Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


Episode 7

It is the second day and antiques experts James Braxton and Charles Hanson are heading across the Solent to the Isle of Wight in search of bargains. Charles finds a bit of history.


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Transcript


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts.

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With £200 each, a classic car

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and a goal to scour Britain for antiques.

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That hurts.

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My sap is rising.

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The aim, to make the biggest profit at auction, but it's no mean feat.

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There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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Could you do 50 quid on that?

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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Your steering is a bit lamentable.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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This week we're out on the road with a right pair of rascals,

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auctioneers James Braxton and Charles Hanson.

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James Braxton is the grown-up one, well, sort of,

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and keeps young Charles in check.

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-Don't say sorry, just do it.

-Sorry.

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-Don't say sorry.

-Sorry.

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-Don't say sorry!

-OK, OK, OK.

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Once he sniffs out antiques there's no stopping him.

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Oh, smells of antiques.

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This is Charles Hanson. He's having a bit of trouble with his helmet.

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Can't get it on.

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And he's a right scaredy-cat too.

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If you turn the handle...

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-Will it hurt me or not?

-No.

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-Is it a trick? Is it a trick?

-No.

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James is keeping his chin up despite being the current loser.

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£10 all done.

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Oh, dear, that was cheap.

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Charles Hanson, meanwhile, had a splendid first outing

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with a glittering array of profits, especially the antique toolbox.

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At £220 if you're all done. Last time.

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Oh, thanks, Jim.

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From his original £200, James now has £246.80 to flash about.

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And streaking ahead is the young Charles Hanson.

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He managed to add to his £200 kitty with a wondrous £373.10.

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Ho, ho, ho.

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And James's pride and joy, a stylish 1952 MG, will ferry them about.

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He's slightly nervous because Charles is at the wheel.

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And quite rightly.

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And with no hood they're at the mercy of the weather.

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-Now, Charles, are you getting to grips with this?

-Yes.

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-Oh!

-Exactly. Your steering is a bit lamentable.

-Sorry.

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-Concentrate.

-I think There's some grease on the road.

-No, it isn't.

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This week on the Antiques Road Trip

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James and Charles will travel 400 miles from Dulverton, West Somerset

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via the Isle of Wight to the land of golden beaches,

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Truro in Cornwall.

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On today's show they're starting at the Dorset coastal town of Poole

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and heading for auction two in Shanklin on the Isle of Wight.

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First stop is the Dorset coastal town of Poole.

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Would we be lucky here? Would we?

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I don't know, James, in these difficult times.

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What's on the water then?

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Oh, that's a kite. Kite surfing.

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Oh, yes, it is, look.

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Poole has Europe's largest natural harbour

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and attracts many looking for lashings and lashings of adventure.

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Instead of blazing sunshine our intrepid antiques hunters are faced with lashing rain.

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Just ignore the parking lines, Charles, eh?

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This is young Charles's first stop where he hopes to splash the cash.

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-Hello, sir.

-Hiya.

-Good morning.

-All right.

-How's life?

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-Very well, nice to see you.

-What a wonderful shop. Charles Hanson.

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-Brian, Ethan.

-Good to see you as well. What a fantastic shop.

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Charles has a meticulous eye for the unusual.

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Oh, wow!

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This drinks decanter was made to stop the servants

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from having a quick snifter.

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It's unusual because it's also a games compendium.

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The evergreen, the fairly boring, but the fairly attractive

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oak and brass mounted three-glass Tantalus.

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495 is a bit steep even for "have-a-go Hanson".

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The name Tantalus comes from a Greek mythological figure who was tantalised by objects

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that he could never reach.

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We've also got inside a chess set, the draughts,

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the cribbage board, the pack of cards, the die,

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and everything else.

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The really important matter is to check the condition of the decanters, Brian.

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-Are they OK?

-They're OK.

-These are OK, nice Tantalus.

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Oops, goodness me. No, it's OK.

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-There's a few chips. There's a chip there.

-Is there a chip?

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Brian, there's a chip there, mate.

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-There's a chip there.

-Let me have a look.

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They could be cheaper. They could be cheaper.

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Do you know, I never knew that.

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-So...

-I feel guilty now.

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There's a few nibbles, Brian, there's a few nibbles.

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-There's a few bites on that one!

-There's a few bites.

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-My word!

-Might put the price down a bit.

-I'll drop it to 150 then. I'll lose money on it.

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Well, Brian, that's good of you. It's just the chips.

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We've dropped another tenner, to 140.

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Would you take 120?

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I'll take 130, I'll meet you halfway.

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-130...

-Is that OK with you, Ethan? Is that all right?

-Yeah.

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-130.

-130.

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I'm going... It's almost a third of my budget.

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But, at 130, Brian, I'm going, going...going...going...

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gone.

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Thanks very much, Ethan.

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I'm delighted with that. Thanks ever so much, guys.

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It certainly pays to be thorough, Charles. Excellent work.

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Meanwhile, James has tootled forth, nine miles away,

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to the village of Lytchett Minster.

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Ooh.

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Running.

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Button Shop Antiques is the first on his list

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and, by Jove, he's certainly keen.

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Hello.

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Hello.

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Hello!

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Hello, I'm James.

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Hello, James, I'm Thelma.

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-Hello, Thelma, how are you?

-Nice to meet you.

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-Hello, young man.

-This is Matthew.

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Ooh, there's a lot of little helpers here in Dorset.

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-Everybody needs a right-hand man.

-They do.

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This is rather nice, isn't it?

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Poole Pottery.

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I love the glaze of them.

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-It's like an eggshell.

-It is.

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-It's satiny, it's lovely.

-Very tactile.

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If you were a blind person, that would be a treat.

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It's a sort of beaker, I'd imagine, isn't it?

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Yes, it is, really, yes.

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And the plate, also, is Poole Pottery.

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Poole Pottery, that's lovely.

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The price on the beaker is £6 and the plate is £12.

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And here's a pottery tray, also £12.

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Now, this... What is this?

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This is Devon Ware.

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Devon Ware.

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"A place for everything and everything in its place."

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It's not very well done, but I think...

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-Is there a Branscombe?

-Yeah, it's Branscombe.

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-It's Branscombe.

-It's Branscombe, yes.

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Definitely not Torquay.

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It's a lovely...sort of generically known as Devon Ware, motto ware.

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"A place for everything and everything in its place."

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Yeah, it's lovely.

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And, hold on, something's winking at me.

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Look at that.

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I like it, I like that stiff leaf pattern.

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When buying antiques, it pays to have a few tricks up your sleeve.

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It's so beautiful.

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-It is cracked.

-Oh, I see what you mean.

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Dead as a dodo, isn't it?

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-Terrible shame!

-I know.

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One little crack makes the whole of it sound dead.

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It does, doesn't it? That's what happens when anything's cracked.

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Um, Thelma, is this very cheap?

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Yeah, it is about £20, I would think.

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Has somebody tried to restore it?

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Well, it might be, because the jug that goes with it

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has had some horrible gold bits put on the top of it.

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-Somebody's had a go...

-Somebody's had a...

-They have.

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-There's a little amateur restorer out there, isn't there?

-Yeah.

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I'm just going to do a little test if you don't mind.

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It looks very vicious, but I promise it's not very vicious

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because I'm going to do it very lightly.

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The coin test is pretty nifty

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because it highlights any lumps and bumps of repair work.

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Now, I'm not doing it on the paint, just on the glaze.

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-Yes, I know.

-And it's not sticking at all.

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-So it hasn't been restored.

-I don't think it has.

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No, it's just that crack there.

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What do you have on the jug, Thelma?

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-£10.

-£10.

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I like the Motto Ware as well.

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Yes, it's nice, isn't it?

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And I like these two.

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It seems to be a shop of companion pieces, doesn't it?

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It does, doesn't it?

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Everything comes in two. I like those two.

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-They all came in separately.

-Could you do the whole lot for 40?

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Yes, all right.

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It's being a bit mean on that one... Well, say 45, then.

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But quite realistic on the others.

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Say 45.

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I shouldn't have opened my big mouth!

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You said it!

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Well, you know, I've got to eat.

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Can you do 40?

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I'll tell you what, shall we break the difference?

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-OK.

-Do you want to do, what, 42?

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-42.

-42. I'm very happy with that, Thelma.

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-Lovely, thank you.

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-Thank you, Matthew.

-Thank you.

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To clarify, James paid £30 for the Royal Worcester jug and bowl,

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£7 for the Branscombe Ware pottery tray,

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and a fiver for the Poole Pottery Coronation plate and beaker.

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The big wheels are moving once more.

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The chaps are together again and it's dry.

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The boys are heading to Christchurch,

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the most easterly coastal town in Dorset.

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So how's Charles getting on with the driving?

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I would go down again, double de-clutch.

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-Nice flip.

-Sorry!

-No, too far.

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You went from fourth to second. You should have gone into third.

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Christchurch is an ancient market town

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based between the rivers Avon and Stour.

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It boasts an 11th-century priory

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that attracts pilgrims from all over the world.

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Charles is taking some time out from shopping.

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He's off to visit one of the most intriguing museums in the country.

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This is it, Jim.

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Looks good, doesn't it?

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The Museum of Leccy.

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-I'll see you later.

-Good luck.

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Bzzzzzzz!

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-See you later, OK? Have a good shop.

-Yeah, bye.

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Housed within an old power station,

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the museum provides a potted history of the world of electricity.

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Bright spark Charles is meeting with Ian Peterson to find out more.

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OK, so where are we going, Ian?

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If you'd like to come through to the demonstration room.

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OK.

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-Now...

-Who's this great man here standing before us?

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Indeed a great man. This is Michael Faraday,

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who is the father of electricity. He discovered more things about electricity than anybody else.

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And what was really marvellous about Michael Faraday is he believed in sharing it.

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Basically, he gave everybody the components they need for future invention and discovery.

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Yes.

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The power station was originally built in 1903

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to supply the trams that ran directly from Poole to Christchurch.

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The museum's pride and joy is the electric number 85 tram.

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She was built in 1914

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and is the last complete surviving Bournemouth tram in existence.

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This tram's reasonably unique,

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because in this part of the world, one of the main industries was holidaymaking.

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So you could afford to have nice, luxuriant seating inside.

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Yes.

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It's the beginning of affordable commuting.

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You could live in Christchurch and easily work in one of the hotels in Bournemouth, for example.

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So trams like this were quite revolutionary.

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DING

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We've got some light bulbs on in here

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and that was how it was back in the day.

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You had lighting, as with these bulbs, back in 1905, 1910.

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-Yeah.

-Amazing.

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Fine. I can see over here it says, on the number 85,

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"Please do not spit in the car."

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-Yes, well, it's an unhealthy thing, isn't it?

-I think so!

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I should jolly well think so, Charles!

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Not only did electricity have a huge impact on the commuter,

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it also revolutionised the 20th-century household.

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Domestic appliances were rare in postwar Britain.

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The freezer was almost unknown

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and in 1957 only 15% of the population owned a fridge.

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Ian and Charles step back in time.

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-Obviously, electricity has changed people's lives.

-Yes.

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Electricity has made life easier.

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Things like washing machines have had such a fundamental social effect.

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And this is what people actually forget about electricity, because everybody's used to having a fridge.

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Everybody's used to having a washing machine.

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At one time people used to talk about washing day and it was complicated and everything else.

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But it's also given us all sorts of things which would have been luxuries, which we take for granted.

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This is a Morphy Richards toaster here.

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What, 1980s?

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-No, it's 1950s.

-Oh, I'm sorry!

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That is a design classic.

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That is still being emulated today. I can't say copied,

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but it certainly inspires a lot of the modern toasters.

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But the one I really like, which I think you'll like as well,

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this is an American toaster. It was made in about 1935.

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You put it in the centre of the table

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and you put a slice of bread in each...

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-Yes.

-And then you just closed it up,

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and when you wanted to do the other side, you carefully did that.

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Isn't that wonderful?

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-And it's just brilliant, isn't it?

-Isn't it?

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Yeah, wonderful.

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This is our representation

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of a 1950s, early '60s kitchen.

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You've got all sorts of mod cons that we take for granted.

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We've got a beautiful cooker, a washing machine,

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we've got a fridge.

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A lot of these things you'd have to be earning a fair bit of money

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for something like this.

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All these items, all these things that we rely on today,

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they became possible because of electricity.

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And they really did change people's lives.

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So, without electricity, we would certainly have a very different world.

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Time to say cheerio to Charles

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and find out what live-wire James is up to.

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He's on his way to sunny Lymington, in Hampshire.

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The good weather is definitely raising his spirits.

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And for the first time the sun has come out!

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I'm feeling rather jolly about this.

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This is glorious.

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Lymington, here we come!

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Oh, dear, he spoke too soon.

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The clouds are back.

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But once again he's as keen as mustard.

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He's very sprightly today, isn't he? Running everywhere.

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-Hello. James.

-Hello. Frank.

-Hello. Nice to meet you.

-And you.

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-May I have a good look round?

-Certainly.

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Frankly Frank is the owner of Browse, in Lymington.

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And already something has caught James's eye.

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I like this. It looks like a tea caddy, doesn't it?

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It's a biscuit tin.

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I think it's rather fun.

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Huntley & Palmers were very famous for these

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and they produced a range for Christmas and other occasions,

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where they would produce this rather fun range of novelty biscuit tins.

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There would have been custard creams in there, Hobnobs and whatever.

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But they were packaged in different boxes

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and people started collecting them.

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William Crawford & Sons Ltd was founded in Leith in 1813

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as the local bakery.

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And like many biscuit manufacturers,

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they produced an array of novelty tins

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which can be rather popular at auction.

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It's this novel packaging that induced people to buy their wares

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and retain them as loyal customers.

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Crumbs! There's no stopping this cream cracker.

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This little fellow, Frank, I can't see a price tag on it.

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-Can that be a cheap fella?

-It can be a cheap fella.

-Ah-ha.

-Erm...

-Tenner?

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-Tenner... Say 15.

-15?

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You've got yourself a deal, Frank. Thanks a lot.

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There's another quickie deal for James.

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Now, James, this is it. This is glorious, isn't it?

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-The Isle of Wight.

-Amongst the yachters.

-We're like pirates!

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THEY LAUGH

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-Pirates are like this!

-Yeah, exactly.

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Let's go and make our fortune, mate.

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It's been a packed day for the boys and, as a finale, they've got

0:17:400:17:44

a trip across the water to the Isle Of Wight.

0:17:440:17:47

Nighty-night.

0:17:490:17:51

The chaps are up and at it,

0:17:570:17:58

rejuvenated after a good night's rest.

0:17:580:18:01

So far, James has been a very busy boy. He spent £57

0:18:050:18:09

on four auction lots - the Poole pottery coronation plate and beaker,

0:18:090:18:13

the Royal Worcester jug and bowl, the Branscombe ware pottery tray

0:18:130:18:17

and the novelty biscuit tin,

0:18:170:18:19

leaving £189.80 for the day ahead.

0:18:190:18:24

Meanwhile, Hawk-Eye Carlos managed to get an excellent deal

0:18:260:18:31

on the chipped tantalus. He spent a total of £130 on one lot.

0:18:310:18:35

He has £243.10 to splash around town.

0:18:350:18:40

The boys are heading along the coast of the Isle of Wight.

0:18:430:18:47

First stop is the village of Chale.

0:18:470:18:50

James and Charles have adventured over the Solent to the largest

0:18:520:18:57

island in England.

0:18:570:18:59

From east to west, the Isle of Wight measures just over 20 miles.

0:18:590:19:04

The village of Chale is situated on the south coast of the island

0:19:040:19:07

and is in the area known as "the back of the Wight".

0:19:070:19:11

Don't you know?

0:19:110:19:13

The fellows are sharing their first stop of the day - Chale Antiques -

0:19:130:19:17

and with three barns crammed full,

0:19:170:19:21

they should hopefully find something to tickle their fancy.

0:19:210:19:25

With four lots in the bag,

0:19:250:19:27

James is wasting no time getting the lie of the land.

0:19:270:19:30

Let's have a look. Look at this.

0:19:300:19:32

We've got a vice.

0:19:320:19:34

We've got two metal... two metal winders here

0:19:340:19:39

and two huge mahogany...

0:19:390:19:44

mahogany cheeks here,

0:19:440:19:47

which are bound here, but on a very sturdy table.

0:19:470:19:51

That is the objet trouve - the found object.

0:19:510:19:56

An object of practical use that has aesthetic beauty.

0:19:560:20:00

And that is why... That's lovely.

0:20:000:20:03

Heavy old fellow. You could...

0:20:030:20:05

They... You could move that around.

0:20:050:20:08

Maybe, you know, we're near the coast,

0:20:080:20:10

maybe something to do with the ship.

0:20:100:20:13

Rather nice.

0:20:130:20:14

Meanwhile, I'm going to find out a little more about that fellow.

0:20:140:20:19

Do you have names for these barns?

0:20:190:20:21

He's tracked down the owner Michael, who thinks he knows what it is.

0:20:210:20:25

-Out of there. Out of there!

-What's up? What's up, mate? Excuse me.

0:20:250:20:30

-Out of there.

-It's first come first served!

-Out of there.

-Michael...

0:20:300:20:33

-Out of there.

-Can I go in this barn, Michael? Ow!

0:20:330:20:38

Oh, steady! He's serious about defending his patch, you know!

0:20:380:20:42

This is a 19th-century bookbinder's vice.

0:20:420:20:46

-Bookbinder? I thought it had a purpose.

-Volume in there.

0:20:460:20:50

It's a very unusual thing, but now it's very sculptural

0:20:500:20:53

and decorative and could be used in all sorts of places.

0:20:530:20:57

-Restaurants, glass top...

-It's a sort of found object, isn't it?

0:20:570:21:02

-You won't get another one.

-No. And how much is that?

0:21:020:21:05

Oh, it's got to make around about 150, which is...

0:21:070:21:11

-Bookbinder's vice.

-And if you had to have it made...

0:21:130:21:17

-..I think that will be worth...

-It's great fun, isn't it?

-Very unusual.

0:21:180:21:24

-Michael, could you do 100 on that?

-HE GASPS

0:21:240:21:28

-I could do a little bit off that but not a great deal.

-A little off 100?

0:21:280:21:32

Off the 150. I would take...

0:21:320:21:35

..squeezed, 120. I think that's a good buy.

0:21:370:21:41

Michael, you have a deal.

0:21:410:21:44

Crikey, James. No flies on you! That's his fifth buy of the day.

0:21:440:21:49

No wonder he's looking so pleased with himself.

0:21:490:21:52

James, wait for me!

0:21:530:21:55

But no luck for young Charles, and if he doesn't hurry up,

0:21:550:21:58

-he'll miss his lift.

-Wait! James!

0:21:580:22:00

Next stop for our excitable road trippers

0:22:080:22:10

is the fair town of Shanklin.

0:22:100:22:12

-And the sun's so nearly got his hat on!

-So nearly?

-And now...

0:22:140:22:18

-The sun has got his hat on.

-Almost! Hip, hip, hip, hooray!

0:22:180:22:23

-The sun has got his hat on and he's coming out to...

-Play!

0:22:230:22:28

With us! With us!

0:22:280:22:30

Don't give up the day job, chaps!

0:22:300:22:32

Shanklin is a charming seaside town lined with thatched cottages

0:22:340:22:39

and is usually famed for its glorious weather.

0:22:390:22:42

Sadly, the sun doesn't have her hat on today as the boys roar into town.

0:22:420:22:47

But let's hope the prospects are brighter for Charles,

0:22:490:22:51

because so far he has only bought one item.

0:22:510:22:54

Eeks!

0:22:540:22:56

-Hello. Good afternoon. Charles, nice to meet you. Your name is?

-John.

0:22:570:23:02

-Hi, John. And you are?

-Sally.

-Able assistant? Hello, Sally.

0:23:020:23:06

That's the spirit, Charles. Go get 'em!

0:23:060:23:10

I'm not going to hang around, I've got to really pull it out of the bag.

0:23:100:23:14

And it's not long before he spies some old treasure.

0:23:180:23:22

And we're not talking about the owner.

0:23:220:23:24

I love Roman coins and here you've got a wonderful hoard of Roman coins.

0:23:240:23:31

This could be the handsome hoard of Roman coins going to auction.

0:23:310:23:35

If only these coins could talk, you wonder how many hands have patinated

0:23:350:23:40

the coins and given them real pedigree.

0:23:400:23:44

And John, have they come from one hoard or have they come from...

0:23:440:23:48

-They were found on the mainland.

-On the Isle of Wight?

0:23:480:23:51

-No, on the mainland.

-Were they really?

-Yes.

0:23:510:23:53

-These were all found in one place?

-Yes.

-That's wonderful.

0:23:530:23:56

See, I would happily...

0:23:560:23:58

All of these coins were dug out of the ground and this is real treasure.

0:23:580:24:05

And let's say, John, for example, I said, "John..."

0:24:050:24:09

If I was an English pirate and I've come to the Isle of Wight

0:24:090:24:14

with my hoard of Roman coins found on mainland Britain,

0:24:140:24:18

to make my fortune on the Isle of Wight, if I said,

0:24:180:24:21

"John, I'll buy the whole lot..."

0:24:210:24:24

-Right.

-How much would they cost me?

-That lot there?

-Tell me. One price.

0:24:240:24:29

-John, think about it.

-50 quid.

-£50. There we are.

0:24:290:24:32

A handsome hoard of Roman coins for £50.

0:24:320:24:37

I'm very tempted to buy these.

0:24:370:24:39

What do I think? I've done quite well, John.

0:24:390:24:42

I've done quite well, but sometimes...

0:24:420:24:45

If I gave you them for 40 quid you'd double your money.

0:24:450:24:48

Oh, don't say that, John. Don't say that. Don't say that, John!

0:24:480:24:52

Go on then, £30.

0:24:530:24:55

-Come on, £30.

-The Hanson hoard is going, going...

0:24:570:25:01

I told James I wanted treasure and Pirate Hanson has found his loot.

0:25:010:25:06

Sold! You're a good man. £30. Isn't that wonderful?

0:25:060:25:10

£30 for a hoard of Roman coins.

0:25:100:25:12

Ah-har, me hearties!

0:25:120:25:15

Finally, more booty for Pirate Hanson.

0:25:150:25:18

Meanwhile, James is also in Shanklin.

0:25:210:25:23

He's visiting the home of an extraordinary artist.

0:25:230:25:27

-Hello.

-Hello.

-James.

-Elizabeth Meek. You're very welcome.

0:25:360:25:40

Nice to meet you. Thank you.

0:25:400:25:41

Elizabeth Meek is one of today's greatest miniaturists

0:25:410:25:46

and portrait painters.

0:25:460:25:48

For the past 20 years,

0:25:480:25:49

Elizabeth has created jewel-like miniature portraits

0:25:490:25:53

from all walks of life, including royalty.

0:25:530:25:57

-These are a few samples of my work.

-They're lovely, aren't they?

0:25:570:26:02

-Is the demand for miniatures growing?

-Absolutely huge demand.

0:26:060:26:11

I've got a waiting list that's going to take me till the end of next year.

0:26:110:26:14

I think this is because you are a rather special miniature artist,

0:26:140:26:18

-aren't you?

-Well, thank you.

0:26:180:26:20

And what's your current title?

0:26:200:26:23

-My current title is President of the Royal Miniature Society.

-I see.

0:26:230:26:26

And Elizabeth's commissions can cost up to £2,000.

0:26:260:26:31

Portrait miniatures were at the height of their popularity

0:26:310:26:36

in the late 16th century in the court of Elizabeth I.

0:26:360:26:39

The pre-eminent miniaturist then was Nicholas Hilliard.

0:26:390:26:43

Hilliard was the greatest English miniature painter

0:26:480:26:52

and he wrote this extensive book, which was to teach artists

0:26:520:26:58

how to paint portrait miniatures, and he gave lots of little tips,

0:26:580:27:02

some of which are applicable today.

0:27:020:27:04

He suggested that artists wore silk clothes so that the dust

0:27:040:27:07

didn't go on to the miniatures, that they must be

0:27:070:27:10

very careful not to let dandruff and hairs fall onto the miniature

0:27:100:27:14

and also never to speak over the miniature

0:27:140:27:18

because of spittle going onto the painting.

0:27:180:27:21

As a precursor to photography,

0:27:210:27:24

miniatures would even be valuable for proposals of marriage

0:27:240:27:28

and this was precisely the method used

0:27:280:27:31

when Henry VIII married Anne of Cleves,

0:27:310:27:34

which turned out very nicely(!)

0:27:340:27:36

Miniatures now encompass everything from landscapes to still life,

0:27:360:27:42

to portraits, in every medium.

0:27:420:27:45

It's not just portrays nowadays. And people just love them, collectors.

0:27:450:27:50

Alas, the clock is ticking,

0:27:510:27:54

so we must reluctantly leave the world of miniatures.

0:27:540:27:58

Charles, meanwhile, has travelled eight males north to Ryde,

0:27:580:28:03

the largest town on the island.

0:28:030:28:05

The sun's shining, we're happy.

0:28:050:28:07

-Hello, sir.

-Hello, my friend, how you doing?

-How's life?

0:28:070:28:10

Island Antiques is the last shop of the day.

0:28:100:28:13

Charles has only got two items, but is he worried? Nah!

0:28:130:28:17

This is quite nice. This is a very novel

0:28:200:28:23

little oak stationary desk-stand. Probably pewter.

0:28:230:28:27

Over the years it has tarnished, but look at that really stylish design,

0:28:270:28:32

very much evocative of the Arts and Crafts...

0:28:320:28:35

And that's quite stylish. It's 1910 and it could be yours for £30.

0:28:380:28:42

That's quite nice.

0:28:420:28:44

Think, Hanson, you've got to get thinking now,

0:28:510:28:54

what's going to take your fancy?

0:28:540:28:56

Got a whole array of plate and silver and jewellery.

0:29:000:29:04

And the best price, Anthony, on this little...

0:29:040:29:07

-..envelope stand?

-20 quid.

-20 quid.

0:29:090:29:12

Sometimes on your road trip, you need a stocking filler.

0:29:160:29:20

That one item which is a stocking filler. Merry Christmas.

0:29:200:29:25

-I'll take it, OK? £20. I'm going to take it.

-Christmas? Moving on...

0:29:250:29:30

Right, time to find out what they think of each other's wares.

0:29:300:29:35

JAMES LAUGHS NERVOUSLY

0:29:350:29:37

Um, first of all, James, I like the tea caddy,

0:29:370:29:41

which of course isn't, is it? It's a little biscuit barrel. I love that.

0:29:410:29:45

It's so evocative, what, 1910, 1915? Edwardian biscuit tin.

0:29:450:29:50

-I bet it was worth a nibble at what, £30?

-15.

-You're joking. £15?

0:29:500:29:54

Oh, hell. OK, I'm in trouble.

0:29:540:29:57

My least favourite is the Worcester, of course,

0:29:570:30:00

because it's a bit outdated.

0:30:000:30:02

-I can see condition problems.

-Don't touch it!

-Sorry!

0:30:020:30:04

But I have to, because I need to learn the condition of it

0:30:040:30:07

and give you an honest opinion.

0:30:070:30:09

-I bet you paid £40.

-30.

-Oh, no. OK.

0:30:090:30:12

-Right side!

-And of course, you know,

0:30:120:30:14

we're on the Isle of Wight, you've got to remember Queen and country.

0:30:140:30:17

-Made at Poole?

-Yep.

-Love it. OK.

-Just over...there.

-Yeah, OK, love it.

0:30:170:30:23

It's dated as well. I'm sorry, I've got to handle, James.

0:30:230:30:26

-They're expensive, I must handle.

-No, don't.

0:30:260:30:28

I love them. I bet you paid, for those two bits together...

0:30:280:30:32

£25.

0:30:320:30:34

-Five.

-You're joking. What are you doing to me? Where did you get these?

0:30:340:30:38

I love that. "A place for everything and everything in its place."

0:30:380:30:42

I like it. I bet it cost you £25.

0:30:420:30:44

-Seven.

-Oh, you're joking, seven pounds?

0:30:440:30:47

But I did spend some money on this fellow.

0:30:470:30:49

I did spend some money on this fellow. Look.

0:30:490:30:52

It looks to me to be fairly crippling.

0:30:520:30:56

Maybe on your expense, hopefully.

0:30:560:30:58

It could be something you put your clothes in.

0:30:580:31:00

-It's a book press.

-OK.

-It's an artisan, artisan tool.

0:31:000:31:04

-So you turn there and there?

-Yes.

0:31:040:31:06

You put your book in there. It's for working on the spine.

0:31:060:31:09

I like it. Has it come out of a barn or something?

0:31:090:31:12

-Yes, it has. In Chale.

-Oh!

0:31:120:31:16

James, that could be your nemesis!

0:31:160:31:18

I suspect, James, if I bought that,

0:31:180:31:20

I would probably want to pay about £35.

0:31:200:31:24

-Really?

-You paid less than that? I'll bet £10. You paid £10 for it?

0:31:240:31:29

-Oh, I can't believe it!

-120.

-Pence?

0:31:290:31:33

-Pounds.

-You didn't. Oh, no, you didn't! Give me a press. Good man.

0:31:330:31:38

-Go on, let's see yours.

-OK. I literally found treasure.

0:31:380:31:43

Treasure!

0:31:430:31:45

-Look, James.

-No, not the games compendium.

0:31:450:31:48

Look at the games compendium. Look!

0:31:480:31:50

-James, look at that.

-That is lovely. I reckon you paid...

0:31:500:31:56

-£120 for it.

-Yeah, I paid 130.

0:31:560:31:59

-130. OK.

-Spot on.

-Your next purchase?

0:31:590:32:02

Roman bronze denominations of coinage going back to the third,

0:32:020:32:07

fourth century AD. We're talking 500 years

0:32:070:32:11

-before William the Conqueror.

-How much?

0:32:110:32:13

-Guess.

-£35.

-Oh, doesn't it show? You're spot on! They were £30.

0:32:130:32:19

-Third and final? I like that. I like that.

-Do you really?

-I do like that.

0:32:190:32:22

-I'm going to say £28.

-It cost me 20. And that's it.

-Well done.

0:32:220:32:27

Well done, James. I can't wait for the auction, OK?

0:32:270:32:31

But what do they really think?

0:32:310:32:34

I firmly believe James is a dapper guy from the south

0:32:340:32:38

who has a certain swagger.

0:32:380:32:40

And, at the moment, my mate, he's just buying a bit of tat.

0:32:400:32:45

He is massively in the lead. He has got clear water between us. £100.

0:32:450:32:50

But I think I've got him on this one.

0:32:500:32:53

It's been an exciting second leg travelling from Poole

0:32:530:32:56

via Lytchett Minster, Christchurch, Lymington

0:32:560:33:00

and then a voyage to the Isle of Wight,

0:33:000:33:03

where we popped into Chale, Shanklin and Ryde.

0:33:030:33:06

And the boys love the Isle of Wight so much,

0:33:060:33:09

today's auction will take place in Shanklin.

0:33:090:33:12

This is their second road trip auction.

0:33:130:33:16

-James, this is it.

-Into the auction. Yes, stop. That would be good.

0:33:160:33:21

-Where dreams are made. The Hanson hoard comes good.

-Let's see.

0:33:210:33:26

Squeeze a small profit. OK?

0:33:260:33:29

-After you.

-Great.

-"Children not permitted."

0:33:290:33:32

Island Auction Rooms has been established since 1850

0:33:320:33:37

and holds two auctions per month.

0:33:370:33:38

Today, we have two auctioneers in charge of proceedings -

0:33:380:33:42

Tim Smith and Warren Riches.

0:33:420:33:45

Warren has a few thoughts on today's items.

0:33:450:33:48

The quirkiest lot is the bookbinder,

0:33:480:33:50

which is a lumpy piece but I think someone might fall in love with it,

0:33:500:33:55

and the Roman coins, they're a kind of speculative lot

0:33:550:33:58

which should do well on the internet.

0:33:580:34:01

My favourite's the three bottle tantalus and games compendium.

0:34:010:34:04

It's just a nice piece of quality and it's quite a handsome piece.

0:34:040:34:08

Let's hope it's rags to riches.

0:34:080:34:11

James Braxton started today's show with £246.80

0:34:110:34:15

and spent £177 on five lots.

0:34:150:34:18

Charles Hanson began with £373.10

0:34:220:34:26

and spent £180 on just three auction lots.

0:34:260:34:30

Quiet, please! The auction is about to begin.

0:34:310:34:35

The room is absolutely heaving.

0:34:350:34:37

And not only that, the auctioneers have the internet bids

0:34:370:34:41

in front of them.

0:34:410:34:42

First up, it's Charles's magnificent but nibbled tantalus

0:34:440:34:47

and games compendium.

0:34:470:34:49

-Here we are.

-Tantalus. Nice hobnail cut-glass decanters.

0:34:490:34:53

-Showing here, sir!

-Chest pieces.

-Good man. There we are.

-There it is.

0:34:530:34:58

-Showing there.

-Good man.

-Someone start me at £100.

0:34:580:35:03

-Anywhere? 100 in the middle.

-Yes!

0:35:030:35:05

We've got 100 right in the middle. 110 anywhere?

0:35:050:35:08

110. 120. 130.

0:35:080:35:11

140. 150. 160. 170.

0:35:110:35:15

180. 190. 200.

0:35:150:35:19

210. 200 in the middle. 210 anywhere?

0:35:190:35:22

210, the phone?

0:35:220:35:24

-On the phone?

-210 on the phone. 220.

0:35:240:35:27

-230.

-I can't believe it, Jim.

0:35:270:35:29

240. 250. 260.

0:35:290:35:32

270.

0:35:320:35:33

280? It's 270 on the phone then.

0:35:360:35:39

We're going to sell at 270, all done at 270 on the phone.

0:35:390:35:44

-Yes!

-Well done.

-Thank you. He's over there. Good man.

-That's very good.

0:35:440:35:49

-I can't believe it. I can't believe it.

-140?!

-I'm cooking gas, Jim.

0:35:490:35:54

I'm cooking gas.

0:35:540:35:55

You certainly are, Carlos.

0:35:550:35:57

And you're off the starting block and you made a whopping profit.

0:35:570:36:01

God, it's always a roller coaster at auctions,

0:36:010:36:05

no matter how you get on, you always get nervous and you get butterflies.

0:36:050:36:09

So, next up on the road trip roller coaster

0:36:090:36:12

is James's Branscombe pottery tray.

0:36:120:36:15

Someone start me. £30. 30 anywhere?

0:36:150:36:18

20, if you like? 20 is on my right.

0:36:180:36:21

-Brilliant.

-Two anywhere?

0:36:210:36:23

22. 24.

0:36:230:36:25

-24. 26. 28.

-That is brilliant.

0:36:250:36:28

-26 here. 28 anywhere?

-Keep going.

-£26 right in the centre.

0:36:280:36:33

Eight, can I say? 26 then, we're selling in the room at 26.

0:36:330:36:38

-Well played, buddy. Good profit.

-That's good. 19.

0:36:380:36:42

You more than trebled. That is a result.

0:36:420:36:45

Keep it going, Jim.

0:36:450:36:48

Not such an exciting result for James, but it's still a profit.

0:36:480:36:52

And now for Charles's treasure. The hoard of Roman coins.

0:36:520:36:58

-Discovered in the south of England...

-Quite right.

0:36:580:37:02

-We've got quite a lot of interest. Coming in at 55.

-Great.

0:37:020:37:08

65. That takes him straight out. 70, he's back in. And five?

0:37:080:37:12

75? 75 on the net. 80?

0:37:120:37:15

£75 then. We're on the internet at 75.

0:37:150:37:18

-I am delighted, Jim.

-We're going to sell at 75 to the internet.

0:37:180:37:22

-Well done, well done. That's great.

-I'm delighted, Jim. I am.

0:37:220:37:25

-Doubling your money.

-I can't grumble. I'm delighted, buddy.

0:37:250:37:28

I think you'll get a job at JP Morgan.

0:37:280:37:30

You're a great generator of wealth. Just what you need.

0:37:300:37:33

Well done. Charles is chuffed to bits.

0:37:330:37:36

He's unearthed yet another profit.

0:37:360:37:38

It's James's novelty biscuit tin next.

0:37:400:37:43

Can it give him a much-needed lift?

0:37:430:37:46

Nice lot. Someone start me. £30.

0:37:460:37:49

20, then.

0:37:510:37:52

-20. Yeah.

-20, I am bid. Two anywhere?

0:37:520:37:55

At £20 at the back of the room. At 20.

0:37:550:37:58

-22. 24. 26. 30.

-Here we go, James.

0:37:580:38:02

32. 34. 36.

0:38:020:38:04

No money at all? At £34 on my right. £36 anywhere?

0:38:040:38:08

-Yeah, go on.

-£34 then, all finished at 34?

-Oh.

0:38:080:38:12

-34. That's all right. That's double.

-That's still £19 profit.

-Steady work.

0:38:130:38:19

-Jim, happy?

-Sort of!

0:38:210:38:23

At least it's a profit, James.

0:38:240:38:26

Steady work, but you need a biggie to overtake Charles.

0:38:260:38:30

This Royal Worcester jug and bowl may be damaged,

0:38:320:38:34

but can it catapult James into the lead?

0:38:340:38:37

Someone start me. £50 and away.

0:38:370:38:39

£30, then.

0:38:410:38:43

32 on the net. 34 in the room? 32 on the net. 34 anywhere?

0:38:430:38:49

The net has it at 32. It goes to the net at 32.

0:38:490:38:54

Oh, yippy-do(!)

0:38:540:38:56

-Jim, it's a profit.

-It's just not happening.

0:38:560:38:59

It's just not working for me. Not working.

0:38:590:39:02

I don't know what's gone wrong. The wheels are coming off, chief.

0:39:020:39:05

Be a good sport, James. It could be worse.

0:39:050:39:09

It's Charles's Art Deco letter stand now.

0:39:110:39:14

Will it put him even further in the lead?

0:39:140:39:16

30 anywhere? 20, if you like then.

0:39:170:39:21

20 bid. Two, can I say? I've got 20.

0:39:210:39:24

22 in the middle. 24. 26. 28.

0:39:240:39:28

And 30. And two.

0:39:280:39:30

30 in the middle. Two anywhere? I've got £30. Right in the middle.

0:39:300:39:34

Going to sell at 32 in time. 34.

0:39:340:39:36

36, will you say?

0:39:360:39:39

34 right in the middle, we're going to sell at £34.

0:39:390:39:43

Delighted.

0:39:430:39:44

-I'm happy, Jim.

-34. That's good.

-Thank you.

-Well done.

-I'm delighted.

0:39:440:39:49

Small profit.

0:39:490:39:50

-Small profit.

-Working profit, I always like to say.

0:39:500:39:54

-Jim, every pound is a winner, OK?

-Spoken like a true pro, Charles.

0:39:540:39:59

The pennies look after the pounds. Well done.

0:39:590:40:02

Fingers crossed for James.

0:40:030:40:05

He's hoping for a right royal profit with his Poole pottery plate

0:40:050:40:08

and beaker.

0:40:080:40:09

Someone start me, £30 and away.

0:40:090:40:11

20 then? £20 I'm bid. 20.

0:40:130:40:16

Two anywhere? £20 on my left at 20. 22. 24.

0:40:160:40:20

26. 26. 28. They're cheap

0:40:200:40:23

at £26, below me at £26.

0:40:230:40:25

28 anywhere? 28.

0:40:250:40:27

-Well done.

-30. 32. 34.

0:40:270:40:30

Go on, keep going.

0:40:300:40:32

All finished, 32 then.

0:40:320:40:34

I sell in the middle of the room at £32.

0:40:340:40:37

-Brilliant.

-Well done. You got a good buy there.

-Fantastic.

-Steady work.

0:40:370:40:42

Yeah, you're grinding it out. You're grinding.

0:40:420:40:44

At last! James is full of smiles. That is his biggest profit yet.

0:40:440:40:49

So now it is James's last stab at the lead.

0:40:520:40:54

Will that big lump of a bookbinder's vice be the winning ticket?

0:40:540:40:59

-Nice lot, this one. Someone start me at £100.

-Commission's at 100.

0:40:590:41:03

-£100 I'm bid on commissions.

-Brilliant!

-And 10. 120.

0:41:030:41:07

-120, a good thing. 130. 130. 140.

-I'd never have thought...

0:41:070:41:12

-One more.

-140. 150. 160.

0:41:120:41:16

Away, buddy. Heck.

0:41:160:41:19

160. 170.

0:41:190:41:21

At 160, then. It goes at 160.

0:41:210:41:26

-Jim, I am in admiration, buddy.

-I'm pleased.

0:41:260:41:30

-Well done, that man.

-I would never

0:41:300:41:33

in my wildest dreams have thought that. I commend you, buddy.

0:41:330:41:37

-Who would have thought that? Well done, James.

-Hanson-Braxton.

0:41:370:41:42

-It was good.

-Let's get back to England.

-Well played.

0:41:420:41:46

"Back to England"? Stupid boy. So, has James done enough to win?

0:41:470:41:53

He started today's show with £246.80

0:41:540:41:58

and, after paying auction costs, made a small profit of £55.88,

0:41:580:42:03

giving him a respectable £302.68 to carry forward.

0:42:030:42:08

Well done.

0:42:080:42:10

But there's no stopping Charles.

0:42:130:42:16

He started with a delightful £373.10

0:42:160:42:20

and accumulated a bumper profit of £130.78,

0:42:200:42:24

making him today's clear winner with a whopping £503.88

0:42:240:42:29

going into the next show.

0:42:290:42:31

There's something rather engaging about Charles

0:42:310:42:33

when he's on a winning roll.

0:42:330:42:36

Didn't you have faith in young Hanson?

0:42:360:42:38

I did, but I just didn't think that compendium was going

0:42:380:42:41

-to make so much money.

-I know. I'm delighted. I can't believe it, Jim.

0:42:410:42:44

-But listen, we're going back now...

-I think almost indecent,

0:42:440:42:47

if not vulgar profits!

0:42:470:42:49

-Vulgar!

-Jim, you make your own luck. I got lucky.

-You did get lucky.

0:42:490:42:54

-It was really lucky.

-Second-time win, then, for Charles.

0:42:540:42:58

James is certainly keen to overtake his companion in the profit stakes.

0:42:580:43:03

-Really lucky.

-Really lucky.

0:43:030:43:05

HORN TOOTS

0:43:050:43:08

Next time on the Antiques Road Trip,

0:43:080:43:10

James and Charles head for Dorchester,

0:43:100:43:13

James is flying high...

0:43:130:43:14

David, this is amazing.

0:43:140:43:16

It feels even bigger within the cockpit.

0:43:160:43:19

..and Charles finds a secret location.

0:43:190:43:22

Abracadabra!

0:43:220:43:24

Am I seeing things?

0:43:270:43:29

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:330:43:36

It is the second day and antiques experts James Braxton and Charles Hanson are heading across the Solent to the Isle of Wight in search of bargains. Charles finds a bit of history.


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