10/02/2017 Look East (West)


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10/02/2017

Latest news for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Hertfordshire, Milton Keynes and Northants.


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Four men from Luton are jailed for drumming up support

:00:00.:00:07.

for Islamic State after a 20-month undercover police operation.

:00:08.:00:13.

A major search of a Cambridgeshire landfill site is to start

:00:14.:00:16.

in the search for a missing airman Corrie McKeague.

:00:17.:00:20.

And the new virtual reality approach to treating cancer

:00:21.:00:23.

as researchers get a multimillion-pound research grant.

:00:24.:00:29.

And I'm here in Stevenage for the launch of

:00:30.:00:31.

a major new exhibition about a pioneer of modern theatre

:00:32.:00:35.

Four men from Luton have been sent to prison for arranging meetings

:00:36.:00:52.

that drummed-up support for so-called Islamic State.

:00:53.:00:55.

Mohammed Alamgir, Yousaf Bashir, Ziur Rahman and Rajib Khan

:00:56.:01:00.

for their part in the meetings attended by up to 70 people.

:01:01.:01:07.

Money was also collected to help pay the legal fees

:01:08.:01:10.

of a convicted terrorist, as Mike Cartwright reports.

:01:11.:01:16.

Four men from Luton, jailed after a campaign

:01:17.:01:19.

At three locations in the town - a school, a Methodist church,

:01:20.:01:25.

a home - preaching terror at large public meetings.

:01:26.:01:31.

Muslim community leaders today condemning what they stood for,

:01:32.:01:33.

fearful others may have listened to their extremist teachings.

:01:34.:01:38.

There is a level of extremism among young people,

:01:39.:01:41.

And if these people are drawing hundreds of people

:01:42.:01:49.

to their meetings, then I think it is a matter

:01:50.:01:53.

and much earlier interventions should have been made.

:01:54.:02:02.

All members of the extremist group Al-Muhajiroun.

:02:03.:02:05.

This a photo of Isis fighters in Syria.

:02:06.:02:08.

To his right, Rajib Khan and Mohammed Alamgir.

:02:09.:02:14.

If the aftermath of the Tunisian terror attack,

:02:15.:02:17.

Alamgir was secretly recorded praising the gunman.

:02:18.:02:33.

Inside there, Alamgir described the attack in Tunisia as a victory.

:02:34.:02:37.

Today, the judge described him as a very dangerous man,

:02:38.:02:42.

deeply committed to an extreme and violent jihad.

:02:43.:02:47.

They were holding events at various locations in Luton.

:02:48.:02:49.

One particular address was a tent that was erected in the rear garden

:02:50.:02:54.

They invited groups of 50 to 70 people,

:02:55.:03:00.

The type of rhetoric they were spreading was certainly

:03:01.:03:05.

encouraging support for terrorist organisations such as Daesh.

:03:06.:03:09.

Their arrest came after raids in December 2015.

:03:10.:03:12.

once again putting the town in the headlines.

:03:13.:03:20.

Well, earlier, I spoke to Professor Anthony Glees,

:03:21.:03:22.

an expert on terrorism from the University of Buckingham,

:03:23.:03:24.

and ask him how easy it is to radicalise people

:03:25.:03:27.

We are, in this country, very aware of the fact

:03:28.:03:33.

that there are people who might go out and fight

:03:34.:03:36.

And one reason the United Kingdom is currently, touch wood,

:03:37.:03:41.

one of the safest countries in the European Union

:03:42.:03:43.

is precisely because we take these things very seriously.

:03:44.:03:48.

But we know they were targeting places

:03:49.:03:50.

So how easy is it for radicalisation to spread in an area like Luton?

:03:51.:03:56.

Unfortunately, I think it is much easier than people would assume.

:03:57.:04:01.

they build on the wrong interpretation

:04:02.:04:06.

of the peaceful religion of Islam.

:04:07.:04:08.

Let us never forget, the vast majority of Muslims

:04:09.:04:11.

in the United Kingdom, indeed throughout the world,

:04:12.:04:13.

want absolutely nothing to do with this ideology of violence

:04:14.:04:17.

But young minds are impressionable minds,

:04:18.:04:23.

and these people are very good at turning these minds.

:04:24.:04:26.

That is why we need good prevention in this country.

:04:27.:04:30.

But how easy is it for prevention to work and root out this problem?

:04:31.:04:36.

Well, I think again, it's easier in some senses

:04:37.:04:40.

Easier to radicalise and easier to de-radicalise.

:04:41.:04:46.

We're talking about people being responsive teachers,

:04:47.:04:49.

listening to what their pupils are saying,

:04:50.:04:51.

then having those danger signs addressed.

:04:52.:04:56.

as it was with undercover policing, as you said.

:04:57.:05:04.

It can often be about stopping people from getting

:05:05.:05:07.

into the position where they will do something stupid like go off

:05:08.:05:10.

to fight for the so-called Islamic State

:05:11.:05:12.

by teaching them that, in this country,

:05:13.:05:17.

we do not allow violence to prosper.

:05:18.:05:28.

EU staff working at our biggest hospital

:05:29.:05:30.

have appealed to the Government for an early decision

:05:31.:05:32.

They were meeting with one of our Euro MPs who'll be playing

:05:33.:05:36.

a role in the forthcoming Brexit negotiations.

:05:37.:05:45.

Uncertainty, anxiety. The two words that kept coming up at this eating

:05:46.:05:52.

at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge. Doctors, nurses and

:05:53.:05:56.

research staff at being called together to discuss their fears

:05:57.:05:59.

about what Brexit could mean for them. There were plenty of concerns.

:06:00.:06:08.

The insecurity, the uncertainty is palpable, and it's kind of trying to

:06:09.:06:11.

find out whether our futures are secure. I'm Swedish, but I have a

:06:12.:06:18.

British partner and two British boys, and they have British

:06:19.:06:22.

passports. At the moment, I feel like an outsider looking in on my

:06:23.:06:25.

own family. Having worked my entire professional life here, having paid

:06:26.:06:31.

my only pension contributions in this country, what would happen to

:06:32.:06:36.

me next? Most of the concerns were practical, but AQ said they had

:06:37.:06:38.

seized racist comments following the Brexit boat, and no one felt welcome

:06:39.:06:45.

here. 30% of the staff here are from the U. This is home, people have

:06:46.:06:52.

been brought up here, they have been married to people from other

:06:53.:07:00.

countries, so it is a pitch tapestry of experience going on here. Brexit

:07:01.:07:06.

will affect us all, but the NHS, with its reliance on overseas

:07:07.:07:13.

workers, is of particular concerns. Local MPs are holding meetings like

:07:14.:07:20.

this to address people's concerns. It is complicated. 40 years of close

:07:21.:07:23.

corporation between the UK and the rest of Europe, unravelling that is

:07:24.:07:29.

going to be complicated. The Government says it wants to end the

:07:30.:07:32.

uncertainty for EU citizens as soon as possible, but that depends on the

:07:33.:07:36.

outcome of the Brexit talks, which haven't even started yet. So the

:07:37.:07:44.

reality for EU worker s here is that that uncertainty is to continue for

:07:45.:07:48.

some time. The police say they'll start

:07:49.:07:50.

a major search of a landfill site near Cambridge to try

:07:51.:07:53.

to find a missing man. Corrie McKeague

:07:54.:07:56.

was last seen in September in the centre of

:07:57.:07:58.

Bury St Edmunds after a night out. Searches involving hundreds

:07:59.:08:01.

of police officers and volunteers have so far failed to find

:08:02.:08:03.

any trace of him. Now police say they'll search

:08:04.:08:05.

the Milton landfill site, Milton landfill site, not far from

:08:06.:08:19.

Cambridge. It is the focus of the latest phase of the investigation

:08:20.:08:22.

into the missing airman, Corrie McKeague. Police will search 1000

:08:23.:08:26.

square metres of the site and up to eight metres below the ground. They

:08:27.:08:31.

are searching here after he was picked up on CCTV walking into a

:08:32.:08:36.

loading bay behind some shops, a dead-end full of beans. Shortly

:08:37.:08:41.

after, a waste lorry was caught on camera, making a collection in the

:08:42.:08:47.

same area where he was last seen. The lorry itself was forensically

:08:48.:08:52.

tested, but no evidence was found. Waste from that lorry is still at

:08:53.:08:55.

the site after police told them not to put anything on top of it. Since

:08:56.:09:00.

he went missing in the early hours of the 24th of September, there have

:09:01.:09:04.

already been searches involving hundreds of police and volunteers.

:09:05.:09:09.

We have 40 months of the public, I have somewhere around about 60

:09:10.:09:15.

trained search technicians, team leaders and research managers. I

:09:16.:09:21.

think we have 14 four by fours out. We will bury the teams around with

:09:22.:09:27.

those. The police say searching this site will be the next logical step.

:09:28.:09:33.

His mother told this latest news leave the family with mixed emotions

:09:34.:09:36.

and while she is pleased searches are taking place, she is terrified

:09:37.:09:40.

and desperate for the result it may bring.

:09:41.:09:43.

Scientists in Cambridge have been awarded ?40 million in one

:09:44.:09:46.

of the biggest ever funding grants to be given by Cancer Research UK.

:09:47.:09:49.

one will look into the lesser-known causes of cancer.

:09:50.:09:52.

The other uses virtual reality to build breast cancer tumours,

:09:53.:09:55.

what looks like a virtual reality video game

:09:56.:10:01.

is, in fact, a research tool to study tumours.

:10:02.:10:07.

Thanks to a ?20 million grant, scientists in Cambridge

:10:08.:10:10.

will now be able to build a 3D model of a tumour,

:10:11.:10:13.

allowing doctors and patients to understand how and why

:10:14.:10:17.

What patients want to do when they are diagnosed

:10:18.:10:22.

with cancer is, in many ways, take control of their disease,

:10:23.:10:25.

We imagined that giving patients the option of putting on these

:10:26.:10:32.

goggles and really flying inside, stepping inside the virtual world

:10:33.:10:37.

with a doctor by their side, explaining to them

:10:38.:10:39.

why the therapeutic procedure was taken,

:10:40.:10:41.

It can be really empowering for patients.

:10:42.:10:46.

Computer programmes can only hold so much data.

:10:47.:10:49.

According to the man who came up with the project,

:10:50.:10:52.

virtual reality means cells can be studied in greater numbers.

:10:53.:10:56.

What we want to do now is go from a few thousand

:10:57.:11:00.

to a few million and put that in a spatial context.

:11:01.:11:04.

The way that I think about this is, if we do this right,

:11:05.:11:07.

by the time we'd done, we will generate more data

:11:08.:11:10.

in a single experiment than exists right now about cancer.

:11:11.:11:15.

has been used to study and build real-life tumours.

:11:16.:11:20.

The samples are gathered in this lab.

:11:21.:11:22.

Here, material donated by hundreds of breast cancer patients

:11:23.:11:26.

at Addenbrooke's Hospital is extracted from tumour samples,

:11:27.:11:30.

which are then fed into the programme.

:11:31.:11:32.

to understand the complexity of cancer is clear.

:11:33.:11:36.

At the moment, just 50% of people diagnosed with cancer

:11:37.:11:39.

go on to live for ten years or more.

:11:40.:11:41.

This work could see that number rise.

:11:42.:11:45.

And it's people like Lynn who could benefit from the research.

:11:46.:11:49.

not once but twice with breast cancer.

:11:50.:11:54.

You don't think about the scientists that are actually behind

:11:55.:11:56.

that are looking into cancer in all ways.

:11:57.:12:03.

Because I think, with cancer, you just get the word "cancer"

:12:04.:12:06.

and you don't really understand what it is.

:12:07.:12:11.

And since I've been involved in this project,

:12:12.:12:13.

I have a great understanding that cancer is so complicated.

:12:14.:12:18.

Cancer remains one of the biggest killers in the UK.

:12:19.:12:21.

This work, researchers claim, could improve survival rate.

:12:22.:12:29.

Five suspected illegal immigrants have been found

:12:30.:12:30.

in a shipping container at Cambridge Services on the A14.

:12:31.:12:33.

The two adults and three teenagers were discovered

:12:34.:12:36.

when the lorry driver heard knocking.

:12:37.:12:38.

He didn't have the keys and the fire service were called to release them.

:12:39.:12:41.

They have been taken into custody and will be passed to immigration.

:12:42.:12:46.

First, back to Amelia and Stewart for the rest of the news,

:12:47.:12:51.

Still to come tonight: Julie is here with your weekend weather forecast.

:12:52.:13:03.

We find out about the man from Stevenage who had a huge

:13:04.:13:08.

Ask any rail passenger what they want, and you can bet

:13:09.:13:23.

near the top of the list will be new trains.

:13:24.:13:25.

When Abellio Greater Anglia won a new nine-year franchise last year,

:13:26.:13:28.

it committed to replacing it's entire fleet by 2020.

:13:29.:13:30.

Greater Anglia unveiled plans today for a new ?70 million

:13:31.:13:33.

The company says it will play a key part in transforming train services

:13:34.:13:38.

Travellers on the Great Eastern Line out of Liverpool Street have

:13:39.:13:52.

for a decade looked out on a post-industrial wasteland

:13:53.:13:54.

as the train passes over the River Stour estuary to Brantham,

:13:55.:13:57.

It used to be a thriving industrial centre employing thousands.

:13:58.:14:05.

ICI one of the companies that used to operate here.

:14:06.:14:08.

Margaret Roberts, later Margaret Thatcher, was employed

:14:09.:14:11.

as a research chemist at a plastics company close by.

:14:12.:14:15.

Now, 22 acres is earmarked for a state of the art

:14:16.:14:17.

This is an enormous decrepit and decaying site which is crying

:14:18.:14:24.

out for regeneration which many people thought would never happen.

:14:25.:14:29.

It is now going to be delivered, and delivered on the back

:14:30.:14:32.

of investment from this private rail company, and the thing

:14:33.:14:34.

that is so important for all of us is this is the first step

:14:35.:14:38.

on the road to how this new franchise will regenerate

:14:39.:14:40.

The new depot will have 15 tracks for stabling,

:14:41.:14:45.

cleaning and maintaining a new fleet of trains.

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It will complement existing ones in Norwich, Clacton and Ilford

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and include a new lathe, especially useful in the autumn

:14:51.:14:59.

when falling leaves create slippery conditions can

:15:00.:15:01.

Local planners have given permission for 300 new homes nearby, and now

:15:02.:15:04.

This is the largest inward investment since

:15:05.:15:08.

?70 million coming in to a very tricky site

:15:09.:15:18.

Design work is underway and work proper should start in the summer.

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The aim is to have it up and running by December 2018.

:15:23.:15:25.

Then it will receive a first of a fleet of new trains to be

:15:26.:15:28.

Jamie Burles is Managing Director of Greater Anglia.

:15:29.:15:39.

Late this afternoon I spoke to him about the new depot,

:15:40.:15:43.

But pointed out that what most passengers want is a reliable

:15:44.:15:46.

What we have got is we are working closely with Network Rail

:15:47.:15:53.

and for example services this week we have been ahead of target

:15:54.:15:57.

so we are seeing some green shoots with regard to the millions

:15:58.:15:59.

of pounds we are spending on making the trains

:16:00.:16:02.

themselves and the reliability of the fleet better.

:16:03.:16:04.

We're continuing to put more money into that as well.

:16:05.:16:07.

So we are seeing some green shoots but you are right,

:16:08.:16:14.

that to get to the 93% we need, we need a lot more progress,

:16:15.:16:17.

as is planned over the next coming months and years.

:16:18.:16:20.

How many out of ten would you give the service currently?

:16:21.:16:22.

Our customers give the service, if you think about the National Rail

:16:23.:16:25.

passenger survey, independent survey, our passengers give a score

:16:26.:16:28.

I am honest when I say there are still too many incidents

:16:29.:16:41.

and that is where the billions we are putting in will reduce

:16:42.:16:45.

those incidents and keep on improving the service.

:16:46.:16:50.

How frustrating is it for you to get blamed for a lot of the problems

:16:51.:16:53.

which should be blamed on Network Rail?

:16:54.:16:55.

I think, as you know, we cause 30% of our problems and Network Rail

:16:56.:17:01.

And other operators, such as freight, is 10%.

:17:02.:17:07.

But we are the operator and take the money from the customers

:17:08.:17:11.

of the customer absolutely is relying on us to

:17:12.:17:15.

We are to battle for the customer and to improve the service

:17:16.:17:30.

as much as possible, so it is something we are used

:17:31.:17:33.

to and something we use as a good pressure on ourselves

:17:34.:17:36.

When can we expect this to be the perfect rail service

:17:37.:17:40.

Well, halfway through 2020 we will have the majority

:17:41.:17:44.

of the new trains in and they will bring a much better reliability

:17:45.:17:47.

and customer experience, so around 2020 is when the true

:17:48.:17:50.

transformation will have worked through the system.

:17:51.:17:51.

Sport, and for some of the region's athletes, a chance to blow off

:17:52.:18:05.

Sport, and for some of the region's athletes, a chance to blow off

:18:06.:18:12.

With more on that plus rugby and football, here's Tom.

:18:13.:18:16.

Yes, a full programme of football action this weekend.

:18:17.:18:18.

Boss Mick McCarthy desperately seeking some consistency -

:18:19.:18:22.

Norwich host Nottingham Forest, with manager Alex Neil

:18:23.:18:25.

admitting his side will have to win the majority of their remaining

:18:26.:18:28.

he's been in charge for just over two months and Robbie Neilson

:18:29.:18:33.

down in 19th up to the relative comfort of mid-table.

:18:34.:18:48.

Neilson was nominated but missed out on today's manager

:18:49.:18:50.

When you come in you want to add something to the club.

:18:51.:18:54.

There was already a really good structure here and it is a case

:18:55.:18:58.

of coming in and trying to add a little bit more, and hopefully

:18:59.:19:01.

We're picking up points and heading in the right direction.

:19:02.:19:05.

There is still a long way to go in this season for us.

:19:06.:19:08.

Now if you've ever tried the shot-put, you'll be well aware,

:19:09.:19:11.

Luckily, Sophie McKinna from Bradwell near Great Yarmouth

:19:12.:19:18.

She's also highly motivated after failing to make

:19:19.:19:21.

Sophie's hoping to start her season with a bang

:19:22.:19:24.

at the British Indoor Championships in Sheffield.

:19:25.:19:30.

my strength has increased rapidly since I joined and I can bench 135

:19:31.:19:39.

and my best dead left is 205 which was an unofficial world record.

:19:40.:19:47.

Quite a lot of weight. It is not usual for 22-year-old girls to lift

:19:48.:19:53.

that sort of weight. The life of a shot-putter involve weights, and

:19:54.:19:59.

heavy ones. Sophie McKinna catalyst 22 stone. So she can do this. --

:20:00.:20:07.

Sophie McKinna can lift. Of these students and Norwich were lucky to

:20:08.:20:08.

get a masterclass. It is quite a unique sport and not

:20:09.:20:19.

something you see at a higher level every day, it is not televised like

:20:20.:20:24.

other sports. They are quite receptive. I do some shot-put

:20:25.:20:30.

outside of school but I have never throw that far. I know Sophie

:20:31.:20:35.

because she trains at my gym but I had never see her throat before. She

:20:36.:20:42.

has been competing for button for several years but is still getting

:20:43.:20:45.

over the disappointment of not being selected for Britain's Olympic team.

:20:46.:20:54.

As an athlete I expect to be supported by my governing body but

:20:55.:20:58.

now the way I can get that attention and get my revenge, if you like, is

:20:59.:21:03.

throw further and put the decision out of their hands in the future.

:21:04.:21:09.

With the support of her gym she is in great shape ahead of the British

:21:10.:21:14.

indoor Championships this weekend. The legendary shot-putter is among

:21:15.:21:21.

the coaching team, whose long-standing record might be in

:21:22.:21:27.

trouble. It is amazing having like her, the most successful British

:21:28.:21:32.

shot-putter, on my team and she really wants me to go on and be

:21:33.:21:37.

successful and break that record. Her personal best is just over 17

:21:38.:21:42.

metres so she needs to find another two metres and she hopes to do it at

:21:43.:21:46.

the corner of games on the Gold Coast in Australia.

:21:47.:21:49.

Rugby, and week two of the Six Nations with

:21:50.:21:51.

Northampton's Dylan Hartley leading out England against Wales

:21:52.:21:53.

He's joined by fellow Saints players Courtney Lawes and Tom Wood

:21:54.:21:58.

Saints meanwhile play tonight at Bath in the Premiership and must

:21:59.:22:01.

win to keep their hopes of a play-off finish alive.

:22:02.:22:06.

Very difficult place to go, and a lot on the line for both teams.

:22:07.:22:09.

Away rugby, our defence is going to be massive,

:22:10.:22:13.

but in the context of our season we need to go down there

:22:14.:22:16.

There's full previews to all this weekend's sport on the website

:22:17.:22:26.

and coverage too on your local BBC Radio Station.

:22:27.:22:33.

Now he was a revolutionary influence on modern theatre.

:22:34.:22:36.

But most of us have never heard of Edward Gordon Craig.

:22:37.:22:38.

He's also one of Stevenage's most famous sons.

:22:39.:22:50.

If you live in Stevenage you probably know the name of the

:22:51.:22:56.

theatre which is named after him but now there is a chance to find out

:22:57.:23:00.

more about him with a lottery funded exhibition.

:23:01.:23:03.

Using projection and staging, this is an exhibition which captures

:23:04.:23:05.

Born in Stevenage in 1872, Edward Gordon Craig revolutionised

:23:06.:23:09.

He took the Victorian theatre he had grown up

:23:10.:23:12.

with that was elaborate, maybe slow in terms

:23:13.:23:14.

of its production values, and he turned it on its head

:23:15.:23:17.

and introduced light, flooded the stage light,

:23:18.:23:18.

pared everything right back and asked the audience

:23:19.:23:20.

Stevenage's theatre may be named after him, but Craig,

:23:21.:23:36.

seen here in later years, has a much lower profile

:23:37.:23:39.

Working mainly in Europe in the 1900, he saw theatre

:23:40.:23:42.

as joining architecture, movement and music and did Hamlet

:23:43.:23:44.

at the Moscow Art Theatre to critical acclaim in 1912.

:23:45.:23:47.

He was tall, good-looking, had a great stage presence

:23:48.:23:49.

when he was an actor, and I think women just

:23:50.:23:51.

He had about 13 children, at least, by eight different woman.

:23:52.:23:55.

On display include production designs from the VNA

:23:56.:23:59.

and Eton College, some of which have never been seen

:24:00.:24:03.

Also featured in the exhibition are some incredible puppets that

:24:04.:24:10.

were central to the way he thought about the theatre and he used

:24:11.:24:18.

as a production technique to plan out actors' movements in scenes.

:24:19.:24:21.

Stevenage's new town status masks a thriving arts scene,

:24:22.:24:23.

and it has received ?65,000 from the Heritage lottery Fund for

:24:24.:24:26.

And it is hoped more people in the town will recognise

:24:27.:24:31.

the face of the man who radically changed theatre.

:24:32.:24:49.

And 13 children with eight different woman? I think that is what she

:24:50.:24:57.

said. And all that and the theatre as well. Shall we talk about the

:24:58.:25:05.

weather? What a cold and wintry day. Some

:25:06.:25:13.

snow showers and it was starting to settle here in Suffolk. These

:25:14.:25:17.

flurries this morning on the east Coast mainline. It has been rather

:25:18.:25:28.

called, at best three Celsius and many getting just one above

:25:29.:25:35.

freezing. Overnight further showers, either rain, sleet or snow and some

:25:36.:25:44.

snow is likely to settle. We could see a frost and ice in places and it

:25:45.:25:51.

is already misty and murky for some. Mainly light winds. Tomorrow, we

:25:52.:25:57.

keep this north-west of the flow and we should have further wintry

:25:58.:26:04.

showers to start. As the day goes on they become predominantly rain but

:26:05.:26:08.

pretty miserable, cloudy skies. Temperature is widely struggling to

:26:09.:26:15.

about three Celsius and we have mainly light to moderate north to

:26:16.:26:20.

north-easterly winds continuing to feed in rain showers throughout the

:26:21.:26:26.

evening. Sunday does not look much better. The winds turning more

:26:27.:26:36.

Easter break, cold easterly flow and Sunday -- winds turning more

:26:37.:26:42.

easterly. Feeding in rain, sleet or snow. Hopefully some dry weather,

:26:43.:26:48.

too. The cloud may break at planes for some brightness but largely

:26:49.:26:55.

cloudy skies and a cold easterly flow with the winds reaching

:26:56.:27:00.

moderate in strength. Similar temperatures to Saturday but feeling

:27:01.:27:05.

much colder when you factor in the wind. We keep that cold easterly on

:27:06.:27:12.

Monday but any showers on Monday are few and far between and much better

:27:13.:27:16.

chance of at least seeing some sunshine to help lift the spirits.

:27:17.:27:24.

On Tuesday, we lose the risk of showers, largely fine and dry with

:27:25.:27:29.

decent sunny spells and by Tuesday the winds to the south-east are

:27:30.:27:34.

bringing in more mild air and temperatures perhaps closer to

:27:35.:27:42.

average. Sounding better next week. Is spring coming, do you think? Have

:27:43.:27:44.

a good weekend.

:27:45.:27:49.