Episode 21 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 21

Seasoned auctioneers James Braxton and Jonathan Pratt hit the road to travel from Altrincham to Nantwich.


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Transcript


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each and one big challenge.

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-Cos I'm going to declare war.

-Why?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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There's nothing in here.

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The aim is to trade up and hope each antique turns a profit.

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Disappointing.

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But it's not as easy as you might think,

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-and things don't always go according to plan.

-Push!

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So, will they race off with a huge profit or come to a grinding halt?

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-Terribly nervous now, James.

-This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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This week, we start a new chapter with veteran road trippers

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James Braxton and Jonathan Pratt. Goody!

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Seasoned auctioneer James is quite the charmer

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when buying and selling antiques.

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-£40, Val.

-£42.50.

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-I dare you.

-£42.50. £41 and I'll do it.

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Done, because you're a horrible person!

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And always asking the most important questions...

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And for a cuckoo clock, do you need a cuckoo?

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CUCKOO COOS

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..James's opponent is young auctioneer Jonathan Pratt.

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He seems to be quite a meticulous fellow...

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I am just slightly concerned about that stone.

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..but can also be prone to a bit of confusion.

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You're looking at everything, and it can confuse.

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Must be his age.

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The question is, will James help or hinder?

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You can hear him now, can't you? He's round there,

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skulking around, putting me off.

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The boys will travel in James's trusty MG.

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She's prone to breaking down, but let's hope she goes the full distance.

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With £200 in their back pocket,

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can they uncover treasures that will make a stonking profit at auction?

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This week's road trip will start off in Altrincham, Greater Manchester.

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The chaps will journey over 300 miles to the deep south-west,

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finishing off in Lostwithiel, Cornwall.

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But this is day one of the trip.

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We kick off with a bit of shopping in bustling market town Altrincham,

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and we'll auction just over 20 miles away in Nantwich.

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The town of Altrincham an ancient mediaeval history.

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The old marketplace was a thriving trade centre as far back as 1290.

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The arrival of stocks meant that any thieves and vagabonds

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were put on public display. Better be on your best behaviour, boys!

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Oh, dear, the heavens have well and truly opened.

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Right, then, you two, what's your plan for the day?

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-You're off to your first shop.

-Yep.

-I'm off to mine.

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And I'm hoping to buy all five items immediately.

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And go and have a coffee!

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THEY LAUGH

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What's your tactics?

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I'm not competitive in the slightest,

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I just like winning, that's basically it.

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I'm just masking non-competitiveness.

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I'm going to be searching for everything,

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-my whole life is dedicated to beating you.

-I've seen you at work,

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trying to catch me by surprise with this big wonder.

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-Anyway, good luck.

-Thank you. And you.

-Let battle commence.

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James seems to be in a jovial mood, even without his coat.

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Will he get his hands on some treasures in his first shop of the day?

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-Hello, James.

-Val.

-He's James.

-There's a nice calendar down here.

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I'm just getting the feel of the place at the moment,

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I like some goodies already.

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That is lovely, isn't it? And how much have you got on this one?

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Tina, how much have we got on that? The picture.

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£1950, isn't it?

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-It's a bit beyond me, Val.

-I was going to say!

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THEY LAUGH

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-Do you know Bruce Bairnsfather?

-Yes, yes.

-There's quite a lot in that window.

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So you've got this nice plate, this wall plate.

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I'll be flexible on those,

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-cos I actually have another box full of them.

-Do you?

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Bairnsfather was a great war cartoonist, so '14-'18 war.

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Captain Bruce Bairnsfather was a world-famous cartoonist

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who created satirical images from the trenches of the First World War.

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His character, Old Bill,

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a walrus-moustached soldier,

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was much-loved for keeping up the morale of the troops at the time,

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and his work is much sought-after today.

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He was just a really important cartoonist,

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who kept everybody's spirits up.

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The only problem is,

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and here's a funny one, you can see this sort of missile coming in.

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Coiffeur In The Trenches.

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This says, "Keep your head still, or I'll have your blinking ear off."

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The only problem with ashtrays is they're not as popular.

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This is a lovely piece, that. What's your little gold?

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Is that a little pearl box?

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And how much have you got on your little pearl box, Val?

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It's 1927. I've got £195 on it.

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I have a limited budget that I've got to spread. I think that's lovely.

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And I think that's lovely.

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-Looks like you're spoilt for choice, James.

-It is lovely.

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What could you do the two for? So that's the pearl box and the plate.

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-I'll do the two for £200.

-£200, that's my total budget.

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Could you do either of these two items at £90, Val?

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-Not really.

-Not really. What could you do the two ashtrays at?

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I'll do those at £40, just for the two ashtrays.

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£40 for the two ashtrays.

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And could you do 90 on that, Val?

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-I'll do that for you.

-OK.

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-I'll take those two, so 40 and 90.

-That's 130. Thank you very much.

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Job done, thank you. I'm so pleased.

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-Tina, could you wrap those for me? Thank you.

-Well done, Tina.

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Everybody needs a Tina.

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Hey, hands off, Mr Braxton, Tina's not for sale.

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Blimey, you weren't joking

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when you said you wanted to buy all your lots as quickly as possible.

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It's only the first shop and you've already spent £130.

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Meanwhile, in nearby Hale,

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Jonathan is in tentative mood as he approaches his first shop.

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I've walked a little way, and here it is. Still raining.

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I've got no idea what to expect inside.

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There's some painted furniture in the window, so I'm not so sure at the minute.

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-Morning.

-Morning.

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This is Porcupine, and what do you sell a lot of round here?

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-Chandeliers.

-Really?

-A lot.

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-Interesting.

-Glass of fizz?

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-Well, why not?

-Why not?!

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-James is driving!

-Join in the club!

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Champagne on arrival, Jonathan. What's Val up to?

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The Cheshire gentlemen, what do they want?

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-This is a ladies' shop.

-This is definitely.

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I have a few things, I've just bought a great croquet set,

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a chap'll buy that.

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I think, in all honesty, there's nothing in here for me.

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The painted furniture is far too ready-to-go and priced accordingly.

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I don't want to buy a chandelier, I've had my fingers burnt before.

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It's a great shop, retail. Not much for me.

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I've been offered a cup of coffee, so I might go downstairs for a cup of coffee now.

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Champagne, now coffee.

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-You don't normally have six or seven chandeliers hanging in someone's sitting room.

-True.

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But this is where you assemble them, clean them and you get them ready for upstairs?

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-That's it.

-What else have you got?

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-What about the croquet set? Is this complete?

-Yes,

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they're very hard to find, croquet sets, now.

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This one, would you take £45?

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-You're obviously joking?(!)

-No.

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Right, go on. Up we go.

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If we said...

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-..60?

-No.

-OK, what do you want for it?

-80.

-You want £80?

-Yeah.

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Oh, blimey.

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65.

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Oh, come on, 70. 70's good, you know.

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-Where's this coffee?

-On its way.

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-Erm, 65.

-Done for 70.

-65.

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£67.50. Go for it. Yes, we've done it!

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Brilliant, lovely, thank you very much.

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It obviously pays to have a nosy around in a lady's basement, Jonathan.

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Well, OK, I did say that I wasn't going to buy anything.

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I don't know, maybe the champ...

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Maybe the sparkling champers might have helped.

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I'm not disappointed, though. I think this is a bit of a speculative lot.

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There is a chance of a profit, so I'm not too disappointed.

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The boys are switching shops this morning, so it's a case of one in and one out!

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Take it easy, Mr Braxton, you've already spent £130 and it's not even lunch time.

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-Hello.

-Very nice to meet you.

-Hello, nice to meet you. James.

-I'm Val.

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-Val.

-Yes.

-Another Val! I've just come from a Val.

-Yes, she is, I forgot.

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-In Altrincham.

-I know her very well.

-Very good.

-I've got some fizz.

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-Oh, lovely. I won't say no.

-Well, the other one didn't, either.

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Eh-up! Watch yourself, James, Val's got the champers out again.

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You like to soften up your client. Is she a skiing lady, then?

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Yes, she's lovely, but I like skiing.

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-It's a sort of Marquette, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Plaster of Paris, is it?

-Yes.

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This is quite fun because it has the alpine theme. You've got your skis, your pole

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and your St Bernard, obviously.

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And, a glamorous early skier, look at that.

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No skier should be complete without a tie.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-How much have you got on that?

-85.

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-The best I can do, Val, and you can chuck me out of your shop.

-I will.

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-35 is the best I can do.

-I'm sure you can go better than that.

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-I can't, in fact.

-60.

-I can't do 60.

-Well, I can't do 35.

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-You've got to meet me somewhere in the middle.

-I'm very happy.

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-Otherwise that's staying.

-£37.50, I can do.

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Good God, you're a pain in the butt! You beam the whole way through!

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You can go better than that.

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OK, 37.50.

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-You keep repeating yourself.

-Yeah.

-The answer is, "no". You've got to go higher.

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-General war of attrition, Val.

-Go on.

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CLOCK TICKS

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-You take a long time to decide.

-I'm just thinking about...

-45.

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I can't do 45. I've got to save myself some money.

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-So £40, and we will shake.

-42.50 and it's done.

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-You see.

-£40, Val.

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-42.50, I dare you.

-£41 and I'll do it.

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Done, because you're a horrible person and you've got a great smile.

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Thank you, Val.

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Very close. Meanwhile, back in Altrincham, Jonathan is on a mission

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to find some more gems for his collection.

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-Hi, there.

-Hello.

-Good morning.

-How are you?

-A bit wet.

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Well, you are in Manchester.

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-How much do you want for this?

-I would have thought about 200.

-Yeah, crikey.

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Looks like Val is trying to squeeze your budget too, Jonathan.

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What kind of things do you like?

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There's lots of things that catch my eye. Jewellery-wise, it depends.

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-I like the bronze but I can't afford that. What's that, £2,500 or something?

-Yes.

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It's a matter of filtering through that top veneer

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-and seeing what's left within my budget that I can afford.

-Mmm.

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Anything else you can show me?

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We've got stuff downstairs in the cellar but it is a cellar,

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-it is not another showroom.

-That's fine.

-If you'd like to have a mooch, you're welcome.

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Thank you.

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Ah, once more into the basement, dear Jonathan.

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I'm looking for the delights. Oh, my word, here we go.

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-I bet you James didn't look down here.

-'I bet he did.'

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"To Church", I like engravings.

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Whilst Jonathan scuttles about downstairs,

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Val holds court at the counter.

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A little canvas of a lady. That's got some age.

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She's in shocking condition. Pretty girl, early Victorian.

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It's a bit of a punt, but, you know. I'll have a think about that one.

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Shallow Campana jardiniere with a stone base.

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That's stone because it's chipped.

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OK.

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Right, three things that I'm interested in. That's the first.

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-Yes.

-She's in appalling condition, isn't she?

-She is, make me an offer.

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A tenner?

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-Well, you said!

-Make it 20, and OK.

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-£15?

-OK.

-I'll take that for £15.

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That's the first one. Erm, the terracotta clay, shallow Campana.

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-Yeah, yeah. Make me an offer.

-£25.

-OK.

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OK. Brilliant!

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Yeah, I'm not doing anything with it.

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-I'll just get this print and see what you think of the print.

-Yes, OK.

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-That one.

-Oh, that one!

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-Make me an offer.

-£18.

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20 and it's yours.

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I'll have a proper look at this. You can have a look at it.

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Is it what I think it is?

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It's behind non-reflective glass, which is a bit of a pain.

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Yeah, it is.

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-£18.

-OK.

-Brilliant.

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Those three objects, I'll take.

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Well done, Jonathan, your purchases so far are rather eclectic.

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Looks like checking out the basement is your new number one manoeuvre.

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Meanwhile, where's Mr Braxton tootling off to?

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James is hurtling his way

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to the magical world of cuckoo land in Tabley, Cheshire.

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The museum was created by brothers Roman and Maz Piekarski.

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They are widely respected in the world of horology -

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that's the study of time to you and me.

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Over the last 40 years, their passion for cuckoo clocks

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has resulted in an enchanting collection

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of over 600 cuckoo clocks of all shapes and sizes and is regarded

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as the most important collection in the world.

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Today, Roman opens the doors to enlighten James further.

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What an amazing place. For many of us, they think cuckoo clocks are Swiss, is that right?

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No, cuckoo clocks are from the Black Forest in Germany.

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After the Second World War, there was a big anti-German feeling,

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and so they sold them

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through Swiss agents, so everybody thinks the cuckoo clocks are Swiss.

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You've got to remember that everything was made within a 25-mile radius of each other,

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all in the Black Forest in southern Germany.

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-So it's that localised, 25 miles?

-Yeah.

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Do they do the whole thing, the people in the Black Forest,

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did they make the movements and cases?

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It was a pure cottage industry.

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A family would be making cabinets, somebody making movements, another family making hands,

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weights, and then it was all put together by a fitter and exported.

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CUCKOO

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-But why "cuckoo"?

-In the beginning, in our research,

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we feel they tried to make a rooster clock, like an alarm clock,

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but it was very difficult to imitate the rooster.

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As they were doing it, they probably heard the old cuckoo and they went,

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"Oh, two bellows, "two pipes, there's the cuckoo".

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Then in about 1840, 1845, they made the quail which was one pitch,

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so one bellow only, and it went on like that.

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-Oh, so it's almost mechanical ease, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Really...?

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-And for a cuckoo clock, do you need a cuckoo?

-Of course you do!

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Of course you do.

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What we have here is very, very interesting.

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This is not a clock but it's Black Forest.

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In the early days of photography, you had to stand there for ages when you had your picture taken,

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so to keep people occupied they used to say "watch the birdie".

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Cuckoo, cuckoo...

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-What are you showing me now?

-I'd like to show you this clock here

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which is a cuckoo and echo.

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CUCKOO ECHOES

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How is that done?

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I can show you on this clock here, which we've taken the dial away,

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and you can see the cuckoo and echo working.

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Oh, I see, so there's separate bellows at the back.

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Yes, which are reversed inside the pipes

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so it throws it around and it sounds like an echo.

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What you've got to remember in the Victorian days, the more your clock did, the more entertaining it was.

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The happier the people were, there was no television so the clock had to do everything.

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These look like English bracket clocks, but these were made for the big houses,

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the stately homes, the very wealthy people.

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I just noticed these moving eyes, what are these?

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These are bracket clocks with the eye turners in the bottom.

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They were made in 1856 in Eisenbach in the Black Forest.

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-Now, this big fellow has caught my eye.

-A clock fit for a king, huh?

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In our opinion it's the most important cuckoo clock in the world.

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-It was made for Frederick The First of Baden Baden.

-Right.

-In the 1860s.

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-Yes, I love the figures here.

-They're all hand-carved.

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This clock is an amazing testament to exquisite craftsmanship.

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Many would go cuckoo over it!

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In German folklore, they believed in the little people that come out at night

0:18:150:18:18

to do all the work in the houses and on the machines and everything.

0:18:180:18:24

-Thank you very much. I go away a wiser man.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:18:240:18:30

It's the end of a long day

0:18:350:18:36

and the chaps will rest in the village of Tarporley.

0:18:360:18:40

Another busy day awaits tomorrow.

0:18:400:18:42

It's day two and we're 13 miles down the road in Tarporley, Cheshire.

0:18:470:18:52

James is visiting Tarporley Antique Centre, hoping to bag a bargain.

0:18:520:18:58

Yesterday, James proved he's a gambling man.

0:18:580:19:01

He spent a whopping £171.

0:19:010:19:03

He bought the Bruce Bairnsfather ashtrays,

0:19:030:19:07

the eye-catching gold pill box and the ski figurine.

0:19:070:19:11

This leaves him with a measly £29.

0:19:110:19:13

Jonathan has remained steady. He spent just over £125 on four items.

0:19:160:19:21

A child's croquet set, a terracotta jardiniere, the engraving

0:19:210:19:26

and the rather tatty painting.

0:19:260:19:27

This leaves him with just under £75. Game on!

0:19:270:19:32

James, you might find something interesting in the back room.

0:19:340:19:39

It's got all the weird and wonderful rusty, old things, that men like.

0:19:390:19:43

Toys for the boys, excellent! This is the boys' room, is it?

0:19:430:19:47

-We've got First World War grenades. We've got weapons.

-There we are.

0:19:470:19:54

Ahoy!

0:19:540:19:55

I've just found this nice group of medals, great war medals.

0:19:560:20:01

I don't know a great deal about the Great War.

0:20:010:20:03

I know a little bit about the general history of it,

0:20:030:20:06

but a friend and a colleague of mine knows a great deal. I'll give him a call.

0:20:060:20:11

In the antiques' business it's impossible to know every single subject inside out

0:20:140:20:18

and seasoned expert, James, knows it's vital to have a bulging contacts' book that one can use

0:20:180:20:24

in times of need.

0:20:240:20:26

This man has priced them up at £60.

0:20:290:20:32

If I could secure them at £29, they would be a lovely bed fellow for my Bruce Bairnsfather.

0:20:320:20:38

Here goes.

0:20:380:20:40

Telephone call over, James is armed with the necessary information.

0:20:400:20:43

Will he be able to seal the deal?

0:20:430:20:46

-This is the particular thing I like in here.

-Let's have a look.

-It's your Great War trio.

0:20:460:20:51

My only conundrum, and I'm going to be totally straight with you,

0:20:510:20:54

I larged it yesterday in Altrincham and Hale and spent a lot of money.

0:20:540:20:59

Oh, you're going to give me the sob story now.

0:20:590:21:02

I am going to give you a sob story, but it doesn't matter, you can either say "yay or nay".

0:21:020:21:06

That is exactly what I have left.

0:21:060:21:10

£29.

0:21:100:21:12

£29 and no other small change?

0:21:120:21:14

I've heard this sob story before from other people, but you do it so nicely.

0:21:140:21:19

OK, that's really kind of you. Thank you very much, indeed.

0:21:190:21:22

You're welcome. Would you like them wrapped for that money?

0:21:220:21:25

Oh, well - dear, oh, dear, I wouldn't have the temerity to ask,

0:21:250:21:29

but now you're offering, lovely.

0:21:290:21:31

# Prince Charming Prince Charming

0:21:310:21:35

# Ridicule is nothing to be scared of... #

0:21:350:21:38

Meanwhile, Jonathan is on his way over to the village of Blackden near Crewe,

0:21:400:21:44

just over 20 miles away.

0:21:440:21:47

He has a special invitation to a rare 16th-century timber-framed building

0:21:470:21:52

called the Old Medicine House,

0:21:520:21:54

believed to have been built for an apothecary.

0:21:540:21:57

Herein lies an even more remarkable twist to the tale.

0:21:570:22:01

In 1970, Alan and Griselda Turner discovered through an architect friend

0:22:010:22:06

that the house was to be condemned and demolished.

0:22:060:22:09

We were living in that house there, which is basically three up and three down with three children.

0:22:090:22:16

We needed more space. The architect that we found said it was very difficult

0:22:160:22:21

to extend a timber-framed building and the best way to do it

0:22:210:22:24

was to bring another timber frame to join it on.

0:22:240:22:27

Determined to save the Old Medicine House the couple managed

0:22:270:22:31

to dismantle the building piece by piece and move it 20 miles

0:22:310:22:36

and attach it to their own home here in Blackden.

0:22:360:22:38

The house is an amazing piece of history and Griselda has made some fascinating discoveries

0:22:380:22:45

over the past few decades.

0:22:450:22:46

Here is the display of the artefacts going back...

0:22:460:22:50

This was found in the house?

0:22:500:22:51

This was found in the house. This was a stirrup.

0:22:510:22:53

-We found stuff mostly in the fabric.

-OK.

0:22:530:22:56

When we were taking it down my husband, Alan, told workmen

0:22:560:22:59

if they found anything unusual they were to stop.

0:22:590:23:03

In 2004, the Blackden Trust was set up to preserve the history of the house

0:23:030:23:07

and visitors are warmly welcomed.

0:23:070:23:11

And another amazing discovery was found in the rafters of the house.

0:23:120:23:16

Right, these are the shoes.

0:23:180:23:21

In the 16th Century shoes in the roof

0:23:210:23:24

were used as a protective charm to ward off evil spirits.

0:23:240:23:28

This house is multiply protected. It's protected by the shoes and quatrefoils

0:23:280:23:32

-on either side of the window.

-The Gothic motif, particularly for churches?

-Yeah.

0:23:320:23:37

So you've taken these out of your roof.

0:23:370:23:39

-They're here in the house in boxes.

-Yes.

0:23:390:23:41

Have you replaced them with anything else?

0:23:410:23:43

-My son actually hid his first trainers up there.

-Oh, good.

0:23:430:23:46

So the tradition still continues, yeah.

0:23:460:23:49

-A pair of old running shoes.

-Yes, indeed.

0:23:490:23:52

Because this house was once owned by an apothecary, local herbalist, Sue, is on hand

0:23:520:23:58

to give the low-down on ancient, herbal remedies.

0:23:580:24:01

So, take me through all this medicine here.

0:24:010:24:05

This house has a history of herbs and medicines going back to the 16th Century

0:24:050:24:09

when we thought an apothecary lived here,

0:24:090:24:11

right up to the 20th Century when the famous XX oils were made here.

0:24:110:24:16

-They were a cure-all.

-Really(!)

-Anything you had wrong with you, this would cure it.

0:24:160:24:21

When we re-erected the house, lots of seeds and things fell out of the timbers and plants

0:24:210:24:26

that had never grown here before started to come up like opium poppies and feverfew.

0:24:260:24:31

All things that were used in folk remedies.

0:24:310:24:33

So we decided to plant a herb garden outside.

0:24:330:24:35

-Shall we have a look?

-Would you like to look at the garden?

-Please, I'll see if I can identify any.

0:24:350:24:40

This cabbage-like plant at the front?

0:24:420:24:44

They're opium poppies.

0:24:440:24:46

They're the poppies? Of course.

0:24:460:24:47

I recognise the leaf now.

0:24:470:24:49

Do you recognise this?

0:24:490:24:50

I've got this in my garden at home and this is Alchemilla?

0:24:500:24:54

We call it Lady's Mantle, the folk name for it.

0:24:540:24:56

But what on earth is it useful for?

0:24:560:24:58

In the 18th century it was said if you'd been breastfeeding

0:24:580:25:01

and you wanted to reshape your breasts afterwards,

0:25:010:25:05

you'd place the leaves on your breast to firm them up again.

0:25:050:25:08

So a sort of a cosmetic surgery of the 16th century?

0:25:080:25:12

It is, yes.

0:25:120:25:14

Wonderful.

0:25:140:25:15

Come on, Jonathan, refocus on making a profit at auction.

0:25:150:25:19

You need to get a move on for a spot of shopping.

0:25:200:25:23

Our next and final shopping destination is 18 miles away

0:25:280:25:31

in the village of Sandiway, near Northwich.

0:25:310:25:35

Blakemere Craft Centre is set around charming Edwardian stables

0:25:350:25:39

and is home to a large antiques and collectables emporium.

0:25:390:25:43

James is there, but as he's splashed all his cash,

0:25:430:25:46

the only buying he'll be doing is at the ice-cream stall.

0:25:460:25:49

-Thanks a lot.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:490:25:53

£1.75, I hope Jonathan is able to find similar value in the antiques store.

0:25:530:26:00

This is quite nice quality actually.

0:26:000:26:01

-Jonathan?

-Hello.

-How are you getting on?

-I'm all right.

0:26:050:26:08

Look at it you! What flavour's that?

0:26:080:26:10

I'm relaxing, it's lovely strawberry.

0:26:100:26:12

If you find your purchase, I might buy you one of these.

0:26:120:26:15

Lots to see in here. How long did you spend in here?

0:26:150:26:17

I spent no time in here, just had a quick little look.

0:26:170:26:20

-You just carry on, don't worry about time.

-Thank you.

0:26:200:26:24

-I won't, I won't. Bye.

-Goodbye and good luck.

0:26:250:26:29

Thank you, James. Thank you(!)

0:26:290:26:32

It's nice to see a man scratching around isn't it?

0:26:330:26:36

You can hear him now, he's round there skulking around,

0:26:380:26:41

putting me off.

0:26:410:26:43

I'm trying to concentrate, get on with the job

0:26:430:26:46

and he's there licking his lolly, giving it all that.

0:26:460:26:51

Eagle, knicker elastic!

0:26:510:26:53

The heat is on for poor Jonathan.

0:26:530:26:55

Don't listen to that cheeky beggar, Braxton, he's winding you up.

0:26:550:27:00

In here, this has caught my eye.

0:27:010:27:05

That little brooch at the back, it says it's a Peridot bug brooch.

0:27:050:27:08

Says it's in solid white metal.

0:27:080:27:10

It's worth looking at, as not all antique jewellery was hallmarked anyway.

0:27:100:27:13

So it might be late 19th century and that could be interesting.

0:27:130:27:16

OK, let's have a look at that.

0:27:160:27:18

What would be the best price on that?

0:27:200:27:22

-We can definitely do you 10% off it.

-At a push £30?

0:27:220:27:26

Yeah, at a push, we can go to £30.

0:27:260:27:28

Wish I had a stronger lens with me,

0:27:280:27:30

I'm slightly concerned about that stone.

0:27:300:27:34

I tell you what, I like it anyway.

0:27:360:27:39

What the heck, it's nice, there's a little bit of gold and silver,

0:27:390:27:43

if you can take £30, I'm not going to haggle any more.

0:27:430:27:46

Yes we'll do it for £30.

0:27:460:27:47

Thank goodness you've found something Jonathan.

0:27:470:27:51

Top marks for not allowing James to put you off your stride.

0:27:510:27:53

Shopping is now over,

0:27:530:27:55

it's time to have a look at one another's purchases.

0:27:550:27:59

Jonathan, how are you feeling? Bubbly?

0:27:590:28:03

Terribly nervous now, James. I've got this all under wraps here.

0:28:030:28:07

Bring it on.

0:28:070:28:09

The story is, we went downstairs for a coffee

0:28:090:28:12

and she'd only just bought this, and here it was.

0:28:120:28:16

-Fresh goods.

-Fresh goods.

0:28:160:28:18

Looks... Oh!

0:28:180:28:19

A little croquet set.

0:28:190:28:21

-Isn't that sweet?

-There we go.

0:28:210:28:23

Is this for a smaller home, or is this indoors?

0:28:230:28:26

-It's a child's croquet set, I suppose.

-A child's croquet set.

0:28:260:28:29

I imagine it probably is.

0:28:290:28:30

It looks very good, can I see a ball?

0:28:300:28:32

You can have a couple.

0:28:320:28:34

-Lovely, very good.

-You've always wanted a couple.

0:28:340:28:36

And how much did you pay for them?

0:28:380:28:40

-70... No, £68.50 I think it was.

-£68...

-£67.50. What d'you think?

0:28:400:28:46

-Best of luck with them.

-You know...

0:28:460:28:49

Right, here's my first purchase. Two ashtrays.

0:28:490:28:54

They're kind of fun.

0:28:540:28:56

Not normally something you should really buy, ceramic ashtrays, is it?

0:28:560:29:00

Is this Barnswood or whatever his name is?

0:29:000:29:03

-Yes, Bruce Bairnsfather, one of which is chipped.

-I noticed that.

0:29:030:29:07

-You noticed that?

-Yes.

0:29:070:29:09

You're honing in on the errors?

0:29:090:29:12

No. Far be it from me to try and pick fault in things.

0:29:120:29:16

How much do you think I paid for them?

0:29:160:29:18

-You paid £15.

-I paid a lot more than that, I paid £40.

-Did you? OK.

0:29:180:29:22

Because of the Bruce Bairnsfather prints,

0:29:220:29:25

I think that will carry the day.

0:29:250:29:28

Goodness me, there's quite a garden theme to your purchases isn't there?

0:29:280:29:32

So we've got this, this sort of terracotta planter.

0:29:320:29:36

It's not in the finest of condition.

0:29:360:29:39

To say it's got a few chips is a slight under exaggeration.

0:29:390:29:43

-I'd say it's probably end of 19th century, early 20th century.

-So would I.

0:29:430:29:47

Shallow Campana, terracotta urn, how much do you think?

0:29:470:29:50

I'd pay anything between £30 and £60 for it.

0:29:500:29:55

I paid £25 for it.

0:29:550:29:58

I think you're in with a shout with that one.

0:29:580:30:00

OK, here's my second, enjoy.

0:30:000:30:03

Look at that, isn't that very cute, a little pill box.

0:30:050:30:09

-Nine carat gold!

-Nine carat gold.

0:30:090:30:11

-Bring out the scales.

-Here we go.

0:30:110:30:15

Does it measure terracotta, your scales?

0:30:150:30:17

You can see the scratch marks on there. Here we go.

0:30:170:30:21

-Slap it on.

-14 grams.

-14 grams.

0:30:210:30:24

So if you're paying up to 120 for it,

0:30:240:30:26

-you're on the money for gold value.

-Yeah.

0:30:260:30:30

Sadly, the value of this little pill box lies in the weight,

0:30:300:30:34

but hopefully someone will buy it

0:30:340:30:36

for its beauty and not its scrap value.

0:30:360:30:38

And I paid £90 for it.

0:30:380:30:41

Ooh! Good.

0:30:410:30:43

I didn't see it, but then you bought it before I got in there.

0:30:430:30:46

I did. Come on man of mystery, what have you got?

0:30:460:30:49

Look at this! This is very glam.

0:30:500:30:53

It's got some age.

0:30:530:30:54

-What are you dating that at?

-1840, 1850.

0:30:540:30:58

Yes, yes I'm getting that.

0:30:580:31:01

Not in great condition, so again this was in Val's basement.

0:31:010:31:04

I think if it gets through the viewing process,

0:31:040:31:08

I think you've got a profit.

0:31:080:31:10

We might have to put more clingfilm on there.

0:31:100:31:12

Here it is, a big fella.

0:31:120:31:14

You've peaked haven't you?

0:31:140:31:15

I haven't peaked, I wouldn't want to peak too soon.

0:31:150:31:18

You've probably seen it before. Reveal, go on. Enjoy.

0:31:180:31:23

Wow! Actually, was this at the back by the wrapping area?

0:31:230:31:28

It was, it's plaster of Paris. it's one of those maquettes.

0:31:280:31:31

I've always felt these were sort of a decoration for French radiator covers.

0:31:310:31:35

You know they have those big radiator things.

0:31:350:31:37

It's not without fault, she's lost her toes at some point, or it's been stuck back on again.

0:31:370:31:42

I was told it was a skiing injury.

0:31:420:31:45

That's why she sitting down! She's hurt her knee as well.

0:31:450:31:48

She's twisted her knee. How much did you pay for it?

0:31:480:31:51

-£41.

-I think that's a good price.

-Thank you.

-Yes.

0:31:510:31:53

Show me your fourth object.

0:31:530:31:55

My fourth object.

0:31:550:31:57

Ah-ha!

0:31:570:31:58

Who was this by? It's an artist's proof.

0:31:580:32:01

It's an artist's proof by someone called Frieff.

0:32:010:32:04

It's behind non reflective glass which doesn't...

0:32:040:32:07

On no, it's just filthy! Look at that.

0:32:070:32:09

-I think it just needs a clean.

-That might be a thing to do.

0:32:090:32:12

-This looks like another basement purchase. Is it?

-Yes!

0:32:120:32:15

-How much did you pay?

-£18.

0:32:150:32:19

This is my fourth and...

0:32:210:32:23

Is this the cutlery from lunch?

0:32:230:32:26

-This is my final, here we are.

-Blimey!

0:32:260:32:28

A nice little Great War group, medal group. 14/15 Star, British war medal

0:32:280:32:35

and the Victory Medal.

0:32:350:32:37

-Solid silver?

-Yes.

0:32:370:32:39

-Yes, that one.

-Yeah.

-And I paid my remaining money, I paid £29.

0:32:390:32:45

-I think that's a good buy, James.

-Thank you.

0:32:450:32:49

But are the boys being truthful with one another?

0:32:490:32:52

Now we've done the reveals, I'm a little more confident again.

0:32:520:32:58

Now I've seen what James has got, it's all that panic about,

0:33:000:33:04

"Did I pay too much for that? Have I chosen the right objects for the right sale?" That sort of stuff.

0:33:040:33:09

So...yes, I feel a lot better now.

0:33:090:33:13

I think I have a chance.

0:33:130:33:16

Is Jonathan feeling a little rocky? I don't know.

0:33:160:33:19

I think his optimism waned a little when my pill box slipped on

0:33:190:33:24

his electronic scales and registered 14 grams!

0:33:240:33:27

That's great. I think my items, I like my items.

0:33:270:33:31

I think they have a theme, I think they're nice, clean items.

0:33:310:33:35

You know, my condition is good, pretty well on all of them, bar the skier.

0:33:350:33:41

And I think I might just have squeezed this leg.

0:33:410:33:44

Given the choice,

0:33:440:33:45

I think Jonathan might swap my four items for his five.

0:33:450:33:49

The boys have employed some cunning manoeuvres,

0:33:510:33:54

but what results lie ahead?

0:33:540:33:55

What a wonderful start to the first leg.

0:33:550:33:58

We've travelled from Altrincham, Greater Manchester,

0:33:580:34:01

and followed a south-westerly direction through Tarporley

0:34:010:34:05

to the final destination of the day in the historic

0:34:050:34:08

market town of Nantwich, Cheshire.

0:34:080:34:11

Nantwich is a small medieval market town with a modern edge,

0:34:110:34:15

yet still crammed full of ancient character.

0:34:150:34:19

The Great Fire in 1583 destroyed much of the town

0:34:190:34:22

but its rebuilding has left a wealth of beautiful timber-framed

0:34:220:34:26

buildings second only to Chester.

0:34:260:34:28

So, have our boys made a good gamble with their items?

0:34:290:34:33

There's only one way to find out, at their first auction of the week.

0:34:330:34:37

-Here we go.

-Are you feeling lucky, Jonathan?

0:34:370:34:41

Erm...are you feeling lucky?

0:34:410:34:43

I'm feeling good, I think I've got some nice items.

0:34:430:34:47

Whether the general public of Nantwich think so, will be a different matter.

0:34:470:34:51

Exactly!

0:34:510:34:52

Peter Wilson Fine Art Auctioneers has been established since the mid-50s

0:34:520:34:57

and specialises in many things, including furniture, jewellery and ceramics.

0:34:570:35:02

Today is the collectables and antiques auction.

0:35:020:35:06

Let's hope our boys walk away with tidy profits.

0:35:060:35:09

Budge up!

0:35:090:35:11

The ever effervescent Robert Stones is today's auctioneer.

0:35:110:35:15

Rob joined the business in 1982 and has worked as an auctioneer

0:35:150:35:18

all his working life.

0:35:180:35:20

They've bought some nice things,

0:35:200:35:22

which we're excited about, so I think the sale is going to be pretty successful.

0:35:220:35:26

The croquet set's the most unusual thing.

0:35:260:35:28

I haven't seen one before so that'll be interesting.

0:35:280:35:31

The gold box, I think, is something which is going to do reasonably

0:35:310:35:35

well because obviously bullion at the moment is doing very well.

0:35:350:35:38

The one that worries me most is definitely the painting

0:35:380:35:41

that looks like someone's jumped through it.

0:35:410:35:43

Speculative, of course,

0:35:430:35:44

because it is quite good quality,

0:35:440:35:47

but on the other hand, the condition is not very clever,

0:35:470:35:50

so we'll see what happens with that one.

0:35:500:35:52

James Braxton blew every single penny of his £200 budget

0:35:520:35:57

and ended up with four lots.

0:35:570:35:59

Jonathan Pratt, on the other hand, was slightly more cautious

0:35:590:36:03

and spent £155.50 on five lots.

0:36:030:36:06

Quiet, please. All attention to the front. The auction is about to start.

0:36:080:36:13

-I want steady profits. Steady, just chip, chip, chip.

-Honestly?

0:36:130:36:18

-Cha-ching, cha-ching.

-Not a snowflake in hell's chance.

-Cha-ching.

0:36:180:36:24

First up, it's Jonathan's engraving.

0:36:240:36:28

Will his basement buy come up trumps?

0:36:280:36:30

Lot number 23 showing now. We really like this. What may we say?

0:36:300:36:34

How much are we bid on this? I have £80 straightaway.

0:36:340:36:37

-At £80.

-Oh!

0:36:370:36:39

Five now do I hear? At £80, I'm bid at 80. Five anywhere now, quickly?

0:36:390:36:44

Don't hold back. At £80 only. At 80. Five, 90 now. At 90, and five now.

0:36:440:36:50

At 90, great value for money.

0:36:500:36:52

At 90, sold at 90.

0:36:520:36:56

Jonathan sets the standards high with an early profit.

0:36:560:37:00

HE LAUGHS

0:37:000:37:02

Well done!

0:37:020:37:03

Well he may laugh.

0:37:030:37:05

Next up it's another Jonathan purchase - the child's croquet set.

0:37:050:37:09

We like this, ladies and gentlemen. What's it worth?

0:37:090:37:12

£80 bid straightaway. £80 I have. 85 anywhere now?

0:37:120:37:16

At 85, 90's here, 95 now. At 90 I have it. And five now? £90 only.

0:37:160:37:21

-Come on.

-All quiet at £90. Will be sold at £90.

0:37:210:37:27

-Sold at 90.

-Well done.

0:37:270:37:29

A profit's a profit, Jonathan. You've still got 3 to go.

0:37:290:37:33

Lot number 46, this terrific plaster figure, ladies and gentlemen.

0:37:330:37:38

The Lady Skier. £30 straightaway. At £30 bid, and five now. 35.

0:37:380:37:44

Your bid at 35, I'm looking for 40.

0:37:440:37:47

-Oh, I knew it.

-It's going to stick at this, by the look of it.

0:37:470:37:50

At 35, bid's there.

0:37:500:37:52

All quiet at 35. Disappointing, at £35 only, then. Your bid, 35.

0:37:520:37:57

Disappointing indeed. Hopefully your next item

0:37:580:38:02

will bring you better luck.

0:38:020:38:04

Back to Jonathan now and the terracotta jardiniere.

0:38:040:38:07

Lot number 57, terracotta garden urn. What may we say for it?

0:38:070:38:13

£40 anywhere for it now? £40, surely, for it.

0:38:130:38:15

Quickly now, £40 anywhere now do I hear? £40 now do I hear at £40?

0:38:150:38:19

A lovely thing at £40. 40 I'm bid. At 40, and five now do I hear?

0:38:190:38:23

At £40 only, a lonely bid of £40. Disappointing price.

0:38:230:38:27

At £40 only, then, if you're all finished and done at 40. All quiet.

0:38:270:38:30

-At £40.

-Oh, well, fair enough, £40.

-Steady gains here, Jonathan.

0:38:300:38:37

Can James catch up? His medals are next.

0:38:370:38:39

A group of medals. And I can start the bidding on these at £70.

0:38:390:38:44

-A bid straightaway. 75 anywhere now? At £70.

-You're in there.

0:38:440:38:48

-75, 80, 85, 90, 95. At £90 on commission.

-Good boy.

0:38:480:38:55

At £90 only, then, with me, on commission. Make no mistake.

0:38:550:38:58

-At 90, all quiet and done at 90.

-Well done, well done.

0:38:580:39:01

-Thank you.

-Very good, James.

-Thank you.

0:39:010:39:04

Sounds like James' friend gave some good advice there.

0:39:040:39:09

What about Jonathan's bug brooch?

0:39:090:39:10

Has it got a sting in its tail?

0:39:100:39:13

Lot number 78 is this delightful little bar brooch.

0:39:130:39:16

-Oh, isn't that pretty?

-It's a lovely thing.

0:39:160:39:18

I've got £20 bid for it straightaway. 25 anywhere now?

0:39:180:39:23

25, thank you, at 25. 30 anywhere now? At 25, the bid's there,

0:39:230:39:26

at 30 anywhere now do I hear? At £25, 30, 35.

0:39:260:39:30

-£30 only, at 30. Bid's here at £30 and will be sold.

-No, it won't.

0:39:300:39:35

At 30, your bid at 30.

0:39:350:39:37

-That's what I paid for it. My first loss.

-Oh, dear.

0:39:370:39:39

Oh dear, Jonathan. £30 on the nose.

0:39:390:39:42

Still means a loss because

0:39:420:39:44

the auction house must take its hard-earned commission.

0:39:440:39:47

So far Jonathan is in the lead with four lots down, one to go.

0:39:470:39:53

Can James make the comeback

0:39:530:39:55

with his remaining two lots?

0:39:550:39:56

It's his gold pillbox next.

0:39:560:39:58

Lot number 88, this delightful pillbox.

0:39:580:40:01

£130 bid on commission, at 130, 135, 140, 145 now.

0:40:010:40:07

At 140, the bid's here.

0:40:070:40:09

-145 do I hear? At £140 it will be sold.

-Oh, come on.

-140 then.

0:40:090:40:15

140 - sold.

0:40:150:40:17

Not bad, but you obviously had higher hopes.

0:40:170:40:20

Oh, well, 140.

0:40:230:40:24

-It's still a profit, James.

-Still a profit.

0:40:240:40:27

Will the Bruce Bairnsfather ashtrays make some much-needed dosh?

0:40:270:40:31

These Grimwades, Old Bill...

0:40:310:40:33

You can't even see the chip in the photograph.

0:40:330:40:36

It brilliant, isn't it?

0:40:360:40:38

What may we say for these? 50 I'm bid.

0:40:380:40:40

Straightaway at 50. £50 on commission at 50.

0:40:400:40:44

55, 60, 65 now do I hear?

0:40:440:40:45

-£60, the bid's here. At 65 there.

-Very good.

0:40:450:40:49

That's taken out the commission at 65.

0:40:490:40:52

All quietened down at £65 then. 65.

0:40:520:40:55

-Well done. Well done, James.

-Thank you.

0:40:550:40:57

Oh, dear. Disappointing.

0:40:570:40:59

But one never knows what will happen at auction.

0:40:590:41:02

Finally, it's the badly slashed portrait.

0:41:040:41:06

Did Jonathan spot something special here?

0:41:060:41:10

Lot number 110.

0:41:100:41:12

This magnificent portrait. How much may we say?

0:41:120:41:15

-I've got £20 bid for it straightaway on commission.

-Fantastic!

0:41:150:41:18

25, at £25, bid's there. 30 anywhere else?

0:41:180:41:21

30 bid on the internet,

0:41:210:41:23

35, 40 now on the internet do I hear? £40?

0:41:230:41:25

-Come on, internet.

-45, 50 now. 50 on the internet,

0:41:250:41:29

55? 55. 60 now. 60 am I bid?

0:41:290:41:33

-At 60, 65, 70.

-They'll chuck it back when they see the condition.

0:41:330:41:37

-They'll chuck it back.

-80 now. At £80.

0:41:370:41:40

80 bid, 85, 90 now on the internet, at 90. At 90?

0:41:400:41:45

No, 85, your bid at 85. £85, last chance.

0:41:450:41:49

At 85, being sold, then. 90.

0:41:490:41:51

LAUGHTER

0:41:510:41:53

SHE MOUTHS

0:41:550:41:56

-100!

-Get in there!

-105 do I hear?

0:41:560:41:59

£100 bid in the room. Last chance, being sold at 100.

0:41:590:42:04

-Get in there!

-Well done. Well done.

0:42:040:42:09

Well, can you believe it? James and Jonathan can't.

0:42:090:42:13

Triumph is on Jonathan's side today.

0:42:130:42:16

Stunned. No words, no words for it.

0:42:160:42:20

Well done, well done. Very good, very good indeed.

0:42:200:42:24

Ah, well, the drinks are on you tonight, that's for sure, Jonathan.

0:42:260:42:29

So, all in all, a surprising and exciting first auction.

0:42:310:42:35

Our chaps started today's show with £200 each.

0:42:350:42:39

After paying auction costs, Jonathan's made a profit of £131.50,

0:42:390:42:44

so has £331.50 to carry forward.

0:42:440:42:48

And lagging behind is James, who made a profit of £70.60,

0:42:490:42:53

leaving him with £270.60 in the kitty.

0:42:530:42:57

It's the end of the first day, both chaps are in healthy profit,

0:42:570:43:01

but there's still four more days to go.

0:43:010:43:03

Next time our dynamic duo head for Leek in Staffordshire.

0:43:050:43:08

-Jonathan gets his hands dirty.

-A pump of the bellows to start with.

0:43:110:43:16

Why not? In for a penny, in for a pound, eh?

0:43:160:43:18

You've got to start as the apprentice.

0:43:180:43:21

-And James meets a hot chick.

-And where's that come from?

0:43:210:43:25

-Just a local sale.

-So a stuffed chicken?

-Yeah.

-What a weird thing to do.

0:43:250:43:32

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0:43:460:43:49

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0:43:490:43:51

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