Episode 1 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 1

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon hunt for antiques around Sussex. Will 18th-century buckles get the bidders in a tizz or will English silver be the order of the day?


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-With £200 each...

-I want something shiny.

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..a classic car and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I like a rummage!

-I can't resist it.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Why do I always do this to myself?

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Give us a kiss.

-..and valiant losers.

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Come on - stick 'em up.

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-So, will it be the high road to glory...

-Onwards and upwards!

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..or the slow road to disaster?

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Take me home!

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This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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# It's a new dawn, it's a new day

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# It's a new life for me

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# And I'm feeling good. #

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Today we begin a brand-new adventure in the south of England with

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les auctioneers extraordinaires,

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Catherine Southon and Charles Hanson.

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How exciting. They make a nice couple, don't they?

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I'm a northern guy,

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and I've come very far south to take on a southern lass.

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That's it. Southon in southern.

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You know what they say - there can be a big North-South divide

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and I'm feeling it, but not that much.

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Right. Road Trip regular Charles is a smooth talker

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who knows his stuff when it comes to sniffing out antiques.

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Isn't it beautiful?

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Oh, look at this little lamby!

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-I know.

-Oh, look!

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-Baaa!

-Hello, lambs.

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His rival on this journey, another Road Trip favourite, Catherine,

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is the queen of brokering a good deal.

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How do you play the Road Trip game?

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-What is your game?

-I don't have a game.

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I don't have a strategy.

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If I like it, I buy...

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-What have you done?

-My seat has gone back.

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Sorry. Sorry, Catherine about that.

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Oh, Charles. Starting this Road Trip with £200 each,

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our experts will be zipping around in this snazzy 1981 MGB GT.

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On this epic Road Trip,

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Catherine and Charles will start in the south of England before making

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their way north, meandering around the West Midlands

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and then travelling through the Peak District.

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They will finish up with a final auction in Congleton in Cheshire.

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This leg will kick off in Arundel, West Sussex,

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and end in Paddock Wood, Kent, for an auction. Nice.

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Charles, it is getting really hot in here.

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You think this is right?

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Um, do you mean the car or us?

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-What?

-Sorry.

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Charles Hanson!

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Yeah. This morning, our Charles will shop first.

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Look out, Arundel.

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Isn't that charming?

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-Good morning.

-Good morning.

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-How are you?

-I'm very well, thank you, Charles.

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-Charles Hanson.

-Nice to meet you.

-What a gorgeous town.

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You are right there.

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David's good lady wife Amy has something she'd like to

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show Charles, and she's a good egg.

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Hello. Is that ostrich egg? Of course.

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It's a cigarette stand, isn't it?

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Dispenser. I would have thought...

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What is it - 1930s?

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Yes, it's so exotic,

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It's so, I suppose, stylish.

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So really because this obviously is a faux shell.

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It's not a real shell, is it?

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It's just made to imitate some type of ostrich egg.

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It's a really stylish object, Amy.

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How much is it?

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-£50.

-How much?

-£50.

-£15?

-50!

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Sorry. Five-zero.

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OK. You're happy. No problem. 20.

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-How much?

-20.

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-20?

-Yeah.

-Oh, that's not bad.

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Blimey! One to consider.

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And he rather fancies this Minton bowl. Goodness knows why.

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The reason that I like this is this, what we call...

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we call this blue Blue Celeste.

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What I love is this continuous band of sailing vessels

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against this really well-illuminated skyline.

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-Art Deco, 1930.

-Oh, right.

-HE TAPS THE BOWL

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Is that a chip?

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Yeah, it is.

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Yeah. Surely that will knock some money off

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the £120 ticket price, then?

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I'd want to pay you about £50.

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-Is that too little?

-I think that's too low, I'm afraid.

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Would you meet me at £60?

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Let's do it at £60.

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Amy, you are happy at 60?

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-Yeah.

-I think we're all good at 60.

-David, you're happy?

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So I can buy the attractive bowl,

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my Road Trip now is off and running,

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quite literally sailing.

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You slightly lost me there, Charles.

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Anyway, that's your first lot bought -

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what else is here of interest?

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A little rootwood carving of an elder.

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Probably Japanese.

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And this would date to around 1880.

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He has got a split.

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The feet are not particularly good,

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but the detail in there is very, very nice indeed.

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Nice patination. David, how much is he?

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-35.

-Yeah, he's nice.

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And the best on him would be?

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Make an offer.

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-Make an offer?

-Yes.

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-£10.

-All right.

-Is that a sale?

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It's a £10 sale. Well done.

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-I'll take him.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-I'll take him.

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Cor, he is on a roll, isn't he?

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That's another lot bought and he is showing no sign of stopping.

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What is this ink stand here, David?

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-Well, I believe it to be Black Forest.

-OK. So it is German.

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I think it is about 1900, 1910.

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-But it is in remarkably good condition.

-Yep.

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Black Forest carvings became a symbol of luxury and wealth

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associated with travel, and very popular today.

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What would be your very best price, Amy?

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You can have...150.

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I like it, but my bid would be £70.

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-£80.

-Oh, don't say that.

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SHE LAUGHS

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£75, and you've got a deal.

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-OK.

-OK, 75 is good.

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-I'll take it. Go on, thank you very much.

-Thank you so much.

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Another deal done and Charles is still considering

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the cigarette dispenser, which could be a risky punt,

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as tobacco-related collectables

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aren't particularly popular these days.

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HE COUGHS

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And your best on that is 20?

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-Yes.

-This lovely sort of simulated ostrich egg in the jazz

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Art Deco style,

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it's got great style, I will buy this for £20.

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Thank you, Amy.

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It seems like a no-brainer to me, and he is done!

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That's a huge £165 spent on four lots in his very first shop.

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Catherine has made her way to Storrington

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for her first shop of the day.

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And she's made a beeline for something elegant.

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I have actually done OK with some fans recently.

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This one in particular, though, this is mother-of-pearl,

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so the guard sticks, the outer sticks,

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are mother-of-pearl.

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It does say on it, AF, so "as found",

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so that means there is obviously something wrong with it.

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Well, let's get the lowdown from dealer, Ian.

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It's in a little bit of a poorly state.

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-Oh, gosh, it is, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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OK. Right. You don't have any more, by any chance, do you?

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Anywhere else, dotted?

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Well, actually, I have. I've got two more which I haven't priced up yet.

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I haven't put out for sale.

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Lovely! This is getting exciting.

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It is indeed.

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Right, let's see those fans.

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I used to have a few of those.

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Well, the problem that we have is that we have

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three fans in very poor condition.

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These two you haven't put prices on.

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-No.

-I mean, he's put £12 on that, your friend, Simon?

-Yes.

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I mean, I would probably offer eight, if that is acceptable to him.

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-Eight for this one, alone?

-Yeah.

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I think I can do it for ten.

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Oh, OK. And then I would probably say ten for each of those.

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Shall we see what else you might buy?

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Well, I'm quite interested in your little puppy outside.

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-Ah.

-How much is that doggie in the window?

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Well, actually on the path.

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-He's lovely.

-He's actually...

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Although he is a puppy, he is about the same age

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as the larger full-sized Great Dane.

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Is he not very old?

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He's probably about ten years old.

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What sort of price could he be?

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-He could be about 30-ish?

-I would say 40.

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If we can say 30 on the fans and 38 on him, we've got a deal.

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You don't think we could do 32 on the fans and 38 on him?

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Oh, I'm not going to argue over £2.

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-Very good.

-I'm not going to argue over £2.

-Thank you.

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It's been lovely. £32. £38. What are we going to call him?

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Lucky.

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Well, let's hope he lives up to his name.

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So that is the trio of fans and Lucky the dog bought for £70.

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Good stuff. Woof.

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Back with Charles and he has made his way 12 miles north

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to the small town of Petworth - I live near there.

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Charles is heading into Petworth Antiques.

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With just £35 left in his pocket, he'll need to be canny.

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Isn't that sweet?

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We see lots of blue and white at antique centres

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and often it's willow pattern,

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it can be quite mundane and quite boring.

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This is a fisherman pattern,

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and this coffee cup would date to around 1785.

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And what I like about this coffee pot is you will see,

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this, almost, fritting in the glaze,

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which might suggest it is experimental.

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It could be quite an early coffee cup.

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With a ticket price of £10, it is time to talk to dealer Jeff.

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1,000 pence and the best price would be, in pence?

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I should think £8.

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800 pence. That's not bad. 800 pence.

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-A good buy, I think.

-It just sounds a bit more grand saying pence.

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If you say so, Charles.

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And it looks like that is a deal done on the Caughley coffee cup.

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And with that, a day's shopping draws to a close.

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Nighty-night, guys.

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And just like that, Catherine and Charles are back on the road.

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This is, Charles,

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the first time I have ever been in a car with you driving

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-and I am petrified.

-You're not, are you?

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-Why?

-This is you.

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This morning, Catherine and Charles have moseyed along

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to Lewes in East Sussex,

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home to our experts' first shop of the day.

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This is well-known territory to me - I will show you around.

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Come on. Ladies first.

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Catherine has £120, while Charles

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has just under 30. Crumbs!

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Oh, look, smiley owners Michelle and Craig.

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Hello!

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This cabinet, I feel, is a very good place to start.

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-Hello.

-Hello, I am back with the keys.

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Thank you, Michelle.

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-Another thing...

-Can I call you Michelle My Belle?

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It might give us a discount as well. Thank you, Michelle.

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ALARM SOUNDS Oh, my Lord! Charles!

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-Sorry about that.

-How alarming.

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Meanwhile, Catherine has spied a small charm that she likes.

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Isn't that sweet?

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You've got this nice sort of embossed design.

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I would have thought it is about 1920.

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-Somewhere around there.

-Can I hold on to that?

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-Of course.

-Would you mind? Can I give that to you?

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Thank you. I just like that because it is a little bit...

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A little bit different. And we all love a fan, don't we?

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We do indeed.

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Well, you certainly seem to this Road Trip.

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What else has caught your eye, then, old girl?

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I saw this ballerina.

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I'm not a big fan of brooches, but she is quite sweet.

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-Yes.

-The subject is fantastic,

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I mean, so often you find these big clusters with the big stone stuck in

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the middle, but something like that..

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I mean, and she's quite elegant.

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Her pose is quite elegant, isn't it?

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She's actually quite lovely.

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I quite like that.

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It has got 50 on it.

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I was thinking in my mind sort of 28, 30...

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We'll leave Craig to consider Catherine's offer,

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because Charles has found a Swansea porcelain ink stand.

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He only has £27 left, so fingers crossed, eh?

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I think it's lovely.

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It is this beautiful boat shape and I would call this a piece

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of Georgian porcelain and then it would date to around 1820.

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How much could that be, Michelle?

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I will have to phone him because there is no ticket on it.

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Could it be £25?

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-I really don't know.

-Could you give him a call?

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All right, I'll ask him, yeah.

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Ink well. Thanks, Michelle.

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-Find out for me.

-OK.

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Hi, Ian, it is Michelle.

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Hello, lovey, how are you?

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Right, Michelle My Belle, what news?

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-Michelle?

-Your luck is in.

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-No, really?

-Well, he said 30, but...

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Really? I just wonder if you could do £28?

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I think that would be OK.

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-I will buy that for £28.

-OK.

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Oh, no, you won't. You're short, Charles.

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I've only got £27 left.

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-Oh, dear.

-Would you like...

-Never mind!

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-That is not on purpose. I am a pound short.

-I believe you.

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Would you take £27?

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And you really have completely cleared me out.

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I apologise.

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Yes. It's fine, it's fine, never mind.

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Are you sure? Michelle My Belle, give us a kiss.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes. It doesn't matter.

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You naughty boy.

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That forgiving deal means Charles has spent every single penny,

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so top marks.

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Catherine is still shopping and Craig has something he thinks

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will pique her interest.

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How about some Asprey hair brushes?

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-Now you're talking.

-These have only just come into stock

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-so they haven't even been cleaned yet.

-They are lovely.

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So this would've been in a set once upon a time.

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Perhaps with some other little jars or something like that.

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And maybe a hand mirror, probably.

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But it's nice that we've got Asprey on the side there -

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a nice clear mark, which is lovely, and you haven't polished them,

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which I think is fantastic.

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A great side as well is the lovely green enamel,

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the engine-turned enamel.

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Did you have a price in mind for these?

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Yes. They come in at a massive £10 each.

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So £40.

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Can they be 30 - is that cheeky?

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-Can they be 30?

-They can be 35.

-Lovely.

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Now, decision time.

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Catherine has three lots.

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Did you find out anything else on that?

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I had a word with Michelle, we've made a decision

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and we're going to take 30 on it.

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You can do 30? That's wonderful. I will take that at 30.

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This had a little ticket on it. What price...was it 12?

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It was £12, so it's £10.

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£10, OK.

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Can you do that for eight?

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Just to make my lot...

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The reason being, the rest of my fans are 32 and if

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I can make that eight, that gives it a nice comfortable...

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-A nice round figure.

-A nice round figure.

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So, if I can do eight for that, that's lovely.

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And £35 for the Asprey hairbrushes makes a combined total of £73.

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S'marvellous.

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Having spent every penny,

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Charles has decided to take a trip to the seaside,

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and has made his way to Brighton.

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MUSIC: I Do Like To Be Beside The Seaside

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But he is not here to stroll along the prom, prom, prom - oh, no.

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Instead, he is here to learn all about how the town

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used to pong, pong, pong,

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as he has come to meet Stuart Slark,

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who knows a thing or two about Brighton's sewers.

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Rather Charles than me.

0:15:050:15:07

-Is it Stuart?

-Yes, it is.

0:15:070:15:09

-Good to see you.

-Hello, Charles, nice to meet you.

0:15:090:15:11

That smell. It is great taking in this lovely air.

0:15:110:15:15

-Oh, it's beautiful.

-It's clean and we always say enjoy the sea air,

0:15:150:15:18

-don't we?

-We do.

0:15:180:15:20

If we roll back the years to maybe when Brighton Pavilion

0:15:200:15:22

and Prince Regent George IV, it was the place to come,

0:15:220:15:26

it was highly fashionable,

0:15:260:15:28

but back then there was a stench, wasn't there?

0:15:280:15:30

There was a very bad stench, yes.

0:15:300:15:33

Because Brighton didn't have any sewerage system at all.

0:15:330:15:36

All the properties were on cesspits,

0:15:360:15:38

which meant there was nowhere for it to go,

0:15:380:15:41

which meant when they were full up

0:15:410:15:42

they used to tip them in the streets.

0:15:420:15:44

And it used to come all the way down on to the beach,

0:15:440:15:46

and then go out into the sea.

0:15:460:15:47

You're going to show me

0:15:470:15:48

what the sewers did to make this what it is today.

0:15:480:15:51

-Yes.

-Great! I can't wait, Stuart.

0:15:510:15:53

By the mid-19th century,

0:15:530:15:56

Brighton was one of the fastest-growing towns in Britain

0:15:560:15:59

and thousands of families would visit

0:15:590:16:01

for their annual seaside holiday.

0:16:010:16:04

As a result, parts of Brighton struggled to cope.

0:16:040:16:07

One huge problem was the stench from overflowing cesspits,

0:16:070:16:11

and it would take one engineering genius to fix it,

0:16:110:16:14

by creating a sewerage system.

0:16:140:16:16

-Mind your step, Charles.

-I can smell it.

0:16:190:16:22

Oh, my goodness me.

0:16:220:16:23

-Is that sewage?

-That is raw sewage going through there at the moment.

0:16:230:16:26

Oh, my goodness me. So are we now...?

0:16:260:16:29

This is the old Victorian sewer.

0:16:290:16:32

Everything you see today with me is the old Victorian sewer, yes.

0:16:320:16:37

There is a surface run-off.

0:16:370:16:38

-Is that sewage?

-No, that is just condensation in here at the moment.

0:16:380:16:42

I am pleased to hear it.

0:16:420:16:44

If you look here...

0:16:440:16:45

-Oh, yes.

-This is where the rats normally sit.

0:16:450:16:48

Oh, you are joking.

0:16:480:16:49

-There's none here, so you're all right.

-Oh, God!

0:16:490:16:52

This is awful,

0:16:520:16:54

in the nicest sense of learning about history, it's awful.

0:16:540:16:59

Gosh, we're quite deep now, aren't we, underground?

0:16:590:17:01

Yes, we are about 40 foot underground at the moment

0:17:010:17:04

in the sewers itself.

0:17:040:17:05

My immediate reaction, I think, Stuart,

0:17:050:17:08

to what I can see is what a tremendous feat of engineering.

0:17:080:17:12

It's an incredible feat of engineering

0:17:120:17:14

when you think this was all open-cast done,

0:17:140:17:17

in other words it was a great big hole and then they just built

0:17:170:17:20

the brickwork around a wooden frame.

0:17:200:17:22

The man in charge of designing this impressive system

0:17:250:17:28

was Sir John Hawkshaw,

0:17:280:17:30

a talented civil engineer noted for his work on Charing Cross

0:17:300:17:33

and Cannon Street railway stations in London.

0:17:330:17:38

What did Sir John Hawkshaw do?

0:17:380:17:39

All I can see is a tunnel.

0:17:390:17:41

What was different with his work?

0:17:410:17:43

The difference came because Brighton has got no pumping stations on it

0:17:430:17:48

at all, and everything was done by gravity.

0:17:480:17:51

So what they invented, they invented an egg-shaped barrel,

0:17:510:17:55

as you can see. I'll show you with my torch.

0:17:550:17:57

As you can see, the egg-shaped barrel there.

0:17:570:18:00

So what that does, because it is

0:18:000:18:03

a small amount of gravity going through,

0:18:030:18:05

what it does, it speeds up and throws all the water

0:18:050:18:09

into the bottom of the barrel

0:18:090:18:11

and makes it go faster as you can hear it going down

0:18:110:18:13

the end of this pipe bit.

0:18:130:18:15

What a man Sir John was.

0:18:150:18:17

He almost, I suppose, rescued Brighton from what had been.

0:18:170:18:20

I think he helped make it as popular as it was.

0:18:200:18:23

And it is still in very good working condition now.

0:18:230:18:26

Which way are we going now, Stuart?

0:18:260:18:28

-Let's go down here.

-OK.

0:18:280:18:30

As you go round the second bend, just mind the step down.

0:18:300:18:32

I feel like I'm in a loo, literally.

0:18:320:18:34

There are an impressive 29 miles of Victorian sewers

0:18:340:18:39

running under Brighton.

0:18:390:18:41

Wow!

0:18:410:18:42

# Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside

0:18:420:18:46

# Oh, I do like to be beside the sea... #

0:18:460:18:49

I wish he would stop jumping up and down.

0:18:490:18:52

Stuart, I can see light.

0:18:520:18:54

Yes, this is one of the most impressive chambers

0:18:540:18:57

that has ever been built

0:18:570:18:59

by Sir John Hawkshaw.

0:18:590:19:01

Wow, that is amazing, isn't it?

0:19:010:19:03

If you would believe it,

0:19:030:19:05

we have been told there is over seven million bricks in here.

0:19:050:19:07

Who were the workers?

0:19:070:19:09

They employed Irish navvies, actually.

0:19:090:19:12

So the Irish came over in their droves to support this build?

0:19:120:19:16

Yes, correct, yes.

0:19:160:19:18

And it cost quite a bit of money in those days.

0:19:180:19:21

They estimated the cost to build this at £80,000.

0:19:210:19:25

Back in 1860 something?

0:19:250:19:28

-Correct.

-That would work out to be about £9 million today.

0:19:280:19:32

You would never get brickwork laid like this now in this day and age.

0:19:320:19:36

How long did it take to build?

0:19:360:19:38

It took from 1869 to 1874.

0:19:380:19:41

It was five years, which is incredible.

0:19:410:19:44

A tribute to Victorian ingenuity and construction,

0:19:450:19:48

Hawkshaw's sewers remain in use today, keeping Brighton clean,

0:19:480:19:53

fragrant and safe from disease.

0:19:530:19:55

Daylight. Thank goodness.

0:19:550:19:59

Talking of fragrant...

0:19:590:20:00

The sweet smell of Brighton is here once again.

0:20:020:20:06

That was an experience.

0:20:060:20:08

So romantic, Charles.

0:20:080:20:10

Back with Catherine and she's travelled half an hour south

0:20:160:20:19

to Peacehaven for a final spot of shopping.

0:20:190:20:22

Good afternoon, sir.

0:20:250:20:27

Hiding behind the cabinets!

0:20:270:20:29

Good afternoon. A pleasure to meet you.

0:20:290:20:31

-I'm Catherine and you're...?

-Hello, Catherine, I'm Steve.

0:20:310:20:34

Hello, Steve. Catherine has £57 still to spend.

0:20:340:20:38

Thank goodness there's lots of stock.

0:20:380:20:41

Whenever I see anything shagreen, I have to pick it up.

0:20:410:20:45

Shagreen is the most wonderful material.

0:20:450:20:48

So this is dyed, dyed green shark skin or ray skin.

0:20:480:20:54

You find a lot of things made from this in the Art Deco period.

0:20:540:20:57

This is probably '20s, '30s.

0:20:570:20:59

It's a lighter.

0:20:590:21:01

Had that been an etui or something like that,

0:21:010:21:03

that would have been absolutely gorgeous.

0:21:030:21:06

Can you do this for 20?

0:21:060:21:08

HE SIGHS

0:21:080:21:09

No.

0:21:090:21:11

Oh!

0:21:110:21:13

22 really would be the lowest.

0:21:130:21:15

22.

0:21:150:21:16

Shake my hand, Steve.

0:21:160:21:18

I'm going to buy this at £22.

0:21:180:21:21

Okey-doke.

0:21:210:21:22

That purchase brings the shopping to a close for this Road Trip.

0:21:220:21:26

Catherine will add the Art Deco gent's lighter

0:21:260:21:30

to her other purchases -

0:21:300:21:32

the collection of fans, including the novelty gilt metal charm,

0:21:320:21:36

the Great Dane woofer,

0:21:360:21:38

the green enamel brush set,

0:21:380:21:41

and the 1950s silver ballerina brooch.

0:21:410:21:45

She spent a total of £165.

0:21:450:21:48

Well done, that girl.

0:21:480:21:49

Charles, meanwhile, spent every single penny of his £200 pot,

0:21:490:21:54

buying a Minton bowl, the 1930s ostrich egg cigarette dispenser,

0:21:540:22:00

the Japanese carved figure,

0:22:000:22:03

the Black Forest desk stand,

0:22:030:22:06

the rare Caughley coffee cup

0:22:060:22:08

and the Swansea porcelain ink stand, which,

0:22:080:22:11

if it's right, is worth a fortune.

0:22:110:22:13

So, what do they make of each other's lots?

0:22:130:22:15

I love Catherine's puppy. That Great Dane in the window,

0:22:150:22:17

made in Cotswold stone, was an inspired buy.

0:22:170:22:21

And at £32, to me,

0:22:210:22:23

it's worth between 50 and 70.

0:22:230:22:25

That little blue and white cup looks pretty rare to me,

0:22:250:22:28

but have you spotted that massive crack down it?

0:22:280:22:31

But then he only paid £8 so who knows what will happen?

0:22:310:22:35

After starting in Arundel in Sussex,

0:22:370:22:40

our experts are now en route to

0:22:400:22:41

auction in Paddock Wood, Kent.

0:22:410:22:44

And they are raring to go.

0:22:440:22:46

We are literally at the back of the saleroom.

0:22:460:22:49

And the sun is shining.

0:22:530:22:54

And the sun is shining.

0:22:540:22:56

-What can go wrong?

-Everything is in our favour today.

0:22:560:22:58

Hop Farm Auction Rooms is the place of battle.

0:22:580:23:01

What does the man in charge, Alex Jenkins, have to say

0:23:010:23:04

about our experts' lots?

0:23:040:23:06

I think my favourite for the auction has got to be the Black Forest.

0:23:060:23:10

I think that one has just got it all going on.

0:23:100:23:12

I think it is going to do very well and I'm just jealous

0:23:120:23:15

that I can't buy it myself, I have to say.

0:23:150:23:16

The Cotswold stone,

0:23:160:23:18

this could be the little fun

0:23:180:23:19

surprise hit of the auction, I think.

0:23:190:23:21

Time to find out.

0:23:210:23:23

With buyers online and in the room,

0:23:230:23:25

it's time for this pair to take their seats.

0:23:250:23:27

First up, Charles's Minton bowl - this could be good.

0:23:300:23:33

100, it starts at 100.

0:23:330:23:36

Oh, come on.

0:23:360:23:37

-I do hate to disappoint.

-It's a great object, I had £100.

0:23:370:23:41

110, 120, 130, 140, 150 now.

0:23:410:23:43

160 on there, 170 now.

0:23:430:23:47

-Go on.

-I'm over the moon with that.

0:23:470:23:49

Selling at 160.

0:23:490:23:50

Yeah! I just liked it.

0:23:500:23:54

-Thank you very much.

-I wonder if they know about the chip.

0:23:540:23:57

Charles is off to a flying start, though.

0:23:570:23:59

That was your best thing.

0:23:590:24:01

Yeah, it was, and my blockbuster paid off, and I'm delighted.

0:24:010:24:03

Can Catherine make as big a splash with her first lot?

0:24:030:24:06

Her set of enamel brushes are next.

0:24:060:24:09

-£50 - I'm in.

-Well done.

0:24:090:24:11

-Put it there? That's good, well done.

-Sh! Keep going.

0:24:110:24:14

55 is online, 60.

0:24:140:24:16

At £60, £60, 65, 70, we're there.

0:24:160:24:18

-£70, sir?

-I told you.

0:24:180:24:21

-I told you.

-£70 here, 75 we want.

0:24:210:24:22

At £70 it is.

0:24:220:24:25

Yay! He's a friend of mine.

0:24:250:24:27

Hey! That's a profit apiece - great stuff.

0:24:270:24:31

I think you did very well.

0:24:310:24:33

Charles is up again, this time with his Swansea porcelain ink stand.

0:24:330:24:36

Now, stand by.

0:24:360:24:39

-£30 online.

-Thank you, net, I'm happy.

0:24:390:24:42

32. 32 is at the back, 32.

0:24:420:24:44

34's there, 36? 36 there.

0:24:440:24:46

-Come on!

-38 is there, 40.

0:24:460:24:48

-Keep going.

-40 is there, 42.

0:24:480:24:50

-42 is there - 44, anywhere?

-It doesn't need any more!

0:24:500:24:52

46 there, 48, 50 now.

0:24:520:24:55

£50 online.

0:24:550:24:57

At £50, we're selling at 50.

0:24:570:24:59

Gosh, well done. Another profit there for Charles,

0:25:000:25:03

but it could have been more.

0:25:030:25:04

You are flying.

0:25:040:25:06

-It's good.

-£23...

0:25:060:25:08

Shall I go? You want to do this Road Trip by yourself?

0:25:080:25:11

Thank you, Wales, and thank you, Kent.

0:25:110:25:13

Time to find out if there are any dog lovers in the room.

0:25:130:25:16

It's Catherine's Great Dane.

0:25:160:25:18

Will he prove to be lucky?

0:25:180:25:21

-£20 is bid.

-That's profit there.

0:25:210:25:24

-Oh, it's a bid!

-£22 now,

0:25:240:25:26

-£22, 22 is online, 24.

-Oh, come on!

0:25:260:25:31

-22 it is.

-No.

-The sympathy bids are coming in.

0:25:310:25:35

-Well done.

-26 is in.

0:25:350:25:38

-£28, 30.

-Yay! 32, 34. 34 is online.

0:25:380:25:41

36. 38's there, 40 now.

0:25:410:25:44

-42.

-Very, very, very good.

0:25:440:25:46

44, back in. 46 there, 48 to you.

0:25:460:25:49

48's there, 50 now.

0:25:490:25:51

48 it is.

0:25:510:25:52

It got there in the end.

0:25:520:25:54

And it's another profit for Catherine.

0:25:540:25:57

-Here we go, at £5...

-Lucky, you made £10.

0:25:570:25:59

-Lucky.

-Now, Charles, this time with his Oriental old boy.

0:25:590:26:06

-22, 24, 26, 28.

-Quite right, yes.

0:26:060:26:10

30. Go on!

0:26:100:26:12

Go on! Go on!

0:26:120:26:13

32's online. 32 it is.

0:26:130:26:15

At £32. Sells at 32.

0:26:150:26:18

Charles is certainly on a roll today.

0:26:200:26:22

Quality sells.

0:26:220:26:24

Quality sells well.

0:26:240:26:25

Quality sells well.

0:26:250:26:27

That's his mantra.

0:26:280:26:30

Catherine's fan selection is up next.

0:26:300:26:32

£20, thank you, sir.

0:26:320:26:33

22 now, straight in at 20.

0:26:330:26:35

Net's in. Watch the net go. Watch the net.

0:26:350:26:37

Still cheap for this lot.

0:26:370:26:39

-It's really cheap.

-22 is there, 24, 26, 28, 26 there.

0:26:390:26:41

28, 30. 32, 34. No?

0:26:410:26:45

32 it is. In the middle at £32.

0:26:450:26:48

Anywhere else? Still pretty things, still cheap.

0:26:480:26:51

-Come on, Internet.

-Watch the net.

-There's nothing on the net.

0:26:510:26:53

£32 it is , it sells at 32.

0:26:530:26:56

-What?

-Paris.

0:26:560:26:58

It was a risky punt, given their condition,

0:26:580:27:00

and one which didn't pay off, unfortunately.

0:27:000:27:03

I'm really gutted. I really, really thought they would do brilliantly.

0:27:030:27:08

That was my hope.

0:27:080:27:10

Don't laugh. Don't laugh!

0:27:100:27:12

Time to see how Charles's ostrich egg cigarette dispenser

0:27:120:27:16

will go up in smoke or not.

0:27:160:27:18

-£60 I'm bid. £65 we want.

-We are in.

0:27:180:27:21

-You've got 60?

-Look! We're live in the States.

0:27:210:27:25

£60 I've got, £65 we need.

0:27:250:27:27

At £60. It's still cheap, isn't it?

0:27:270:27:30

£60 here,

0:27:300:27:32

-at 60 it is.

-Come on!

0:27:320:27:33

The world came to Kent

0:27:340:27:36

and the world saluted my egg and it hatched. I'm delighted.

0:27:360:27:41

I bet you are. That profit means Charles is romping

0:27:410:27:44

-further into the lead.

-Funny old game, you know,

0:27:440:27:46

we've got a long way to go.

0:27:460:27:48

Oh, if looks could kill.

0:27:480:27:50

But can Catherine make a comeback

0:27:500:27:53

with her pretty little silver ballerina brooch?

0:27:530:27:55

Start straight in at £36.

0:27:550:27:59

-£38 anywhere?

-Good.

-Good. Keep going.

-Good.

-£38 now.

0:27:590:28:03

£38 there, 40 is here, 42, 44, 46.

0:28:030:28:07

-She's skipping away.

-£48 now.

0:28:070:28:09

-Oh, that's quite good.

-46 there, 48 we need.

0:28:090:28:12

Any more?

0:28:120:28:13

At 46.

0:28:130:28:15

Nice profit.

0:28:150:28:17

You've got to be pleased with that, Catherine.

0:28:170:28:19

-That's good. That's sweet 16 profit.

-It's good for you.

0:28:190:28:23

Next up, Charles's rare Caughley coffee cup.

0:28:230:28:26

-£30 for it.

-30.

0:28:260:28:28

Come on, rare object.

0:28:280:28:29

Look, Internet bid.

0:28:290:28:31

-Yes, straight in at 30.

-32 we need. Still cheap. £30 there, 32 we want.

0:28:310:28:36

At £30 it is.

0:28:360:28:38

32's in, £34 now.

0:28:380:28:41

£32, at £32, it is 34 we want.

0:28:410:28:43

-Still going on the net.

-At £32, £32 it is, at 32.

0:28:430:28:46

-Stop dancing.

-Sorry.

-Another cracking profit there for Charles.

0:28:460:28:50

Look at me. Thanks a lot. That's good.

0:28:500:28:53

Catherine is back in the hot seat now with her last lot,

0:28:530:28:57

the Art Deco gents' lighter.

0:28:570:29:00

£10 I'm bid.

0:29:000:29:01

12, 14, 16, 18.

0:29:010:29:04

-Come on, it's gorgeous!

-22 it is.

0:29:040:29:07

24, worth a lot more.

0:29:070:29:09

-Too little ducks. Quack quack.

-22, and 24 we need.

0:29:090:29:13

At 22.

0:29:130:29:14

Well, at least it wasn't a loss.

0:29:140:29:18

It had a good skin on it, it was a thick-skinned object,

0:29:180:29:21

you're thick-skinned as well, come on, it doesn't matter.

0:29:210:29:25

I think I'm going to cry.

0:29:250:29:28

Here comes Charles's final lot, the Black Forest desk stand.

0:29:280:29:32

-100 I'll take, 100, thank you.

-Hello!

0:29:320:29:35

-You should take that and run.

-No. Come on.

0:29:350:29:37

£100 it is. 110 now, should be more.

0:29:370:29:39

-110, 120, 130.

-What?

-Hold tight, baby. I'm sorry.

0:29:390:29:42

-130, 140.

-Are you paying these guys?

-140, 150.

0:29:420:29:44

-Hold tight.

-160 online. 170.

-Hello, Internet. America is calling.

0:29:440:29:48

It's the American dream. Come on, America. Come on, America.

0:29:480:29:50

-170,

-180, 190?

0:29:500:29:52

-Yes, please.

-Yes, please.

-190 there, 200.

0:29:520:29:54

-200 is there, 210?

-How do you...

-Come on, America.

-Charlie!

0:29:540:29:57

-220, 230. 230 is there, 240 now. 230 it is.

-I'm amazed!

0:29:570:30:00

Baby, hold tight, it's a funny old game.

0:30:000:30:03

Sorry, Catherine. Keep going.

0:30:030:30:05

230 in the room, 240 we want.

0:30:050:30:07

-Come on, America!

-240 is there, 250 is yours.

0:30:070:30:10

-250 it is, 260 now.

-Come on!

-At 250 in the room.

0:30:100:30:14

-At 250 it is, selling.

-Sold.

0:30:140:30:16

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

0:30:160:30:19

-Wow!

-Well done.

-I can't believe it.

0:30:190:30:21

I think I need a kiss for that.

0:30:210:30:23

Oh!

0:30:230:30:24

And so Charles completes his full house of profits

0:30:260:30:29

with an amazing result.

0:30:290:30:31

I think you should do a little dance.

0:30:310:30:33

I might have a little jig for joy.

0:30:330:30:34

I might do a little jig for joy as well.

0:30:340:30:37

-GAVEL BANGS

-Sorry. We're being told off now.

0:30:370:30:39

Catherine started this leg with £200 and made a pretty profit

0:30:390:30:42

of £13.76 after auction costs, leaving her with £213.76.

0:30:420:30:49

Well done.

0:30:490:30:51

Charles also started with £200 and he made an amazing profit of

0:30:510:30:56

£278.88, after saleroom fees,

0:30:560:31:01

so he goes into the next leg way out in the lead,

0:31:010:31:05

with a fabulous £478.88.

0:31:050:31:08

MUSIC: I Get Around by The Beach Boys

0:31:100:31:13

Hold onto your hats, we're about to start off on the second leg

0:31:180:31:21

with giggly twosome Charles amd Catherine.

0:31:210:31:24

They do love a laugh.

0:31:240:31:26

They'll start in the Kent village of Chart Sutton,

0:31:260:31:31

and aim for auction in Bourne End in Buckinghamshire.

0:31:310:31:34

They're sharing their first shop. Fortunately, it's a biggie.

0:31:340:31:38

Dealers Jamie and Trevor are on hand to help.

0:31:380:31:40

-Hello, gents.

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:31:400:31:43

-Catherine.

-I'm Trevor. How nice to meet you.

-Hello.

0:31:430:31:46

-Hello, Charles. Trevor.

-Good to see you.

-Nice to meet you.

-Jamie.

0:31:460:31:48

Jamie, hello, Jamie.

0:31:480:31:50

Time to split up and browse.

0:31:500:31:52

Antiques don't buy themselves, you know.

0:31:520:31:57

Catherine has just over £210.

0:31:580:32:01

I quite like this. What's this over here?

0:32:010:32:04

-Oh, the clock and the manicure set.

-That's an unusual combination.

0:32:040:32:07

This charming Edwardian mantle clock contains some tools

0:32:100:32:13

for keeping your nails neat and tidy. How sweet.

0:32:130:32:16

Want to have a look?

0:32:160:32:18

And then you open it up and you've got...

0:32:180:32:21

A set of manicure tools.

0:32:210:32:22

It's priced at £35.

0:32:220:32:24

To make something on this, I need it to be more like 15.

0:32:240:32:28

Could we split the difference and come in at 20?

0:32:280:32:31

-OK, let's put that as a possibility.

-OK.

-Put that to one side,

0:32:310:32:34

because I feel you have a lot more to offer here.

0:32:340:32:37

One item put aside. And what's this?

0:32:370:32:42

That's quite a nice old...

0:32:430:32:45

..railway sign. It's very heavy, be careful.

0:32:450:32:48

-It is heavy, isn't it? Cast iron.

-Yes, cast iron.

0:32:480:32:50

What is it? "Any person who omits to shut and fasten this gate

0:32:500:32:55

"is liable to a penalty." That's a big lump, isn't it?

0:32:550:32:59

Yes, it's quite nice.

0:32:590:33:01

It's proced at 48.

0:33:010:33:03

What's ypur best, then, Trev?

0:33:050:33:08

-I'm happy to let you have that for 15, if it helps.

-Are you? Right.

0:33:080:33:13

Another item to set aside.

0:33:130:33:15

And there really is no stopping Catherine this morning. Go, girl.

0:33:150:33:18

This is nice.

0:33:180:33:20

-Yeah, that's unusual, isn't it?

-Mm.

0:33:220:33:24

Certainly is. Mid-20th century parasol

0:33:240:33:27

embellished with a carved figure?

0:33:270:33:29

Lovely.

0:33:290:33:30

-The sticks are all good.

-There we are.

0:33:300:33:32

Mm. Priced at £35.

0:33:320:33:35

And once again, Catherine's not going to commit

0:33:350:33:37

until she's finished browsing.

0:33:370:33:38

Isn't this terribly bad luck to put that over your head?

0:33:410:33:43

Oh, yeah, thanks. God, I don't need any more bad luck!

0:33:430:33:45

I don't need any more.

0:33:450:33:47

Charles, do you want an umbrella?

0:33:470:33:51

Now, Charles has a huge £480. And this looks promising.

0:33:510:33:56

They're good signs, aren't they?

0:33:560:33:59

Wow!

0:33:590:34:01

It's a collection of six enamel advertising signs from the early

0:34:010:34:05

to the mid-20th century.

0:34:050:34:07

Ticket price on the lot is a whopping £600.

0:34:070:34:10

Dealer Jamie will try to contact the vendor to see if a deal

0:34:100:34:14

can be struck, while Charles browses on.

0:34:140:34:17

But elsewhere, Catherine has also nabbed Jamie's attention.

0:34:170:34:20

Tell me about the bubblegum machine.

0:34:220:34:24

It's very good. It takes 20p pieces.

0:34:240:34:26

-You can use it as a money box, if you want to.

-Oh, you can use it?

0:34:260:34:29

Yeah, you can use it.

0:34:290:34:30

Oh, yes. It dates from the 1980s. Ticket price is £75.

0:34:300:34:34

Can we say 25 and I won't go down any more?

0:34:340:34:37

-OK.

-Can we?

-Yeah.

-I quite like this.

0:34:370:34:40

-I'm going to shake your hand on that.

-OK.

-I'm going to say yes

0:34:400:34:43

-to £25.

-OK.

0:34:430:34:45

Crikey! Catherine bags the sweetest of discounts.

0:34:450:34:48

But, despite the dancing, she's still got a heap of items set aside.

0:34:500:34:55

The mantle clock-cum-manicure set,

0:34:550:34:57

the railway signage and the mid-20th century parasol,

0:34:570:35:00

which Trevor has had some word on.

0:35:000:35:03

He's prepared to let you have that for £18.

0:35:030:35:05

-18, OK.

-Mm.

0:35:050:35:08

I can do the clock for 15 for you, if that helps.

0:35:080:35:10

Right. So we've got 15 on the clock.

0:35:100:35:12

Yes. And the railway sign...

0:35:120:35:14

-We can do that for 15?

-I'll do it for 15.

0:35:140:35:18

Yeah, I think that seems pretty good.

0:35:180:35:20

Deal done, then, at £48 for the parasol, sign and clock,

0:35:200:35:24

and Catherine also has the bubblegum machine she bought earlier as well.

0:35:240:35:28

So, she's got a whopping four items in the bag for a total of £73,

0:35:280:35:32

and she's finished here also.

0:35:320:35:34

HE WHISTLES Nice flowers.

0:35:340:35:37

And Charles... Blimey! This carved African mask

0:35:410:35:44

dates from around about 1900, and it's priced at £95.

0:35:440:35:50

-I'm going to read your mind...

-Go for it.

0:35:500:35:53

-Go on, tell me.

-No, you read my mind. What did I say?

0:35:550:35:58

-I think you might say about £30.

-I had £30 in mind.

0:35:590:36:03

-No!

-There we go.

-Really?

0:36:030:36:05

-It was £30.

-And that still gives you a profit?

-Yes.

0:36:050:36:08

Lovely. That little "face-off" - ha-ha!

0:36:080:36:11

means Charles finally has his first item.

0:36:110:36:14

And now, the owner of all those signs is on the blower.

0:36:140:36:17

What might he do if Charles takes all six?

0:36:170:36:20

30 quid the lot?

0:36:200:36:22

£400?

0:36:230:36:25

-And that's the bottom?

-Better than the top.

0:36:250:36:29

And after a final chat with Jamie...

0:36:290:36:31

Take care, bye-bye, bye!

0:36:310:36:33

So, if we both say together, the best price was...?

0:36:340:36:37

380.

0:36:370:36:38

It wasn't?!

0:36:380:36:39

A terrific offer,

0:36:390:36:41

but Charles still wants to keep his options open.

0:36:410:36:44

I feel duty bound, just to get myself around

0:36:440:36:49

the great landscape of Kent,

0:36:490:36:51

just to make sure I don't unearth anything else...

0:36:510:36:54

would you have an agreement to hold them?

0:36:540:36:56

-Yep.

-And I will, either way, call you.

-Yep.

0:36:560:36:59

Jamie, you are a gent.

0:36:590:37:02

Charles has those on hold, and the mask in the bag.

0:37:020:37:06

And he's heading off.

0:37:060:37:07

Meanwhile, Catherine has travelled on to the Kent town of Tenterden,

0:37:100:37:15

where she is strolling into her next shop.

0:37:150:37:17

Looks lovely in here.

0:37:170:37:18

Quite nice. So we've got a leather Georgian fire bucket.

0:37:240:37:29

Copper around the top.

0:37:290:37:32

That's quite nice, isn't it?

0:37:320:37:35

1820s, '30s?

0:37:350:37:37

It's in quite nice condition. People like these.

0:37:370:37:40

As well they might.

0:37:400:37:42

What can Pam and Terry do for you?

0:37:420:37:44

138 on your bucket.

0:37:450:37:47

We could do 110

0:37:470:37:49

for you. It is an old Georgian one,

0:37:490:37:52

-it's at least 200 years old.

-Yeah.

0:37:520:37:55

I do like it. The ones that tend to do very well

0:37:550:37:59

aren't so worn. Because this is quite worn.

0:37:590:38:01

It feels like it's almost...

0:38:010:38:03

-It still holds water.

-Have you tested it?

-We have.

0:38:030:38:06

But will this deal hold water?

0:38:060:38:08

Would that be your best on that?

0:38:080:38:11

I can do you £100.

0:38:110:38:13

-It's a lot of money, isn't it?

-Do 90, then.

0:38:130:38:16

-And 90 is your best price?

-Yeah.

-Yeah? OK.

0:38:160:38:18

-We'll shake on it.

-Thank you.

0:38:180:38:20

A gamble it is.

0:38:200:38:22

Catherine parts with the lion's share of her kitty

0:38:220:38:26

for a venerable bucket,

0:38:260:38:27

leaving her with just over £50 left to spend.

0:38:270:38:31

And after such a daring buy, I think a bit of rest is needed,

0:38:310:38:34

so nighty-night.

0:38:340:38:36

The morning sun finds them back in the MG, and raring to go.

0:38:390:38:45

You know, the sun has got his hat on today.

0:38:450:38:47

It's going to be a hip, hip, hip hooray.

0:38:470:38:50

And I can't wait. Yeah.

0:38:500:38:51

And neither can I, Charles.

0:38:510:38:54

They have arived in the village of Headcorn.

0:38:540:38:58

Catherine's dropping Charles off at his first shop.

0:38:580:39:00

Sweet little place.

0:39:000:39:02

Drive carefully. See you later. Good luck.

0:39:020:39:04

Bye.

0:39:060:39:07

With only £50 in his pocket,

0:39:070:39:08

Chsrles is meeting Shirley, owner of Allsorts.

0:39:080:39:12

Hi, Shirl.

0:39:120:39:14

-Shirley, good to see you.

-And you.

-It's nice to be here.

0:39:140:39:16

-Good.

-I like your antique shop. I'll go for a wander.

0:39:160:39:18

-OK.

-Thank you, Mrs...

0:39:180:39:20

-Just Shirley?

-Just Shirley.

-Just Shirley here in Kent.

-Not Mrs.

0:39:200:39:24

I like your style. We're friends in Kent. That's great.

0:39:240:39:27

Now, that's a lot of crockery.

0:39:300:39:32

That's quite nice.

0:39:320:39:34

Isn't that pretty? Isn't that a beautiful shape?

0:39:340:39:37

It's so... So Art Deco.

0:39:370:39:39

So you. This part-dinner service was made by Gray's,

0:39:390:39:43

a Staffordshire pottery maker founded in 1907.

0:39:430:39:46

But this set dates from the early 20th century.

0:39:460:39:50

Look at that, the design. That's got the lid...

0:39:500:39:53

Open it up,

0:39:550:39:56

and this sort of set just makes you feel happy.

0:39:560:40:00

That ladle. Because the colours are so vibrant,

0:40:000:40:03

the sun is shining in Kent, and importantly, I like this.

0:40:030:40:08

Ticket price is £45. Oh. Shirley...!

0:40:080:40:12

Shirley! You're a lady who's full of joy.

0:40:120:40:16

What could be the best price on that?

0:40:160:40:19

I'll have to phone the dealer for you.

0:40:190:40:20

-But I'm sure we can do something.

-What are you thinking?

0:40:200:40:23

-What are you thinking?

-What am I thinking?

0:40:230:40:25

He's got 45... I don't know if he'd go as low as 30.

0:40:250:40:28

-That sounds good to me.

-Does that all right?

-Yeah.

0:40:280:40:31

Within a flash, Shirl the Pearl has the answer.

0:40:310:40:35

-I've spoken to the dealer.

-Full of Art Deco promise. Hit me.

0:40:350:40:38

-Yes, you can have it for 30.

-I'll take it. Thank you.

-Great.

0:40:380:40:42

I'll take it. That's one down. Fantastic. I'm delighted, Shirley.

0:40:420:40:44

And that's another tidy little buy for Charles.

0:40:440:40:47

Thank you, Shirl.

0:40:470:40:49

Now, Catherine already has five items in the old bag,

0:40:500:40:54

so she's galloped straight back to the town of Maidstone.

0:40:540:40:59

Cantered, actually. Where she seems to be horsing around.

0:40:590:41:02

Ha! Where did you get that wonderful conveyance, ma'am?

0:41:020:41:04

MUSIC: Galloping Home by Denis King

0:41:040:41:07

So, from classic car

0:41:070:41:10

to my carriage. This is even more classic.

0:41:100:41:12

Eat your heart out, Charles Hanson.

0:41:140:41:17

Crikey. In quite the correct style, she is heading

0:41:170:41:20

-for the Tyrwhitt-Drake Museum of Carriages.

-Thank you very much!

0:41:200:41:25

That was an amazing experience.

0:41:250:41:27

Thank you, thank you.

0:41:270:41:28

-You're welcome.

-Thank you, Wilbur and Buster.

0:41:280:41:30

Well done, boys.

0:41:300:41:32

Here she's meeting Maidstone Museum's director Victoria Barlow.

0:41:320:41:38

-Hi, there.

-Hi.

-Victoria, very nice to meet you.

0:41:380:41:40

This place holds a collection of over 60 carriages.

0:41:400:41:45

It's a time capsule of the world

0:41:450:41:47

when horsepower was really the thing.

0:41:470:41:50

We owe its existence today to its founder and namesake.

0:41:500:41:54

Who's our friend here, then?

0:41:550:41:57

OK, so this is the reason that we're here,

0:41:570:41:59

this is Garrard Tyrwhitt-Drake.

0:41:590:42:01

He was born in the 1880s, so very much a late Victorian,

0:42:010:42:05

but he came from a local brewing family, so very wealthy.

0:42:050:42:09

The reason he's important for this museum was that

0:42:090:42:12

after the end of the Second World War

0:42:120:42:14

he began to see that carriages had had their day.

0:42:140:42:18

Motorised vehicles were coming in,

0:42:180:42:19

and he was quite aware of the fact that

0:42:190:42:22

a lot of the carriages that had been so popular and that he remembered so

0:42:220:42:24

fondly from his youth, were sitting in barns, rotting away,

0:42:240:42:29

and were never going to be used again,

0:42:290:42:30

and he wanted to save examples,

0:42:300:42:33

so that we would know what it was like.

0:42:330:42:36

The horse-drawn carriages he saved form the basis for the museum's

0:42:360:42:41

collection. They tell the story of coach and carriage evolution

0:42:410:42:44

down the ages - from the days

0:42:440:42:46

when carriage travel was only for the wealthy,

0:42:460:42:49

to the 19th century, when it opened up to ordinary people.

0:42:490:42:52

Well, this is quite an important carriage in the development of them.

0:42:520:42:55

This is a Clarence, also known as a growler,

0:42:550:42:59

because of the noise its wheels made on the floor.

0:42:590:43:02

This was one of the first carriages in the Victorian era,

0:43:020:43:04

when a normal middle-class family could buy a carriage

0:43:040:43:08

and take their family out in it.

0:43:080:43:10

This made carriage travel an option for the middle-class masses.

0:43:120:43:15

And they soon learned that they made perfect cabs for hire,

0:43:150:43:21

because you could get four people and some

0:43:210:43:23

luggage into the carriage,

0:43:230:43:26

so people started then renting them by the hour,

0:43:260:43:29

-and these became the first hackney carriages.

-Oh, really?

0:43:290:43:32

So where we get the name hackney carriages from today,

0:43:320:43:35

for the London cabs?

0:43:350:43:36

The streets of Britain's cities teemed with carriages

0:43:360:43:39

in their Victorian heyday,

0:43:390:43:41

but it didn't take long until carriage design

0:43:410:43:43

evolved along some more daring lines.

0:43:430:43:46

Victoria, this particular coach

0:43:480:43:50

looks structurally very different from what we've seen downstairs.

0:43:500:43:54

What's happened here is we've had a shift

0:43:540:43:56

from having your driver upfront

0:43:560:43:58

driving you while you sit in comfort at the back.

0:43:580:44:01

This is actually an owner-driver vehicle, so you drive yourself.

0:44:010:44:05

It meant that it became very popular with young men who liked speed.

0:44:050:44:10

So this was, you know, the sort of sports car of its day.

0:44:100:44:14

You would get up, set off, possibly with a friend,

0:44:140:44:18

but essentially it was for the young, the daring,

0:44:180:44:21

the need for speed.

0:44:210:44:23

MUSIC: William Tell Overture by Rossini

0:44:230:44:25

Boy racers might have been a hazard even in the 19th century,

0:44:250:44:28

but Victoria also wants to show

0:44:280:44:30

Catherine another carriage that really typified the age.

0:44:300:44:33

Giddy up.

0:44:330:44:35

This is lovely and open, this one, isn't it?

0:44:360:44:38

It is. This is a Victoria.

0:44:380:44:41

-So this was named after...

-The Queen, Queen Victoria,

0:44:410:44:43

who very much popularised carriages as a way of being seen by a crowd.

0:44:430:44:49

So a lot of the carriages we looked at downstairs

0:44:490:44:51

had doors and window blinds that you could pull,

0:44:510:44:53

so you could ride in privacy.

0:44:530:44:54

This carriage is all designed to show off.

0:44:540:44:57

-"Look at me."

-Indeed.

0:44:570:44:59

So when you are going out to an event,

0:44:590:45:01

perhaps to the races or to a picnic,

0:45:010:45:03

and you've paid a fortune for your beautiful dress,

0:45:030:45:06

you want people to see it.

0:45:060:45:07

So you could fold the roof back down and the sides are cut away very low.

0:45:070:45:12

And obviously for the Queen, that was important,

0:45:120:45:14

so her subjects could see her.

0:45:140:45:15

As the 20th century dawned,

0:45:180:45:19

motorised transport started to usurp the carriage,

0:45:190:45:22

but these still have an elegance and romance all of their own.

0:45:220:45:26

Well, I have to say it's been wonderful.

0:45:280:45:31

Now my carriage awaits. And I have to head off.

0:45:310:45:33

-Thank you so much, Victoria, thank you.

-Take care.

-Bye-bye.

0:45:330:45:37

You could get too used to this, Catherine.

0:45:380:45:40

Right, we're off again.

0:45:400:45:42

Walk on, as they say.

0:45:420:45:44

Meanwhile, Charles has motored on to the town of Faversham...

0:45:510:45:56

..where he's sauntering off into his next shop.

0:45:560:45:59

Andy's in charge here today.

0:45:590:46:01

True to form, Charles doesn't take long to spot a possible.

0:46:010:46:05

It's this revolving cabinet here.

0:46:050:46:08

Here they are.

0:46:080:46:10

-Aren't they wonderful?

-They're lovely.

0:46:100:46:12

-Are they yours?

-They are, sir.

0:46:120:46:14

-They could be yours.

-Aren't they gorgeous?

0:46:140:46:17

They are a pair of decorative cut steel shoe buckles,

0:46:170:46:22

which Charles thinks may date from as early as the 18th century,

0:46:220:46:25

and I think he's right.

0:46:250:46:27

So, you'd put them on like that, wouldn't you, in the day?

0:46:270:46:30

That's it, yes.

0:46:300:46:32

So... Maybe a Georgian gent, and don't my shoes look better now?

0:46:320:46:36

-They do, they look beautiful.

-They're just stunning.

0:46:360:46:40

Ticket price on these handsome accoutrements is £150.

0:46:400:46:44

But what might be Andy's bottom line?

0:46:440:46:48

To be honest, I'd like about 80.

0:46:480:46:50

-Could you go a bit less, do you think?

-70.

0:46:500:46:52

You're an odd and I'm an even.

0:46:520:46:54

-Right.

-Odd and even.

0:46:540:46:56

And I wonder if you could be an even-steven and meet me at £60.

0:46:560:46:59

-Go on, then.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-Does that leave you...?

0:47:010:47:04

-It still gives me a profit, yeah, absolutely.

-And that's a deal.

0:47:040:47:08

-Done. Sold. Thanks a lot.

-Thank you.

-Appreciate it.

0:47:080:47:11

That's one more item bagged, but Charles is still on the hunt.

0:47:110:47:14

Watch out, he is in a cabinet.

0:47:160:47:19

Quite like this vase down here.

0:47:190:47:20

Hello, vase.

0:47:200:47:22

"Hello, Charles!"

0:47:220:47:25

And that landscape is quite unusual, and the gilding is good.

0:47:250:47:28

Charles is gently tapping the vase on his teeth

0:47:280:47:32

to check for the sound of any repairs.

0:47:320:47:35

Sounds OK - and you do have to have your own teeth.

0:47:350:47:37

It's a piece of Carlton Ware, probably dating from the 1920s.

0:47:370:47:40

-Andy?

-Yes?

-Excuse me, come hither.

0:47:400:47:43

-Over here. I'm waiting.

-I'm admiring your vase.

0:47:430:47:45

-Thank you.

-It says £15.

0:47:450:47:48

I like it. Best price?

0:47:480:47:49

-13?

-I was hoping you might say it could be Hanson's den - number...?

0:47:490:47:53

-Ten.

-12...

0:47:530:47:56

I would happily take this vase for a tenner, because I think for £10

0:47:560:47:59

-it's decorative. Put it there.

-Yeah, go on.

-£10?

0:47:590:48:02

-Sold!

-Good man.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, fine.

0:48:020:48:05

That's yet another deal sealed. Good man.

0:48:050:48:09

Now, Charles is in a bit of a pickle.

0:48:120:48:14

Remember the set of six metal signs he reserved yesterday?

0:48:140:48:18

The last quote was £380.

0:48:180:48:20

The problem is, Charles no longer has that much cash.

0:48:200:48:23

Oh,dear, what's to be done?

0:48:230:48:27

But I've still got £348 left.

0:48:270:48:30

Time to give the dealer, Jamie, a tinkle, I think.

0:48:300:48:33

Let's go for it.

0:48:330:48:36

Thanks ever so much, I'll buy them. Thanks a lot. Cheers. All the best.

0:48:360:48:40

Bye-bye, cheers, bye-bye. Bye.

0:48:400:48:42

Well, from having a full kitty,

0:48:420:48:44

I'm now down to nothing. I've bought the signs for £348.

0:48:440:48:49

I'm banking on a whole load of rusty old tin plate signs,

0:48:490:48:54

which could be dangerous. But he who dares wins, as they say.

0:48:540:48:58

Who says? The SAS, and Del Boy! That's who.

0:48:580:49:01

And so, that concludes the shopping.

0:49:010:49:04

Charles has bagged the African tribal mask, the Carlton Ware vase,

0:49:040:49:08

the part-dinner service and the metal shoe buckles,

0:49:080:49:12

as well as the set of six signs,

0:49:120:49:14

which he plans to sell in three separate lots.

0:49:140:49:16

He spent £478 exactly.

0:49:160:49:18

While Catherine has the Georgian fire bucket,

0:49:180:49:21

the manicure set-cum-clock,

0:49:210:49:23

the vintage railway sign, the bubblegum machine -

0:49:230:49:28

freshly filled with sweeties that cost her a fiver - and the parasol.

0:49:280:49:32

She spent £168 exactly.

0:49:320:49:36

But what on earth do they make of each other's lots?

0:49:360:49:38

Not much, I fancy.

0:49:380:49:40

I love her bubblegum dispenser.

0:49:400:49:43

For £25, it's cheap.

0:49:430:49:45

It might go pop at auction, and it might blow up the room

0:49:450:49:48

and make a fortune. I hope not.

0:49:480:49:50

Charles loves those little Georgian shoe buckles, and they are lovely,

0:49:500:49:55

especially being in their fitted case, but,

0:49:550:49:58

do people really want those?

0:49:580:50:00

Do people really buy those? Who knows? Time will tell.

0:50:000:50:04

On this leg, they began their buying in Chart Sutton, Kent,

0:50:060:50:10

and are now heading for some selling in Bourne End in Buckinghamshire.

0:50:100:50:14

Could it be the END for you in Bourne END?

0:50:140:50:17

I might be born again in the end!

0:50:170:50:19

DEEP VOICE: Now...

0:50:190:50:21

..this is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end.

0:50:210:50:26

Now, that's a quote. Time to get inside.

0:50:260:50:28

Our auctioneer today is Simon Brown.

0:50:310:50:33

Before the off, what does he make of our lots?

0:50:330:50:35

The late 1970s, early '80s bubblegum machine, it's quirky.

0:50:370:50:42

The pair of Georgian shoe buckles, very collectable,

0:50:420:50:46

quite sought after and quite rare,

0:50:460:50:48

so I'm looking forward to selling those.

0:50:480:50:50

The sale's about to begin. Starting positions, please.

0:50:500:50:55

First up, it's Catherine's parasol.

0:50:570:50:59

-20 I'm bid.

-Well done.

0:50:590:51:01

20 in the room.

0:51:010:51:02

-You built it up.

-It's moving. Hold tight.

0:51:020:51:04

-Online, he's got.

-25 now.

0:51:040:51:06

Really disappointing.

0:51:060:51:09

It's a profit, if not a huge one.

0:51:090:51:13

You made 700 pence.

0:51:130:51:16

Nothing to be sniffed at.

0:51:160:51:18

Now, it's Charles's African mask.

0:51:180:51:21

40 I'm bid. Got you. 40. Yours at 40.

0:51:210:51:24

42. 45. 47. 50. 55.

0:51:240:51:27

60. 65?

0:51:270:51:29

That's good. £20 profit.

0:51:290:51:33

I thought you'd make more than that.

0:51:330:51:34

Selling at 60. Are we all done?

0:51:340:51:36

On my right, thank you.

0:51:360:51:38

That's a nice winner to start him off.

0:51:380:51:40

Had a nice colour, had a nice glow, like you.

0:51:400:51:43

-Colour?

-Nice colour and glow.

0:51:430:51:45

Didn't have colour, it was wooden.

0:51:450:51:47

The bubblegum machine filled with sweets is next

0:51:470:51:49

to take a pop at some profit.

0:51:490:51:52

Nice stylish little piece there.

0:51:520:51:54

-With sweets.

-Who'll start me at £30, please, for this lot?

0:51:540:51:57

-30 I'm bid.

-Well done.

-Yours at 30.

0:51:570:52:00

Have we all done at 30? 32. 35. 37. 40.

0:52:000:52:03

-42.

-Good.

-45.

0:52:030:52:05

-Well done.

-Shhh!

-55.

0:52:050:52:07

60. 65. 70?

0:52:070:52:09

-65 in the room.

-Yes!

-Selling at 65.

0:52:090:52:12

Are you all done at 65,

0:52:120:52:14

we all done?

0:52:140:52:15

-Ohh...

-That blew a big bubble.

0:52:150:52:18

Ooh-hoo! And it's another winner for her.

0:52:180:52:21

-It had a style.

-Nah-nah, nah-nah-nah!

0:52:210:52:23

I can be childish.

0:52:230:52:25

You certainly can.

0:52:250:52:27

Next up is Charles's little Carlton Ware vase.

0:52:270:52:30

-Rouge Royale.

-Ten to start.

0:52:300:52:32

-£10, anybody interested?

-Could be in trouble.

0:52:320:52:34

Ten for the Carlton Ware vase.

0:52:340:52:36

-Oh, I say.

-Go on, sell it for a fiver.

0:52:360:52:38

Go on, it would be hilarious.

0:52:380:52:39

-Fiver?

-£5, anybody?

0:52:390:52:41

-That's not me bidding. I'm not bidding.

-Thank you very much.

0:52:410:52:44

£5. We are struggling.

0:52:440:52:47

£5 now.

0:52:470:52:48

-Hello!

-Are we all done at £5?

0:52:480:52:51

Selling at five. Just behind, now.

0:52:510:52:53

-I told you I was horrible.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:52:530:52:56

So the rivalry's really ramping up.

0:52:580:53:01

Somebody has bought a wonderful bargain,

0:53:010:53:03

and I commend them for very good taste.

0:53:030:53:06

One more chance for Catherine now,

0:53:080:53:10

as her mantle clock, concealing a manicure set, meets the room.

0:53:100:53:14

20 I'm bid. Yours at 20,

0:53:150:53:18

-are we all done?

-Good. Profit.

0:53:180:53:19

-Oh, shush.

-25, 27...

0:53:190:53:21

30. £27 now.

0:53:210:53:24

It's good. Doubling up.

0:53:240:53:26

-30. 32.

-Double...

-Charles, will you be quiet?

0:53:260:53:29

-You've doubled up.

-Selling at 30,

0:53:290:53:30

yours at 30. Are we all done at 30?

0:53:300:53:32

-I've not finished yet.

-30, are we all done now?

0:53:320:53:34

Did you buy it?

0:53:360:53:37

-Did you buy it?

-Me? No, I didn't buy it.

0:53:370:53:39

The guy behind you.

0:53:390:53:41

Thanks to the chap behind, she's nailed a winner there.

0:53:410:53:44

Next, Charles's six metal advertising signs,

0:53:460:53:48

which he's split into three separate lots, each costing him £116.

0:53:480:53:53

Here's the first.

0:53:530:53:54

We all done at 75 in the room now?

0:53:540:53:57

And now, the next lot of signs.

0:53:590:54:01

Selling at 130 now.

0:54:010:54:04

And the final sign is...

0:54:040:54:06

95 now on the net. Selling at 95.

0:54:060:54:09

-One more.

-You don't need any more money. I do.

0:54:090:54:12

Are we all done?

0:54:120:54:14

Altogether, those three lots LOST - ha! - £48. Bad luck, Charles.

0:54:140:54:20

I wish you'd have put them all together in one lot

0:54:200:54:23

and then you would have had even more losses.

0:54:230:54:25

And that would have been good for me.

0:54:250:54:27

It's the battle of the signage now

0:54:270:54:29

as Catherine's railway specimen is up.

0:54:290:54:32

£10 I'm bid. Got you at ten. 12. 14. 16.

0:54:330:54:36

-18. 16. 16 seated.

-Doubled up...

0:54:360:54:39

-Selling at 16. All done.

-It's good.

0:54:390:54:41

-No, it's not.

-16. 18. 20.

0:54:410:54:43

22. 25. 27.

0:54:430:54:45

30. 32. 35?

0:54:450:54:48

-It's amazing.

-Ooh.

-£32 now.

0:54:480:54:51

-I thought we were on a roll, then.

-You've flown.

0:54:510:54:53

-You all done at 32? On my right.

-Internet might have come in on that.

0:54:530:54:56

-That's puffed and huffed like a train.

-That was my steam train.

0:54:560:54:58

Like a loco, and you really moved, baby.

0:54:580:55:01

That did, indeed, puff its way to a nice little profit.

0:55:010:55:05

-I'm building up slowly.

-You are.

-As I say, I'm getting there.

0:55:050:55:08

Now, Charles's Art Deco-style dinner service.

0:55:080:55:12

-80, then, to start.

-Go on.

-Anybody interested?

0:55:120:55:15

60, then, to start. 60.

0:55:150:55:18

-Nobody interested?

-Oh, no.

-60.

0:55:180:55:20

We're coming down. 50? Anybody interested?

0:55:200:55:22

40.

0:55:220:55:23

30?

0:55:230:55:25

LAUGHTER

0:55:250:55:27

-30?

-Ten!

-20?

0:55:270:55:29

It's a full room. 20.

0:55:290:55:31

Someone feels sorry for you.

0:55:310:55:33

20, I've got you at 20.

0:55:330:55:34

Don't worry, Charles!

0:55:340:55:36

Don't worry. Don't worry.

0:55:360:55:38

-It's a disaster.

-Hammer down!

0:55:380:55:40

-At 20...

-Gavel down!

0:55:400:55:42

-Shove it down.

-At £20...

0:55:420:55:43

-Help!

-At £20 on the back wall...

0:55:430:55:45

-Shut up!

-At £20 now...

-He doesn't need any help!

0:55:450:55:48

Selling at 20, are we all done?

0:55:480:55:50

-Yay!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:55:500:55:51

No need to gloat, Catherine, though that was an unlucky loss.

0:55:530:55:56

THEY LAUGH

0:55:560:55:58

The final lot now for Catherine.

0:56:000:56:02

Her leather fire bucket might just ignite some interest.

0:56:020:56:05

-Pretty one...

-It is pretty.

-Pretty?

0:56:070:56:10

£50, please, for this lot.

0:56:100:56:11

50. 40, then, to start.

0:56:110:56:13

Good bucket there at 40. 40 I'm bid.

0:56:130:56:15

-Come on!

-40, yours at 40. 42 now...

0:56:150:56:17

Yours at 42. 45 - with me at 45...

0:56:170:56:21

-Oh, I really need...

-Are you all done at 45?

0:56:210:56:23

With me at 45. We all done now?

0:56:230:56:25

Ooh-hoo! That went up in smoke.

0:56:250:56:29

But importantly, Catherine, you had a passion for it.

0:56:290:56:32

I don't know if I did, actually.

0:56:320:56:34

Well, you don't any more.

0:56:340:56:37

Our very last lot now, Charles's Georgian cut steel shoe buckles.

0:56:370:56:41

Start me at £100, please, for this lot.

0:56:410:56:44

100 I'm bid. Got you. 100.

0:56:440:56:46

110. 120. 130...

0:56:460:56:48

-They're worth all of this.

-How do you do that?

0:56:480:56:51

150. 160.

0:56:510:56:53

170. 180. 190. 200. 200.

0:56:530:56:56

-Lordy!

-220...

0:56:560:56:58

-Charles!

-240. 260.

0:56:580:57:00

280. 300. 320.

0:57:000:57:03

340. 360. 380. 400.

0:57:030:57:07

They dance away like a man in a fine pair of shoes.

0:57:070:57:11

-I'm absolutely...

-They're wonderful.

0:57:110:57:13

At 420. Got you at 420. Yours at 420...

0:57:130:57:16

Did they have diamonds?!

0:57:160:57:18

They were stunning. They were completely...

0:57:180:57:21

Did they have diamonds on them?

0:57:210:57:22

Diamonds are a girl's best friend, baby. Give us a kiss.

0:57:220:57:26

Ha-ha! And buckles are a boy's, it seems.

0:57:260:57:29

That's a stunning profit for Charles, and with it,

0:57:290:57:32

he absolutely steals the day.

0:57:320:57:35

Catherine began this leg with £213.76.

0:57:350:57:40

After auction costs, she made an unfortunate loss of £6.46,

0:57:400:57:46

leaving her now with £207.30.

0:57:460:57:50

While Charles started with £478.88.

0:57:520:57:57

After costs, he made a monster profit of £182.10.

0:57:570:58:02

So, he now has £660.98.

0:58:020:58:07

Well done, Charles.

0:58:070:58:09

Next sale is mine.

0:58:090:58:11

Well, you never know.

0:58:110:58:12

You're on my away patch now - well, my home patch.

0:58:120:58:14

-Let's go.

-Let's go.

-Seatbelts on.

0:58:140:58:17

And on to the next leg.

0:58:170:58:20

ENGINE REVS

0:58:200:58:22

-Woo-hoo!

-Careful!

-Sorry, Catherine...

0:58:220:58:24

Now we're off.

0:58:260:58:28

Are we in the right gear?

0:58:280:58:29

Beep, beep!

0:58:290:58:30

-Ooh!

-THEY LAUGH

0:58:300:58:33

Cheerio.

0:58:340:58:36

Charles Hanson and Catherine Southon hunt for antiques around Sussex in their zippy 1950 MG Midget.

This fizzy pair are a whirlwind of energy as they look to uncover big money plunder to take to auctions in Kent and Buckinghamshire. Will Charles's big gamble of 18th-century buckles get the bidders in a tizz or will Catherine's classical English silver be the order of the day?

Charles delves into the pongy parable behind Brighton's sewers while Catherine finds out that journeying by horse and cart really is the best way to travel.