Episode 14 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 14

Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell travel along the beautiful Cornish coastline before heading to an auction in Bristol.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts!

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-That's cracking.

-With £200 each...

-Wonderful.

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..a classic car, and a goal -

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to scour Britain for antiques.

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That's exactly what I'm talking about!

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I'm all over a shiver.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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-No-brainer.

-Going, going, gone.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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So, will it be the high road to glory?

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-Push!

-Or the slow road to disaster?

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How awfully, awfully nice.

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to the fourth leg of the trip. Our experts,

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Philip Serrell and Catherine Southon, are enjoying a jaunt

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along the stunning Cornish coastline in a 1970s Citroen DS 20.

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Shall we have a pasty?

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-Have a pasty?

-Pasty.

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Now then, do you have red sauce or brown sauce with pasties?

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Oh, I don't have any sauce, I am not a saucy girl.

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I'm inclined, I'd have red at one end and brown at the other.

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And then you eat from the left and eat from the right

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-and meet in the middle.

-Mmm, tasty!

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Last time, Philip tried to drum up a profit,

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while Catherine thought she had a wheel of fortune.

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But it was all in vain, as they both lost out at auction.

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I think that we flagged yesterday.

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-I think we did.

-We flagged.

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Between us, we actually bought some quite nice things.

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You did, but it wasn't to be.

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Both experts started with £200, and after three auctions,

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Catherine has £223.42 to play with.

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Philip has surged ahead with a whopping £321.44.

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So there's about £100 difference between us, isn't there?

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There is a very large difference between us, but new county,

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-new challenge...

-Another day, another deal.

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Oh, yes.

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This road trip kicks off in Coleshill in Warwickshire,

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meanders around the Midlands, heads due south towards the coast,

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before turning west down to the tip of Cornwall.

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They'll nip briefly into South Wales,

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and finish up at auction in Wells.

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Today, our experts start in the small Cornish town of Hayle,

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and end at an auction in Bristol.

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This is going to be interesting, there's a cattle truck in the middle of the road.

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What's going on here? It's little sheepsies!

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Shall we go and buy a sheep? Have we got enough between us?

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It's been a lifelong ambition of mine on the Road Trip to buy a sheep.

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-How much is it to buy a sheep?

-About 60 or 80 quid, I would think.

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And farmer's son Philip Serrell should know.

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Oh, look! Come on!

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You've got one, you're losing one round the back.

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-It's fallen!

-Don't worry, don't worry.

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He's fallen, where's he going?

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Oh, no!

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Running after him is not a good idea, Catherine!

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We've lost this man's sheep!

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Remind me never to go sheep rustling with you, Catherine Southon.

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This is like Wallace and Gromit, isn't it?

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He's crossing the border! He's in Devon!

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Anyway, after helping a local farmer...

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-Top stuff.

-Right, let's shop.

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-Come on, then.

-..both experts are kicking off their shopping at

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the Foundry Antiques and Arts Centre.

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Hello! Catherine.

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You're Paul, hello, Paul.

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-I'm Jan.

-Jan, hello Jan.

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How does this all work, then?

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We've got a sort of small antiques centre, here.

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Various dealers' cabinets.

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Jan here, she does the vintage side.

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-You're a bit vintage, aren't you?

-I do dress like this all the time.

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She actually lives vintage!

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-Do you?

-Somewhat.

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I think we're from the same era, aren't we, Jan?

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Shall we go in there, is that all right?

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You lead the way.

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So, is some of this yours, then, Paul?

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Yeah, this section over here is mine.

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The cabinets there, they are rented out.

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So everything we see on the shop floor is yours.

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It's mine, and I can...

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And you can... I was waiting for that.

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I can negotiate.

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OK, shall I have a little...?

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You have a look around, give me a shout if...

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If I see anything.

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There's lots of lovely, lovely things.

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I haven't got a lot of money, though.

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I feel like last time I just went out on a whim and just bought this

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and that, and all these wonderful things.

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But I think I really need to be sensible this time.

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And play it perhaps safe.

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Could be a plan.

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Now, this, what is this?

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Mini cricket bat?

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No, it's a very large page turner.

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And it's actually poker work, so it's been done with a really,

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really hot poker to create these wonderful patterns.

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This is yours, sir, Sir Paul.

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-Yes.

-I did notice that as I was turning it around,

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you've got a bit of wear, there.

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A little bit of wear, there.

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It's a nice size, though, isn't it?

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Yeah, I think it's probably made

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more as a decorative piece than to actually use.

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What have you got on that, my friend?

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There's £9.50 on it.

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Can you do five on it?

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-Yeah, I'll do five.

-You can do five, OK.

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Could I just put that to one side?

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-I'm still going to carry on.

-Certainly.

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Well, Catherine has secured one buy.

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-How's Philip getting on?

-There's stunning things in here, aren't there?

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There are some beautiful things, really interesting bits and bobs.

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But it's not really my field.

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My field is vintage.

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-You look stunning.

-Thank you.

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Could you give me the vintage look?

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How about a little bit retro, a little bit '70s, maybe?

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Yeah, that's...

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-Let's go and have a look, then.

-Me and Noddy Holder.

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Look at these, fantastic kipper ties. You must remember these.

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They're vintage? I still wear them! Go on, do the deed, do the deed.

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There's lots of people out there willing you to pull this as tight as you can, Jan!

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Surely not, Philip?

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There you are, Noddy Serrell.

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Catherine, do you like this look?

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I love the kipper tie!

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-It's the business.

-But it's better than what you normally wear!

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Now, now, Catherine.

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Anyway, down to business, but be careful, Philip's hovering.

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I think I probably will go for that.

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I think I should make something on it, don't you?

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-I would have thought so.

-Whatever she's giving you,

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I'll give you a tenner more!

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Play fair, now, there's a good chap!

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£5, right?

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Do you have some change, sir?

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I should be able to find some, I think.

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Thank you very much.

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And if it doesn't give me a profit,

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I'm going to whack Mr Serrell round the head with it!

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Catherine's first purchase is secured, Philip's yet to start.

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But hang on!

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That's interesting.

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Jan's got me on this vintage stuff.

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I mean, I just think that's got a bit of a look to it.

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A bit of tubular steel with either plywood or fibre glass or plastic

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on top of it.

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Thomas Chippendale, at this minute in time, is rotating in his grave.

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I can hear the coffin creaking from here, Philip.

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That actually looks a lot better from the top than it does from the

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bottom, doesn't it? I wouldn't think that's '60s, is it?

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It is '70s, isn't it?

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I think more likely '70s with those colours and pattern.

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And what is it? Is it just like MDF or something?

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Chipboard or a ply.

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It's a gamble, this, isn't it?

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What's the ticket price on it?

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It's 85...

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How does 50 sound?

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It's a very good starting point.

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I'm working on the theory it won't be the end point,

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but it's a very good start point.

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I'm interested now, let's have a look and see what else we can find.

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-Yeah.

-Let's leave Philip browsing.

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Catherine's found Jan and her cabinet stocked full of vintage.

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What would be really nice would be making up a lot of some sort of quite fun vintage accessories.

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-Yes, yes.

-I like that.

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-Disco clip.

-Disco clip.

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It goes with Phil's kipper tie!

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I like that. This is all coming back, isn't it?

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Where did you get that from?

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I've had that a long, long time.

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I think it's probably from 1970, from one of my pieces.

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-Oh, it was one of yours?

-Yeah.

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So you've worn it?

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-Yeah, a long, long...

-And with your hair, it probably looks amazing.

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Have you got another few unusual beaded bits?

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How about that? It's a Whiting and Davis, very, very collectable.

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They are made in the USA, very popular.

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They started their company by making chainmail for uniforms.

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-Oh, right.

-Or, I do have a very, very big beaded collar necklace.

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Oh, my goodness me, yeah.

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That's lovely, isn't it?

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You could go to dangerous territory here,

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and end up buying all this stuff...

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It's because it's girlie things, it always tempts you.

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It is, isn't it?

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Total ticket price for these three is £65.

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Would you do 30 for the whole lot?

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Ooh, er...

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OK, I will do it for 30, because I am of the school of thought

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that I need to put vintage out there.

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That's jolly decent of you, Jan.

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Is there anything else we can add to it, just to

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sort of enhance it a little bit more?

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Another necklace?

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How about that one?

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A nice long strand, double-stranded.

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Rather fine beads.

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Can that go with it?

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-Yes.

-So I could have this at 30.

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Yes.

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I think you're being very generous.

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I think that's very kind.

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How about this one? Little beaded purse, there we go.

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I've got to give you a little bit more for that.

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Can we say 35 for the lot?

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I think we could.

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-Is that all right?

-I think that's a smashing little lot.

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I think that really is. Jan, you've been an absolute star.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Right, what shall I do? I'm going to wear it!

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This is the only chance I'm going to get to play around with it.

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I look much nicer than he did in his kipper tie!

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I think I've managed to suitably put both of you into vintage.

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You have. We are really into vintage, now.

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I know that looks awful with what I am wearing but I love it,

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it's gorgeous!

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-Let's leave Catherine all dressed up.

-Where's the party?

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Philip's still with Paul, and he's got his eye on something.

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That's interesting, Paul.

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Yeah, it's a Masonic lodge in India.

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I think about sort of 1890, early 1900s.

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Have you got any other history to it?

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They were big photographers in India, they were Madras Bangalore.

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It's in a nice, what I call native frame.

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You know, Indian-made frame.

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Can we take that down and have a look at it, please?

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-Yes, certainly.

-Let's have a look.

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What's the best you could do that for, please?

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35 on it.

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I know I could do that for 20.

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Which have you got more movement in, Paul,

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the Masonic photograph or the retro table?

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I couldn't go below 20 on that one, I don't think. But...

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I was going to try and buy the two off you for, like, £55.

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Would that work?

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-I could do 60.

-Go on, then, I'll have a deal with you.

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You're a gentlemen, thank you very much indeed.

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Let me give you some money. Two, four, six.

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There we are.

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That's Philip's first two lots for auction.

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Well done.

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Meanwhile, Catherine has made her way

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to the south-west tip of Cornwall.

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She's meeting Professor Gareth Parry on the beautiful Porthcurno beach to

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find out what part it played in the communications revolution of the late 1800s.

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I've got to take my shoes off,

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because I cannot go on sand with my shoes on.

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You just make yourself comfortable, Catherine!

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That feels better already.

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So why this speech, why are we here?

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Well, this was the landing site for the first telegraph cable that

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connected this country with Bombay, as it was called then, in India.

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And this was in 1870.

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Up until that point, if you wanted to communicate between this country

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and India, for example, it would take something like six or eight weeks.

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-By letter?

-By sea, yeah.

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But one man was about to change all that.

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John Pender, a wealthy Scottish merchant,

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had an ambition to connect the entire world with cables,

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and this would eventually transform the way the British Empire was controlled.

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Once the cable was installed, it went via relay stations,

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messages could take nine minutes.

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Pender wanted to avoid damage to his cables from shipping,

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so he avoided ports like Falmouth

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and instead brought his cables ashore on

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the isolated Porthcurno beach.

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So have we still got cables beneath our feet, now?

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Yes, yes indeed.

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There's the odd one or two of the old telegraph cables.

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You may well have a cable going underneath your feet that goes

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from Cornwall right out through the Mediterranean

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to Japan, China and South Korea.

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Something you would never think, while you were sitting here with

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your ice cream, making your sand castle!

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The original 19th-century subsea telegraph cables would emerge

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in the cable hut,

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where the signals were collected and taken to the telegraph station.

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Within 50 years,

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Porthcurno was to become the busiest telegraph station in the world.

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So it really was the hub, wasn't it?

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Yes. This map actually shows the cable network in 1920.

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It really shows how the Eastern Telegraph Company that Pender formed

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became one of the most powerful cable companies in the world.

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Because, if you look at the map here,

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we see red lines which indicate the routes taken by the cable networks

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going right up to the Far East,

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Australia, New Zealand,

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and by this stage, Africa, South America.

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And you can see how all the lines converge onto this one little beach.

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What sort of messages would have been exchanged during this time?

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Almost certainly diplomatic messages, trade, finance, commerce.

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Pender's whole operation depended on the durability of his subsea cables.

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If you hold that, you can see how heavy it is.

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Oh, wow, that's really heavy.

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Once the cables had been made, they still had to be laid,

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and that's where Brunel's SS Great Britain came in,

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which at that time was the largest ship in the world.

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This was put on the ship, and I'm guessing it must have been

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wound round lots of barrels or something?

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They did wind it onto the decks,

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they had what they called three tanks.

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Then they gradually off-loaded it.

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With the cables in place,

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it was left to the operators to send and receive the messages.

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This instrument is a Morse Inca.

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And it was one of the early ways of getting a printed record

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-of a Morse code signal.

-Right, what can I say?

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-Help.

-Help, OK.

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Dot, dot, dot, dash, dash, dash...

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And three dots again.

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-Perfect!

-You'd definitely get help with that.

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Victorian innovation meant that the sleepy village of Porthcurno was

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at the cutting edge of information technology.

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Now, in the 21st-century,

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the village is still synonymous with technology,

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with fibre-optic cables making landfall on its beach.

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Meanwhile, Philip is back up the coast

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at the pretty town of Marazion,

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famous for St Michael's Mount.

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He's visiting his second shop, The Old Drill Hall.

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-Hi there.

-Hello.

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-You must be Christian.

-I am.

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-I'm Philip, how're you?

-Very nice to meet you, very well, thank you.

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-This is a place and a half, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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You've got some stuff in here, haven't you?

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-Thank you.

-We better have a look around them, hadn't we?

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-Please do.

-I like stores and outside places,

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have you got an outside place?

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We have a pile at the back door at the moment.

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Let's go have a look at the pile.

0:15:090:15:12

This is... A pile outside the back door is always a good place to start, I think.

0:15:120:15:16

Better out than in, eh, Phil?!

0:15:160:15:17

Lord above!

0:15:170:15:19

These are calf feeders or something like that, aren't they?

0:15:190:15:22

I think they are, yeah.

0:15:220:15:23

If they were older, I'd be interested in those.

0:15:230:15:25

-There are some boilers at the back.

-Oh, those old galvanised tanks...

0:15:250:15:30

-Are they whole?

-I don't think there's any holes in them.

0:15:300:15:33

-We can dig them out.

-How much are they?

0:15:330:15:35

£25 each.

0:15:350:15:36

-I'm going to be a real pain now.

-OK.

-But could I have a look at those?

0:15:360:15:39

-Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

-Can I go back in and have a look round,

0:15:390:15:42

see if I can find something else,

0:15:420:15:44

and then perhaps they could miraculously...

0:15:440:15:46

-Appear on the ground?

-What a good man you are, I like you.

0:15:460:15:49

You've just watched the master at work

0:15:520:15:54

when it comes to ducking hard work,

0:15:540:15:56

and that looks like hard work to me.

0:15:560:15:58

Sneaky! Ah, rust, Philip's favourite.

0:15:590:16:03

This gate has a £50 ticket price.

0:16:030:16:05

One to consider.

0:16:050:16:07

What else tickles his fancy?

0:16:070:16:09

-Christian!

-Hello.

0:16:090:16:11

-What've you been doing?

-Thank you for your help moving...

0:16:110:16:13

-My new best mate!

-Hey, Christian's got the measure of you, Philip.

0:16:140:16:18

-How old are these, do you think?

-To be honest, I'm not too sure.

0:16:180:16:20

I think there's a reasonable bit of age to them.

0:16:200:16:22

Perhaps '50s, are they? '50s, '60s.

0:16:220:16:24

-Are they velvet?

-Yes.

0:16:240:16:26

There's three or four pairs.

0:16:260:16:28

OK. If you paid the right money for them, that could be a deal.

0:16:280:16:32

-Did you buy these right?

-I think so.

0:16:320:16:35

-Could be interesting.

-So there's four pairs, if I bought all of them...

0:16:350:16:38

-There might be three.

-Oh, look at this now.

0:16:380:16:40

-We'd have to price it per pair.

-Let's just see what we've got.

0:16:400:16:44

Let's be fair to you and to me.

0:16:440:16:46

So that's

0:16:460:16:47

three pairs of curtains, isn't it?

0:16:470:16:50

-So how much are they?

-£100, for you.

0:16:500:16:52

For the curtains? Pull yourself together!

0:16:520:16:55

Hey, that went well.

0:16:550:16:57

That's a bit more than a chuckle, Christian.

0:16:570:16:59

See, he's getting the hang of this now.

0:17:000:17:02

I quite like that, the old pine pew, as well.

0:17:020:17:05

And how much is this, Christian?

0:17:050:17:07

The ticket price is 375.

0:17:070:17:09

I need to think about this. I like that gate that's down there.

0:17:090:17:12

And I like the two bits of galvanised.

0:17:120:17:14

I'm looking at 60 quid for the three.

0:17:140:17:17

How's that sound?

0:17:170:17:18

-Yeah, OK.

-All right?

0:17:200:17:21

-Yeah.

-I'll shake your hand on those, I'll have those for sure,

0:17:210:17:24

that's 60 quid bought.

0:17:240:17:25

That's £60 for the green gate and the two galvanised tanks out in

0:17:250:17:29

-the yard.

-And then here I've got a pine pew and I've got some curtains.

0:17:290:17:34

I'm going to an auction in Bristol, and I'm thinking to myself...

0:17:340:17:37

Big houses in Bristol.

0:17:380:17:39

Curtains... I don't know.

0:17:410:17:43

Would those come at 50 and that come at 100?

0:17:430:17:45

I'm only going to buy one of them.

0:17:450:17:47

-The curtains...

-Could come at 50 quid, could they?

0:17:470:17:49

Yeah, not the pew.

0:17:490:17:51

I'm going to buy the curtains off you for £50,

0:17:510:17:54

and those other bits of fine quality antiques.

0:17:540:17:57

-Super.

-Lovely job.

0:17:570:17:59

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:17:590:18:00

Philip has been busy, he's spent £110 on that little lot.

0:18:000:18:04

I think it's time to hit the hay.

0:18:040:18:07

Nighty night.

0:18:070:18:08

Morning, everyone. Today, Philip's in the driving seat

0:18:130:18:16

and our experts are enjoying the delights of the Cornish countryside,

0:18:160:18:19

hopefully without a sheep in sight.

0:18:190:18:22

-Big splash.

-Can I put in a special request today?

0:18:220:18:26

What's your request, Philip?

0:18:260:18:27

Well, we don't want any Katy Cropper/Hannah Hauxwell impersonations of you

0:18:270:18:31

yomping across the fields of Cornwall,

0:18:310:18:33

chasing sheep, cows, goats,

0:18:330:18:35

pigs or any other animal that you might find in a field.

0:18:350:18:39

Yes, Katy and Hannah may well be two of Britain's best-loved female

0:18:390:18:44

farmers, but our Catherine knows an antique.

0:18:440:18:47

So far, she's bought a poker-worked page turner and a lot of vintage

0:18:470:18:51

jewellery and purses.

0:18:510:18:52

-Where's the party?

-And she has a decent £183.42 left to spend today.

0:18:520:19:00

Philip has been a busy old bee.

0:19:000:19:02

He's netted an Indian Masonic photograph, some velvet curtains,

0:19:020:19:06

a wrought iron gate that he's combined

0:19:060:19:08

with some vintage water tanks to

0:19:080:19:09

make one lot, and a retro coffee table.

0:19:090:19:12

Thomas Chippendale at this minute in time is rotating in his grave.

0:19:120:19:17

And that leaves him £151.44 left in his kitty.

0:19:170:19:22

Our experts are making their way to the first shop of the day,

0:19:230:19:26

a pretty village called The Lizard,

0:19:260:19:28

which is mainland Britain's most southerly settlement.

0:19:280:19:32

Redruth that way...

0:19:320:19:33

Somebody was telling me how you pronounce it.

0:19:330:19:35

What you have to do, if you're Cornish, you have to go RedRUTH.

0:19:350:19:38

It's the last part of the word that you have to say.

0:19:380:19:40

-RedRUTH.

-That's it, you see, you've got it!

0:19:400:19:43

-PenZANZE.

-PenZANCE.

0:19:430:19:45

-Is that we say?

-That's brilliant.

0:19:450:19:46

-The last part.

-PAsty.

0:19:460:19:48

-PAsty.

-PAsty.

-You're getting the hang of this, aren't you?

0:19:480:19:51

Philip is dropping Catherine off at the aptly named Lizard Antiques.

0:19:540:19:59

-Well, I need to be here.

-I'm quite envious of you here.

0:19:590:20:02

I like it when you're envious.

0:20:020:20:04

-Bad luck.

-Now, now Philip.

0:20:040:20:05

-Bye.

-Bye.

0:20:050:20:07

-Hello...

-Hello. Good morning, Catherine, welcome to The Lizard.

0:20:070:20:10

Good morning, thank you. This is jolly nice.

0:20:100:20:13

This looks really like my kind of shop,

0:20:130:20:15

lots of rusticy metal and wood and...

0:20:150:20:18

Tactile, unusual, junky things.

0:20:180:20:21

There's no shiny jewellery and silver in here, is there?

0:20:210:20:24

-No.

-Right, I'd better get to it.

0:20:240:20:25

-Yes.

-I like your bottles. They're in lovely condition, aren't they?

0:20:250:20:29

-Yes.

-The actual labels?

0:20:290:20:30

-Completely cleaned up.

-That's such an old

0:20:300:20:33

-symbol, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:20:330:20:34

I remember that, Flying Horse.

0:20:340:20:37

I think that might do better at auction, maybe.

0:20:370:20:38

Quite fun to have these.

0:20:380:20:40

I'm not looking at the prices at the moment, because it upsets me.

0:20:410:20:45

-You never know, Catherine.

-These are real boys' things,

0:20:450:20:48

not really my thing at all,

0:20:480:20:50

but I've been very girlie and bought some jewellery.

0:20:500:20:52

What can you do on those?

0:20:520:20:55

Well, at the moment...

0:20:550:20:57

each of them is 25, so it would be 100, wouldn't it?

0:20:570:21:01

I could be really good and say 50.

0:21:010:21:04

I know they won't make that at auction.

0:21:040:21:06

Can you do any better on that?

0:21:060:21:08

OK, seeing as it's you and us girls are going to stick together,

0:21:080:21:13

I'm going to go for 40, which is a bargain, £10 each,

0:21:130:21:16

-you will definitely...

-I should do, shouldn't I?

0:21:160:21:19

-Yeah.

-And that's quite nice as well, for the bottles.

0:21:190:21:21

Seen better days.

0:21:210:21:23

-I know.

-But that's part of its charm, isn't it?

0:21:230:21:27

That's quite nice, isn't it?

0:21:270:21:28

-Are you OK with that?

-Yes.

0:21:280:21:30

I quite like that.

0:21:300:21:31

And, three shilling deposit.

0:21:310:21:33

You might get some money back on that one.

0:21:330:21:35

I notice you've got 42 on that, but can that be very, very cheap?

0:21:350:21:39

Did you get a bit of a bargain with that?

0:21:390:21:41

We could have some movement on that.

0:21:410:21:43

Right, OK. That is a possibility.

0:21:430:21:46

And Debbie has another wooden box in the window.

0:21:460:21:48

F Dibben, I think it says, Fish Market, Poole.

0:21:490:21:53

There's absolutely no way that this is reproduced?

0:21:530:21:55

-No.

-We've got a lovely bit of woodworm there as well,

0:21:550:21:58

-which is always nice.

-Try telling that to the wood!

0:21:580:22:00

And then it just slides off.

0:22:000:22:01

Does it still smell of fish?

0:22:030:22:04

Oh, yes, you can smell the haddock!

0:22:060:22:09

Ticket price for this fishy box is £65.

0:22:090:22:12

What about the bottle box?

0:22:120:22:13

-We haven't talked about a price on this.

-No.

0:22:130:22:15

Did you want me to put it together with that one?

0:22:150:22:18

And do a sort of joint price, or do you want them individually?

0:22:180:22:21

Let's have a look, what do they look like together?

0:22:210:22:23

Can I make you an offer?

0:22:230:22:24

It would be easier, yes.

0:22:240:22:26

To be perfectly honest, I wouldn't pay any more than 30.

0:22:260:22:29

For the two? No.

0:22:310:22:33

Couldn't do that.

0:22:330:22:35

What about with the bottles as well, if I did...

0:22:350:22:38

What did we say on those, about 40?

0:22:380:22:40

Yes, 40.

0:22:400:22:42

And then maybe 30 on those.

0:22:420:22:44

Debbie, can I say 65 for the whole lot, rather than 70?

0:22:440:22:48

-Go on, then.

-Can I?

0:22:480:22:49

Yes, let's do that. Let's shake on it.

0:22:490:22:51

I'm going to shake your hand.

0:22:510:22:52

And I suppose you want some money.

0:22:520:22:55

So that's £35 for the bottles, and 30 for the boxes.

0:22:550:22:58

A pleasure doing business with you, thank you.

0:22:590:23:02

It's been really lovely, thank you very much.

0:23:020:23:03

-Lovely to meet you.

-You've got a lovely shop.

0:23:030:23:05

Right, I shall put these in my little holder.

0:23:050:23:08

-OK.

-This should be fun, Catherine.

0:23:080:23:10

-Watch out!

-How do I get out the door?

0:23:100:23:13

Meanwhile, Philip is on his way to

0:23:170:23:20

the famous old mining town of Camborne

0:23:200:23:22

to find out how a local man helped start a revolution in steam travel.

0:23:220:23:27

He's meeting steam enthusiast, Kingsley Rickard.

0:23:270:23:31

Camborne, home of steam, they tell me.

0:23:310:23:33

Presumably, whoever that is has got something to do with it?

0:23:330:23:36

This fellow is Richard Trevithick, or Captain Dick, known as locally,

0:23:360:23:41

and he was the fellow that invented high-pressure steam.

0:23:410:23:44

-Camborne man?

-Camborne man, born and bred.

0:23:440:23:47

-Clever man?

-He was quite clever, as a practical man,

0:23:470:23:51

he wasn't much of an academic.

0:23:510:23:52

I'm beginning to like him already.

0:23:520:23:54

He was born into a mining family and naturally, on leaving school,

0:23:540:23:59

he just joined his father on the mine.

0:23:590:24:01

His father was a mine captain, as they say in Cornwall,

0:24:010:24:04

that's a manager.

0:24:040:24:05

The Camborne area was the centre of a copper mining industry in the 18th

0:24:050:24:09

century, but the Cornish mines had to be constantly drained of water,

0:24:090:24:13

using primitive coal-powered low-pressure steam engines.

0:24:130:24:16

Once he got talking to miners,

0:24:180:24:19

he realised that one of the big costs in mining was that of coal.

0:24:190:24:25

The existing steam engines were very expensive to run, and he thought,

0:24:250:24:30

I must do something about steam generation,

0:24:300:24:33

and make some sort of boiler that's more efficient.

0:24:330:24:36

Trevithick invented the first high-pressure steam engine which

0:24:370:24:41

greatly reduced mine operating costs,

0:24:410:24:43

but his ingenuity didn't end there.

0:24:430:24:45

That really is something else, isn't it?

0:24:520:24:55

This is absolutely amazing, Phil.

0:24:550:24:57

This really is the world's first high-pressure steam self-propelled vehicle.

0:24:570:25:01

This is a replica of Trevithick's engine, which had the rather

0:25:010:25:06

brilliant name of the puffing devil.

0:25:060:25:09

Now then, you are dealing with a scientific idiot here, right?

0:25:090:25:13

Put it simply, you boil a kettle, steam comes off the kettle,

0:25:130:25:17

that steam can be used to harness to drive a piston.

0:25:170:25:20

Is that what this does?

0:25:210:25:22

-Is that a big kettle?

-It does the same thing.

0:25:220:25:25

Yes, it's a vast improvement on a domed kettle on a heat source.

0:25:250:25:31

-Right.

-Because you can't actually pressurise to any degree that shape,

0:25:310:25:37

and he needed to have this increase in pressure.

0:25:370:25:41

And so what he did was to have

0:25:410:25:43

a cylinder, and we've got it here, and then within it,

0:25:430:25:47

we've got another cylinder.

0:25:470:25:49

The pressure comes from the fact that on this end,

0:25:490:25:52

we've got a fire inside, so being a circular tube,

0:25:520:25:57

you can pressurise that much more than the old dome-type kettle.

0:25:570:26:02

It's using the heat more effectively.

0:26:020:26:05

I mean, this must have cost a fortune in those days to make it.

0:26:050:26:08

It cost about £35.

0:26:080:26:10

-Now, today...

-£35?

0:26:100:26:12

I can buy this!

0:26:120:26:13

I've got enough money. I can buy this.

0:26:130:26:15

Today, I would hazard a guess it would cost the best part of half a million.

0:26:160:26:20

Now, we've got lots of legs and bodies here.

0:26:200:26:22

How many does it take to operate this?

0:26:220:26:24

Essentially, it takes three to operate it,

0:26:240:26:27

and these lovely legs belong to the steersman and the driver,

0:26:270:26:31

and then on the back end,

0:26:310:26:33

you've got someone in charge of the water supply.

0:26:330:26:35

This diagonal arm is in fact the steering.

0:26:350:26:39

We've got the foot brake there, we've got a screw handbrake there.

0:26:390:26:44

Go on, then. I'm no you're dying to.

0:26:440:26:46

-Can I have a ride, mister?

-I think we can do that, Phil.

0:26:460:26:50

-And you've got to go on the backend.

-The backend.

0:26:500:26:52

Let her go.

0:26:570:26:58

In 1801, Trevithick's cutting-edge technology

0:26:590:27:03

was tested out on the streets of Camborne.

0:27:030:27:06

HOOTER BLOWS

0:27:060:27:07

Lordy, Lordy, Lordy.

0:27:090:27:11

I couldn't have put it better myself, Philip.

0:27:110:27:14

Determined to travel further and faster,

0:27:140:27:17

Trevithick put his invention on rails,

0:27:170:27:19

predating George Stephenson's Stockton to Darlington Railway by several years,

0:27:190:27:24

and the rest, as they say, is history.

0:27:240:27:27

Meanwhile, Catherine is in Redruth visiting her last shop -

0:27:300:27:35

Thornley Trading.

0:27:350:27:37

She's got £118 left to spend

0:27:370:27:39

and something has already caught her eye.

0:27:390:27:42

That is interesting, that little Deco trolley.

0:27:420:27:45

That, with some really good glasses on, some really good cocktail glasses,

0:27:450:27:50

really nice little decanters, that could look superb.

0:27:500:27:53

I can see a huge ticket on it, though, of £175.

0:27:550:27:59

It's Art Deco. It is '30s.

0:27:590:28:02

I'm going in for the kill.

0:28:020:28:03

Oh, lots of lights.

0:28:050:28:07

Hello. Do you like lights, by any chance?

0:28:070:28:09

Just a bit, yeah.

0:28:090:28:11

Hello, Catherine. And your name is?

0:28:110:28:13

-Walter.

-Hello, Walter.

0:28:130:28:14

-How are you doing?

-Fine.

0:28:140:28:16

I just had a look in the window.

0:28:160:28:18

-Your deco...

-Trolley.

0:28:180:28:20

That you've got one hell of a price on that.

0:28:200:28:23

-Can that be...?

-It's nothing to us.

0:28:230:28:25

What do you mean? What's nothing to you?

0:28:250:28:28

Putting high prices on things.

0:28:280:28:30

Oh, that's what you do, is it? You put high prices on.

0:28:300:28:32

I'm kind of looking at £40 on that, or less.

0:28:320:28:36

I...

0:28:360:28:37

-What could you do?

-I'd let you have it for 40.

0:28:380:28:41

-Came I have a look at it?

-Absolutely.

0:28:410:28:43

It's smothered in all sorts of stuff.

0:28:430:28:45

It is. We could be here some time.

0:28:450:28:47

I'm going to take my jacket off.

0:28:470:28:48

-What am I going to do with this lot?

-What are we going to do with this?

0:28:480:28:52

What's this little bit at the end for?

0:28:520:28:54

Oh, I know. That's to put your bottles in, isn't it?

0:28:540:28:57

There's a couple of pictures leaning against the front there.

0:28:570:29:00

Careful, if you can get to those.

0:29:000:29:02

-I'll do it, shall I, Walter?

-No pain, no gain, Catherine.

0:29:020:29:06

Look at that. That's good for serving.

0:29:060:29:08

You can actually take the drinks along.

0:29:080:29:11

Nice bit of chrome.

0:29:110:29:12

Nice bit of mirror. There's absolutely no way that that's later.

0:29:120:29:15

That is of the period, isn't it?

0:29:150:29:18

-Look at that.

-Look at that.

0:29:180:29:20

That's quite nice, actually, isn't it?

0:29:200:29:23

-Does it work?

-Yes.

0:29:230:29:24

SQUEAKING

0:29:260:29:27

Needs a little oil.

0:29:270:29:29

Yes, we have the movement.

0:29:290:29:31

-That's it.

-You haven't got a couple of nice little glasses, have you?

0:29:310:29:34

-To put on there.

-In one of the cabinets, I believe, yes.

0:29:340:29:37

There's some Babycham in the cupboard there.

0:29:370:29:39

There, these little glasses here?

0:29:390:29:42

Somewhere, I've got a bottle of champagne.

0:29:420:29:44

Oh, yeah, we'll have a bottle of champagne!

0:29:440:29:46

-No, it's only a dummy.

-Oh, have you?

0:29:460:29:48

Oh, yes, no, I'd love to see that, where's that?

0:29:480:29:50

-I will find it.

-How much are these glasses?

0:29:500:29:52

They've got no prices on.

0:29:520:29:53

-That's a good sign.

-Well, I'll do them a fiver each.

0:29:530:29:56

I'm creating a look here.

0:29:580:29:59

There you go, you're going to love that.

0:29:590:30:01

Oh, I do like a bottle of champagne.

0:30:010:30:03

You know what I like, don't you?

0:30:030:30:05

Don't get too excited.

0:30:050:30:07

It's only a dummy bottle, remember.

0:30:070:30:09

I tell you what, the glasses, the champagne bottle and the trolley,

0:30:090:30:14

60 the lot, and I'm amazed at my generosity.

0:30:140:30:17

-Are you?

-I am.

0:30:170:30:19

Well, because there's a few more glasses,

0:30:190:30:20

are you talking about those with it, or just those three?

0:30:200:30:23

No, you can have the other three as well. Now, that's looking fantastic.

0:30:230:30:26

It is, isn't it? Come to my party.

0:30:260:30:28

But we've got of '70s glasses here, so were going sort of '70s and '30s.

0:30:280:30:33

What do I do, do I buy the trolley by itself or do I buy the whole thing?

0:30:330:30:37

Decisions, decisions.

0:30:370:30:39

-Can I be cheeky?

-Just a little bit, Catherine.

0:30:390:30:42

Even cheekier?

0:30:420:30:44

-What's new?

-You know me.

0:30:440:30:46

Can I say 50?

0:30:460:30:48

Oh, blimey.

0:30:480:30:50

55, you've got a deal.

0:30:500:30:52

-Put it there.

-Right on, we sold something.

0:30:520:30:53

Right on.

0:30:530:30:55

That's the 1930s tray,

0:30:550:30:56

the 1970s glasses, and not forgetting

0:30:560:30:59

the dummy champagne bottle.

0:30:590:31:00

That's quite a nice lot, Catherine.

0:31:000:31:03

What did we say? 55, and there we go.

0:31:030:31:05

-And five, thank you very much.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:31:050:31:08

Let's leave Catherine in Redruth and catch up with Philip.

0:31:080:31:12

He's heading to Falmouth on Cornwall's south coast.

0:31:120:31:15

He's got £151.44 left to spend

0:31:150:31:18

at his final shop, the Vintage Warehouse.

0:31:180:31:22

-Hi.

-Morning.

-I'm Phil.

0:31:220:31:24

-How are you? Good to see you.

-Hi there, Cole.

0:31:240:31:26

-Cole?

-Yes.

-And this is the Little Vintage Warehouse. I'm on a mission.

0:31:260:31:29

-OK.

-I've got some money to spend.

0:31:290:31:31

In an ideal world, I'd like to spend all of it.

0:31:310:31:33

-OK, sounds good.

-OK, let's go and have a look round, see what we can see.

0:31:330:31:36

Oh, Cole, I love this.

0:31:360:31:38

How cool is that?

0:31:390:31:41

So this is a 1950s Jielde?

0:31:410:31:45

What make's that? German or Scandinavian or something.

0:31:450:31:48

Very cool thing, isn't it?

0:31:480:31:50

How much is that? Oh, £400!

0:31:500:31:52

I've got nowhere near that. Are you open to offers?

0:31:520:31:55

-Yeah, we're open to offers.

-I love that.

0:31:550:31:57

-It's a great piece.

-Right, do you want to know how much I've got?

0:31:570:32:00

-OK.

-You might not want to know how much I've got.

0:32:000:32:02

-Right.

-Go on, Philip, put the young man out of his misery.

0:32:020:32:05

I've got, to the last penny, £151.44.

0:32:050:32:11

-£150...

-51, don't forget the one.

0:32:110:32:14

-OK.

-And 44p. I'd love to buy that. Can you do anything with that?

0:32:140:32:18

In all honesty, I'd have to give Ollie a call, who's the shop owner because...

0:32:180:32:21

-Would you mind?

-No, not at all.

0:32:210:32:22

-He might throw me out.

-Hey, let's not be too dramatic, Philip.

0:32:220:32:25

-He might, yeah.

-Blimey.

0:32:250:32:27

-See what he says.

-Worth a try.

0:32:270:32:28

-Yeah, give him a go.

-OK.

-Thank you.

0:32:280:32:30

I think this is so lovely because it's just such a cool thing.

0:32:300:32:34

1950s. It's sort of got that vintagey warehouse look.

0:32:340:32:37

Clearly, it's all adjustable, I would imagine.

0:32:370:32:39

Look at that, how cool is that?

0:32:390:32:42

You know, and we're going to Bristol.

0:32:420:32:44

Is Bristol bang on trend then, Philip?

0:32:440:32:45

Bristol's full of students.

0:32:450:32:47

I like your thinking. Anyway, Cole is trying to get through to Ollie,

0:32:470:32:50

-the owner.

-Yeah, can you hear me?

0:32:500:32:53

Hello, hello?

0:32:530:32:54

Technical difficulties.

0:32:560:32:57

-Can you hear me?

-Cutting edge communications, Lordy.

0:32:570:33:01

-Hello, mate, you all right?

-Right, we're in business, Philip.

0:33:010:33:04

You know the industrial 1950s lamp

0:33:040:33:06

with the brake disk for a stand on it?

0:33:060:33:09

Yes, so you couldn't do any less than about 200.

0:33:100:33:12

-You think it'll go for 300 at auction?

-Can I have a word?

0:33:120:33:15

Phil says can he have a word with you quickly?

0:33:150:33:17

All right, I'll put you on.

0:33:170:33:18

Ollie, how are you? I desperately want to buy that but I have only got

0:33:200:33:23

left £151.44.

0:33:230:33:26

Can you do me a deal?

0:33:260:33:28

Let me just hand you back to Cole, then, you can tell him.

0:33:290:33:32

Well, Ollie's just sold Philip the Jielde lamp for the bargain price of

0:33:320:33:36

£151.44.

0:33:360:33:38

I am so excited by that.

0:33:380:33:40

I absolutely love it. So I bought that with my heart, not with my head.

0:33:400:33:44

I wonder if it's going to turn around and bite me in the b-u-m.

0:33:440:33:46

Only time will tell, old boy.

0:33:460:33:48

There's the £1.44.

0:33:480:33:51

-Thank you.

-And there's the balance money. There you are, I have no more. The cupboard is now bare.

0:33:510:33:55

So, that's Philip's shopping done.

0:33:560:33:58

He's added the vintage lamp to the rest of his loot -

0:33:580:34:00

an Indian Masonic picture, the retro coffee table,

0:34:000:34:04

the velvet curtains and a lot made up of a wrought iron gate with

0:34:040:34:08

the vintage water tanks, and he's spent all of his £321.44.

0:34:080:34:14

Excellent work.

0:34:140:34:15

Catherine's haul includes a fishmonger's crate together

0:34:150:34:19

with vintage bottle crate, some automobilia glassware,

0:34:190:34:22

a poker-work page turner,

0:34:220:34:24

a collection of vintage jewellery

0:34:240:34:26

and accessories and a drinks trolley and glasses.

0:34:260:34:28

She spent £160.

0:34:280:34:31

So, what do our experts make of each other's buys?

0:34:320:34:36

Before I saw your things, I thought I'd done really well today and I was

0:34:360:34:39

actually really chuffed with my purchases.

0:34:390:34:43

Now I've seen yours, I don't know if I'm so happy.

0:34:430:34:46

I love your bits of automobilia.

0:34:460:34:49

They are a sale lot.

0:34:490:34:50

At £35, there's a profit there for sure.

0:34:500:34:53

Something that I don't think anyone's ever bought before on the Antique's Road Trip is your velvet.

0:34:530:34:59

Not the best colour, I don't think, but so much of it.

0:34:590:35:02

At 50 quid, could be curtains for me.

0:35:020:35:05

I just hope that all the bidders in Bristol will have seen the light.

0:35:050:35:09

After setting off from Hayle,

0:35:110:35:12

our experts are now heading for auction in Bristol.

0:35:120:35:15

So, you spent up again, Mr Serrell.

0:35:150:35:18

Every last penny gone out of the window, kerching.

0:35:180:35:21

I think you did really well with your buying. I hate saying that.

0:35:210:35:25

Sorry, could you just say... I didn't quite hear what you said.

0:35:250:35:27

-No, I said it enough.

-No, just one more time.

-No!

-Please, just one more time.

0:35:270:35:30

You did really well with your buying!

0:35:300:35:32

Thank you, because the car just popped and banged a bit then, you see.

0:35:320:35:35

Today's sale is at one of the area's newer salerooms.

0:35:350:35:38

East Bristol Auctions have been only open for four years

0:35:380:35:42

but old hand Evan MacPherson

0:35:420:35:44

has cast his experienced eye over our pair's lots.

0:35:440:35:48

The star lot we think is the Jielde lamp.

0:35:480:35:51

Perhaps the most iconic of lights from the 20th century.

0:35:510:35:53

That should do really well and we've seen a lot of interest in that,

0:35:530:35:56

so we're excited for that one.

0:35:560:35:57

Drinks trolley, well, that's a party in a lot so you've got six Babycham

0:35:570:36:00

glasses but you've got an empty bottle of champagne for display.

0:36:000:36:03

What you really need is the bubbles and you've got the complete party.

0:36:030:36:06

Different decorative objects across the board, so, yes,

0:36:060:36:09

-I think they should do well.

-Fingers crossed, then.

0:36:090:36:11

It's busy today and the auction house also accepts internet bids.

0:36:110:36:14

Experts, take your seats.

0:36:140:36:16

Excited!

0:36:170:36:19

-I love auctions.

-So today could be my day.

0:36:190:36:21

First up is Philip's wrought iron gate with vintage water tanks.

0:36:220:36:25

Those tanks are really cool.

0:36:250:36:27

Wax them up, great coffee tables.

0:36:270:36:30

Brilliant industrial garden planters...

0:36:300:36:32

Actually, they're really nice.

0:36:320:36:33

..coffee tables, interior tables...

0:36:330:36:35

Coffee tables, get in there!

0:36:350:36:36

Coffee tables.

0:36:360:36:38

£50 with me on the commission.

0:36:380:36:40

Do I see two or five anywhere?

0:36:400:36:42

At 50 with me.

0:36:420:36:43

No money, but with me at £50.

0:36:430:36:46

At £50 and selling...

0:36:460:36:47

Well, some lucky bidder has bagged themselves a bargain.

0:36:500:36:53

Would you like me to start lending you some money?

0:36:530:36:55

You might have to in a minute.

0:36:550:36:57

Very confident, Catherine.

0:36:570:36:58

Next up are your vintage automobilia bottles.

0:36:580:37:01

I've got interest and I can start straight away at 38 with me.

0:37:010:37:05

Do I see 40?

0:37:050:37:06

At 55 on the screen. Do I see 60 anywhere?

0:37:060:37:08

-Get in there!

-She's punching me!

-Keep going!

0:37:080:37:11

60, thank you. Anyone in the room? At £60 on my screen.

0:37:110:37:13

Oh, look, Phil, look!

0:37:130:37:16

-70!

-At £70, do I see five anywhere?

0:37:160:37:18

At £70.

0:37:180:37:19

-Five, there we go.

-75!

0:37:190:37:21

One more will take it.

0:37:210:37:22

Be sure. £75.

0:37:220:37:25

-I'm so happy for her.

-Are we done?

0:37:250:37:26

-Sold.

-Well, Catherine's off on a flyer.

0:37:290:37:32

Are you a little bit miffed? Are you?

0:37:320:37:34

-Yeah.

-Are you a little bit miffed?

0:37:340:37:35

Let's see if Philip can get back to winning ways

0:37:350:37:38

with his velvet curtains.

0:37:380:37:39

I've got commission interest all over the place

0:37:390:37:41

and I can start at 70 with me.

0:37:410:37:43

-Well done.

-70 with me. 75 with me.

0:37:430:37:47

With me at 75. 80. Five with me.

0:37:470:37:50

-Five with me.

-90.

0:37:500:37:51

-90!

-95, with me still. At 95.

0:37:510:37:55

And I've got more on them at 95.

0:37:550:37:57

Are we done at £95?

0:37:570:37:59

-Sort of OK, isn't it?

-That's more than OK, Philip.

0:38:000:38:04

You've drawn a handsome profit out of that sale.

0:38:040:38:06

Next up is Catherine's vintage jewellery collection, but bad news,

0:38:060:38:09

the disco hair clip has been lost.

0:38:090:38:13

To make things fair, if this lot sells for less than what she paid,

0:38:130:38:17

we'll pay Catherine back the original £35 purchase price.

0:38:170:38:20

How's that?

0:38:200:38:22

Start me at £50 for those, please.

0:38:220:38:24

Start me at £30, then.

0:38:260:38:28

Oh, no. Wrong day for jewellery.

0:38:280:38:31

Any love at £20?

0:38:310:38:32

20 on the screen, thank you.

0:38:320:38:34

Surely, wake up to this. Take a look at them, that is beautiful.

0:38:340:38:37

22. Asking four.

0:38:370:38:38

-Oh, no.

-Four? At £24.

0:38:380:38:41

Be sure...

0:38:410:38:44

That's a loss of £11, but, as promised,

0:38:440:38:48

we're going to return Catherine's initial purchase price of £35.

0:38:480:38:52

Right, Philip's Indian Masonic photo's next.

0:38:520:38:55

Someone start me at £50 for that, please.

0:38:550:38:58

40 and away, then.

0:38:580:38:59

-It's going the wrong way.

-Yeah.

0:38:590:39:01

Any luck with 35?

0:39:010:39:03

Start me at 20, then, and see where we get to.

0:39:030:39:05

20 on the screen, thank you.

0:39:050:39:07

Any advance on 20?

0:39:070:39:08

Come on, let's see where we get to.

0:39:080:39:09

22 now. Come back, four.

0:39:090:39:10

Four, thank you. Asking six.

0:39:100:39:12

26 now. Still no money.

0:39:120:39:14

I'm surprised, that's a good thing.

0:39:140:39:16

Do I see eight anywhere? At 26, and selling.

0:39:160:39:19

Blimey, a lucky buyer is going home happy.

0:39:200:39:23

What can Catherine's poker-work page turner do?

0:39:230:39:27

-You don't like it, do you? A bit boring, you said.

-Er... Yeah.

0:39:270:39:30

Start me at £40 for that, please.

0:39:300:39:32

-Oh, no.

-Start me at £20, then.

0:39:320:39:34

20, surely. 20, 20.

0:39:340:39:35

20 on the screen. Thank you.

0:39:350:39:36

At £20 do I see two?

0:39:360:39:39

-Are we done?

-Keep going!

0:39:390:39:41

I didn't want to work with her, I really didn't want to work with her.

0:39:410:39:43

At £20...

0:39:430:39:45

Anita Manning, she'd have been lovely. Anybody.

0:39:450:39:48

Thomas Plant in a dress, that would have been fine for me.

0:39:480:39:51

Crikey, that's turned a whopping profit for Catherine.

0:39:510:39:54

Did that make a profit? Did that make a profit?

0:39:540:39:57

-Shut up!

-Did it?

0:39:570:39:58

Now it's time for Philip's retro table.

0:39:580:40:01

Someone start me at £50 for that, please.

0:40:010:40:03

50.

0:40:030:40:05

Start me at 30, then, let's see where we get to.

0:40:050:40:07

Oh, dear, dear, dear.

0:40:070:40:08

Surely £30.

0:40:080:40:09

£30.

0:40:090:40:11

At £30.

0:40:110:40:13

Looks like it's in Poland at £30.

0:40:130:40:15

Or Portugal! £30.

0:40:150:40:16

It's like the Eurovision Song Contest, isn't it?

0:40:160:40:18

Portugal, nul points.

0:40:180:40:20

Never mind, Philip.

0:40:200:40:21

At least someone in Portugal liked your table.

0:40:210:40:24

And to all our Portuguese viewers, I'd just like to say thank so

0:40:240:40:27

much for that.

0:40:270:40:28

Right, here's Catherine's crates.

0:40:280:40:31

I can remember the Corona pop man delivering.

0:40:310:40:33

Yes, and then getting your money when you put them out afterwards.

0:40:330:40:37

Yeah. You remember Corona?

0:40:370:40:38

-Yes, of course I do.

-You've worn well.

0:40:380:40:41

Start me at £40 for those two, please.

0:40:410:40:42

40. Start me at £30, then, see where we get to.

0:40:420:40:47

30, 30, 30 on my screen.

0:40:470:40:48

-You're all right.

-Thank you, do I see two anywhere?

0:40:480:40:50

-Oh, come on.

-At £30.

0:40:500:40:51

I can see you hovering. Two and four, thank you.

0:40:510:40:53

-Asking six.

-It's a bit of profit.

0:40:530:40:56

Six. 38, now.

0:40:560:40:57

-Come on, one more.

-Are we done?

0:40:570:40:59

Are you sure? 38.

0:40:590:41:00

That's another profit for Catherine

0:41:020:41:04

and her drinks tray with glasses is up next.

0:41:040:41:06

Start me at £80.

0:41:060:41:08

Nice little lot, that.

0:41:080:41:10

-Come on.

-50 and away.

0:41:100:41:12

50. 50 on the net.

0:41:120:41:13

Thank you, at £50.

0:41:130:41:14

Do I see 55? Now 60.

0:41:140:41:16

That's 60, asking five.

0:41:160:41:18

That's a lovely little lot, people.

0:41:180:41:20

-We've got £60.

-Please!

-At £60.

0:41:200:41:22

Come on. That could have been so good.

0:41:220:41:27

Someone's going to be cracking open the bubbly.

0:41:270:41:29

Philip's last lot is the Jielde lamp.

0:41:290:41:32

-I am really in love with that lamp.

-I don't want to sell it.

0:41:320:41:35

You don't want to sell it?

0:41:350:41:37

-No, I want to take it home.

-I've got loads of interest, unsurprisingly.

0:41:370:41:40

I can start with me at 150.

0:41:400:41:43

Do I see 160?

0:41:430:41:44

-160.

-170 with me.

0:41:440:41:46

-180. 190 with me.

-Brilliant.

0:41:460:41:49

200. 220 with me.

0:41:490:41:51

Still no money. 240, sir.

0:41:510:41:52

250. 260 with you, sir.

0:41:520:41:54

Do I see 280 anywhere?

0:41:540:41:56

At 260.

0:41:560:41:57

-Well done.

-Do I see 280?

0:41:570:41:59

280 against you.

0:41:590:42:00

300, sir. No, shakes his head.

0:42:000:42:02

-Oh, my goodness.

-280.

0:42:020:42:03

Are we done at 280?

0:42:030:42:04

Very well done.

0:42:060:42:07

-Well done.

-Philip's ended on a high note with that whopping profit.

0:42:070:42:11

-Well done.

-Better go, hadn't we?

0:42:110:42:13

Come on.

0:42:130:42:14

Well, that's our experts' fourth auction completed.

0:42:150:42:18

Let's see how they're faring.

0:42:180:42:20

Catherine started off with £223.42.

0:42:210:42:25

After paying her auction costs, she's made a profit of £26,

0:42:250:42:30

leaving her with a princely £250.38 to spend next time.

0:42:300:42:35

Philip started off with £321.44.

0:42:360:42:40

After paying auction costs, he's made a profit of £72.98,

0:42:400:42:44

leaving him a handsome £394.42 to splash on the final leg.

0:42:440:42:51

You did well.

0:42:510:42:52

Well, I think I deserve a chauffeur.

0:42:520:42:54

Oh, go on, then.

0:42:540:42:55

But a chauffeur like me?

0:42:570:42:58

I'm prepared to take the risk.

0:42:580:42:59

-Are you?

-Life is all about taking a risk.

0:42:590:43:02

Off to the races we go.

0:43:020:43:04

Goodbye, then.

0:43:040:43:05

Next time on Antique's Road Trip...

0:43:060:43:08

It's our experts' final leg.

0:43:080:43:11

You buy biscuit tins, I buy biscuit tins.

0:43:110:43:14

And the competition is hotting up.

0:43:140:43:16

Phil, this is the best shop ever.

0:43:160:43:18

But Philip's taking it all in his stride.

0:43:180:43:21

Catherine Southon and Philip Serrell are travelling along the beautiful Cornish coastline in a classic Citroen DS20. Before the auction in Bristol, Catherine heads to Porthcurno to see first-hand the incredible cables that stretch from this little village, along the sea bed, to South America, Australia and India. Meanwhile, Phil goes for a ride on a replica of the Puffing Devil, one of the first steam-powered vehicles in the world.