Episode 13 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 13

Antiques experts compete to make the most money at auction. It is the final showdown for antiques experts David Barby and Charles Hanson, who head for an auction in Nottingham.


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The nation's favourite antiques experts, £200 each, and one big challenge.

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Well, duck, do I buy you or don't I?

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Who can make the most money buying and selling antiques as they scour the UK?

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The aim is trade up, and hope that each antique turns a profit.

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But it's not as easy as it looks, and dreams of glory can end in tatters.

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I'm a loser! I'm a loser.

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So, will it be the fast lane to success,

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or the slow road to bankruptcy?

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Oh! There's a mouse! There's a mouse!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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We're still out there, man,

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fighting the elements and hurtling along the antiques highway.

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INDISTINCT SPEECH

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On this trip are our fine pair of experts - David Barby and Charles Hanson.

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This is it, this is the big one.

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-You've got such a lead on me, how on earth am I going to make it up?

-I'm a lap ahead.

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-But, you know, you've got some legs on you, I'm sure.

-Not at my age!

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THEY LAUGH

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Known simply as the Master, a man with serious, intimidating depth of antiques knowledge,

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yet strangely, David Barby just loves to shop.

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I'm going in.

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Can't resist a bargain.

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And giving "the Master" a run for his money,

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the young pretender himself, Bonnie Prince Charles Hanson.

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An all-action auctioneer from Derbyshire.

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With the commission to pay as well, it'd need 30 to break even for me.

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Are you OK?

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Yeah, sorry, Charles, yeah, I've just lost the will to live.

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Well, he can go on a bit.

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LAUGHTER

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But that's not stopped Charles from making lots and lots of money.

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-GAVEL BANGS

-Oh, that is marvellous, Charles.

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So, from his original £200, Charles is standing proud with a robust £400.96.

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That's brought a smile to his face.

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David, meanwhile, has struggled, despite his great skill at turning tiny profits.

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Do you know, you're the most irritating person, I absolutely...

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So, David languishes behind, with his £200 barely swollen to £261.68.

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All he needs now is the luck of the Road Trip.

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But the super-cool 1959 Hillman Minx is taking him dangerously close to Charles's home patch.

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You know, I know people.

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What I'm concerned about is you going to these dealers' shops,

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and they'll know you, they'll greet you like a long-lost friend.

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-"Charles! How wonderful to see you!"

-Get out of here! THEY LAUGH

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On this Road Trip, it's a huge 300-mile sprint -

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from Lichfield, south to Frome, back up north to the Wirral Peninsula,

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and ending in Nottingham for the final showdown.

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On this leg, they're leaving Congleton, heading through Derbyshire,

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and ending up at auction in Nottingham.

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Handsome, historical Stafford is the first port of call.

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-Awful cold.

-Oh!

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-Do you want a kiss?

-No.

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THEY LAUGH

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Just keep wiping the windscreen with that snotty tissue.

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Preparations are already under way for the 1,100th year anniversary of Stafford's foundation.

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Kind Alfred the Great's daughter, Aethelflaed, is no longer with us,

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but she established the Borough of Stafford way back in AD 913.

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CAR DOOR SLAMS Come on, David, get eager!

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This is our last trip together. It's our last feeding frenzy of antiques.

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-Why do you use such language?

-Because this is it!

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-The...

-Charles, do not touch me. You go down there, I'm going here.

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David, if you want to play hard, I'll play hard.

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David, it's only a game. David!

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A game to you, Charles.

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But David begins this shopping trip £139.28 down,

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and he needs a plan.

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My word, the pressure is on, so I've got my work cut out.

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My ploy - spend the lot.

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Church Lane Antiques offers two floors of intriguing prospects,

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with lovely assistant Maureen to help.

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-Hello. Can I call you Maureen?

-Please do.

-Oh, good.

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-Now.

-Hmm?

-Is there anything that you personally think is absolutely a knock-out?

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Well, where do I begin?

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I do like that.

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-My main problem is that it has no mark on it whatsoever.

-Mm-hmm.

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And that's 120, so I'll be quite honest, I'm losing at the moment.

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I'm £150 down on Charles Hanson.

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And this is why I hesitate at that price of 120.

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Well, complaining isn't going to help.

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Keep looking, David.

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Gosh, there's another shop up here!

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This is beautiful, beautiful decoration.

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All of that is hand-painted.

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And the sides are emulating basketwork.

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The mark on the back is Spode. Spode started bone china.

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There was a factory called New Hall that produced hard-paste porcelain,

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and they sold the clay to other manufacturers.

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And Spode used that base of clay and put bone ash with it,

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hence the term bone china.

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The asking price for the Spode dish is £100,

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but now something else at £110 has caught David's eye.

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-Masonic cuff links.

-Enamelled on one side.

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That's a very acquired subject, isn't it?

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I wonder how many Masons would go into a general sale?

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Masonic lodges have ancient traditions,

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founded by the Master Stonemasons who built Britain's castles and cathedrals,

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but many original members were unable to read,

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so trade symbols like the compass and set square were used in ceremonial items.

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Like cuff links.

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110, I think I said.

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-So what would they be priced at?

-80.

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I'll give you a cheeky 60.

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So, with his familiar hurt expression on display, David is wanting three items.

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The £100 Spode dish, the £110 Masonic cuff links,

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and the £120 Arts and Crafts box.

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But he wants them all at £60 each.

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I'll make a call.

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Hi, Stuart. No, he would like all three at £60 each.

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Sharp intake of breath.

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All three at 200.

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-Can we split the difference?

-Hang on a sec. Have a word, it's Stuart.

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I think 180 is the price I'd like to offer these.

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Split the difference, 190! God, that leaves me nothing.

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All right, 190.

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OK, I'm metaphorically shaking your hands.

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Ha-ha! And now Stuart might be wise to, metaphorically speaking, check his wallet and his watch.

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-Thank you very much.

-It's been a pleasure.

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Really? Oh, well.

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And whilst David's growing in confidence, Charles appears to be shrinking.

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Ian, I've never come across such a big copper kettle in my life.

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You've got the biggest kettle I've ever seen.

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It was a shop sign, Charles, that used to hang outside Dale's Shop in Stafford in 1828.

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It would have watched dandies and ladies of the day walk past.

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-Charles Dickens stayed opposite.

-Really?

-At the Swan Hotel.

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-And they say that he wrote The Old Curiosity Shop based on this shop.

-Really?

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That's amazing, Ian. And if it could talk, what could it tell us?

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-Well, one thing it would tell us...

-Yeah.

-..is it's got pellet holes here.

-Oh, yes?

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-And they were put in by the delivery boy for Dale.

-Really?

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-He didn't like working for Dale, so he decided to shoot the side.

-Really?

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As far as provenance goes, this enormous antique has just about the best you can get.

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HE SIGHS

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But can proud Ian let it leave the safety of his shop?

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Ian, I've got £400 in my kitty, really, and I don't mind paying a bit for it.

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What's your best price?

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-(It's not for sale.)

-Is it not for sale?

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Ian, I think it's great, and it's great to see.

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And whilst Charles goes off the boil, happy shopper David's gone for a rummage.

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Strangely choosing a rather lovely charity shop,

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Aren't these so stylish? These were produced in 1978, limited edition.

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This is by Royal Doulton.

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So we've got Pierrot and Punchinello, oh, this is Columbine.

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But aren't they absolutely superb? For £6.50 each.

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Mais oui.

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Tease!

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I'm going to buy these.

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You are going to buy these?

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I'm letting my heart rule my head, I think.

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-£6.50 each, then.

-Ah!

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For goodness's sake! Please don't haggle, David, it's a charity shop.

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-£19.50.

-Yes.

-Will you take £20 for me?

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

-That's very kind of you.

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50p?

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Yet how delightful to see David actually paying more than the asking price.

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And shopping-wise, he's putting the young pretender to shame.

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Bit concerned, frantic shopping, but I'll get there.

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But where Charles refused to purchase, David now dares to tread.

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-Hello.

-Hello, how are you?

-David Barby, we've met before, haven't we?

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-Somewhere along the line.

-Your face is so familiar.

-Is it?

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-Perhaps you've met me in...

-Don't say anything else.

-No.

-No.

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THEY LAUGH

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Well, quite. Actually, I think there are rather too many familiar faces here in Stafford today.

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Oh, my goodness me!

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I know neither of us are fans of these items,

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-but you need to make a profit.

-Do I like them?

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Well, you don't have to like them.

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Royal Doulton's talented designer, Harry Simeon,

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reinvented the classic Toby jug in the 1920s,

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creating full head, full colour character jugs of famous British heroes and villains.

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But can this motley crew turn David a profit?

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Because you're knocking the stuff, you can have one, two, three,

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four, five, six pieces for £50.

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-What about 40?

-40?!

-Yeah.

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-You want to get rid of them.

-Not that desperately. £50.

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I like 40. Give me a chance at 40.

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-I'll tell you what, 45 quid.

-Split the difference. 42.

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Oh, you're a hard man. He's a hard man, isn't he?

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Yeah, go on, then.

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Very wise, Ian. Back down before the sob story starts.

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-Three. Did we say 40?

-We said 42.

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You don't want to split into a tenner, do you?

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-Do you want to flick?

-Yeah.

-Have you got a coin?

-No.

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-You can have it for 40 quid, go on.

-Thank you very much.

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-That's all right.

-Thank you.

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Well, what's £2 if it gets David out of the shop?

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Some would say cheap at the price.

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Now, he could be stealing a shopping lead on his young tormentor.

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I really, really, really enjoy winding David up.

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Because David's very easy to wind up.

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But I'm still nervous because David's the sort of expert

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who can suddenly pull a real find out the bag.

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With a fair wind behind him,

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the Road Trip is lurching hard of starboard

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to take Charles on a historical maritime adventure in Milford.

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Not quite Hanson country,

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Charles is headed to the former home of the Anson family.

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From 1624, Shugborough Estate was home to local lawyer William Anson.

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A century later, great-grandson Admiral George Anson

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would make the family very rich and famous.

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Oh, look at this. Wowee!

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Well, you're right there, Charles.

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That is one entrance, isn't it?

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Charles is about to meet with project development manager Coreen Caddy.

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George Anson became 18th-century Britain's most successful and celebrated naval hero,

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though strangely not that well-known today,

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taking historical second place to that Admiral Horatio fellow.

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When I think of naval heroes,

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I think of Nelson, Trafalgar, the Egyptian campaign and all of that.

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Everybody knows about Nelson, but nobody talks about Anson.

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And yet we would argue strongly

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-that he's the biggest naval hero of all time.

-Really?

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So, how did he suddenly acquire all of this money and new-found wealth?

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Twice a year there was a large Spanish treasure ship

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-that crossed the Pacific.

-Yes.

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-It was loaded with Spanish treasure from the South Americas.

-Gold...

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-Everything you can imagine. Gold, jewels.

-Precious stones.

-Absolutely.

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-George, being very ambitious, went to King George...

-Yes.

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-..and said, "I think I can capture that treasure galleon for you."

-Really?

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In 1739, Admiral Anson requested 1,000 fit men on ships

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for a daring escapade to capture the treasure.

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He did get his 1,000 men, but he had 170 people from hospitals,

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-so sick and injured soldiers.

-Gosh.

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-265 Chelsea pensioners with an average age of 70.

-Wow!

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I'm afraid to say that all the pensioners were dead before they got to Madeira.

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As they rounded the tip of South America, several ships broke up.

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One crew mutinied.

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They ended up in the San Francisco area with just 100 men left and the flagship.

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-And the flagship, which was?

-The Centurion.

-The Centurion.

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Last remaining ship, the Centurion finally had a piece of good luck

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whilst hunting the Spanish galleon.

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Would you believe, they actually happened on it by accident?

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They spent months looking for it and failed. They stumbled across it and thought, "Shall we have a go?"

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And they captured it. It was absolutely loaded with treasures.

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In the 18th century, for naval ships' crews,

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the capture of every enemy ship and cargo was called prize money,

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part of which was passed back to every sailor, no matter how junior.

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So, I think of myself as a bit of a treasure hunter.

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I'm trying to gather these antiques to make a small profit at auction.

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Not really for Queen and Country today but just more for my competition.

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But I'm thinking of gold coins and real treasure, you know?

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Big chests of jewels, falling out. Any of that here?

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Well, you say you're the treasure hunter,

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it's up to you to hunt them out.

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OK. I'll follow you.

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Coreen, is there any treasure around here?

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Well, perhaps not the treasure you're quite looking for.

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However, I would say this lump of wood is perhaps my favourite treasure.

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-It looks like a piece of driftwood.

-It's far more important than that.

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This is the last remaining piece of the figurehead of HMS Centurion,

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the ship that captured all of the Spanish treasure.

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Amazingly, this fine relic of our maritime history spent many years

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as both a pub sign and then garden furniture at Chelsea Hospital

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before its incredible value to Britain was rediscovered in the 1920s.

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A national treasure indeed

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and surely enough to satisfy our Charles.

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The cabinet marks the spot.

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Wow! So, Coreen, this is what I've been waiting for. This is it.

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-There's not much here, is there?

-No, there's not much.

-No.

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Most of it was reminted for the King.

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Charles must sadly make do with the few remaining spoils of George Anson's historic voyage.

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The captured Spanish captain's compass

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and a few gold doubloons that escaped the minting furnace.

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-Ms Caddy, thank you very, very much.

-Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

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Goodbye, Miss Caddy, indeed.

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Milford now joins the list

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of wonderful English places in David and Charles's past.

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The Road Trip pushes on once more, 34 miles east to Derby.

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-Our last waltz together.

-I used to do the Charleston.

-You didn't!

-I did.

-You didn't?

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I loved doing the Charleston.

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Huh!

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So, our light-footed experts trip their way into Charles Hanson's local town.

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But on 4th December 1745,

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Derby played host to that other young pretender,

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Bonnie Prince Charlie,

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who set up his council of war here.

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This is a massive day today. We're in Derbyshire, my homeland.

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It's an iconic day for me because I've got to buy all my items in Derbyshire,

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to hopefully round off my Road Trip and beat David Barby. Will it happen? I really hope so.

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-Good morning.

-Good morning. How nice to see you, old fellow!

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Luckily, Colin and Julie are here to help, if Charles can maintain his fear of influence.

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Colin, the little decanter set. Look at that colour. It's radiant, gaudy, it's very Art Deco.

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-At auction, it might make £25. It might make 30. And you're only asking £25 for it.

-Cheaper than charity!

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-Well, I'm a charitable case here.

-Don't knock me down, Charles, on £25.

-Do you know what?

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If I was to come to your saleroom, it'd be 45.

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Ooh! Suddenly the local connections are not in Charles's favour.

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-What does affect value, Colin, is this corroding here.

-It's not corrosion, it's muck.

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Is it? Colin, where there's muck, there's brass.

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It just wants cleaning.

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-I'd be happy to pay £25 for it...

-I know.

-..with a caveat, OK.

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-And my caveat is this. If Julie... Julie?

-Yes.

-Yes, it's Julie.

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-Sorry, Julie.

-If Julie can take this muck off, I'll pay £25 for it.

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-If she can't, I'll only pay £15 for it.

-OK. Silvo.

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Let's get the Silvo out and start rubbing, then.

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-All right, we're in business.

-I'm rubbing as hard as I can.

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-It is coming off, actually.

-I don't believe it!

-Look at that shine.

-Wow!

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It actually looks like Charles Hanson will have to pay the full ticket price for an antique.

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At £25, you've got me. It's a deal. Thank you, Julie. Well done!

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At last, Charles has the kick-start he needed.

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I've just spotted this little green Street glass bowl.

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It's hand-blown. There's a ground pontil mark on the base

0:19:010:19:04

where the rod has been blown and snapped off to create this wonderful design.

0:19:040:19:08

But the way it sits, it's very much of the Art Nouveau.

0:19:080:19:13

But at £15, can it turn a profit?

0:19:130:19:15

-I quite like this little bowl here.

-There's not a lot of money in it.

0:19:150:19:20

-You're not going to make any money by buying a cheap thing like that.

-I've got to beat David Barbie.

0:19:200:19:25

If it doubled its price, what's £8 in a competition? You want to be making £80.

0:19:250:19:31

-You think my game plan's all wrong?

-You've got to change the style and go upmarket.

0:19:310:19:38

I never thought I'd see the day! Charles, exposed as a bit cheap?

0:19:380:19:44

Any bit of help. £5 for it?

0:19:440:19:47

£8, Charles, it's yours. That's almost half-price.

0:19:470:19:51

£6? Going once! Come on, Colin!

0:19:510:19:54

-Go on, then.

-Sold! It's gone!

0:19:540:19:57

Well done, Charles, but is this all you want from your beloved Derbyshire today?

0:19:570:20:02

I ought to be really buoyant by the fact I'm in Derby, but, in fact, I'm not. Something's going wrong.

0:20:020:20:11

I've got to somehow pull the cat out of the bag.

0:20:110:20:14

Luckily, fellow dandy, Dennis, is just waiting to help down at Ashbourne Road Antiques.

0:20:140:20:21

Hop to it, Charles!

0:20:210:20:23

Hi! Good to see you. Charles Hanson.

0:20:230:20:25

I feel underdressed compared to you.

0:20:250:20:27

The cravat, you know, this look.

0:20:270:20:30

-It's fantastic!

-You're really kind.

0:20:300:20:34

-I'm looking for things that are a bit quirky, a bit different.

-You've come to the right place.

0:20:340:20:39

Is that silver in this little loving cup?

0:20:390:20:41

-You know your stuff.

-Get out of here!

-You didn't say, is that silver, which is plated,

0:20:410:20:46

you went straight to that.

0:20:460:20:48

-I like this decoration. It's beautifully cast and gilded too.

-Yes.

0:20:480:20:53

On the base, it says,

0:20:530:20:55

"The Royal Christening, August 1982."

0:20:550:21:00

-It's a lovely little piece.

-It's Stuart Devlin.

0:21:000:21:03

Charles, you wanted a great find, you've got one.

0:21:030:21:07

Stuart Devlin is one of the best contemporary silversmiths,

0:21:070:21:12

designer of Australia's decimal coinage and Olympic medals as well as his famous decorative eggs.

0:21:120:21:18

Dennis, I'm a local man. I'm always at your disposal, OK?

0:21:180:21:21

-Boys stick together in Derby, don't we?

-That's right.

-Exactly!

0:21:210:21:24

I quite like that because it's a decorative object. What's the best price on it?

0:21:240:21:30

Well, I'm in your expert hands.

0:21:300:21:32

-Well, Dennis, you know...

-Whatever you say is gospel.

-Oh, Dennis, I can't do that!

0:21:320:21:38

It's got £99 on it. Give us 100 for cash.

0:21:380:21:41

100? Euros, pounds, sterling?

0:21:430:21:47

We're talking pounds.

0:21:470:21:49

-What's your absolute best price?

-£75.

0:21:490:21:52

Oh, Dennis. We're getting close now.

0:21:520:21:54

-Getting really close.

-£70 because I like you.

-Get out of here!

-You're a wonderful guy.

0:21:540:21:58

Dennis, I'll pay £70 for it.

0:21:580:22:01

-Brother?

-I think you're being fair.

-Give me a high five.

0:22:030:22:07

-Are we in?

-Yes, I think you're being fair.

-Sold for £70! Dennis, what have I done?

0:22:070:22:11

Dennis, I do love your style.

0:22:110:22:14

-We're a similar size. I'm going to start wearing cravats. I'm serious.

-OK.

0:22:140:22:18

-If that's the case, there you go.

-You know what? I love cravats. I've never worn a cravat before.

0:22:180:22:23

-So, you do it up like that?

-Look at that!

-Dennis, I kid you not.

0:22:230:22:27

-I will start wearing cravats. Can I borrow this?

-You can have that one.

-Are you serious?

-You can have it.

0:22:270:22:33

It's worth almost as much as my silver loving cup. I love it.

0:22:330:22:36

Hats off again to that Derbyshire dandy and his new sartorial friend.

0:22:360:22:42

This week's shopping is now heading towards a photo finish.

0:22:420:22:46

Ah, how sweet!

0:22:470:22:49

So, let's remind ourselves what our chaps have bought.

0:22:490:22:53

David started with just £261.68

0:22:530:22:55

and spent a daring £250 of it on five auction lots -

0:22:550:23:00

a porcelain basket, a Newlyn box,

0:23:000:23:03

a pair of cuff links, three Royal Doulton plates

0:23:030:23:09

and a collection of 20th-century pottery jugs.

0:23:090:23:12

Charles, meanwhile, has spent a somewhat smaller £101

0:23:120:23:17

from his healthy £400.96 balance, on a mere three auction lots -

0:23:170:23:21

the Art Deco cocktail set, an Art Nouveau glass bowl,

0:23:210:23:25

and a silver loving cup.

0:23:250:23:28

So, what do our duo think of each other's purchases?

0:23:280:23:31

I'm very disappointed in Charles's objects

0:23:310:23:34

because he didn't spend all his money.

0:23:340:23:36

We're about to freefall into our finale. I'm very nervous.

0:23:360:23:39

He's brought a really, really good, varied mix.

0:23:390:23:42

The star object is his Stuart Devlin commemorative cup.

0:23:420:23:46

But hopefully, Hanson's silver cup will be hoisted up

0:23:460:23:49

and that will be my crowning glory.

0:23:490:23:51

That's the spirit.

0:23:510:23:53

Always good to aim high, no matter how ridiculously unrealistic.

0:23:530:23:59

It's time to get a wriggle on to auction,

0:23:590:24:01

heading 15 miles east,

0:24:010:24:03

across Brian Clough Way, and over the county line.

0:24:030:24:06

Last stop - Nottingham.

0:24:060:24:09

Our Road Trip renegades arrive in fresh attire for the auction and raring to go.

0:24:100:24:16

Well, Charles, here we are, the final curtain. My goodness me.

0:24:180:24:22

It's the end of the romance between you and I.

0:24:220:24:25

-You used to work here, didn't you?

-Ten years ago.

0:24:250:24:28

-Bring back happy memories?

-So much so.

0:24:280:24:31

Opened in 1993, Mellors and Kirk are well-known for fine art sales,

0:24:310:24:37

antiques and today's general sale.

0:24:370:24:39

Our Charles cut his teeth here as a young sales porter

0:24:390:24:43

and fledgling auctioneer,

0:24:430:24:46

and the prodigal son returns.

0:24:460:24:48

Our experts straighten their ties and take their seats.

0:24:480:24:53

How does it feel that this young pretender has taken a mantle

0:24:530:24:57

over the might of David Barby?

0:24:570:24:59

Every dog has to have his day.

0:24:590:25:02

Down, boy! And hush now.

0:25:020:25:04

The sale's about to start.

0:25:040:25:06

David's corking Spode dish is first up for grabs.

0:25:070:25:11

£30 for it, please. 30? 20?

0:25:110:25:13

20 I'm bid.

0:25:130:25:15

Thank you, sir. 20, 30, 40.

0:25:150:25:17

£40. Any more?

0:25:170:25:19

Selling at 40, 50, 60. £60. Second row, selling at £60.

0:25:190:25:24

A disappointing start for David, especially on such a lovely item.

0:25:250:25:30

-Will you catch me up?

-I don't know. One lives in hope.

0:25:300:25:35

Stranger things have happened.

0:25:350:25:37

Could the gold Masonic cuff links turn the tide for David?

0:25:370:25:41

-£20 for them, please.

-Take it steady.

0:25:410:25:44

-Oh, Charles.

-Let's get them sold.

-40?

0:25:440:25:46

£30 it is. 40. 50. 60.

0:25:460:25:49

-£70.

-Come on.

-Commission bid. I'll sell.

0:25:490:25:52

-That's OK.

-It's not.

-You broke even.

-Don't try and console me.

0:25:520:25:58

Best to say nothing, actually.

0:25:580:25:59

And now the young pretender's first lot seeks some decisive bidding.

0:25:590:26:04

£20 for it, please. 20?

0:26:040:26:07

-£10.

-Come on.

-Do we have a bid? 5 I'm bid, thank you.

0:26:070:26:11

At 5. 10, may I say?

0:26:110:26:12

Oh, dear me.

0:26:120:26:14

-£5 only, and I shall sell it at £5.

-That's all I thought it was worth.

0:26:140:26:19

Quite possibly.

0:26:190:26:21

But a shame for Charles. I think that £1 loss really hurt.

0:26:210:26:25

I can't believe it.

0:26:250:26:26

So, let's have something bright and cheerful to lift our spirits.

0:26:260:26:31

£20 for them, may I see?

0:26:310:26:32

10 I'm bid. Thank you. At 10. 15, 20.

0:26:320:26:35

25? At £20. On my right, I'm selling at 20.

0:26:350:26:40

-Broke even.

-What happened?

0:26:400:26:43

Well, the auctioneer is speedy.

0:26:430:26:44

And that means David's chances are fading fast.

0:26:440:26:49

David, it's never over until the last gavel falls on your very last lot.

0:26:510:26:55

True enough, but first, Charles's startling cocktail set

0:26:550:27:00

wants to dazzle the room.

0:27:000:27:02

-20? £10.

-Oh, no.

-10 I'm bid. Thank you, at £10.

0:27:020:27:07

-15 for it?

-One more.

-15.

0:27:070:27:09

Charles, dear friend, you're going to need more than just one more.

0:27:090:27:12

£15, I shall sell it.

0:27:120:27:15

£15.

0:27:150:27:17

No great shakes there, then, Charles,

0:27:170:27:19

but you are still ahead.

0:27:190:27:21

What can David do with this motley crew of hopefuls?

0:27:220:27:25

-We're nearly there, Charles.

-Will we keep in touch afterwards?

0:27:250:27:28

I doubt we will.

0:27:280:27:30

Ooh. Let's just get on with the sale, shall we?

0:27:300:27:33

20?

0:27:330:27:34

20 I'm bid, thank you, sir. At 20, 30, 40.

0:27:340:27:38

£40. No more? Selling at 40.

0:27:380:27:40

Whoo! Was that it?

0:27:400:27:43

David Barby's mugs were mugged. So cruelly and, well, quickly.

0:27:430:27:50

I think this auction will hang on one thing, OK, and it's coming up next.

0:27:500:27:55

And here it is. Charles's prize sterling-silver commemorative cup.

0:27:550:28:00

The style of it is so neat for that decade. I love it.

0:28:010:28:06

£30. 40. 50.

0:28:060:28:08

60. 70.

0:28:080:28:10

80. 90. 100.

0:28:100:28:12

-Keep going.

-At £100 on my left. 120.

0:28:120:28:15

130?

0:28:150:28:16

At 120, we sell.

0:28:160:28:18

That's good. My dream is about to crack open. Champagne?

0:28:180:28:23

Maybe a bit early, Charles.

0:28:230:28:26

Though I have to say, you look unbeatable now.

0:28:260:28:29

David must pray the lovely Art Nouveau box

0:28:300:28:34

can turn copper into cash.

0:28:340:28:36

You could hear a pin drop in here.

0:28:360:28:38

50. Any interest? 50, 30.

0:28:380:28:40

Nobody want it? 30, 40.

0:28:400:28:42

50, 60, 70, 80 with me.

0:28:420:28:44

90 to you. 100. 110. 120 here.

0:28:440:28:48

-130? At 120.

-Good price, David.

-Selling with me at £120.

0:28:480:28:52

-All done?

-That's amazing.

0:28:520:28:54

I commend you for finding an antique.

0:28:540:28:57

I think we all commend David Barby today.

0:28:570:29:01

But sadly, that double-your-money sale is just not enough

0:29:010:29:04

to beat Charles.

0:29:040:29:06

-Come on, David, congratulations.

-No.

0:29:060:29:09

You're the one that has congratulations. Well done, Charles.

0:29:090:29:12

Brave words in the face of defeat. What a nice chap.

0:29:120:29:17

Sadly, after paying auction costs,

0:29:170:29:19

David's £261.68 grew by a mere £4.20.

0:29:190:29:26

David ends his Road Trip with £265.88,

0:29:260:29:31

but he can hold his head high.

0:29:310:29:33

The local hero began with £400.96

0:29:350:29:40

and turned another modest profit of £13.80.

0:29:400:29:43

Charles finishes off with £414.76.

0:29:430:29:47

Well done, boy.

0:29:470:29:49

The chaps' combined profits will go to Children in Need.

0:29:540:29:57

Congratulations to that victorious young pretender,

0:29:570:30:00

and, David, no sweat.

0:30:000:30:03

It's Hanson-town.

0:30:030:30:04

-Give me a high five, David. It's been a great day.

-Is that what a high five is?!

0:30:060:30:10

David, this great business, there is so much luck involved, and all the romance, long may it continue.

0:30:100:30:16

-You've taught me so much.

-I hope so, David.

0:30:160:30:20

I do feel this is the start of a bromance,

0:30:200:30:22

but then this pair have had quite a journey.

0:30:220:30:25

# It takes two, baby... #

0:30:250:30:27

Whilst David and Charles drive off into the sunset,

0:30:270:30:31

we join grizzled veteran Mark Stacey and comparative novice Margie Cooper on a new Road Trip...

0:30:310:30:38

You are a sort of Road Trip virgin, if you like.

0:30:380:30:41

..in a nippy 1960s MGC.

0:30:410:30:44

Mark, from Brighton, is a valuer and a dealer,

0:30:440:30:48

with the honesty to admit the limits of his expertise.

0:30:480:30:51

I don't do ladies' paraphernalia. Well, on a weekend, maybe.

0:30:510:30:57

Debutante Margie is a silver expert

0:30:570:30:59

and she's also been on the Antiques Road Show.

0:30:590:31:02

She's a dealer too, like her grandmother before her.

0:31:020:31:04

What her granny didn't teach her, she can find out off the telly.

0:31:040:31:08

And I've been watching the repeats of this programme!

0:31:080:31:12

Our competitive pair start this trip in Kent, at Chilham,

0:31:120:31:17

and travel across southern England to the West Country,

0:31:170:31:19

and end up for the finale in Torquay.

0:31:190:31:23

But on this leg, Heathfield will be the battleground

0:31:230:31:26

for their auction showdown.

0:31:260:31:28

-This looks lovely, Margie, look.

-Gorgeous flowers!

0:31:280:31:32

-We're about to start our adventure, Margie.

-Right.

-Feeling all right?

0:31:320:31:36

-Absolutely super.

-But I've only got...

-Yeah?

0:31:360:31:39

-..one thing to say to you.

-Say it.

-OK?

-Yes.

0:31:390:31:43

It should be ladies first, so I'll see you later.

0:31:430:31:46

So, this is what it's going to be like, is it?!

0:31:460:31:49

Once inside the barn, Margie is up and running.

0:31:500:31:54

What's this curious object here?

0:31:540:31:56

It looks like an egg... So, what is it? Oh, it's a lighter!

0:31:560:32:00

Oh, my goodness, that's a funny thing, isn't it?

0:32:000:32:04

"The Poppell butane gas pocket lighter."

0:32:040:32:07

OK, Margie, it's your first negotiation. The ticket price is £28.

0:32:070:32:12

-Go on, tell me how much it is!

-Erm...

0:32:120:32:16

MARGIE LAUGHS NERVOUSLY

0:32:160:32:17

£20.

0:32:170:32:19

-15, I'll buy it.

-OK.

0:32:190:32:21

So, Margie's bought a lighter, and Mark's got himself an old gamp,

0:32:210:32:25

as Kent resident Charles Dickens would have described it.

0:32:250:32:28

This is rather sweet -

0:32:280:32:31

this is a little Victorian parasol, lady's parasol.

0:32:310:32:35

We know, of course, that it's probably after 1860,

0:32:350:32:40

cos it looks like a mourning one, being black.

0:32:400:32:42

And what I quite like about it is, it's got a carved ivory handle.

0:32:420:32:48

And I think these little finials, actually on the shade itself,

0:32:480:32:53

are ivory - that's rather sweet.

0:32:530:32:57

But what isn't so sweet is the price tag of £45.

0:32:570:33:01

I would love to buy it from you for £20.

0:33:010:33:05

-SHE DRAWS BREATH

-No, can't do that. 30?

0:33:050:33:09

Ooh.

0:33:090:33:11

-22?

-25?

-I've just noticed, as I was coming across...

-Yes?

0:33:110:33:15

-Is that a little back scratcher or something?

-Looks like it, yes...

0:33:150:33:19

Good move, change the subject! Now Margie's having a wander into the furniture section.

0:33:190:33:24

Careful, Margie, that looks pricey!

0:33:240:33:26

I would call it a music stool, but it's a cellist's chair.

0:33:260:33:30

You sat on that, like that... Legs wide open!

0:33:300:33:34

..and you play the cello, don't you? It's great.

0:33:340:33:37

And it's a gorgeous thing. It is very old, it's William IV,

0:33:370:33:41

which takes it down to...pre-1830.

0:33:410:33:45

£895. That's not in my budget, sadly!

0:33:450:33:50

Mark seems to have escaped Edna's stern gaze to try Peggy instead.

0:33:500:33:55

I just think it's rather charming. What we've got here is a little...

0:33:550:33:59

ivory and...possibly gold-plated

0:33:590:34:03

little necessaire, or etui - this is a little object

0:34:030:34:06

that ladies, and gentlemen, would have carried

0:34:060:34:10

to keep your essentials in. Now, for those who are worried about ivory,

0:34:100:34:14

which we all should be today - these are antique items.

0:34:140:34:18

These are legal to sell, they're not against the 1947 CITES agreement

0:34:180:34:23

on the prevention of use of ivory.

0:34:230:34:25

I think this would probably date to about 1800.

0:34:250:34:29

I got down to 25 on the parasol, so far.

0:34:290:34:33

This is marked at 85 - what do you think they'd do it for if I bought the two together?

0:34:330:34:38

85 for the two?

0:34:380:34:41

So, that would bring that down to 60, wouldn't it?

0:34:410:34:44

-Mark...

-Yes?

-Have you been upstairs?

-No.

0:34:440:34:48

There's some other small items that you might find as well.

0:34:480:34:52

Oh, do you think so?

0:34:520:34:54

Oh, yeah, he's got something.

0:34:540:34:57

This is a lady's ebonised walking cane.

0:34:570:35:00

The base wood has been lacquered in black

0:35:000:35:04

to give the illusion of ebony - ebony is heavy, and this is quite light.

0:35:040:35:09

I haven't seen a hallmark on the collar, but it looks like silver.

0:35:090:35:13

And it's got a very nice feel. But more importantly,

0:35:130:35:17

it's priced up at around 20, and I think if I put it in

0:35:170:35:20

with the parasol and the ivory box,

0:35:200:35:23

it makes a nice little interesting lot,

0:35:230:35:25

So, what's Peggy's very best price?

0:35:250:35:27

-85.

-85 for the three items?

-Mm-hmm.

-Gosh.

0:35:280:35:32

-Now, that is gold.

-You think it's gold?

-Oh, definitely.

0:35:330:35:37

-Peggy, thank you very much. Can I come back to you in a moment?

-You can.

0:35:390:35:43

-You are so sweet.

-But...that's it.

-No, I won't.

0:35:430:35:46

-I won't ask for any more, I promise you.

-OK.

-Thank you, Peggy.

0:35:460:35:50

Right, have a think about that. Now, where's Margie heading?

0:35:500:35:54

-Ooh, she's found a chair.

-You've seen how it works, obviously...

0:35:540:35:58

Well, actually, it's so small, I thought it was mainly for a doll.

0:35:580:36:03

But, you know, I'm afraid...

0:36:030:36:06

-it's a lot of money.

-65 on that.

0:36:060:36:09

-Mmm. Do you hear the intake of breath?!

-Yes, I know.

0:36:090:36:12

60 is the very best.

0:36:120:36:14

Mm, that sounds like a good deal.

0:36:140:36:16

-So, what's the last?

-55.

0:36:170:36:20

That is final - absolutely no more.

0:36:200:36:22

-OK, we've done it. Thank you.

-OK, Margie, OK!

0:36:220:36:26

Two deals for Margie. Come on, Mark, enough mulling!

0:36:260:36:29

-Peggy...

-Mark.

0:36:290:36:31

I've agonised over these, because I do love them,

0:36:310:36:34

-and I think they make a nice little lot.

-They do.

0:36:340:36:38

Your dealers and yourself have been extraordinarily generous to me,

0:36:380:36:41

but I have to, because it's the nature of my game, I'm afraid...

0:36:410:36:46

-Remember this?

-I won't ask for any more, I promise. Thank you, Peggy.

0:36:460:36:51

You've come down to 85 - is there any chance we can do it for 80?

0:36:510:36:55

-I wish we could, but that's really the bottom line.

-The bottom line. £85.

0:36:560:37:03

Well, I tried. I have to try, you see. And wish me luck.

0:37:030:37:07

I can't say I hope you win, because it would be biased.

0:37:070:37:09

Well, you can say it. Nobody's watching.

0:37:090:37:12

-No-one's watching. I hope you win.

-Thank you.

0:37:120:37:15

So, they've both bought,

0:37:160:37:18

and now it's time for Margie to take the wheel.

0:37:180:37:20

Now, then. Let me just check this out.

0:37:200:37:23

Neutral. Clutch. I'm not used to heavy steering.

0:37:230:37:27

Where are you going?

0:37:270:37:28

-Will you help me get it into reverse?

-No!

0:37:280:37:32

I feel like I've been going in reverse all morning.

0:37:320:37:35

-SHE LAUGHS

-Oh, dear. I'm not looking.

0:37:350:37:37

We're definitely off this time.

0:37:370:37:39

Oh, gosh!

0:37:390:37:41

I do like a nice, big car park.

0:37:420:37:45

-Don't you?

-Yeah, I've done it!

0:37:450:37:47

THEY CHEER

0:37:470:37:49

After that somewhat erratic departure,

0:37:490:37:52

Margie and Mark make their way from Chilam to Canterbury.

0:37:520:37:56

Famous for tales and saints, Canterbury has been inhabited since prehistoric times,

0:37:560:38:02

and a place of pilgrimage since the murder of Thomas A Becket in 1170.

0:38:020:38:08

I wonder what Chaucer would have made of our two travellers?

0:38:080:38:12

-Bye, darling. See you later.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:120:38:15

-Have a good visit.

-Happy hunting.

-I will. Take care.

0:38:150:38:19

Bye!

0:38:190:38:20

So, while Margie heads off through the traffic...

0:38:200:38:25

I haven't stalled it once.

0:38:250:38:27

..Mark searches for his next shop.

0:38:270:38:29

These are little silver bridge markers,

0:38:290:38:31

so when you're playing bridge,

0:38:310:38:33

you can mark your score on top of each of them.

0:38:330:38:37

They have the representative suits. Hearts, clubs, diamonds and spades.

0:38:370:38:41

I would have thought they're Art Deco, 1930s.

0:38:410:38:44

They're marked up at £70.

0:38:440:38:47

Quite sweet.

0:38:470:38:48

I do quite like this as well, actually.

0:38:500:38:53

This is a silver bonbon dish. It's quite lightweight.

0:38:530:38:56

It's quite nice, because they have that crinkled edge

0:38:560:38:59

with this fern leaf design on it.

0:38:590:39:02

It's rather fun, that, isn't it? Priced up at £89.

0:39:020:39:07

I think I'm getting all flustered. I might need a bit of fresh air.

0:39:070:39:11

I'm thinking of spending serious money here.

0:39:110:39:14

I do quite like the bonbon dish.

0:39:140:39:18

-And the bridge markers.

-Right.

0:39:180:39:19

This is quite nice. It's marked up at £89.

0:39:190:39:22

What sort of price could you do on that?

0:39:220:39:25

-70?

-70? Mm.

0:39:250:39:28

-I'm going to be cheeky.

-Go on, then.

0:39:280:39:30

All right. Then we'll see where we go.

0:39:300:39:32

In an ideal world, I would say 30 quid.

0:39:320:39:36

In an ideal world.

0:39:360:39:38

In an ideal world, but as you know, the world is not ideal!

0:39:380:39:43

-Particularly at the moment!

-THEY LAUGH

0:39:430:39:45

I know what you mean.

0:39:450:39:46

Shall we go in the middle, at £50?

0:39:490:39:51

Keith, you are so kind.

0:39:510:39:54

And what about this?

0:39:540:39:56

Well, that is £70, and going on the previous conversation,

0:39:570:40:02

-you want that for £20!

-Exactly!

0:40:020:40:04

You're attuned to the way I'm thinking here.

0:40:040:40:07

Exactly.

0:40:070:40:09

40 and 40.

0:40:090:40:12

-Well, that's 80, isn't it?

-That's tempting.

-It IS tempting.

0:40:120:40:17

We couldn't go to 70?

0:40:170:40:19

75. That's how you do it, isn't it?

0:40:190:40:22

-That's how YOU do it.

-That's how

-I

-do it.

0:40:220:40:24

-But I like working in round figures, and not £80, £70.

-Right.

0:40:240:40:28

I'm sorry to push you.

0:40:280:40:31

-Well, I could push you.

-You could.

0:40:310:40:34

-It's not far to go.

-HE LAUGHS

0:40:340:40:37

Oh, you're too nice a man to do that.

0:40:370:40:41

So, where did we get to?

0:40:410:40:42

-Well, we got to 65. No, we didn't get to 65.

-No, we didn't.

0:40:420:40:46

-We got to 75.

-I AM being mean, aren't I, really?

0:40:460:40:51

Are you just standing there hesitating,

0:40:510:40:54

-hoping I'm going to say 70?

-Yeah, I am.

0:40:540:40:56

-You are?

-I am.

-Then I will.

0:40:560:40:58

-70, it is.

-Thank you, Keith.

0:40:580:41:00

-I really appreciate it.

-That's all right. You're welcome.

0:41:000:41:03

Meanwhile, Margie C,

0:41:030:41:05

and the MG,

0:41:050:41:07

have made their way from Canterbury to Fordwich.

0:41:070:41:11

Described in the Domesday Book

0:41:150:41:19

as "a small burg", and still tiny now,

0:41:190:41:21

Fordwich owes its historic importance to the River Stour.

0:41:210:41:26

Here, they took delivery of French stone for Canterbury Cathedral.

0:41:260:41:30

Margie is here to visit the smallest town hall in England.

0:41:300:41:35

When she can get out of that little MG, that is.

0:41:350:41:38

-HORN BEEPS

-Oops.

0:41:380:41:40

-Hello!

-I'm Marjorie Cooper.

0:41:400:41:42

I'm Andrea Russo. Very nice to meet you. Welcome to Fordwich.

0:41:420:41:46

Old Fordwich had big powers,

0:41:460:41:48

especially when it came to enforcing the law.

0:41:480:41:50

Councillor Russo can describe what life was like

0:41:500:41:54

when the town hall doubled as the courtroom.

0:41:540:41:57

-This, Marjorie, is the pleading bar.

-Right.

0:41:570:42:00

Hence the expression, "the prisoner at the bar".

0:42:000:42:03

Because the prisoner would come up, and put his hands here,

0:42:030:42:07

-and plead his case.

-And plead his case.

0:42:070:42:10

Then, of course, he would be tried by the judge,

0:42:100:42:14

who was the major of the town.

0:42:140:42:17

There were six jurors on each side,

0:42:170:42:20

on the table, which was made in 1580, for eight shillings.

0:42:200:42:24

So, this is virtually 500 years old.

0:42:240:42:26

-We've got a couple of handcuffs.

-Yes.

0:42:260:42:30

We've also got a branding iron, which is quite fascinating.

0:42:300:42:33

As you can see, it's got an "R" here, for "Rex", or "Regina",

0:42:330:42:38

-depending who was on the throne.

-Who was on the throne at the time.

0:42:380:42:42

So, this would be heated up, and then would go, "tschh".

0:42:420:42:45

On your face, or where?

0:42:450:42:47

Don't know. Perhaps in some place which we cannot tell.

0:42:470:42:49

-Do you know what I mean?

-SHE LAUGHS

0:42:490:42:52

I don't think they'd put it there.

0:42:520:42:54

It would be somewhere people could see it!

0:42:540:42:56

Underneath is the town jail,

0:42:560:42:59

last used in 1855,

0:42:590:43:02

where the accused could contemplate

0:43:020:43:04

whatever grisly punishment might be in store.

0:43:040:43:06

So, a heavy responsibility for the jury,

0:43:060:43:09

yet their room was even smaller.

0:43:090:43:13

They had to stay here until they reached a verdict,

0:43:130:43:16

and they couldn't have any food, no light, nothing.

0:43:160:43:20

You can imagine they reached a verdict pretty quickly.

0:43:200:43:24

And if they had to relieve themselves,

0:43:240:43:27

shall I show you?

0:43:270:43:29

Hold me up! Here we go.

0:43:290:43:31

-That's what they did.

-Oh, my goodness me!

0:43:310:43:33

Straight onto the stones. Aren't you glad you live now, and not then?!

0:43:330:43:37

Bit small too. That would require a degree of accuracy.

0:43:370:43:43

Our experts are looking to hit the target at auction in Heathfield,

0:43:430:43:46

East Sussex.

0:43:460:43:47

Next stop is in Kent, at Charing.

0:43:470:43:50

-Here we are, Margie.

-Great stuff!

0:43:500:43:53

Our pair are eager to find bargains, but the £200 they started out with

0:43:530:43:57

has already begun to shrink alarmingly.

0:43:570:43:59

So, what will they plump for?

0:43:590:44:02

Oh, afternoon tea!

0:44:020:44:04

I hate to use this phrase, but my mum had one of these.

0:44:060:44:10

What used to really annoy me, when I had an antique shop...

0:44:100:44:13

People used to come in,

0:44:130:44:14

spend all their time saying their mum and granny had this,

0:44:140:44:18

and go on and not buy anything. So, I'm doing it now!

0:44:180:44:22

(£65!)

0:44:220:44:24

You can't moan at that, can you?

0:44:240:44:26

You push it in, fold it away,

0:44:260:44:28

and they can just stick it against the wall.

0:44:280:44:30

So, I think they might come back into fashion, those.

0:44:300:44:35

Mark's found something that's unlikely ever to trouble

0:44:350:44:39

the zeitgeist again.

0:44:390:44:40

They're rather greasy. Do you know what they are?

0:44:400:44:45

They're little discs for a "simfonium".

0:44:450:44:47

"Sinfonium", actually, Mark.

0:44:470:44:50

You put these in the machine, and the machine goes round

0:44:500:44:53

and it plays notes, when you see through the light, there.

0:44:530:44:56

These were played on a sort of upright jukebox,

0:44:570:44:59

invented in the late-19th century.

0:44:590:45:03

About 26 of them.

0:45:030:45:05

I've never sold any before,

0:45:050:45:07

so I could be risking everything on a broken record.

0:45:070:45:10

-Hello. I'm Mark.

-Hello, Mark, I'm Owen.

0:45:120:45:15

-Could I have a little look at the cabinet?

-Yeah, sure.

0:45:150:45:18

This is very pretty, isn't it?

0:45:180:45:21

It's a little folding frame.

0:45:210:45:23

You can put a picture of your loved one in with you.

0:45:230:45:26

When you look at it, the style of it looks very 1920s.

0:45:260:45:29

But, when you actually look at the label, it says,

0:45:290:45:33

"A heavy, solid silver picture frame. 1994."

0:45:330:45:38

So, it's very modern. "Mappin & Webb," it says.

0:45:380:45:40

"£65."

0:45:400:45:42

Did this come in privately?

0:45:420:45:44

-These things are all from another dealer.

-Another dealer? Oh.

0:45:440:45:47

-He puts the trade discount on the other one.

-Oh, does he? OK.

-Which is...

0:45:470:45:52

-Oh, yes. So, he'd do it for £55.

-Yeah.

0:45:520:45:55

-I'll have a think about those.

-OK.

0:45:550:45:58

Mark's hogging Owen, but Margie's desperate to get in there.

0:45:580:46:02

I want to go over where his lordship is.

0:46:020:46:05

And now he's chatting away to the owner.

0:46:060:46:09

-Are those discs yours?

-Yes, they are.

0:46:090:46:12

I know nothing about these. Do you?

0:46:120:46:14

-Well, they are lovely...

-Are they a lot of money?

0:46:140:46:18

Well, I don't think...

0:46:180:46:19

-They all say that.

-They're £2 each.

0:46:190:46:22

-Oh, gosh.

-There's 26 of them.

0:46:220:46:24

Around 26. £2 each.

0:46:240:46:26

Would they sell at auction, though?

0:46:260:46:28

Ah! He's moving off.

0:46:280:46:31

Margie might be new to this, but after watching Mark,

0:46:310:46:34

she seems to have found a new tactic.

0:46:340:46:37

-Follow the label!

-There's a ticket on this table.

0:46:370:46:40

"A heavy, solid silver picture frame. Mappin & Webb.

0:46:400:46:43

"£65." He's obviously trying to do a deal with you. Be honest.

0:46:430:46:47

He's had a good look at it, but he hasn't...

0:46:470:46:51

-Where is it?

-On the table there.

0:46:510:46:54

-Oh, that's it!

-Yeah.

-I was thinking it was a photo frame!

0:46:540:46:58

-No. It's a little compact there.

-Oh, that is...

0:46:580:47:01

There's been no agreement made.

0:47:010:47:03

I can do that for £55.

0:47:030:47:05

40 quid won't buy it?

0:47:050:47:08

I can make a phone call, and then I can do the deal.

0:47:080:47:11

-I'm sure I can do something for you.

-I will try, but it's got to be £40.

0:47:110:47:14

You've got a little Mappin & Webb double photo frame here.

0:47:140:47:17

Would you be able to take £40 for it?

0:47:170:47:19

OK. All right. Thank you. Bye.

0:47:210:47:25

-Yes, he will.

-Yes!

0:47:250:47:28

I wonder what Mark will make of that?

0:47:280:47:30

Still, he did have his chance!

0:47:300:47:32

I have noticed this little figure, here.

0:47:320:47:35

No, it's not a period one. It's a little figure produced by Worcester.

0:47:350:47:40

Um...

0:47:400:47:42

In the late-19th century.

0:47:420:47:45

This is known as the Regency Gentleman.

0:47:450:47:47

It was modelled by James Hadley,

0:47:470:47:50

who was a very famous modeller for Worcester Porcelain.

0:47:500:47:53

It's still lovely quality, but IS fairly modern.

0:47:530:47:55

I think it's rather nice, but there's no price on it.

0:47:550:47:59

-Owen, I've spotted a little item here, which I rather like.

-OK.

0:47:590:48:03

-But it doesn't seem to have a price on it.

-Oh, dear. That's not very good, is it?

0:48:030:48:08

-I thought maybe it was free(!)

-Nothing's free.

0:48:080:48:11

No, nothing's free in life. Do you know how much that is?

0:48:110:48:14

-I know what I paid for it.

-Ah!

0:48:140:48:15

HE LAUGHS

0:48:150:48:17

That's not a good sign. I don't think this will go my way at all.

0:48:170:48:20

Dare I ask what you could let me have it for?

0:48:200:48:23

-£50.

-Oh!

0:48:230:48:25

This isn't going my way, is it?

0:48:250:48:28

-HE LAUGHS

-Well, what did you want to hear?

0:48:280:48:30

I wanted to hear £20. That's what I wanted to pay for it.

0:48:300:48:34

-That's highway robbery, you know.

-I know.

0:48:340:48:36

-But he's a... He's not a highwayman.

-Not a highwayman.

0:48:360:48:39

-He's a foppish Regency dandy.

-He's a dandy, yes.

-More like me, actually.

0:48:390:48:44

-I don't know what to say.

-"Yes" is a nice word.

0:48:440:48:46

-Ah!

-HE LAUGHS

0:48:460:48:48

-OK. You can have it for £20.

-Oh, that's wonderful.

0:48:500:48:53

I did notice this, as well.

0:48:530:48:54

-You know it's broken, the arm's missing?

-Yes.

0:48:540:48:57

And the head's been off. Yes.

0:48:570:49:00

I thought they looked rather nice together.

0:49:000:49:02

You can't have that for free, no!

0:49:020:49:04

THEY LAUGH

0:49:040:49:07

-The other thing I wanted to say is, these discs.

-Yes.

0:49:070:49:11

Would there be any chance we could do the figure and those for £45?

0:49:110:49:16

You really can't do £50?

0:49:160:49:17

Honestly, I would love to.

0:49:170:49:19

If I had £50, I would say £50, I promise you.

0:49:190:49:21

But I would be completely spent, I think.

0:49:210:49:23

-OK. There you are.

-Thank you very much, Owen.

0:49:230:49:27

With all of his cash spent, Mark can do no more.

0:49:270:49:30

Time for Margie to step in.

0:49:300:49:32

Well, I must admit, I haven't really noticed these.

0:49:320:49:35

They are from Lord Roberts' workshop, which is in London.

0:49:350:49:41

Can you help me with this, Owen? I really don't know.

0:49:410:49:44

Lord Roberts was a decorated war hero.

0:49:440:49:47

He was very concerned about the rights of disabled war-injured from the First World War.

0:49:470:49:52

-Yeah, what happened to them.

-He set up workshops, where they could make things.

0:49:520:49:55

-It's just incredible.

-So, those are hand-painted?

-Yeah.

0:49:550:49:58

-Gosh!

-They're just lovely.

-They are.

0:49:580:50:00

-What sort of price are they?

-These four are £30.

0:50:000:50:04

Should I have a go at these?

0:50:040:50:06

£20.

0:50:080:50:10

So, £15's out?

0:50:110:50:13

THEY LAUGH

0:50:130:50:15

You see, I've been watching the repeats of this programme.

0:50:150:50:19

-And they get really dead hard!

-Yeah!

0:50:190:50:21

-OK. £15.

-Oh, you're very sweet. Thank you very much. I'll buy those.

0:50:220:50:28

Everything nicely wrapped up, including a little surprise.

0:50:280:50:31

-So, there we are. £45.

-Thank you very much.

0:50:310:50:34

But I've thrown in the Venus De Milo, as a free gift for you.

0:50:340:50:37

-Oh!

-There you are. I hope you do well.

0:50:370:50:39

You are SO kind to me. Thank you.

0:50:390:50:41

Roof up, to keep out the rain,

0:50:420:50:44

Margie and Mark make their next move.

0:50:440:50:47

From Charing to the historic town of Faversham.

0:50:470:50:51

Time for the one with the cash to make her final manoeuvres.

0:50:520:50:55

Ah, looks nice!

0:50:550:50:57

But will she unearth a bargain?

0:50:570:50:59

There's quite a good market for these things.

0:50:590:51:02

That's something that could be used.

0:51:040:51:06

This one's a nice one, isn't it?

0:51:060:51:08

Somebody's initials.

0:51:080:51:10

There we go.

0:51:140:51:15

Ooh!

0:51:150:51:17

SHE LAUGHS

0:51:170:51:18

Can't get it open. There we go.

0:51:180:51:21

Yeah, just a plain one.

0:51:210:51:23

Yeah, I quite like that.

0:51:230:51:25

I don't know. I could afford it. It's £45.

0:51:250:51:27

The dealer is on hand to haggle.

0:51:270:51:29

20 quid buy it?

0:51:290:51:32

SHE LAUGHS

0:51:320:51:33

Well, as I would like you to win...

0:51:330:51:36

-Oh! Bless you.

-Yes.

0:51:360:51:38

Oh, my gosh! I'm shocked.

0:51:380:51:41

Because I think that's a bargain, and I think you'll do well.

0:51:410:51:44

-That's really sweet of you. Thank you very much!

-OK!

0:51:440:51:48

So, Margie's spent £150 on five lots -

0:51:480:51:52

a Bakelite lighter, a Victorian doll's highchair,

0:51:520:51:56

a silver frame, four hand-painted place mats

0:51:560:52:00

and a leather case.

0:52:000:52:02

While Mark's blown the entire £200 on a silver decanter coaster,

0:52:020:52:08

four bridge pens, a set of sinfonium discs

0:52:080:52:11

a Royal Worcester figure

0:52:110:52:13

and a collector's lot containing parasol, walking cane

0:52:130:52:18

and a mounted etui.

0:52:180:52:20

So, I wonder what they think of each other's bounty.

0:52:200:52:23

His last lot, I felt a little bit jealous.

0:52:230:52:26

That's a really good lot he's got there.

0:52:260:52:29

That lovely Georgian etui.

0:52:290:52:31

Why did she buy that doll's fold-in whatever-it-was?

0:52:310:52:36

I was speechless with the sinfonium discs. I didn't know what to say.

0:52:360:52:41

I just don't understand them. I just don't get it.

0:52:410:52:44

I don't get those at all.

0:52:440:52:46

After starting out in Kent at Chilham,

0:52:460:52:49

this leg of our trip will conclude in Sussex at Heathfield...

0:52:490:52:53

Out you get. Let's get in there and get started.

0:52:550:52:58

..at Watsons Auction Rooms.

0:52:580:53:00

OK, settle down, everyone. Margie's lighter is up first.

0:53:020:53:06

-How are you feeling about it?

-I'm hoping for a fiver.

0:53:060:53:09

-Profit, presumably.

-Bakelite lighter.

0:53:090:53:13

-At £10...

-Oh, come on.

0:53:130:53:15

-10, 12, 14, 16, 18.

-Creeping up.

0:53:150:53:19

At £18. Right in front.

0:53:190:53:21

At £18.

0:53:210:53:23

He started at 10, Margie.

0:53:230:53:26

A £2 loss, more after commission.

0:53:260:53:30

Trying to cheer me up?

0:53:300:53:31

How will Mark's odd couple get on?

0:53:310:53:34

-£10 I'm bid.

-This is terrible.

-At 10, 12...

0:53:340:53:36

-You're going up.

-..14, 16, 18,

0:53:360:53:38

-20, 22, 25.

-You're in profit.

0:53:380:53:42

At £25. 28 now? At £25.

0:53:420:53:45

-It wiped its face.

-You haven't lost money.

0:53:450:53:49

At last, a fiver profit.

0:53:490:53:51

Not an ecstatic sum.

0:53:510:53:53

The silver frame, they both wanted it but Margie got it.

0:53:530:53:57

30. £30. 20.

0:53:570:54:00

-Come on.

-Oh.

-10 I'm bid. 10, 12, 14, 16...

0:54:000:54:04

-It's not going to make it.

-..18, 20, 22, 24.

0:54:040:54:08

26 now. 26. At £26. Going to sell at £26.

0:54:080:54:13

I'm really sorry, Margie. That's very disappointing.

0:54:130:54:16

Perhaps she won't be so keen to follow Mark next time.

0:54:160:54:20

I think that's an omen.

0:54:200:54:22

Mark's silver bridge pens.

0:54:220:54:25

£30... 20, take a bid. £20.

0:54:250:54:29

At £20 bid, 20. 22, 25,

0:54:290:54:32

28, 30, 32, 35.

0:54:320:54:35

At 35 on commission, selling at £35.

0:54:350:54:39

-Ridiculous.

-Hardly all square, though.

0:54:400:54:44

It's a loss by the time they take the commission out of it.

0:54:440:54:47

Will someone please appreciate the story of Margie's mats?

0:54:470:54:51

Nicely decorated, £10.

0:54:510:54:53

-I'm going to cry in a minute.

-5, 6, 8,

0:54:530:54:56

10, 12.

0:54:560:54:58

-Terrible.

-I can't bear this.

0:54:580:55:00

At £12, 14.

0:55:000:55:02

16, at £16.

0:55:020:55:05

-Made a profit of a pound!

-18 now. Last time at £16.

0:55:050:55:10

Yes!

0:55:100:55:12

Margie's first profit of the day.

0:55:120:55:14

Back to the drawing board.

0:55:140:55:16

Mark's collector's lot, I'm worried.

0:55:160:55:19

30 I'm bid. £30.

0:55:190:55:21

-This is ridiculous.

-At £30. 30, 35, 40, 45.

-This is a joke.

0:55:210:55:25

-50, 55, 60.

-Give it a chance.

0:55:250:55:28

-65, 70, 75.

-There you go.

0:55:280:55:31

80, 85,

0:55:310:55:34

-90, £90.

-It's creeping.

0:55:340:55:36

At £90.

0:55:360:55:39

-It's absolutely silly.

-Another £5 profit.

0:55:390:55:42

Wish I'd just kept my money in my pocket.

0:55:420:55:44

Next up, Margie's biggest buy.

0:55:450:55:47

20 I'm bid, £20.

0:55:470:55:50

At 20, 22, 25.

0:55:500:55:52

28, 30, 32,

0:55:520:55:55

35, 35, 38,

0:55:550:55:58

40, 42, 45...

0:55:580:56:00

At £45.

0:56:000:56:02

48 at the back. At £48, at 48.

0:56:020:56:06

-50 now? At £48.

-It's so pretty!

0:56:060:56:10

-48.

-I'm relieved.

0:56:110:56:13

Another loss. It's not always like this, Margie.

0:56:130:56:17

You got away with that one. I thought it was going to go for a lot less.

0:56:170:56:21

-Mark's silver coaster.

-20 I've got, £20.

0:56:210:56:26

At £20 bid. 20, 22, 25.

0:56:260:56:28

-28, 30, at £30.

-£30!

0:56:280:56:34

-38. At £38, £38.

-Profit!

0:56:340:56:37

-It's a loss after commission.

-He's right, you know.

0:56:370:56:43

If you cannot get £50 or £60 on this,

0:56:430:56:46

there's no point in selling it in the auction. Really isn't.

0:56:460:56:50

Margie's last chance, the luggage.

0:56:500:56:53

-At £60. 60, 50...

-Yes.

0:56:530:56:57

-30 I'm bid.

-30, tenner up.

0:56:570:56:59

30, 32, 35.

0:56:590:57:02

-He's on the book.

-38, 40, 42.

0:57:020:57:04

45, 48.

0:57:040:57:05

-That's good.

-50, 55, 60, 65...

0:57:050:57:08

At £65.

0:57:080:57:10

-On my left now, at £65.

-Nice profit.

-Have I gone pink?!

0:57:100:57:14

That's up £45.

0:57:140:57:17

£45 profit in the bag.

0:57:170:57:19

That's brilliant, well done.

0:57:200:57:22

OK, sinfonium fans, this is your moment.

0:57:220:57:27

-10 I'm bid, only 10.

-Good Lord.

0:57:270:57:29

-12, 14, 16, 18.

-You're on the book.

-20, 25, 28, 30.

0:57:290:57:34

32, 35, 38.

0:57:340:57:36

40, 42.

0:57:360:57:37

£45, 50? At 45.

0:57:370:57:42

Can you believe it? You little devil.

0:57:420:57:44

That IS a surprise.

0:57:440:57:46

-£20 profit.

-Gosh, that is amazing, I apologise.

0:57:460:57:51

But look in my face. Not happy.

0:57:510:57:55

And for a very good reason. The new girl's beaten him by 80p.

0:57:550:57:59

-I'm not sure, what can I say? What a day.

-Unmitigated disaster.

0:57:590:58:03

What a rollercoaster.

0:58:030:58:05

Mark Stacey began with £200

0:58:050:58:08

and made a loss of £8.94 after auction costs.

0:58:080:58:11

So, he has £191.06 to spend on the next leg.

0:58:110:58:17

Whilst Margie Cooper, who also began with £200,

0:58:170:58:20

made a loss of £8.14 after auction costs,

0:58:200:58:23

so she leads, narrowly, with £191.86 to spend going forward.

0:58:230:58:29

-I simply can't believe that you beat me by 80p.

-I can't...

0:58:320:58:39

Watch out for the heavy steering, Mark.

0:58:390:58:42

-Ready?

-Ready.

0:58:420:58:44

Onward and downward, as they say, Marjorie.

0:58:440:58:48

-Oooh.

-Ooh.

0:58:480:58:49

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:59:120:59:14

It's the final showdown for antiques experts David Barby and Charles Hanson, who are heading for an auction in Nottingham. Picking up from them are Mark Stacey and Margie Cooper, who start off in Chilham, Kent and end at auction in Heathfield, East Sussex.