Episode 16 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 16

Antiques experts travel across the UK searching for treasures. Mark Stacey and Mark Hales battle it out in the auction rooms and antique shops of eastern England.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each,

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a classic car, and a goal to scour Britain

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-for antiques.

-That hurts.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction,

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but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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We've really lost.

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So, will it be the high road to glory

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or the slow road to disaster?

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There's always another auction, Mark.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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It's the beginning of a whole new week and a whole new road trip,

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This time, our duelling duo are Mark Stacey and Mark Hales.

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Two Marks in one car. Mark what I say.

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Is it true, two Marks are better than one?

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-Absolutely right.

-If you say so.

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Veteran Roadtripper Mark Stacey is an auctioneer and valuer from Brighton.

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He's a smart operator whose wits are as sharp as his tongue.

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-Mark.

-Yes.

-You couldn't give me a hand, could you?

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Could I give you a hand?

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You asked for a hand!

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Ceramics expert Mark Hales runs a Devon auction house.

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He's a relative newcomer

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with just one previous road trip under his belt.

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So, could this upstart be chasing victory this time?

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-I've got to beat Mark over there, haven't I?

-Definitely.

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-It's the name of the game.

-He's such a veteran, he must be beaten.

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Because it's the start of the week, they both have full wallets -

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£200 to spend on antiques which they'll later sell at auction

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aiming to make a tidy profit.

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Today, our brave boys are driving a dashingly red

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1968 Triumph Spitfire MK3.

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That is two Marks in a MK3.

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Oh, good grief!

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I'm not terribly good on cars, but I do like the colour red.

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-It's a lovely red, isn't it?

-I think we could have a hoot in it.

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Sexy red.

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Now, don't get carried away!

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This week's epic journey sees the two Marks drive nearly 300 miles,

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from Finedon in Northamptonshire...

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through Norwich in East Anglia...

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to Colchester in Essex.

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On today's show, they're heading for their first auction

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in Stamford, Lincolnshire.

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The pretty village of Finedon in Northamptonshire effortlessly

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combines the ancient and the modern.

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It's mentioned as a significant settlement

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in the Domesday book of 1086.

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Let's hope it's not too Domesday for our boys.

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-Affleck Bridge Antiques.

-There we are.

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That's the idea. Right.

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Oh, I'm itching to get started, aren't you?

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Well, this is exciting. This is it.

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-The thrill of the chase. This is it.

-Oh, gosh!

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Not as young as you used to be, are you, chaps?

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-I'm glad to be out of that thing!

-I nearly had to ask you to help me out, then!

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I wouldn't have, I would have left you in there.

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More chance of me finding the bargains.

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-Are you feeling nervous?

-Just a little bit.

-Come on, good luck.

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-I'm going over there, I think.

-And have a lousy morning.

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-I hope things go badly for you.

-Yeah, thank you so much.

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I'm only joking. Bye.

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First, Mark Hales is scouting out Affleck Bridge Antiques.

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Robert Cheney is on hand to give him a warm welcome.

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-Hello, Robert, how do you do?

-All right, thank you.

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-Would it be all right if I have a browse?

-Yes, carry on.

-Thank you very much indeed.

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Mark Hales is new to this game than his battle-hardened adversary.

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So, does he have a master plan, other than just rubbing his hands?

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Well, no plan as such, just keep looking, keep looking,

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don't lose my cool.

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I am a little bit nervous I'm always nervous

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until I've got that first buy out of the way.

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Yes.

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The mallet, Robert,

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-is it a presentation piece?

-Yeah.

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It IS a presentation mallet, made for the builder

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of Chelmsford School in 1906 and crafted from ebony.

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Mark's convinced it may be of interest to a particular buyer.

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There are a lot of builders out there,

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-and builders love to collect things, don't they, Robert?

-They do, yes.

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Builders, if you have 20 collectors in a room, I'm sorry,

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but probably 12 of them would be builders. Isn't that right?

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The ticket price is £65, can Mark haggle it down?

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Can I buy it for £35? Because that would give me a profit, won't it?

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-It would, but it wouldn't give us one.

-£40.

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-Just.

-Because if I bought that for £40,

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-I reckon I've got a profit in that, I really do.

-That would be, yeah.

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As long as the auctioneer does his job, puts it out there

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and those collectors, those collecting builders spot it,

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I think it could do well.

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-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-£40 for the mallet?

-That's it, yeah.

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Thank you, Robert, we'll have the mallet, thank you very much indeed.

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Yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, yes, YES!

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We've started, we have started, good.

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Meanwhile, Mark Stacey is next door

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in MC Chapman Antiques, with proprietor, Mike.

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This Roadtripper is a formidable competitor

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but what does he make of his new rival?

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I think Mark's going to be very tough competition, actually,

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I think he jabbers a lot, because we've only just met

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and he might be a little bit nervous, but I think he has a good eye.

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Huh! Looks like he's not the only one!

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This is...

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That's rather pretty as well, isn't it? It's a little...

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-I THINK it's continental silver.

-I think so.

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There's some sort of mark on the bottom. I haven't got my eye glasses with me.

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What he's fiddling with here is a miniature white metal

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continental candleholder, list price, £22. And now,

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he's spied something else, too.

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-This is a rather unusual thing as well, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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What do you think it is?

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-Pin tray?

-Yeah, mother-of-pearl?

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Quite a big piece as well, mounted in a sort of...

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-Almost an arts and crafts...

-It has actually,

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I can't see any marks on, but it feels silver.

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It feels silver, doesn't it, yeah?

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On the ticket, £55. Mark Stacey is an absolute magpie this morning.

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He's found yet another shiny object.

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My eyes are wandering and I'm seeing things I didn't see before.

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And it's just...oops!

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It's just good to have a look at things, because you never know,

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you might just find that extra something, you know?

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It's a little... You could call it a sort of compote,

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or a tazza, I suppose.

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A tazza is a shallow cup or vase usually on a decorative pedestal.

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1882, so it dates it to the late 19th century.

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-How much is that, Mike?

-£45.

-£45.

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In the other room, Mark's alighted on something else he likes.

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-There's no stopping him!

-Gosh! That's rather nice.

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Gosh, it's reasonable, isn't it?

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-Just lovely quality.

-It's lovely quality.

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What we have here is a 19th-century cribbage board.

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This is all mother-of-pearl here

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and you've got... Is this rosewood?

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-If you got that made today, how much would it cost?

-Well, yeah.

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£300 or £400, at least?

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Right, I've got to make some decisions, Mike, haven't I?

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Let's have a little look at what we've got.

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We've got that bit which I quite like.

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That which I like, this which I like, and that which I like.

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Four bits already, isn't it?

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So, this is going incredibly well...

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-or very worryingly.

-Almost too well, really.

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The ticket price for all four items combined is £172,

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so what can masterful Mark get shaved off that hefty lump sum?

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-£145...so far, is that right, Mike?

-Yeah.

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I've really pretty much given you...

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The best on the lot, so I can't twist your arm?

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-You can twist my arm for another fiver off.

-I must be absolutely mad,

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but your charm has beguiled me

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-and I'm going to buy them, thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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He's managed to negotiate £32 off,

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so that's £140 for all four items.

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-Good work!

-I suppose you want the money.

-That would be good, as well!

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That would come in handy! I'll be quite honest,

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I've got my whole budget here.

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So, the easiest thing to do is just to take £60 away

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and give you the rest, actually!

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you again.

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This bold strategy shows a whole new side to Mark Stacey.

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How's he feeling after his buying bonanza?

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I've been in a few awkward positions in my life

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but I've never been in this position before

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of having bought four items and spent most of my budget

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in the very, very first shop.

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Meanwhile, Mark Hales is now in Mike's shop.

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It's been a boon for Mr Stacey,

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will Mark Hales hit the jackpot, too?

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First pick, a 20th-century cast-iron helmet.

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-That hurts.

-Suits you, Mark.

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But upstairs, is something much more promising...

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Happy as a king!

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Lovely!

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It's a coloured 19th-century print,

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Pears print, Pears soap

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and it's always been a favourite painting of mine. Mike!

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The print is of a painting by 19th-century artist William Collins.

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I'll help you with a fiver, I'll do you it for 20 quid.

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You know, that's what I was thinking of.

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Yes! Yes, I've got to have a go, haven't I? I've got to have a go!

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Another buy for Mark Hales.

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Actually, I'm as happy as a king.

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I'll do the jokes! Thank you, Mark.

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Time for the lads to leave Finedon

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and head 21 miles south to Northampton.

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This large market town boasts some fine architecture.

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The Grade II listed Northampton Guildhall was opened in 1864.

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But it's the local museum Mark's heading for,

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Northampton has been the life and soul

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of the British shoe-making industry for centuries.

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He's come to meet Rebecca

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who will walk him through the extensive collection of footwear.

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Shoemaking in the area is a proud tradition

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that survives today.

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Even the local football team is known as the Cobblers.

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Rebecca and Mark are kicking off in a room

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that explains the traditional shoe-manufacturing process

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which has employed generations of local workers.

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So, in here we've got the shoe machinery

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and we start as well with the first, with the last.

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-The last?

-It's just really, usually,

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a wooden foot-shaped sort of block

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that the shoe is then moulded and made round.

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There were over 200 individual processes

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involved in the traditional manufacture of shoes.

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This room describes

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how each of them added up to an natty pair of brogues.

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This machinery didn't wear out easily, did it?

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-It was built to last, wasn't it?

-Well, yes.

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Certain things have changed, you know,

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they've got better machines and improved machines,

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-but there are certain processes that are the same today, so they use the same machines.

-Yes.

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-Isn't that lovely?

-Lovely.

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As a special treat, Rebecca has agreed to show Mark

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behind-the-scenes of the museum. This is the backstage area

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where some of their rarest items are stored.

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They have a vast collection of footwear from ancient to modern.

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This is where everything that's not on display is kept,

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-including the 11,000 pairs of shoes.

-11,000 pairs of shoes, right.

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Promise me, you won't tell my wife!

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So, we have a few prime examples on the table here.

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So, I think maybe you ought to pop a pair of gloves on

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and uncover what lies in these boxes.

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-Right, yes.

-This is one of our very earliest shoes in the collection,

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-It's an Egyptian sandal sole.

-Right.

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It's from 300 BC, actually.

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It's difficult to believe that's 300 years BC.

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Next, Rebecca's got a surprise for Mark -

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a pair of shoes worn by a special lady on her very special day.

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-It's not going to jump out at me, is it?

-No.

-No.

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It's not going to be the smelly pair?

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-These are probably one of our most popular pairs.

-Really?

-Yes.

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-They really...

-Oh, goodness me!

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Oh! Now, 19th-century?

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-Yes, they're Queen Victoria's wedding shoes.

-Wow!

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Just look at the size of the young Queen's feet, how delicate.

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They are. They are about a 3½. And incredibly narrow.

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-Do you think I might, just, could I possibly pick one up?

-Yes, you can.

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If I'm very, very careful. Could you hold that for me?

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I mean, I have to hold... my hand's shaking...

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I have to hold Queen Victoria's...

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Oh, look at that!

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That's it - made by shoemakers to the Queen and the Royal Family,

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Gundry & Sons, in London.

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I think that's a bit of a special moment, don't you?

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Isn't that fabulous?

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If you think of all the prints and paintings that you see of Victoria

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on her wedding day and these are the actual shoes she was wearing.

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And then these are very interesting, I think you'll find.

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Oh, dear!

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You know, I was enjoying myself until I saw those!

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-Well...

-These are from the 1930s,

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-which is quite amazing. Fetish style.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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-Goodness me, from the '30s?!

-It's quite unbelievable.

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It is, isn't it? Oh, they're horrible!

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I mean, seriously horrid! No.

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-Anyway, moving on...

-Rebecca,

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-it's been absolutely fascinating.

-Great.

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I mean that, thank you. I really have enjoyed myself, so, so much.

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-Thank you very much for having me.

-You're welcome.

-Thank you.

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Just down the road, Mark Stacey is continuing his shopping extravaganza.

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He's heading for Northampton's largest retailer

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of antique and vintage goods and proprietor, Gilly Burgess.

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-Hello.

-I'm Mark.

-Hello there, I'm Gilly.

-Nice to meet you, Gilly.

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-Gosh, it's a lot bigger on the inside!

-Size isn't everything!

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-Time is ticking already.

-Sharp!

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It's not long before Mark's spotted something -

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an Italian silver candlestick with a familiar motif.

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Thank you, my love.

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I bought this cherub candlestick this morning and I was just thinking

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that if in the sale there was a cherub lover there...

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-It would complement it.

-It might complement it.

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Sounds like it's time to strike a deal, Mark,

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but after your big spend this morning,

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what can you afford to offer?

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The candlestick is silver, after all.

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Do you think they would take £5 for it?

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LAUGHTER

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I think that's a no, then, is it?

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I think that's a no, is it?

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I thought they might have said, "As you've got the other cherub,

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"it'd be a shame to see them not reunited."

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-For your cheek, you can have it for

-£5. Give me a kiss.

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-On one condition.

-Oh, no! What's the condition?

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This comes with another cheeky bottom.

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-Does it?

-It's part of a pair.

-Oh, yes?

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And if you will consent to take this other cheeky bottom with you

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and have it as part of your...

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-You can have that for £5.

-What's the other cheeky bottom?

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-I'll go and fetch it.

-(What's going on here?)

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Do I look a cheeky bottom type of person? Don't answer that.

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Oh, I can't look. Shall I cover my eyes?

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-This week's objet d'art.

-Is it really cheeky?

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-It's very cheeky.

-Can I look?

-You can look.

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LAUGHTER

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If you can shift that, I'll eat my hat.

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Cos I can't shift it.

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-Is that or is that not...

-The vilest thing you've ever seen.

-Yes!

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Words fail me.

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So, Mark's bagged himself a silver candlestick for a fiver

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and a cheeky bonus.

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On that bombshell, it's the end of a very busy day.

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Plenty of purchases and more than a little tomfoolery,

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so nighty-night, boys.

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It's a new day and our tussling twosome are back on the road.

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This is where it all happens today.

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So far, Mark Stacey's spent £145 on five lots -

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the two cherub candlesticks, a cribbage board,

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the mother of pearl pin tray, the bronze tazza

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and the interesting vase.

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He only has £55 for the day ahead.

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Mark Hales has only bought two items - the 19th century print

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and the ebony presentation mallet, all at a cost of £60,

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leaving him with £140 to play with.

0:17:480:17:52

So, onwards and upwards, boys,

0:17:520:17:54

as they head to Weedon Bec in Northamptonshire.

0:17:540:17:58

Yes! Woo! We're here, good, right, OK. Here we go.

0:17:580:18:04

Heart of the shires. Oh, looks quite big.

0:18:050:18:08

They're aiming for Shires Antiques

0:18:080:18:10

hoping to find their next round of bargains.

0:18:100:18:14

I'm not sure that I want to share this shop with you.

0:18:140:18:17

-Do you not like sharing, Mark?

-I do with some people, Mark.

0:18:170:18:20

It seems a good night's sleep hasn't made them any less competitive.

0:18:200:18:23

Tut-tut.

0:18:230:18:25

-Nice, very nice.

-Children!

0:18:270:18:29

-Shame on you.

-I know, I'm not really normally like that.

0:18:300:18:34

We're shopping together, OK?

0:18:340:18:35

-We certainly are not.

-We stick together.

-I'm going over there.

0:18:350:18:39

You stick down... Don't you dare follow me!

0:18:390:18:43

Lawrence and Alison Spencer will be helping them

0:18:430:18:46

and might be called on to referee.

0:18:460:18:48

Both are competing on the same turf this morning

0:18:480:18:50

and it's all getting a bit tense.

0:18:500:18:53

You are in the wrong side of the shop, Mark.

0:18:530:18:56

You should be over there.

0:18:560:18:58

Rubbish, there's no right or wrong side to the shop.

0:18:580:19:01

There's no point trying to follow me if you're looking for inspiration.

0:19:010:19:04

-You've got to find your own.

-Simmer down, now.

0:19:040:19:08

Honestly... What are you going to buy, Mark?

0:19:090:19:13

That quite interesting, isn't it?

0:19:130:19:16

Little sort of silver quality...

0:19:160:19:19

unmarked silver-plated wine funnel.

0:19:190:19:24

This is what you'd serve, you'd serve your wine through this

0:19:240:19:28

in the days when there was often a lot of sediment.

0:19:280:19:31

That's right.

0:19:310:19:33

You'd use this to pour through

0:19:330:19:36

and the wind would pour out, decanted into the decanter.

0:19:360:19:40

From my point of view, I would love it to be unmarked silver.

0:19:410:19:45

But then it'd be slightly higher in price.

0:19:450:19:49

Unless the dealer didn't know that.

0:19:490:19:53

I've got £55 left.

0:19:530:19:54

Is it worth having a little word with him?

0:19:540:19:57

I'll quite happily give him a ring.

0:19:570:19:59

That wine funnel was marked up at £85,

0:19:590:20:03

so he's going to need a substantial reduction.

0:20:030:20:06

As Lawrence phones the dealer, Mark Hales is looking lost.

0:20:060:20:10

-You couldn't give me a hand, could you?

-Could I give you a hand?

0:20:100:20:13

That was almost a joke. Thank you for your help anyway.

0:20:130:20:16

You're very welcome.

0:20:160:20:18

Any time I can be of any assistance, by all means, feel free.

0:20:180:20:23

-Thank you so much.

-Think of my name and I'll be there.

-Of course.

0:20:230:20:26

Don't know what all that was about.

0:20:260:20:28

I never know with Mark whether he's trying to unnerve me

0:20:280:20:35

or whether he genuinely is panicking.

0:20:350:20:37

Naturally, being the friendly and helpful person I am,

0:20:370:20:40

I'm hoping it's the latter.

0:20:400:20:42

Oh, charming! On the other side of the shop,

0:20:420:20:45

Mark Hales has found some picture frames that take his interest.

0:20:450:20:48

Alison's on hand to help.

0:20:480:20:51

Not my subject at all

0:20:510:20:56

but there's two of them here and it says,

0:20:560:20:59

"Northumberland Fusiliers" and "York and Lancashire Regiment."

0:20:590:21:04

-Militaria. Militaria's quite saleable, isn't it?

-Very.

0:21:040:21:08

-Collectible.

-Yes, and they're nice quality.

-Might do well at auction.

0:21:080:21:13

Price on the ticket is £70.

0:21:130:21:15

Without messing about, if I could buy the two for £45, I buy them.

0:21:150:21:20

-Tell him I'm desperate.

-Oh, dear!

-I'm not really that desperate.

0:21:200:21:24

You shouldn't admit things like that.

0:21:240:21:27

And now we've got an answer from the dealer

0:21:270:21:29

selling Mark Stacey's wine funnel.

0:21:290:21:31

It's your lucky day, she's accepted your offer.

0:21:310:21:35

And there's an answer for Mark Hales too.

0:21:350:21:39

55 is her very best.

0:21:390:21:40

-That her bottom line, is it?

-It is, yes.

0:21:400:21:42

-I think I'd better buy, then, hadn't I?

-Yeah.

0:21:420:21:46

-I think I'd better buy them at £55, thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:21:460:21:50

Not quite the deal he wanted, unlike adversary Mark Stacey

0:21:500:21:52

who's bagged yet another item.

0:21:520:21:54

It seems Mr Hales has some work to do.

0:21:540:21:57

They're in the car again

0:21:570:21:59

and heading the ten miles back towards Northampton.

0:21:590:22:02

Mark Hales is in Old Bakehouse Antiques with Linda Grant.

0:22:030:22:08

Thank you very much. Would it be all right

0:22:080:22:11

-if I have a jolly good look around?

-Of course.

0:22:110:22:14

It seems he's spotted some 1970s retro chairs

0:22:200:22:24

which just might turn a tidy profit.

0:22:240:22:26

-Far out, man.

-Blonde Ercol.

-Yeah, they're all Ercol.

0:22:260:22:30

I'm not very knowledgeable in retro but, you know,

0:22:300:22:33

these have been quite popular.

0:22:330:22:34

Founded in 1920, Ercol is a great British furniture manufacturer

0:22:340:22:39

still going strong in Buckinghamshire.

0:22:390:22:41

Their vintage designs from the 20th century

0:22:410:22:44

are popular with retro furniture enthusiasts.

0:22:440:22:47

Have they been restored? They're absolutely as they were?

0:22:470:22:52

They're great, aren't they?

0:22:530:22:56

The thing is, I've sold these, and you're absolutely right,

0:22:560:23:00

there's nothing wrong with the price,

0:23:000:23:01

but I've sold these in my auction room in Devon

0:23:010:23:05

and I've sold them for £10 each, and I've sold them for £25 each.

0:23:050:23:10

It just depends who's there on the day and what's happening.

0:23:100:23:12

I can do a deal on those. You can have the four at £10 each.

0:23:120:23:17

-That's 40, isn't it?

-Correct.

0:23:170:23:19

I'm not being mean or anything, I've got to ask anyway,

0:23:190:23:22

don't be insulted, but I was thinking if I could get those for 30...

0:23:220:23:27

-I mean, they take up space.

-35.

-Oh, you're a hard woman.

0:23:270:23:30

You've got profit, we've got profit.

0:23:300:23:34

I can't say fairer than that. Fine, thank you.

0:23:340:23:36

Thank you, Linda, I've bought those, that's wonderful.

0:23:360:23:39

Big strapping lad like me, I can carry those. Wish me lots of luck.

0:23:390:23:43

-Good luck, hope you win!

-Bye!

0:23:430:23:46

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. What have I done?

0:23:460:23:50

Retro chair man. Right.

0:23:510:23:55

Retro chair man.

0:23:550:23:57

Let's hope he doesn't live to regret it. Careful.

0:23:570:24:01

Meanwhile, Mark Stacey has hijacked the car and is heading towards

0:24:040:24:07

Rockingham Castle near Corby in Northamptonshire.

0:24:070:24:11

Wouldn't we all love a driveway like this?

0:24:120:24:15

Mark's here at Rockingham to meet head guide David

0:24:150:24:18

who's going to show him around this stately pile

0:24:180:24:22

which boasts impressive connections

0:24:220:24:24

to both grand monarchs and a famous writer.

0:24:240:24:28

That's what I call a door knocker. ..Hello, David.

0:24:300:24:33

-Welcome to Rockingham Castle.

-That's very kind, I'm Mark.

0:24:330:24:37

Built by William the Conqueror, the castle was home

0:24:370:24:40

to medieval kings and queens until King Henry VIII

0:24:400:24:43

granted it to Edward Watson, the 16th century ancestor

0:24:430:24:47

of the current family who still live here.

0:24:470:24:50

Its Royal Tudor pedigree is indicated

0:24:500:24:52

by this magnificent portrait of Elizabeth I.

0:24:520:24:57

400 years after the Tudors,

0:24:570:24:58

Rockingham Castle took on another life

0:24:580:25:01

as the playground of the great English novelist Charles Dickens.

0:25:010:25:05

Dickens would visit his good friends,

0:25:050:25:07

owners Richard and Lavinia Watson

0:25:070:25:10

and try out several of his plays on the castle's guests.

0:25:100:25:13

During the time that Dickens was here in the early Victorian period,

0:25:130:25:17

this was the room in which they entertained and came up to

0:25:170:25:22

after their great meals, and in which, on one occasion in 1851,

0:25:220:25:26

he put a play on. We have the playbill

0:25:260:25:28

in the cabinet round the corner.

0:25:280:25:30

In this cabinet, we have various items connected to Dickens.

0:25:300:25:36

Here, a playbill for a performance

0:25:360:25:40

he put on in this room in 1851.

0:25:400:25:44

He put on three plays in which he acted himself.

0:25:440:25:47

You can see his name there.

0:25:470:25:49

Sir Charles Colestree - Mr Charles Dickens.

0:25:490:25:52

He also acted as Colonel Freelove.

0:25:520:25:55

Then he went down to just being a doctor.

0:25:550:25:58

He was a doctor in Animal Magnetism.

0:25:580:26:00

He stayed here on several occasions

0:26:000:26:02

but one of these things that connects him to Rockingham

0:26:020:26:05

is that one of his novels, Bleak House,

0:26:050:26:07

in it features a house called Chesney Wold, a great house.

0:26:070:26:10

Many of the features of that house are based on Rockingham.

0:26:100:26:14

The long gallery here is the model for the drawing room in Bleak House.

0:26:140:26:20

And the castle's not just famous for its place in literary history.

0:26:200:26:25

Its location by the Welland Valley gives it stunning views

0:26:250:26:29

across five counties. The best place for sightseeing

0:26:290:26:32

-is up the castle tower.

-I'm sure it's going to be worth it.

0:26:320:26:35

I think the views are definitely worth the climb.

0:26:350:26:38

Here we are. A little bit breezy.

0:26:380:26:42

-Oh, wow.

-We have a great panorama.

0:26:420:26:46

David, what a wonderful way

0:26:470:26:50

of ending our visit in Rockingham Castle.

0:26:500:26:53

-Thank you so much for your time.

-I'm glad you enjoyed it.

0:26:530:26:55

I've thoroughly enjoyed it and hope I can come back some other time.

0:26:550:26:59

-Look forward to seeing you.

-Thank you.

0:26:590:27:01

Would you like to lead the way down?

0:27:010:27:04

So if I fall, you can land on me.

0:27:040:27:08

12 miles to the east, Mark Hales has one more shop left

0:27:080:27:12

to visit in the ancient market town of Oundle.

0:27:120:27:14

With £50 left to spend, he's heading towards Green Man Antiques.

0:27:140:27:19

-Hi.

-Hi!

0:27:190:27:21

-I'm Mark.

-I'm Vicky, nice to meet you.

0:27:210:27:24

Hello, Vicky, how do you do?

0:27:240:27:26

-Would it be all right if I had a browse?

-Please do.

0:27:260:27:29

Fabulous!

0:27:300:27:33

With shopping time running out,

0:27:390:27:42

Mark's resorting to an unusual shopping tactic.

0:27:420:27:46

What springs to mind that's £50?

0:27:460:27:49

-Just in case, have a little think for me.

-Yeah, I will.

0:27:490:27:52

I don't have to buy something but it would be nice

0:27:520:27:54

to get rid of that last little bit of money.

0:27:540:27:56

Give myself another item.

0:27:560:27:58

-Determined to spend all your money?

-Yes.

0:27:580:28:02

We do have a couple of barometers, wood-framed barometers.

0:28:020:28:06

-Ah, these.

-Yes.

0:28:060:28:09

These. I didn't look at these.

0:28:090:28:11

I could do the two of those for 46, but that is my absolute final.

0:28:110:28:17

That's jolly reasonable, they're ever so good.

0:28:180:28:21

They are beautiful.

0:28:210:28:23

-And they're useable, aren't they?

-They are, yes.

0:28:230:28:26

That's the beauty of things like this.

0:28:260:28:28

You hang them on the wall and use them.

0:28:280:28:30

They're 19th century, aren't they, Vicky?

0:28:300:28:32

They're 19th century and they're sort of... 1870s.

0:28:320:28:36

-Yes.

-That sort of period.

0:28:360:28:38

They should be snatched from the shop, shouldn't they?

0:28:380:28:41

-They should, before I change my mind.

-Oh, bless your heart.

0:28:410:28:44

-That was very good.

-That's you told, Mark.

0:28:440:28:46

Better hand over the cash and get out of there - quick. 50.

0:28:460:28:51

Right, that's good news, isn't it? That's good news. I've done it.

0:28:540:28:58

I spent all my money. Well, £4 left.

0:28:580:29:00

Marvellous. Maybe.

0:29:000:29:02

Now it's time for the boys to reveal their purchases to each other

0:29:020:29:06

and they've chosen a picturesque but out-of-the-way setting.

0:29:060:29:09

Wait for it. I'm revealing again.

0:29:090:29:14

That's two reveals.

0:29:140:29:16

It's all about quality, not quantity, Mark.

0:29:160:29:18

Right, Mark, what do you think of that?

0:29:180:29:21

You've really gone across the board, haven't you? These look interesting.

0:29:210:29:26

-Are they regimental?

-They certainly are.

0:29:260:29:29

It says on there "Northumberland" and it says on here, look at this,

0:29:290:29:34

"York and Lancaster."

0:29:340:29:36

-I think those are very commercial.

-Early 20th?

0:29:360:29:39

I think they're very nice, actually. Did you pay a lot for them?

0:29:390:29:43

-They cost £55.

-For the pair?

-Yes.

-That doesn't sound much to me.

0:29:430:29:47

Good, I'm pleased to hear that.

0:29:470:29:49

-Are those Ercol, the chairs?

-They are.

0:29:490:29:52

They're very nice, they're very commercial,

0:29:520:29:55

I would have thought. They're very in at the moment,

0:29:550:29:58

-the revival stuff.

-They certainly are.

-Expensive?

0:29:580:30:01

I think they were actually a bargain.

0:30:010:30:03

-£35.

-For the four?

-For the four.

-You can't go wrong.

0:30:030:30:07

Have a look at this. Feel the weight.

0:30:070:30:09

I think it's lovely. I love the turning.

0:30:100:30:12

It's so nice to have that plaque on the front.

0:30:120:30:14

I think that should be very, very saleable.

0:30:140:30:17

How much was that?

0:30:170:30:18

It cost £40.

0:30:180:30:20

-I would have gone for that if I had seen it.

-Good.

0:30:200:30:23

-I think that's the charming item.

-Compliments!

0:30:230:30:25

-Can I just say something?

-Yes.

-You've rather impressed me.

0:30:250:30:28

Praise indeed!

0:30:280:30:30

Well, I didn't expect to, actually.

0:30:300:30:32

-I think I'm going to have to mind my step with you, Mr Hales.

-Really?

0:30:320:30:34

Thank you very much. Would you like to reveal?

0:30:340:30:37

-Are you ready?

-Yes, I am ready.

0:30:370:30:39

I'm going to try and be...

0:30:390:30:41

-Oh, my goodness!

-I've knocked one down already.

-Is that a wine funnel?

0:30:410:30:44

It is. It's absolutely gorgeous.

0:30:440:30:46

I absolutely love it to bits.

0:30:460:30:48

I need to know, and it's no good me guessing, actually,

0:30:480:30:51

what did you pay for that?

0:30:510:30:52

-£55.

-Did you?

0:30:520:30:54

Well, I tell you what,

0:30:540:30:56

if the auctioneer does his job, there's a profit in that.

0:30:560:30:59

-I'm now going to ask you a huge favour.

-Right, go on, then.

0:30:590:31:02

-Because I do have one hidden item.

-Of course!

0:31:020:31:05

-Could you cover your eyes for one moment?

-Right. That's easy.

0:31:050:31:09

-Or turn your back. Cover your eyes.

-I wonder what's coming up here.

0:31:090:31:12

I want your opinion

0:31:130:31:16

as the king of pots...

0:31:160:31:19

What do you think about my modernist vase?

0:31:200:31:24

You can turn around now.

0:31:240:31:25

I'm not terribly good at 20th century when it comes to porcelain...

0:31:250:31:28

Oh, my goodness me! What have you bought?

0:31:280:31:31

What have you bought?! What have you bought?!

0:31:310:31:35

Don't drop it.

0:31:350:31:37

No, I think, in the right place...

0:31:370:31:41

Mark, handling!

0:31:410:31:42

..with the right person.

0:31:420:31:44

In the right place with the right person, I think, yes,

0:31:440:31:46

you could do very well with that, yes, yes. No. Good for you.

0:31:460:31:50

-Actually, I quite like it.

-Do you really?

-How much was it?

0:31:500:31:54

-It didn't cost me anything, actually.

-Really? Oh, isn't that typical?

0:31:540:31:57

I thought we were supposed to go in and pay for things.

0:31:570:31:59

No, well, I was, but the woman would only sell me that

0:31:590:32:04

for the price I paid for it, if I would take that as a gift.

0:32:040:32:07

I see, so you were doing her a favour, were you,

0:32:070:32:09

by removing it from the shop?

0:32:090:32:11

But what do they REALLY think of each other's purchases?

0:32:110:32:14

There's a lot of silver content there, so it could be scrapped,

0:32:140:32:18

so the value's there.

0:32:180:32:19

He can't go wrong. He's played it very, very, safely.

0:32:190:32:23

I'm very pleased with the items I've bought

0:32:230:32:25

and if there's any justice in the world

0:32:250:32:27

they will do reasonably well, but Mark has surprised me.

0:32:270:32:30

There's one or two things there that might sell very well.

0:32:300:32:32

It's too close to call. This is going to be a right royal ding-dong.

0:32:320:32:36

On this leg of the road trip our two Marks have travelled

0:32:360:32:39

from Finedon, Northamptonshire

0:32:390:32:41

to end up today in Stamford, Lincolnshire.

0:32:410:32:44

Stamford's proud past stretches right back to the Anglo-Saxon period.

0:32:440:32:48

It's justly celebrated for its pretty, historic streets.

0:32:480:32:52

-Well, here we are in Stamford.

-Beautiful, sunny Stamford.

0:32:520:32:56

A little bit of old England, isn't it?

0:32:560:32:59

They're on their way to Batemans Auctioneers and Valuers.

0:32:590:33:02

This family business is run by two generations of Batemans.

0:33:020:33:05

Auctioneer David Palmer will be wielding the gavel

0:33:050:33:08

but before kick-off, what does he think of their lots?

0:33:080:33:11

There's one or two that are interesting

0:33:130:33:15

and purchased with feeling, I would imagine.

0:33:150:33:18

There's one curious thing there I didn't understand at all what that was.

0:33:180:33:22

The mother of pearl circular dish with what appears to be

0:33:220:33:25

silver mounts around it.

0:33:250:33:26

I can't imagine anyone these days knowing what to do with it.

0:33:260:33:30

The bit I love the most

0:33:300:33:32

is the jug. The female shape of the jug.

0:33:320:33:36

You've only got to look at it and instantly I'm thinking of my wife.

0:33:360:33:39

Oh, really?!

0:33:390:33:41

Mark Stacey started this leg with £200

0:33:420:33:44

and has spent it all on six lots.

0:33:440:33:46

Mark Hales also started with £200 and has spent 196 on five lots.

0:33:470:33:54

But, don't forget, they'll have to pay auction costs on each sale.

0:33:540:33:57

So, who will be victorious in the first all-Mark showdown?

0:33:570:34:01

On your Marks! Oh, sorry.

0:34:010:34:04

First up, Mark Hales's groovy Ercol chairs.

0:34:050:34:08

Rather attractive design there. Put them in £20. 20 I'm bid.

0:34:080:34:12

20, 22, 25, 28.

0:34:120:34:13

At 28 now, I'll take 30. 30, 2, 32.

0:34:130:34:16

You in again? 35.

0:34:160:34:18

Goes then seated at 35... 38 net.

0:34:180:34:20

38, 40. In the room at 40.

0:34:200:34:23

50 in the room. Net, you out? 55.

0:34:230:34:25

At 55. Done then, at 55.

0:34:250:34:28

They sell on the net at 55. They are proper chairs!

0:34:280:34:30

At 55. Is that a 60?

0:34:300:34:32

-It is 60.

-Oh, put the hammer down!

0:34:320:34:34

-In the room at 60.

-No, keep going, please!

0:34:340:34:37

Take a five if you want.

0:34:370:34:38

Nobody else at 60?

0:34:380:34:40

Great start, and not one to be sniffed at.

0:34:420:34:47

-It's terribly brave of me.

-Was it?

0:34:470:34:50

-That's the first bit of Ercol I've bought in my life.

-Was it?

-Oh, yes!

0:34:500:34:52

I'm quite proud of myself, actually.

0:34:520:34:54

Well, if you're proud of yourself, Mark...

0:34:540:34:56

-That's all that matters, isn't it?

-Absolutely!

0:34:560:34:59

Goodness! What are they like, eh?

0:34:590:35:02

Next, Mark Hales's pair of 19th-century barometers.

0:35:020:35:05

But has he gauged the pressure of the saleroom correctly?

0:35:050:35:08

These are the most fashionable and sought-after of all barometers.

0:35:080:35:11

Put them in at, what, 20 quid? 20 I'm bid. Straight down the front.

0:35:110:35:15

Yes, thank you. 20, two. Here at 22.

0:35:150:35:17

25? 25.

0:35:170:35:19

In the room at 25.

0:35:190:35:20

-With you, sir, at 25. At £25.

-That's not good at all.

0:35:200:35:24

-Done and finished, then, at 25.

-Oh!

0:35:240:35:26

Oh, dear. A loss of £21.

0:35:270:35:31

It was almost like a BOGOF, that. Buy one, get one free.

0:35:310:35:34

Good of you to point that out, Mark.

0:35:340:35:37

Now, Mark Hales's print of Happy As A King is up,

0:35:370:35:40

but will it put a smile on the punters' faces?

0:35:400:35:43

£10?

0:35:430:35:45

-Five anywhere?

-It's a pretty picture, isn't it?

-A fiver...

0:35:450:35:49

Oh, dear, someone's looking glum. And it's not even his lot!

0:35:490:35:52

For the Pears' print. Five I am bid, thank you sir. At five only.

0:35:520:35:56

And I sell it then at £5.

0:35:560:35:57

At a fiver, six.

0:35:570:35:59

Do you want seven? Seven.

0:35:590:36:02

Eight, nine, ten. Ten down here.

0:36:020:36:07

It goes at ten, and I sell at ten.

0:36:070:36:09

All done at £10.

0:36:100:36:11

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Another loss.

0:36:130:36:17

You do know the nature of the game is to buy things

0:36:170:36:20

-and then hopefully make a profit, Mark?

-Oh!

0:36:200:36:23

It's not to buy something

0:36:230:36:24

and then sell it for half of what you paid for it.

0:36:240:36:27

Profit, I remember that!

0:36:270:36:28

So, let's see if you can do any better, Mark Stacey.

0:36:280:36:31

Here comes your inlaid cribbage board.

0:36:310:36:33

I am not hopeful for this one, actually.

0:36:330:36:36

But I do like it and I think it looks nice up there.

0:36:360:36:39

And they are popular.

0:36:390:36:41

Ten for it? Straight in at £10.

0:36:410:36:42

Ten I'm bid.

0:36:420:36:44

With the lady at ten, take two now.

0:36:440:36:46

12, 15, 18, 20,

0:36:460:36:49

22, 25, 28,

0:36:490:36:52

30.

0:36:520:36:54

32, 35, 38.

0:36:540:36:58

At 38, I sell in the seats at £38.

0:36:580:37:01

I sell at 38.

0:37:010:37:02

Not so bright now, Mark Stacey. A £7 loss for you too.

0:37:050:37:10

Well, that's one thing on my list now, no more cribbage boards!

0:37:100:37:13

THEY CHUCKLE

0:37:130:37:14

We're going to have a very long list of things not to buy.

0:37:140:37:17

Let's see if Mark Stacey can redeem himself with his bronze tazza.

0:37:170:37:21

Put it in a £30.

0:37:210:37:23

-30 to start.

-Come on!

0:37:230:37:25

30 I'm bid.

0:37:250:37:26

At 30 now, I sell standing at 30, right at the back at 30.

0:37:260:37:29

Take a two anywhere? It goes then at £30.

0:37:290:37:32

In the blue at 30, the maiden bid of 30.

0:37:320:37:35

-Sell, then, at £30.

-Can you believe that?

-Bid if you want it!

0:37:350:37:37

-So it's not just me, then, is it?

-30.

-£30.

-Right at the back, 30.

0:37:370:37:42

Nothing on the net? 32.

0:37:420:37:44

Do you want 35? 35. In the room at 35.

0:37:440:37:47

Every little helps. In the room at 35.

0:37:470:37:49

At 35, I sell with the sporting gent there at 35. Here at 38, 40?

0:37:490:37:53

I'm getting too carried away here!

0:37:530:37:55

-For God's sake, I think that's plenty, don't you?

-I sell at 40.

0:37:550:37:58

It holds its value

0:38:000:38:01

but there's still a loss after the auction house has taken commission.

0:38:010:38:05

I think we both going to have to chalk this down to experience today, Mark.

0:38:050:38:09

We got an awful lot of lots to go yet.

0:38:090:38:11

It's not looking useful, it's not looking good.

0:38:110:38:14

Another lot for Mark Hales now.

0:38:140:38:16

Can he turn this around with his ebony presentation mallet?

0:38:160:38:19

Let's start at £30. £30 for it?

0:38:190:38:22

30 I'm bid. With the lady at 30.

0:38:220:38:24

And I sell at £30.

0:38:240:38:26

35. With the lady now at 35. 38.

0:38:260:38:29

At 38, sell then.

0:38:290:38:31

This is possibly the worst day of my life.

0:38:310:38:33

-You are all out in front.

-Oh, Mark!

0:38:330:38:35

At 38, I sell on the net, then, at 38.

0:38:350:38:38

-You're out in the room at 38.

-Oh!

0:38:380:38:41

It seems the builders Mark hoped might buy the mallet

0:38:410:38:44

have not materialised. Another loss.

0:38:440:38:48

-Poor Mike!

-I have to say, Mark,

0:38:480:38:51

that you're not having a good day, and it's not fair.

0:38:510:38:54

Next, Mark Stacey's cunningly combined

0:38:540:38:57

his two cherub candlesticks into one lot.

0:38:570:38:59

Will it be enough to pull him out of this quagmire?

0:38:590:39:02

£20 the two? Straight in, £20?

0:39:020:39:05

-Come on!

-20? They're worth that, a tenner each.

0:39:050:39:07

-Come on!

-20 quid. 20 I'm bid down here.

0:39:070:39:09

-With the lady at 20, I'll take two.

-Good, I've got my money back.

0:39:090:39:13

Sell, then, at £20. 25. You in again, 28?

0:39:130:39:15

28. At 28.

0:39:150:39:17

-Internet bidding?

-In the room at 28.

0:39:170:39:19

A bit more.

0:39:190:39:21

A modest profit. Rejoice!

0:39:220:39:24

Is this the turnaround?

0:39:240:39:26

I mean, I'm happy with a profit, at last.

0:39:270:39:29

So fingers crossed anyway, I'm on my way uphill.

0:39:290:39:33

We'll see, as his wine funnel goes under the hammer.

0:39:330:39:36

Straight in, 20 quid? Decant your wine. 20 I'm bid.

0:39:360:39:39

-At the back at 20. Take a two now.

-What did it cost?

-55.

0:39:390:39:42

Sell then, 22 on the net. 25 in the room.

0:39:420:39:44

28. 30, £30.

0:39:440:39:47

Back standing at 30.

0:39:470:39:49

It goes, then, at £30. All done at 30.

0:39:490:39:52

No! No turnaround there!

0:39:540:39:56

I think it's...

0:39:570:39:59

-I think we've entered a new phase of the competition, don't you?

-Yes.

0:39:590:40:02

-It's who can lose the most.

-Yes.

0:40:020:40:05

Oh come on, boys, cheer up. It's not that bad.

0:40:050:40:08

Next, Mark Hales and his regimental picture frames.

0:40:080:40:12

£20 for them? 20? Put the appropriate photographs in them.

0:40:120:40:14

-Don't start at 20.

-£20?

0:40:140:40:16

Oh! 22. Net at 22. Do you want 25?

0:40:160:40:19

25. In the room, 25. 28.

0:40:190:40:21

-That's ridiculous.

-At £28 now. Here at £28.

0:40:210:40:24

-Come on.

-On the net at £28.

-It should be £120.

-30 in the room.

-32.

0:40:240:40:29

You in again? 35? 35.

0:40:290:40:31

35, it's in the room. 38.

0:40:310:40:33

40 now.

0:40:330:40:35

38, 40, 45. The net at 45.

0:40:350:40:38

-45, there's two people on the net.

-55.

-It's going on.

0:40:380:40:41

-It should do.

-65.

0:40:410:40:43

-At 70. At 75.

-It's got to go on to next week.

0:40:430:40:48

It goes, then, at 75. No-one else at 75?

0:40:480:40:51

MARK SIGHS

0:40:510:40:52

A £20 profit will have to do.

0:40:520:40:55

-It's such a shame, Mark.

-Well, you can't win them all!

0:40:550:40:59

Surely Mark Stacey's lovely little Arts & Crafts

0:40:590:41:01

pin tray can tease this tough crowd.

0:41:010:41:05

A tenner for it? £10, the dish? 10?

0:41:050:41:08

At ten I am bid now, and I sell, then, at £10.

0:41:090:41:12

It goes at ten. Take two.

0:41:120:41:14

12 behind you. 15 in front. 15.

0:41:140:41:17

18, 20? £20.

0:41:170:41:20

In front at £20. With the gent there at £20. I sell at 20.

0:41:200:41:23

All done at 20?

0:41:230:41:25

Another lot nosedives.

0:41:270:41:29

We can't have it our way every auction, can we?

0:41:310:41:34

It was a tricky day, wasn't it?

0:41:350:41:37

Well, never mind, boys. Here comes the auctioneer's favourite,

0:41:370:41:40

that vase that the dealer just wanted to get rid of.

0:41:400:41:43

-This is seriously cool.

-Fabulous piece.

0:41:430:41:45

This in my opinion is the best bit in the sale.

0:41:450:41:48

Come on, I want everybody bidding.

0:41:480:41:50

It is so cool. 20 quid for it?

0:41:500:41:53

Straight in, £20.

0:41:530:41:54

-22 I've got on the net.

-Oh!

0:41:540:41:56

-On the net at 22.

-Come on!

0:41:560:41:58

25, at 25, down here at 25.

0:41:580:42:01

Is that it? In the room now at 25. Anybody else?

0:42:010:42:04

28? 30. 32.

0:42:040:42:06

Well, blow me!

0:42:060:42:08

-At 32.

-Come on! One more!

0:42:080:42:09

Goes, then, at £32 now. All done? At 32? Nobody else?

0:42:090:42:12

Come on!

0:42:120:42:14

Yes!

0:42:140:42:15

Well, would you believe it?

0:42:150:42:18

I think that was the most marvellous price.

0:42:200:42:24

Sadly, though, no champagne for either of our experts.

0:42:240:42:28

But, at the end of the auction, it's still a close call.

0:42:280:42:32

Mark Stacey started today with £200 but after auction costs

0:42:320:42:35

he made a loss of £45.84,

0:42:350:42:38

leaving him a slimline £154.16 to carry forward to the next leg.

0:42:380:42:44

Mark Hales also started with £200 and after auction fees

0:42:440:42:48

he made a loss of £25.44,

0:42:480:42:51

giving him a healthy £174.56 to play with.

0:42:510:42:55

Well, Mark, not our finest hour, I think.

0:42:570:43:00

No, no, but it could have been worse.

0:43:000:43:02

It could have been a lot worse,

0:43:020:43:04

so, we have got at least some money to carry forward.

0:43:040:43:07

Money? Not as I remember, Mark!

0:43:070:43:10

-So, onto the second leg. Put it down to bitter experience.

-Yes.

0:43:120:43:16

-And I'm not bitter.

-Oh, really?!

0:43:160:43:19

Next time on Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:190:43:21

our pair of Marks hunt high and low for bargains.

0:43:210:43:25

It's easier just to stay down here, frankly.

0:43:250:43:28

And might have one or two lucky saves.

0:43:280:43:31

Oh!

0:43:310:43:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:500:43:54

Mark Stacey and Mark Hales battle it out in the auction rooms and antique shops of eastern England in the race to turn an unbeatable profit.


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