Episode 15 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 15

Antiques experts travel across the country, competing to make a profit at auction. Paul Laidlaw and Natasha Raskin are antiquing in Norfolk, and headed for a last auction in Diss.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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-With £200 each...

-I want something shiny.

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..a classic car and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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-I like a rummage.

-I can't resist.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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Why do I always do this to myself?

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-There'll be worthy winners...

-Give us a kiss.

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-..and valiant losers.

-Come on, stick 'em up!

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So will it be the high road to glory...

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-Onwards and upwards.

-..or the slow road to disaster?

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-Take me home.

-This is Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Welcome to East Anglia and the final chapter with our Scots on tour.

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-It's nearly the end, Paul.

-Don't say that!

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OK, well, I will, then, because, after several hundred miles,

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-Natasha Raskin...

-Paul Laidlaw!

-..yes, Paul Laidlaw,

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and li'l red Mercedes are approaching journey's end.

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Have you sent any postcards home yet?

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HE CHUCKLES

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I haven't sent any home.

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Well, fortunately,

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the adventures of our art expert and auctioneer from Glasgow

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have been fairly faithfully recorded,

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along with the ups and downs of her fellow doyen.

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Do you like? I like.

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Our major in militaria is miles ahead, but, as they've gone south,

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-the auctions have, well...

-Ouch!

-..followed suit.

-Is that sore?

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There is this gap in my recollection.

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Somehow I got from a lot of money to a lot less money

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in a couple of auctions.

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I don't know how that happened.

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Like I said, it's been on the telly.

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Must be right.

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Anyway, Natasha began with £200 but over the course of their trip

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that sum has dwindled to a mere £141.04.

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Whilst Paul's £200 has both waxed and waned so that

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he starts today with £370.04.

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I'm in uncertain territory here.

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-Lossville. I don't like it.

-You don't like it?

-No, no, no, no.

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-Bring me back to Profit Town.

-What's happened to us?

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I think I'm rubbing off on you, Paul.

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I think I left my mojo in Cumbria.

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I wonder where mine's got to...

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After kicking off at Prestwick, in the west coast of Scotland,

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Paul and Natasha have plotted a course leading south and east,

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sojourning in East Anglia before a final auction in Norfolk at Diss.

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Today's the day they arrive at that climactic destination

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but we start out elsewhere, at North Walsham.

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All quiet now, but back in 1831,

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North Walsham was up for the Peasants' Revolt.

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-Here we are, right to the door.

-Why, thank you.

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-Now, remember the rule when we share a shop.

-What's that?

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-If you see anything good, let me know.

-Cheeky!

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-Hello.

-Hello, there.

-Hi, nice to meet you. I'm Tasha.

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-Hi, I'm Michael.

-Nice to meet you, Michael.

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-Hello, Paul. Welcome to Timeline.

-Thank you very much. Feels good.

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It does feel good. Smells good.

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Well, thank you, Natasha. But is it big enough for the both of them?

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-We'll see.

-There's something quite nice about this crib.

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It's very Victorian. Dark mahogany.

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It's got bun feet. It's detailed.

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But I think it's maybe too far for me.

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As gorgeous as it is, as grand as it is,

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it just seems a little bit weird to put a baby,

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who can't appreciate such fine detail, in a crib like that.

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Save it for the master bedroom.

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What's his game, then?

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(My word).

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Crumbs!

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-AMPLIFIED:

-Is it cheap, Natasha?

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Ooh!

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-Ha-ha!

-What was that? What?

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HE LAUGHS

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There are very breakable items in here, Paul. Stop giving me a fright.

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Well said. Now, wasn't Natasha here just now?

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Have I read this right?

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This dealer here's having a half-price sale?

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-Yeah, he's having a sale.

-I think Natasha's missed that.

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Then this piece here, which has already been reduced once,

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is that now half that ticket price?

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-That is now £50.

-I'd better have a closer look.

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You know what the biggest problem with these is?

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-There's nothing one can do with them.

-No.

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If you've got a big 19th-century residence, dotted in the

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corner of a bedroom, what a joyous object, but it's an ornament.

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You're certainly not going to put a child anywhere near it.

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But it's not been through the wars.

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-It's all right, isn't it?

-Yeah, it's sound.

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Well, in that case, that's sold.

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-Well done.

-Some things you don't haggle on.

-Yeah.

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I wonder if there'll be recriminations over that one.

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It can happen when it's a bit cheek by jowl.

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I don't think I really like Paul being in the same shop.

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It doesn't matter so much if it's huge, but this is quite dinky.

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This is hard enough as it is, looking for antiques,

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without Paul Laidlaw creeping over your shoulder...

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-SHOUTS:

-Keep it down, for goodness' sake! Think library!

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Paul, you're making me nervous!

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I think he might pipe down now for a bit, Natasha.

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One could easily dismiss these as a set of early-20th-century

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field glasses, binoculars, OK, and, as such, they would be worth £25.

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These, however, it's clear to see, are military

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because very rugged case,

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an ordinance broad arrow and a date here on the case of 1918.

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I think there's a fascinating insight into the war here

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because these are Mark V specials.

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Obviously.

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These are termed Galilean. These are traditional.

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Very rudimentary. These were only procured as an emergency measure.

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The British Army would love to order 100,000 sets of binoculars.

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They can not get that many on the open market.

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Now, I say "procure". This is the interesting part of the story.

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They didn't just buy them.

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They set up a campaign whereby they asked YOU, Joe Civilian,

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to donate your binoculars to the military

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and they'd give you a receipt.

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It would see service

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and at the end of the war they'd give you your binoculars back.

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But there's something else I noticed here that transforms them

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from my point of view.

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"Quartermaster Sergeant Morton, Scots Guards."

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Is that not fantastic?

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What was his story during the Great War?

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Price tag on these, £48.

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With the Scots Guards thing, I think they're worth more than that.

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Michael, do you think there's anything to be done

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-on that price tag there?

-Yeah, I can make a phone call.

-Could you?

-Yeah.

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-I wonder if there could be a decent chunk shaved off that price.

-OK.

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If you wouldn't mind asking, in all humility, on my behalf,

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-that would be fantastic.

-So what are you looking at?

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To be honest with you, to be on the safe side,

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I'd like to pay £30 for those.

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In order to SEE a profit.

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How's Natasha getting on?

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I've spotted a word with which I'm very familiar.

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Glasgow. This is the Clyde Shipping Company, SS Caledonia.

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So the Caledonia that I know of was early 20th century, that took people

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from Glasgow to New York, which was then used in the

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Second World War and was destroyed by the enemy.

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So if it comes from that Caledonia, then that's exciting.

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But I'm slightly suspicious of this bucket because anyone who lives in

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Glasgow knows that Argyll is an area, with two Ls, but Argyle Street

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has an "E" at the end and is spelled differently from the area.

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So either I don't know this Argyll Street, double L, in Glasgow,

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or this isn't what is purports to be.

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It's £58. It's the kind of thing I'd want to buy for a tenner.

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Smart move, I'd say.

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Now, the last we saw of Paul, he was after buying those binoculars.

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I've spoken to the dealer. The best he can do on these is 35.

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-Thank you.

-Two in the bag already.

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-Tempus fugit, Natasha.

-I really like this clock.

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It says on the label here, circa 1900,

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and of course it is because it's typical Arts and Crafts.

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Beautiful oak and it's got that real sort of rustic appeal.

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It's very typical Arts and Crafts, but it does say here on the label,

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it's made by the New Haven Clock Company, USA,

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but if it's American Arts and Crafts,

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quite often this gets described as "Mission".

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I think it's really smart.

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You can hear it ticking away and there's the pendulum

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and striking movement, complete with key, so that's nice too.

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It's just a lovely thing.

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It's not everyone's cup of tea,

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but it's really evocative of an era and I really like it.

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£89 is the ticket price.

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You can see it strikes.

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CLOCK CHIMES

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There we go, and, according to the label,

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it does that both on the hour and the half-hour so that's quite handy.

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It's just quite sweet, isn't it? Let's put it back in motion.

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I'd have this in my house.

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I think I'd like to talk to Michael about it and see what I can do.

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-Gird your loins, son.

-I really like it.

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-I think it's cute and I think it's quite unusual...

-OK.

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..but I don't have very much money.

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I'm just going to come clean. I'd be asking for £40 for it.

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OK, I'll give him a ring.

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If he's lying down, we'll see what he says.

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So can Michael make that offer sound at all appealing?

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The ticket price is £89.

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40. Mmm.

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What would be your best on it?

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Straight bat, eh? Good idea.

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His best would be 50.

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-50? Why not? It's a nice thing. I like it. Let's buy it.

-Well done.

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And it's over a third of what she has left.

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-Oh, cool. Thank you so much.

-Great start, Natasha.

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Now let's get that old timepiece safely secured.

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Just strap you in.

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While back inside, Paul's still having fun.

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What's not to like about this?

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So little, somewhat rustic, pine box.

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Delightful period and, by period, what do I mean?

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Got to be late 19th century. There's 100 years in it.

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Table croquet. Well, I love croquet.

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I certainly don't have the lawn for it,

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but I may have the table for table croquet!

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Look at this. Wire hoops, of course.

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Turned and stained wooden croquet balls

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and a complement of mallets.

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How good is that?

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HE CHUCKLES

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Hours of period fun.

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It's all there. You ask me what it's worth.

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I think you'd go in at £30 to £50 at auction. I think I would.

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It's got to be worth that, surely. A few tens of pounds.

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Price tag today is £45.

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I'm going to try and buy that

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but I'm going to have to try and do something about the price.

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-I think he likes this shop.

-I LOVE the little croquet set.

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Less enamoured with the price tag.

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Do you wish me to state where I'd like it to be,

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as we did in the past?

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Or I can give you a price, because somebody's asked before. £30.

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I'm going to be cheeky.

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I'd like it to be 25, if it's possible to buy it at that?

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-The last person walked away at 30.

-True, yes.

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Can you meet me sort of in the middle, 28?

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Of course I can. Absolutely fantastic.

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Quite a start, Paul.

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£113 for the cot, the binoculars and the table croquet.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank YOU very much.

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-All the best.

-Thank you.

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And while he heads off for a well-deserved cuppa,

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let's find out where Natasha's got to.

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Taking our route towards the city of Norwich, the county town of Norfolk,

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where, close to the River Wensum, there's

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a museum dedicated to Norwich's history of printing and publishing.

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-Hi, I'm Tasha.

-I'm Duncan.

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-Welcome to the John Jarrold Print Museum.

-Oh, fantastic.

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-Shall we head inside?

-Please do.

-Thank you.

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Once, printing presses like these were to be found in almost

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every British town, and yet this museum is a rare working survivor.

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Natasha is here to learn from guild-master Duncan

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about how far the printed word has come.

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We're currently in the Dark Ages

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and we want to get some information.

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So who had all the books?

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The books were confined to the clergy and the nobility.

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All hand-written, laboriously done,

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but you'd also have to speak in different languages.

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Of course, so a lot of these books would have been in Latin?

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Latin, Greek

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and French and German.

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But the process of taking books away from the scribes to create

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a more mass-produced system of information

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was certainly underway by the 15th century,

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first with the spread of wood-cut block books

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and then with the introduction of moveable type.

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Gutenberg gets the credit for doing it.

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-There's always someone, isn't there?

-Oh, yeah.

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He invented the system of mechanically making metal letters.

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Gutenberg could cast as many letters as he wanted, which could be

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assembled into pages, taken apart,

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reassembled as another page and they could print 200 copies of them.

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The man from Mainz in Germany was the first to create type pieces

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from a durable and uniform metal alloy, and with that

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he was able to print the iconic Gutenberg Bible in 1455,

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ushering in the era of the printed press across Europe.

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So, Gutenberg's style, I suppose, started to spread.

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When did this sort of technology arrive on these shores?

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It ended up in England with William Caxton.

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He had seven years' apprenticeship in Bruges and came back to England

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and set up a printing press.

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He was part of the middle class.

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He could read and write and he was a businessman.

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Books were being printed in the Continent and brought into England

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so why not print them in England yourself?

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Just as important, why not print in our own language?

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Although Caxton's translations were not without problems,

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he published, in English, many classical works,

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as well as the Bible and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.

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So what do I do? How does it all begin?

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You'll need to start with what we call a sentence stick.

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Right, Natasha's turn. Best steer clear of epics, I think(!)

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Oh, good, so it's a double challenge.

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I've got to get the spelling right

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-and I've got to get it right back to front?

-Yes.

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Can you guess what I'm going to spell, Duncan?

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I'll bet he's got a fair idea.

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# Three little words

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# Oh, what I'd give for that wonderful phrase. #

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Ah, look at that!

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Very nice, spelt correctly,

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and Duncan has something else to show before she goes.

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That's so cool. So what's that?

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It's what we call a Palmer press.

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It was for amateurs to print and do their own stationery,

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long before your computers came on the scene.

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I think it might be for sale.

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All this sort of industrial stuff is pretty trendy at auction right now

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and if that came in the door, I'd probably say,

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"Well, we'll give it a punt at £20 to £40 or so."

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So do you think Mr Jarrold would be quite happy if I put a £20 donation

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in the museum donation box?

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I'm sure he wouldn't mind.

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Do you reckon I can get more than 20 at auction?

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I don't, but you're the optimist.

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Crikey, Duncan!

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-Now, let's find out how portable it is.

-See you again, bye!

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But while Natasha's been reverting to type,

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Paul's made his way southwest of the county town towards Wymondham.

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Yes, not pronounced quite as you would expect, is it?

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Some nice old cars too. Ooh, and here he is.

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-Hello there.

-Hello. My name's Donna.

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-Welcome to Wymondham Antiques Centre.

-Thank you very much.

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-Welcome to where?

-Wymondham.

-Yeah, rhymes with "kingdom".

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I wonder what he'll spot here.

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Certainly looking for a change of fortune.

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Don't like this losing-money-at-auction game.

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It sucks, as the Americans say.

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Time to embrace the suck, as they also say. No. Really, they do(!)

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Surely there's something in here with my name on it?

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That's modern. That's a Vesta.

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Sadly, it's £185.

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Wee cake slice. Isn't that lovely work?

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I think this stands out amongst a large quantity of small silver

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in there. Art Nouveau with a distinctly Scandinavian feel.

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Don't see those in every bijouterie cabinet.

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The aesthetic reminds me straight away of Georg Jensen,

0:16:480:16:51

THE name in Scandinavian flatware.

0:16:510:16:54

That is consummately well designed and executed, so who's responsible?

0:16:540:16:59

Look at the marks and, yes, indeed, they are Scandinavian.

0:16:590:17:02

Sadly not silver marks.

0:17:020:17:03

Well, it's priced at just £20.

0:17:030:17:07

Donna, if that was silver it'd be fabulous, wouldn't it?

0:17:070:17:10

But do you know what? I'm still drawn to it.

0:17:100:17:12

It's a pretty little thing, isn't it, but I've got to ask the

0:17:120:17:15

question, do you think there's anything can be done on that?

0:17:150:17:18

-Do you want to make a phone call?

-Yeah.

-Do what you've got to do.

0:17:180:17:20

-Let's go. I'll see what I can do.

-Thanks very much.

-No problem.

0:17:200:17:23

So why is he thinking about buying silver plate?

0:17:230:17:26

It's all about the aesthetic there.

0:17:260:17:27

Second quarter 20th century, Scandinavian-designed piece which

0:17:270:17:32

I think is more likely to stand out in an auctioneer's cabinet

0:17:320:17:37

than some of the traditional little other objets in there.

0:17:370:17:40

-Uh-oh, Donna's back.

-The best that she'll go down to is 15.

0:17:400:17:44

£15? £15?!

0:17:440:17:46

-That's a good drop for Sue.

-I think it's a good drop for anybody.

0:17:460:17:50

-Oh, good.

-It's sold.

-Oh, brilliant.

0:17:500:17:52

-I'm jesting with you.

-Really good.

0:17:520:17:54

I think he's quite pleased with that.

0:17:540:17:57

-Donna, that's for you.

-Lovely.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks, Paul.

0:17:570:18:01

-All the best. Wymondham?

-Wymondham, yes.

0:18:010:18:04

I couldn't spell it but I can say it.

0:18:040:18:07

Now, can I just say something?

0:18:070:18:09

Wait for it.

0:18:090:18:11

Time for some shut-eye. Nighty-night.

0:18:110:18:15

Next day, we're feeling right at home.

0:18:170:18:20

Norfolk has treated us well.

0:18:200:18:22

Hasn't it just? I'm writing the next official Norfolk guide.

0:18:220:18:25

Paul's already navigated his way to a cradle,

0:18:270:18:30

table croquet, a cake slice

0:18:300:18:32

-and some binoculars or...

-Mark V specials.

0:18:320:18:37

Yeah, and he still has almost £250 for today's purchases,

0:18:370:18:41

while Natasha merely plumped for a printing press and a clock.

0:18:410:18:45

It's a nice thing. I like it. Let's buy it.

0:18:450:18:48

Yeah, leaving just over £70 for her very last day of shopping.

0:18:480:18:52

-How good a mood are you in?

-Tinged with sadness.

0:18:520:18:55

Cheer up, it's not over yet.

0:18:550:18:58

Later they'll be heading to the final auction in Diss,

0:18:580:19:01

but our first stop today is in the little down of Watton.

0:19:010:19:04

Allegedly the scene of the old English ballad of

0:19:060:19:10

The Babes In The Wood.

0:19:100:19:11

-This is cool, isn't it?

-Oh, it's big enough.

0:19:110:19:15

Oh, a bit keen to come in, are you?

0:19:150:19:18

I wonder if there are any sleepy beauties here.

0:19:190:19:22

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

-Hi, I'm Tasha.

-I'm Barney.

0:19:220:19:24

Barney, nice to meet you. Oh, you're accent's lovely. Where you from?

0:19:240:19:27

-Belfast.

-Well, in that case, I know I'm going to be looked after today.

0:19:270:19:30

What a charmer, eh?

0:19:300:19:32

I don't think choice is a problem here.

0:19:320:19:35

It's not at all sparse. There's stuff everywhere.

0:19:350:19:39

Trouble is, she's hardly flush.

0:19:400:19:42

You see these all the time when you go to the antique fairs.

0:19:420:19:45

You see the toilets that have lots of lovely patterns on them.

0:19:450:19:49

It's very Orient Express or it's very, I don't know,

0:19:490:19:53

even Flying Scotsman

0:19:530:19:55

to have a ceramic toilet that has lovely decoration on it.

0:19:550:20:00

It's just a typical Edwardian turn-of-the-century sort of thing,

0:20:000:20:03

but why's it so small? My first thought was novelty planter.

0:20:030:20:06

But then it occurred to me - is this sort of a little example,

0:20:060:20:11

travelling salesman toilet?

0:20:110:20:13

"Salesman's demo toilet from Staffordshire."

0:20:140:20:17

It's quite a cool thing,

0:20:170:20:19

but at £65 it's almost all the money that I have left.

0:20:190:20:24

Comfort break over, what else have they got?

0:20:240:20:27

What better way to bring people together than a pub skittles game?

0:20:270:20:32

I think even I can figure this one out. It looks pretty simple.

0:20:320:20:35

You swish this around and...

0:20:350:20:38

almost a strike! How good is that?

0:20:380:20:40

-It's just so simple. Get them back up.

-Ticket price, £35.

0:20:400:20:45

That is just a good bit of clean fun in the pub.

0:20:450:20:49

Less dangerous than darts and more sociable than a mobile phone.

0:20:490:20:53

Paul's had a similar thought with his table croquet set.

0:20:530:20:56

Now, what came before the hostess trolley?

0:20:560:20:59

Absolutely love this. This is the most beautiful bit of Art Nouveau...

0:20:590:21:05

Well, maybe not THE most beautiful bit of Art Nouveau,

0:21:050:21:08

but a properly practical one.

0:21:080:21:11

Described as a chafing dish.

0:21:110:21:14

You think of going to a canteen and getting your macaroni cheese

0:21:140:21:16

and it's being kept warm by a burner underneath

0:21:160:21:19

and that's exactly what's happening here.

0:21:190:21:21

You've got two levels, all made of copper,

0:21:210:21:24

apart the handles and the legs here, made of brass.

0:21:240:21:26

The top level lifts off so you can see that brass frame

0:21:260:21:30

and underneath here, the heat comes up from the spirit burners,

0:21:300:21:35

goes into these holes, keeping the dishes that you place on top warm.

0:21:350:21:40

This is just a smart bit of kit from probably the 1920s or '30s.

0:21:400:21:45

Not the height of Art Nouveau,

0:21:450:21:48

but certainly displaying some of its key features.

0:21:480:21:51

The legs here on the frame - beautifully curved.

0:21:510:21:54

You call that whiplash curves

0:21:540:21:55

so really organic, like a vine growing down a trestle.

0:21:550:21:59

Just the hand-planished top here.

0:21:590:22:02

£75 is the ticket price. Now, we know that I only have 71 in total.

0:22:020:22:08

Hopefully Barney's up for a cheeky offer,

0:22:080:22:10

so I'm going to take it to him.

0:22:100:22:12

Hang onto your hats because she's also after those table skittles.

0:22:120:22:17

Together they come to £110.

0:22:170:22:21

I can't really offer any more than £55.

0:22:210:22:26

HE SPLUTTERS

0:22:260:22:29

I couldn't raise it a bit, could I?

0:22:300:22:33

I could do 60 and that's it.

0:22:330:22:35

-Done.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-That's amazing. Thank you so much.

0:22:350:22:39

Nice, but it leaves her with barely enough for one more buy.

0:22:390:22:43

Goodbye. Adios.

0:22:430:22:45

De nada. Well, £11.04.

0:22:450:22:49

Paul, meanwhile, is taking a break from the shopping,

0:22:510:22:53

travelling not just towards nearby Lynford, but several thousand

0:22:530:22:58

years back in time, and the lunar landscape of Grime's Graves

0:22:580:23:03

to visit a Neolithic flint mine.

0:23:030:23:07

-Hello, Marie.

-Good afternoon, Paul. Welcome to Grime's Graves.

0:23:070:23:11

It is a pleasure to be here. What a typography.

0:23:110:23:16

On this huge site there are altogether around 1,000 shafts.

0:23:160:23:21

OK, Paul, so we're just going to pop one of these on.

0:23:210:23:23

HE LAUGHS

0:23:230:23:25

OK.

0:23:250:23:26

First dug by our Neolithic ancestors over 4,500 years ago,

0:23:260:23:32

most are filled in, but Paul's here to visit Pit 1...

0:23:320:23:35

(Oh, my word.)

0:23:370:23:39

..the only mine of its kind which is open to the public.

0:23:390:23:42

What does the name Grime's Graves mean?

0:23:420:23:45

It's actually Anglo-Saxon in origin.

0:23:450:23:49

"Grime's" come from the Anglo-Saxon god Grim,

0:23:490:23:53

also known as Woden or Odin,

0:23:530:23:55

and "Graves" just means holes in the ground.

0:23:550:23:58

The Saxons of course arrived a long time after the original

0:23:580:24:01

Neolithic inhabitants.

0:24:010:24:04

They were mining here for around about 200 to 500 years,

0:24:040:24:09

about the same time as Stonehenge was being constructed.

0:24:090:24:13

We're not talking about the Flintstones here.

0:24:130:24:15

-This is modern man.

-Absolutely.

0:24:150:24:18

They are as intelligent, really, as us.

0:24:180:24:22

They were very sophisticated in their technology.

0:24:220:24:25

But what went on here was somehow forgotten by modern times

0:24:250:24:28

and it wasn't until the late 19th century that excavations

0:24:280:24:31

began to reveal the true purpose of the site.

0:24:310:24:35

They were using the jet black flint to make arrowheads,

0:24:350:24:39

oblique arrowheads, axe heads, and they were trading them far and wide.

0:24:390:24:44

Tools that were made from the flint here have been found

0:24:440:24:47

in excavations at Stonehenge and actually as far afield

0:24:470:24:51

as Northern Europe.

0:24:510:24:53

Shaping flint to create tools and weapons is known as flint-knapping

0:24:530:24:56

and so to understand how important it was to the people

0:24:560:25:00

who mined it with red deer antlers,

0:25:000:25:03

meet modern-day flint-knapper Will Lord.

0:25:030:25:06

Without flint, we're in a lot of trouble. It's everything, isn't it?

0:25:060:25:11

We are. It's the ability to cut, pierce, chop and hack.

0:25:110:25:15

So what we're looking at here is, we're looking at

0:25:150:25:18

a typical arrowhead from this particular site.

0:25:180:25:20

And alongside that is his little brother.

0:25:200:25:23

So these are Neolithic in their design.

0:25:230:25:25

That's borderline art.

0:25:250:25:27

Flint is described as the fifth hardest substance on the planet.

0:25:270:25:33

-Right.

-It's 100 million years old.

0:25:330:25:35

-Silica from the bottom of the sea.

-OK.

0:25:350:25:38

So we actually take a little tool

0:25:380:25:40

and we push them individual flakes off of that,

0:25:400:25:43

so you need to push with a bit of power.

0:25:430:25:45

-I get that.

-Whereas with that, what we need to do is,

0:25:450:25:49

we need to strike it accurately.

0:25:490:25:51

I reckoned that there's a potential axe lying in there.

0:25:510:25:54

Basically I need to get all the way around it and make a sharp edge.

0:25:540:25:57

-Are you feeling safe?

-I'm glad I've got my goggles on!

0:25:580:26:02

There you go. That's called "you're not getting an axe"!

0:26:030:26:05

Do you think that's sharp enough?

0:26:070:26:09

I imagine I could shave with that if I was desperate enough.

0:26:090:26:12

-Let's have your arm.

-Something's coming off.

0:26:120:26:14

Looks like... Yes. That's shaving.

0:26:140:26:17

You're not wrong.

0:26:170:26:19

So flint will do the job that you want it to do.

0:26:210:26:23

I'm sticking with the steel, by the way!

0:26:230:26:25

Good idea.

0:26:250:26:27

So I figure that you can have a go.

0:26:270:26:29

OK. Just nibble away at that sharp edge there, eh?

0:26:290:26:32

-That's good. Take a bit more of this back corner.

-OK.

0:26:340:26:38

So you've just created a shock wave on that stone.

0:26:410:26:43

That's going to last for ever.

0:26:430:26:46

So somebody, perhaps in 5,000 years' time, will come and pick it up.

0:26:460:26:51

Back in 2016...

0:26:510:26:52

Hands up who can remember what Natasha had left in her pocket?

0:26:550:27:00

Well, undaunted, she's headed for Foulsham with, yes, £11.04.

0:27:000:27:06

-Hello. Good afternoon. I'm Natasha.

-I'm Catherine. Welcome.

-Nice to meet you.

0:27:060:27:10

-This is the coolest place I think I've ever been, hands down.

-Good.

0:27:100:27:13

There's certainly a lot of interesting stuff at Country Home.

0:27:130:27:18

Now, I bet you can't think what that would be for.

0:27:180:27:21

-It's for keeping ferrets.

-Actual... A live ferret?

0:27:210:27:24

Live ferrets. Hence the holes.

0:27:240:27:27

Hasn't everyone got one?

0:27:270:27:28

-Why would you need to carry your ferret around with you?

-Hunting.

0:27:280:27:31

You can take the girl out of the city...

0:27:310:27:33

I'm thinking, why are you popping to the shops with your ferret?!

0:27:330:27:36

-What have you got on that?

-£85.

-OK. So that's not in the budget.

0:27:360:27:39

With or without the ferret.

0:27:390:27:41

Could be the very point you need to fess up, Natasha.

0:27:410:27:44

I'm not even lying when I say there are pennies because I have £11.04.

0:27:440:27:48

Right. Mustn't forget the 4p.

0:27:480:27:51

I'm willing to give you every single penny.

0:27:510:27:53

But while Catherine ponders that generous offer,

0:27:530:27:57

let's catch up with Paul, now nearing the end of the road.

0:27:570:28:00

I'm so looking forward to doing this road trip with Natasha.

0:28:000:28:03

Is it the Scots thing? I don't know.

0:28:030:28:05

But we've had our shares of ups and downs but never stopped laughing.

0:28:050:28:09

A tear in his eye all the way to King's Lynn.

0:28:090:28:13

The Hanseatic port of the Wash, from which one 17th-century local

0:28:140:28:19

who settled in Virginia exported the name of Norfolk.

0:28:190:28:22

Later came the explorer George Vancouver,

0:28:220:28:25

another Lynn lad who travelled even further,

0:28:250:28:29

while our journey's headed very much the other way.

0:28:290:28:32

Right, then. I've got my wallet.

0:28:320:28:35

I'm motivated to buy my last purchase of this road trip.

0:28:350:28:38

Here we go.

0:28:380:28:40

And he has got over £240 left, lest we forget.

0:28:400:28:44

Late-19th-century Anglo-Indian brass work.

0:28:440:28:48

There you go. Look at that.

0:28:480:28:50

There is a tiger hunt and one hunts tigers in India

0:28:500:28:55

from the howdah of an elephant.

0:28:550:28:59

Not for me to judge, but it's pretty bloodthirsty, actually.

0:28:590:29:03

I could warm to that.

0:29:040:29:06

And he can certainly afford £36.

0:29:060:29:10

But what about the other less-well-off one

0:29:100:29:12

in a Foulsham barn?

0:29:120:29:14

How about this little trug, ideal for eggs?

0:29:140:29:17

It's quite cute, isn't it? It's a possibility, isn't it?

0:29:170:29:19

I mean, it's lovely property here. Is that the sort of thing...

0:29:190:29:22

-Do you keep chickens?

-We do. And ducks, yes.

-Come on.

0:29:220:29:25

So do you use one of these to collect the eggs?

0:29:250:29:28

Not usually, no!

0:29:280:29:30

Catherine's being very helpful.

0:29:300:29:32

How about something like this?

0:29:320:29:34

-This printing block with a pretty pattern on.

-I love these.

0:29:340:29:37

So are these wee leaves, little leaves? Is there another one there?

0:29:370:29:40

-That's quite cute.

-Flowers.

0:29:400:29:42

They are sweet, aren't they?

0:29:420:29:44

Actually, I've just learned all about printing, typesetting

0:29:440:29:47

and lots of things but we didn't do any woodcuts or wood blocks.

0:29:470:29:50

Those are £22 each.

0:29:500:29:52

-Probably in your budget.

-For two of them?

0:29:520:29:55

-For one of them.

-For one of them.

0:29:550:29:57

Quite. Don't push your luck, girl.

0:29:570:29:59

So your preferred one is the leaf?

0:29:590:30:01

I really do like the leaf. I think that's very attractive.

0:30:010:30:04

-£11.04 for a leafy printer's block?

-Go on, then.

0:30:040:30:06

Shall we do it? OK. Here we are.

0:30:060:30:09

I mean, it's not the most exciting thing that's ever happened to you,

0:30:090:30:12

-but I have £10, 11 and four.

-Perfect.

-That's that.

0:30:120:30:16

Thank you very much. Wish me luck. It's been a pleasure.

0:30:160:30:19

But while Natasha takes her leaves... Ha!

0:30:190:30:23

..Paul's just hitting his stride.

0:30:230:30:25

What's in this old cabinet of joy?

0:30:250:30:28

There's something you don't see every day.

0:30:280:30:31

That is a mate straw.

0:30:310:30:33

Mate is South American in origin.

0:30:330:30:36

It's a hot beverage.

0:30:360:30:38

Made from the leaves of the yerba plant,

0:30:380:30:40

mate supplies a mildly drugged kick.

0:30:400:30:43

It has like a sediment in it.

0:30:430:30:45

You know, like coffee grounds.

0:30:450:30:47

And I believe how you drink it, traditionally from a gourd,

0:30:470:30:50

is through a straw that has a filter at the end.

0:30:500:30:55

Tasty. Time for a closer look.

0:30:570:30:59

-Hello there, how are you?

-I'm fine thank you. I'm Niall.

0:30:590:31:02

Good to see you. May I take up some of your time?

0:31:020:31:04

-I'm interested in that glazed cabinet just in that room.

-No problem.

0:31:040:31:08

Ticket price - £45.

0:31:080:31:10

-You've got a bit of gilding around the edges.

-Gilt collars, yes.

0:31:100:31:16

So there you go. It is what you expect it to be. A straw.

0:31:170:31:21

Mouthpiece at this end and that's the filter we were talking about.

0:31:210:31:25

So into the mate cup, or vessel, there you go.

0:31:250:31:29

What do we have here? White metal.

0:31:290:31:31

We're not using an auctioneer's terminology, are we,

0:31:310:31:35

that white metal is un-assayed silver.

0:31:350:31:37

We're saying it's metal and it's not gold.

0:31:370:31:41

No, there is a mark on there.

0:31:410:31:43

-What does the mark say?

-It's plata.

0:31:430:31:45

P-L-A-TA, which in Spanish I think is silver,

0:31:450:31:50

but in another language probably means plate.

0:31:500:31:53

Good point, Niall.

0:31:530:31:55

-There's £45 on that. Is there slack in that price?

-30.

0:31:550:31:59

That's a generous offer, Niall.

0:32:000:32:02

So you have now sold one mate straw.

0:32:020:32:05

-Thanks very much.

-That was easy.

0:32:050:32:08

That possibly silver straw is our very, very, very last buy.

0:32:080:32:11

-That's for you.

-Brilliant.

-A pleasure.

-Thanks very much.

0:32:110:32:15

All the best to you. See you again. Bye.

0:32:150:32:17

So let's have a taste of what's been picked up.

0:32:170:32:21

With Natasha paying all of her £141.04 for a chafing dish,

0:32:210:32:27

a parlour press, table skittles, a clock and a printing block,

0:32:270:32:33

while Paul spent £158 on a cradle, some binoculars,

0:32:330:32:38

a cake slice, a straw and a table croquet set.

0:32:380:32:43

So who's cock-a-hoop?

0:32:430:32:45

The copper food-warmer, I've got to say... Mmm.

0:32:450:32:50

Why did I walk past this rocking cradle? He got it for £50.

0:32:500:32:54

Why on earth I rejected it? I have no idea.

0:32:540:32:57

My modest little silver-plated cake slice.

0:32:570:33:00

We've identified the smith.

0:33:000:33:02

Axel Pip Skifflebrick.

0:33:020:33:05

It's a good Scandinavian name. It's delicious.

0:33:050:33:08

It's the battle of the table games.

0:33:080:33:09

He's bought the table croquet set and I've bought the table skittles.

0:33:090:33:13

I preferred the table croquet set.

0:33:130:33:15

After setting off from North Walsham,

0:33:150:33:17

our experts are now on their way to their final auction at Diss.

0:33:170:33:21

Gets its name from the Anglo-Saxon for embankment or dyke.

0:33:210:33:26

-Let's move on from that to poetry.

-OK. Tell me more.

0:33:260:33:30

Yes, it will be bliss

0:33:300:33:31

When I go with you by train to Diss.

0:33:310:33:34

-John Betjeman.

-That's lovely.

-Isn't that awesome?

0:33:340:33:38

But did Sir John ever come here? No internet bidding then, of course.

0:33:380:33:42

Come on, then. Last-chance saloon and all that. Shall we?

0:33:420:33:46

I wonder what auctioneer Ed Smith

0:33:460:33:48

makes of what our couple have come up with.

0:33:480:33:51

The letterpress, it is unusual. It's a bygone item.

0:33:510:33:54

We sell lots of bygone things here

0:33:540:33:56

so, realistically, it has got a good chance of selling.

0:33:560:33:59

The cake slice, I think it's a lovely item.

0:33:590:34:01

It's very in at the moment. People love baking.

0:34:010:34:04

The clock I think is one of the nicest pieces which has been entered.

0:34:040:34:08

So fingers crossed, I think it's going to be a good one.

0:34:080:34:11

They are. Firmly crossed.

0:34:110:34:13

-It's started.

-It's a lovely saleroom, I must admit.

0:34:130:34:17

And it's busy.

0:34:170:34:19

Starting off with Natasha's hot... well, warm, Art Nouveau item.

0:34:190:34:23

It's really good for curry.

0:34:230:34:26

I like to have my saag aloo from a dish.

0:34:260:34:31

Start me here. £50 for it. 50.

0:34:310:34:33

-Surely.

-Fantastic piece. £50. 40.

0:34:330:34:36

-30 start.

-Oh, come on. This is sad.

0:34:370:34:40

-He's got it.

-£30. 20 bid, then.

0:34:400:34:44

20 I have. 20. Two, five, eight, 30, two.

0:34:440:34:49

32 it is in the room.

0:34:490:34:51

No way. It's so beautiful.

0:34:510:34:54

It seems cheap at 32.

0:34:540:34:56

-That's not on.

-I thought you'd genuinely just frozen there.

0:34:590:35:02

Not a huge loss, but she was awfully fond of it.

0:35:040:35:07

I am so upset.

0:35:070:35:10

Aw...

0:35:100:35:11

I don't care.

0:35:110:35:13

LAUGHTER

0:35:130:35:15

Now for one of Paul's favourites, also Art Nouveau.

0:35:150:35:19

Pure profit, because Art Nouveau is doing really well today.

0:35:190:35:22

You're jinxing this really well.

0:35:220:35:24

What do we say? £20 for this? 20?

0:35:240:35:27

15.

0:35:270:35:28

Out. £10... We're in the danger zone.

0:35:280:35:31

10 it is. 10 it is.

0:35:310:35:32

Is there 12? It is at 10.

0:35:320:35:34

12, 15. 18...

0:35:340:35:36

-Please...

-Profit.

0:35:360:35:39

Going to sell to the lady for £18.

0:35:390:35:42

-Bargains being had here today.

-HE SIGHS

0:35:430:35:46

Nicely put, Paul.

0:35:460:35:48

Don't be sad. What was it you said to me before?

0:35:480:35:51

"I don't care at all"?

0:35:510:35:53

Surely her little piece of printing history can IMPRESS?

0:35:530:35:56

-Were you bin-rattling again at the back of the museum?

-Kind of.

0:35:560:36:00

I've told you, it's not classy, it's not dignified...

0:36:000:36:04

You can take the girl out of Glasgow...

0:36:040:36:07

I'll start straight in at the...

0:36:070:36:10

-£20.

-Oh!

0:36:100:36:12

Well done, there.

0:36:120:36:14

£20. Now, where's 22? 22, 5, 8, 30.

0:36:140:36:17

-30 it is.

-That's 50%.

0:36:170:36:20

£30, now, it is. £30.

0:36:200:36:22

£30.

0:36:240:36:25

It's a Norfolk record, I'll take it. I'll take it.

0:36:250:36:28

Hurrah! Not exactly a licence to print money, though.

0:36:280:36:32

Phew...chuffed.

0:36:320:36:35

Time for Paul's bargain rocker.

0:36:350:36:37

If you don't put a baby in it, what do you do with it?

0:36:370:36:40

-Exactly.

-Spare towels?

0:36:400:36:41

This is why 50 quid might not be so cheap.

0:36:410:36:43

What do you say? Start me here, £100 for it, £100.

0:36:430:36:46

-80.

-Come on! Somebody needs to stick their hand in the air.

0:36:460:36:49

Start me - who wants...

0:36:490:36:51

We're in the danger zone now, we're in the danger zone.

0:36:510:36:53

30, and start, then. It is here to go.

0:36:530:36:56

30, 30, I have...

0:36:560:36:57

If I lose money on this, I may have to just leave.

0:36:570:37:02

It's going to go...

0:37:020:37:03

-It is going to go for 30 quid.

-Are we done?

0:37:030:37:06

Don't go, Paul. Still early days.

0:37:090:37:12

£30.

0:37:120:37:15

It's right there - beautifully turned wood, oh...

0:37:150:37:18

-Don't look at it, don't look at it.

-I'm sorry.

0:37:180:37:21

Can Natasha's skittles bowl them over?

0:37:210:37:23

Attention!

0:37:230:37:26

-I love this.

-It is cool.

0:37:260:37:28

This is the kind of thing I take home and say,

0:37:280:37:30

"Kids, I'm going to change your life,"

0:37:300:37:32

and then I put it in the next auction, or give it to charity.

0:37:320:37:34

And I have three lots of interest.

0:37:340:37:36

He's got commission bids!

0:37:360:37:38

I'm straight in at £15.

0:37:380:37:40

Need more.

0:37:400:37:41

20's online. Are you 2, sir? 22. Is there 5?

0:37:410:37:45

-It's 22.

-Internet's in on it.

0:37:450:37:47

Look, there's Michael from North Walsham.

0:37:470:37:50

-It's worth one more. 32 it is.

-Come on!

0:37:500:37:52

It's 32. Back in the room.

0:37:520:37:54

Is there 5? 35 online. 38. 38 it is. Is there 40?

0:37:540:37:59

It's in the room at £38 now. Is there 40?

0:37:590:38:02

It's in the room...

0:38:020:38:04

-I'm quite impressed by that.

-Totally.

-40 online.

0:38:040:38:06

He's going to do it, he's going to go. Come on.

0:38:070:38:09

Is there 5? We are going to go at £42.

0:38:090:38:12

Are we all done?

0:38:120:38:13

-Yay!

-That is the one... That is the one!

0:38:160:38:18

Yeah - Diss likes old-fashioned games.

0:38:180:38:22

-I tell you what, it bodes well for table croquet.

-Games.

-Mm-hm.

0:38:220:38:26

There it is - table not included.

0:38:260:38:29

Another one I walked straight past.

0:38:290:38:30

Aw, no!

0:38:300:38:32

And we know what happened to the last thing you walked straight past.

0:38:320:38:35

I start with bids on. I start straight in. £20 I have.

0:38:350:38:38

-That'll do, that'll do. I'm happy at that.

-30...

0:38:380:38:41

2 - I'm out.

0:38:410:38:43

-Profit.

-That'll do.

0:38:430:38:44

38. 40. 2.

0:38:440:38:46

42 is standing. 42 it is. Is there 45?

0:38:460:38:51

It is £42 now. Is there 5?

0:38:510:38:52

Selling away at £42.

0:38:520:38:56

-Get in!

-Happy days!

0:38:560:38:57

We should have been buying tabletop games the whole trip.

0:38:570:39:00

Pure PEG-stasy.

0:39:000:39:02

Do you think there is some possibility of us

0:39:020:39:04

salvaging shreds of credibility out of this road trip

0:39:040:39:07

in the final auction?

0:39:070:39:09

Yeah.

0:39:090:39:10

-It's happening, babe.

-It's happening.

0:39:100:39:12

It's happening, girlfriend.

0:39:120:39:13

Time for Natasha's American clock - the auctioneer's favourite.

0:39:130:39:17

Look at that - a lovely piece, that is.

0:39:170:39:19

That is a big-up, that is a big-up.

0:39:190:39:21

-50.

-Oh, come on.

0:39:210:39:24

£30 bid, then.

0:39:240:39:26

A good-quality clock here for £30. £30, 30 at the back. 32.

0:39:260:39:30

35. 38. 40.

0:39:300:39:34

Oh, it's got to be worth one more, come on.

0:39:350:39:38

45. 48.

0:39:380:39:40

-50.

-I think I'm in profit - oh!

0:39:400:39:43

It's got the style. 60. 60 at the back.

0:39:430:39:46

-Oh, come on.

-It's not bad, though.

0:39:460:39:48

It's OK. It's OK.

0:39:480:39:49

At £60...

0:39:490:39:51

-Oh...

-It's all right.

-It's OK.

0:39:530:39:54

Yes, in the circumstances.

0:39:540:39:56

Another healthy profit.

0:39:560:39:58

Mark Vs, anyone? Paul's binoculars...

0:40:010:40:05

-I started...

-He's got bids on.

0:40:050:40:08

£30. 30, I have.

0:40:080:40:09

-It's a start, it's a start.

-He's says bids - plural.

0:40:090:40:13

32, 5, 8, 40, 2, 5, 8.

0:40:130:40:17

50. One more? 5, in the gallery. 55.

0:40:170:40:20

-I'll take it. Back in the game.

-Nice work.

0:40:200:40:23

Binoculars go at £55.

0:40:230:40:25

-Nice!

-I'll take it. Get in.

-Yay!

0:40:260:40:29

They didn't quite see double, but not bad.

0:40:290:40:32

You're getting back, getting back.

0:40:320:40:34

It's cool, it's cool. Nation still respects you.

0:40:340:40:37

Time for that little printing block Natasha picked up for half price.

0:40:370:40:41

£15.

0:40:410:40:43

-Oh, oh, oh!

-Yes!

0:40:430:40:45

Who's 18? It's with Lisa, there, at £15. Where's 18?

0:40:450:40:48

Come on, internet.

0:40:480:40:50

18. 20. 2...

0:40:500:40:53

-Oh, it's 22.

-22 it is.

0:40:530:40:55

It's the lady seated in the room at £22.

0:40:550:40:58

Tell you what, that lady's got a whole weekend

0:41:000:41:02

of leaf-printing ahead of her.

0:41:020:41:04

Ha! I think Natasha could win this auction.

0:41:040:41:06

-It ends with the mate spoon.

-This is not the last lot?

0:41:060:41:12

Of the road trip.

0:41:120:41:14

Seriously? And it all boils down to a small hot-beverage straw?

0:41:140:41:19

Yes. It's South American light refreshment time.

0:41:190:41:23

I'm starting at £15. 15 I have. Who's 18?

0:41:230:41:27

-What's happening?

-£15. 18, 20. 20 I have. Who's 2?

0:41:270:41:32

Paid £30 for it.

0:41:320:41:33

£20 now. Is there 2?

0:41:330:41:35

-22. 22 now bid.

-It's silver!

0:41:350:41:39

Is there 5? It's in the room at £22. Are we all done?

0:41:390:41:43

-And that's how it ends.

-Here endeth...the road trip.

0:41:460:41:50

And that really is the last straw.

0:41:500:41:52

The mate's on you, Paul.

0:41:520:41:55

Ho-ho-ho!

0:41:550:41:56

Natasha started out with £141.04.

0:41:560:42:00

After costs, she made a profit of £11.48.

0:42:000:42:04

So, she wins today and ends up with £152.53,

0:42:040:42:10

while Paul began with £370.04, and after costs,

0:42:100:42:14

he made a loss of £21.06.

0:42:140:42:18

So, runner-up today, but victor overall, with £348.98.

0:42:180:42:24

All profits go to Children In Need.

0:42:240:42:27

OK, one more time.

0:42:270:42:28

It's been such good fun, hasn't it?

0:42:280:42:30

Next time you're in Norfolk, pop in and see me,

0:42:300:42:32

because I might not be going home.

0:42:320:42:33

Haste ye back.

0:42:330:42:35

Really?

0:42:390:42:40

HE LAUGHS

0:42:400:42:42

-You going to cheat, Natasha?

-Oh!

0:42:420:42:44

HE LAUGHS EVILLY

0:42:440:42:45

Ho...!

0:42:470:42:48

How good is that?

0:42:490:42:51

Oh, no.

0:42:510:42:52

It's been one hell of a week.

0:42:520:42:54

It's good, this, isn't it?

0:42:540:42:56

That'll do.

0:42:560:42:57

Rrr...rrr...rrr...

0:42:570:42:59

Over there! Look at it!

0:43:000:43:02

It's glorious. It's glorious.

0:43:040:43:07

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip...

0:43:070:43:09

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:43:090:43:11

James Braxton and Raj Bisram in a classic double bill,

0:43:110:43:15

featuring Big Trouble In Little China

0:43:150:43:18

and The Wicker Man.

0:43:180:43:19

Anatomically, it's beyond reproach, isn't it?

0:43:190:43:22

The tartan twosome, Paul Laidlaw and Natasha Raskin, are antiquing in Norfolk, but somehow finding time to go down a Neolithic flint mine and go into print. It's the final 'Round Britain Rummage' and they unearth a rarely seen art nouveau food warmer and a charming 19th-century table croquet set. They're headed for one last auction in Diss and it's still anyone's game. Who will win this Road Trip?


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