19:42.

will join the likes of Manchester and Sheffield as one of just half a

:19:43.:19:46.

dozen areas with a new devolved mayor.

:19:47.:19:48.

Let's talk about this with our political

:19:49.:19:50.

So Peterborough and Cambridgeshire gearing up for devolution -

:19:51.:19:53.

what's going on in other parts of the region?

:19:54.:20:01.

Varies little happening in other parts of the region. In some parts

:20:02.:20:09.

there are not even talking about devolution. Northamptonshire and

:20:10.:20:13.

Essex briefly flirted with the idea. They could not find out who else

:20:14.:20:19.

they could go in with. The only other place where do stood a chance

:20:20.:20:27.

of success was Norfolk and Suffolk. What has happened is Suffolk and two

:20:28.:20:32.

authorities in Norfolk have formed a coalition of the winning and they

:20:33.:20:35.

are starting talks with the government but they are at an early

:20:36.:20:41.

stage and it is not clear how Suffolk and two bits of Norfolk

:20:42.:20:48.

could work as devolution. This was supposed to be the government's big

:20:49.:20:55.

idea. Yes, and all of last year, they have always said devolution is

:20:56.:20:59.

the way forward. This is the way local authorities receive their

:21:00.:21:03.

money for infrastructure, housing. The money wants to -- government

:21:04.:21:10.

wants to give money to regions. We have seen the lion's share of

:21:11.:21:17.

government grants go to areas that has devolution at our expense.

:21:18.:21:22.

Cambridgeshire will get a lot more money probably at the expense of the

:21:23.:21:28.

rest of the region. We have some important local elections coming up.

:21:29.:21:33.

County council elections in May. Four years ago, you will remember

:21:34.:21:38.

Ukip came from nowhere to do really well on councils like Essex,

:21:39.:21:43.

Cambridgeshire and Norfolk. How will they do this time? Will be Lib Dems

:21:44.:21:49.

keep fighting back? What will happen to the Labour Party? All sorts of

:21:50.:21:53.

parties have all sorts of things to prove this year.

:21:54.:21:55.

A terraced house in Cambridge preserved like a time

:21:56.:21:57.

capsule since Victorian Times is to receive more than ?600,000

:21:58.:22:00.

was owned by David Parr, whose day job was to decorate

:22:01.:22:05.

he painted his own house in similar styles.

:22:06.:22:09.

Now it's been given a grant so it can be restored

:22:10.:22:11.

Outside is 21st-century Cambridge. But inside it is still very much the

:22:12.:22:32.

1890s. This house has been in the family unchanged for well over a

:22:33.:22:37.

century, but until recently, few people knew what treasures were hit

:22:38.:22:42.

in the time the front door. Let me show you into the drawing-room. It

:22:43.:22:50.

is painted by David Parr. If we look over here, you can see the walls

:22:51.:22:55.

which are all hand-painted and which he painted in 1912 and it took him

:22:56.:23:01.

two years. The ceiling which he painted by the early in 1903, but he

:23:02.:23:07.

really did try and cover all surfaces. David Parr made his living

:23:08.:23:11.

decorating grand buildings like stately homes and churches, but he

:23:12.:23:15.

also spent more than 40 years painting his own house in a similar

:23:16.:23:22.

style. If you needed to spend a penny here, even in 1893, there was

:23:23.:23:28.

no reason to go outside because David installed this toilet. The

:23:29.:23:33.

property is now owned by a trust and has been awarded ?625,000 by the

:23:34.:23:39.

Heritage lottery fund so it can be renovated and open to the public.

:23:40.:23:45.

There are issues here, there are stamp coming through, paint peeling

:23:46.:23:50.

and we wanted to stop that happening so that we can protect for future

:23:51.:23:55.

generations. We will only take six people around on any given tour and

:23:56.:24:00.

we will have to limit the numbers who come to the house each year,

:24:01.:24:05.

because part of our job is to conserve the house as well as

:24:06.:24:11.

opening it up to the public. It will be two years before this house is

:24:12.:24:15.

fully restored. Visitors will then be able to get a glimpse into a

:24:16.:24:17.

world long gone. I had no idea about that. A

:24:18.:24:32.

revolutionary toilet as well. It was very chilly today. But thankfully

:24:33.:24:37.

getting older. But another cold night tonight. Look at the

:24:38.:24:43.

temperatures from last night. Down to -5 and a lot of places, 80

:24:44.:24:48.

degrees below freezing. Similar temperatures tonight. Some fantastic

:24:49.:24:57.

photographs taken in Hertfordshire this morning. Look at this

:24:58.:25:02.

windscreen. Also, a rainbow because there were some coastal showers and

:25:03.:25:08.

this shows the coastline of Norfolk. Thank you for those. We start the

:25:09.:25:14.

night dry, maybe the chance of a coastal shower but most places will

:25:15.:25:17.

stay dry. Temperatures dropping away. Mist and fog and some freezing

:25:18.:25:25.

fog patches, particularly affecting the western half of the region. That

:25:26.:25:30.

could be quite a hazard and ice on untreated surfaces. But you can see

:25:31.:25:37.

across the coastline and further east, temperatures staying a degree

:25:38.:25:42.

or so above freezing. A cold start tomorrow. Changes are on the way.

:25:43.:25:48.

High-pressure being pushed away by this weather system from the West.

:25:49.:25:54.

That will bring us rain, but for us in the least, the bulk of the day

:25:55.:26:00.

will be dry. The biggest thing will be the freezing fog which may well

:26:01.:26:04.

linger through the morning and then a period of brightness, sunshine and

:26:05.:26:09.

then the cloud will push in from the West has that weather front edges

:26:10.:26:16.

closer. It will be a cold day. Temperatures between four and six

:26:17.:26:23.

Celsius. The wind switching round to a south-westerly direction, pushing

:26:24.:26:27.

in the milder air. By the end of the day they see spots are patchy rain

:26:28.:26:31.

across northern and western counties, gradually trekking

:26:32.:26:36.

eastwards. It will push in quite a bit of milder air for the weekend

:26:37.:26:42.

but also a lot of cloud. We have another cold night tonight and then

:26:43.:26:47.

it will be milder for Friday night. Rain clears on Saturday,

:26:48.:26:51.

temperatures will be milder but a lot of mist and murk around. Milder

:26:52.:26:59.

by day and not quite so sharp, no frost expected overnight for

:27:00.:27:02.

Saturday and Sunday and a milder start for next week. It means

:27:03.:27:10.

children can wear fewer coats. See you tomorrow. Goodbye.

:27:11.:27:12.