Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

Antiques series. Travelling through Norfolk, James Braxton tries his hand at bell ringing in Norwich and Anita Manning travels to Holt to visit a unique arts & crafts stately home.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts, with £200 each,

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a classic car, and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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Going, going... Gone.

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-Yes!

-It's a bit like fishing!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction. But it's no mean feat.

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-There'll be worthy winners and valiant losers.

-What have I done?!

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So, will it be the high road to glory, or the slow road to disaster?

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I had better look out!

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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Yeah!

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On this road trip, it's Scottish grit versus Southern wit,

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as two learned auctioneers battle for supremacy.

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Anita Manning is a cheerful and canny Glaswegian,

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who's hoping to sail away to victory...

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-Well, they say all the nice girls like a sailor!

-Ha-ha!

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While James Braxton's an affable Sussex chappie who might have

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some special skills up his sleeve...

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I think I'm a mind-reader!

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Both our experts started this whole shebang with £200.

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Anita has so far made an unlucky loss

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and starts today with £197.50.

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While James has positively flourished,

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growing his seed cash to a very healthy £297.10.

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Wow!

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Well done. That was a smashing result.

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Very magnanimous, Anita!

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Today, they're driving the Brigitte Bardot of old bangers,

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the tres jolie 1986 Citroen 2CV6 Special.

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A lot going on in this car, isn't there?

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We've got the mirrors, we've got...

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Actually, mirrors come as standard in motors, James!

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The whole epic road trip sees them journey from Stamford

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in Lincolnshire through the leafy lanes of eastern England,

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to the London Borough of Greenwich.

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On today's show, they're touring the noble county of Norfolk.

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Beginning in handsome Holt and heading for their auction in Diss.

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Don't "Diss" that!

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James is confident enough this morning to be giving his rival

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some advice on bargaining.

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Remember, be hard.

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-I'll be hard, right. I'll be hard.

-You're not making friends.

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-I got 5p off a packet of crisps the other day!

-Was it second-hand?

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No, it wasn't. It was first-hand!

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Jamesie, do you realise that you're giving me hints here?

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And good advice?

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Well, that's part of the generous nature of the Southern gentleman!

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Quite so, James!

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We're going to a market town called Holt,

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which is just inland from the coast.

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And it's very pretty, it's sort of 18th-century, Georgian market town.

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-But it's famous for its book shops and antique shops.

-Oh, really?

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So it should be right up our street.

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Indeed it should!

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Most of medieval Holt was destroyed in a great fire in the 1700s.

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But the subsequent rebuilding efforts gave us

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the Georgian streets we enjoy today.

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They're parking and splitting up to begin the day's shopping.

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-Right.

-Perfect!

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HE GROANS

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Oh, careful, old bean!

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-So, James...

-Yeah.

-The winner so far. Give me some advice.

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-You need to buy well, buy cheap, and bye-bye!

-See you later!

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See ya! James is strolling off towards his first buy.

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-You never know what's around the corner.

-I'm going to guess...

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There might be an antiques shop, James! And indeed,

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he's heading for Richard Scott Antiques...

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Great Scott, eh?

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-Is this it?

-Yes!

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..Where he's greeting the eponymous Richard.

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-Hello!

-Hello!

-Hello. James.

-Hello. Richard Scott.

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James has decided to mine Richard for some local knowledge.

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Richard, I'm off to Diss for the auction.

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What sort of thing would you suggest I took to auction?

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You could take them a rather large, tempting set of china.

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Sounds smashing! Lead on, Richard.

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-Who is it made by? Is it, what, a Staffordshire maker?

-Wilkinson.

-Oh, Wilkinson.

-Yes.

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AJ Wilkinson were a Staffordshire pottery manufacturers

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founded in the late 1800s.

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The legendary ceramics designer Clarice Cliff

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worked for Wilkinson and eventually married its proprietor.

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Though this set isn't branded as a Cliff design,

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it dates from the 1930s.

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So there are your main plates here. And these are your serving plates.

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So you've got little plates. Two, four, six.

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So you've got six in all that. Oh, we've got a vegetable tureen.

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Rather fun. Nice octagonal shape. There's the maker. Wilkinson.

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And then this is for your Sunday roast. Two, four, six.

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So we've had a couple of casualties there.

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But they all look in very bright order.

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-So there's about 34, 35 pieces in all.

-Yes.

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So, you know, these used to make £10 or £15.

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-Little ladles for gravy or onion sauce.

-Mmm, scrummy! Careful...

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-Right. Getting hungry.

-Hungry for a bargain, I'll bet.

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There's no ticket price on the dinner service,

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so James will have to make an offer. Stand by.

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What would I like to pay for it? Between 50 and 60.

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You must be mind-reading. I was thinking 80,

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-so we could move down or up.

-Down would be lovely for me.

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-Up would be lovely for you, Richard.

-Quite.

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How near £50 could I get it?

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-I think we could do £50.

-Could you?

-Yes.

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So, James gets the whole dinner service for £50,

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now, that's a bargain.

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Meanwhile, Anita's only a couple of minutes away

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in Shirehall Plain Antiques Centre

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where she's greeted by owner Mandy.

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-Hi, lovely to meet you!

-Nice to see you again.

-Yes.

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This looks absolutely wonderful.

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Multiple dealers operate in this centre,

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and Anita's having a right good rummage through the ample stock.

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She seems particularly taken with dealer Celia's items,

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and before long a handy little thing of Celia's has caught Anita's eye.

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-This wee paperweight here - is this yours?

-Yes.

-Could I see it out?

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It's actually a Victorian paperweight, comprising

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a cast from a child's hand in white porcelain, known as Parian ware,

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and mounted on a small marble plinth. Handy!

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-Common motif in Victorian objects, this gloved hand.

-Mmm.

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A bit sort of strange, a bit sort of scary.

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You have £10 on that.

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I hear James's voice singing in my ears,

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"Anita, you've got to be disciplined and you've got to bargain."

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Give it your best shot, Anita, go on.

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-Can I buy that for £5?

-No.

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LAUGHTER

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-Could you come to six?

-No.

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Well, this is going well(!)

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Am I able - here I'm going again - to buy this for

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-£7?

-No.

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-You're better at this than me.

-You can buy it for eight.

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I'm obviously not very good at that, but I'll do a deal because

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I think it's great, and I don't think it was dear in the first place.

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Even if Anita's attempt at hard bargaining fell on deaf ears,

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she still got a decent deal, and her first buy's, erm...in hand.

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But she's browsing on.

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Soon, she spied a gem of an item in one of the cabinets.

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What I've got here is a little nine-carat Edwardian brooch.

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It's at £22. I want to buy it about 12, 15, maybe,

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but I'm not sure if they'll come down that far.

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-It all depends on the price.

-Quite.

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It's also insert with a ruby or a garnet. She's going to ask Mandy about it.

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Are you able to negotiate, or do we...? Shall we phone a dealer?

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-I can give him a ring. What's on the ticket?

-It's 22 on the ticket.

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-Let's have a quick look.

-Keep him on the phone, Mandy...

-I will indeed.

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..if he's only going to take a couple of quid off it.

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It's for Anita and she's being very sweet.

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And she said she'll talk to you if you don't give her a good price.

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Now there's a threat.

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15, did you say? OK, 15 because it's you.

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Aw! Can I blow a kiss through the telephone?

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-She wants to talk to you for a minute.

-SHE LAUGHS

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-Hang on. His name's Philip.

-Philip, you're a darling.

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You're a darling. Can I blow a kiss through the telephone to you?

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Look lively, Philip - Anita's going to turn on the charm.

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Could you go down to 12 on that?

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I know that you're already coming down substantially.

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I know you're already coming down substantially.

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And tell me to get lost if you feel like it.

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Aw, that's great!

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Aw, Philip, thank you so much. You're a darling.

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Deal done at £12.

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And that's such a good deal, it seems like Anita's quite smitten.

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-What age is he?

-Oh, I don't know.

-Is he married?

-Yes.

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THEY LAUGH

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That's enough of that, now, thank you.

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Mandy. That's good, that's two items and I've only spent £20.

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-Nice to do business with you.

-And she's off!

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Now, James is still back in the other shop with dealer Richard,

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and he's gone barking mad for an unusual item.

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Here's a picture of the dog, so we've got a springer spaniel.

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It's a framed first prize from premier dog show Cruft's,

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dating from 1929, complete with a picture of the winning pooch.

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It has a decorative value, that,

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the way it's been framed is interesting.

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I haven't seen much to do with Cruft's, really.

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It belongs to Richard's son, Luke,

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who's also a dealer with items in the shop.

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-Do you know how much he's got on that?

-I'd have to give him a ring.

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-Do you want to speak to my son?

-Oh, thank you.

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Hello, I'm with your father, my name's James Braxton.

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And I'm just rather intrigued by your rather nice diamond-framed Cruft's first prize.

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What would be your price on that?

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25 would be the best. OK, that's fair.

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Brilliant, OK, I'll pass you back to Father. Thanks a lot, bye.

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£25. It's a bit of a risk, that.

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It's very unusual. I haven't seen the like of it before.

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He's going to think on it.

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And shortly, his eye's caught by another item.

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This is a rather nice millefiori.

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Millefiori is a glasswork technique

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named from the Italian meaning "thousands of flowers."

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This is a brooch with a silver-gilt mount.

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These are just canes of multicoloured glass that are then cut.

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Thank you.

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Inset in a darker piece of glass,

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and then it's mounted with silver-gilt.

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A pretty little item, isn't it?

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-Richard, could that be a better price?

-It's got 20 on it, hasn't it?

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-Could I squeeze you a bit?

-17 help a bit on that?

-17 would help.

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I like that, I really like that.

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It's got colour, it got design, hasn't it?

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I think I'll definitely do 17 on that.

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Deal done on the brooch,

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but James's attention has strayed back to the Cruft's item.

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It's a bizarre thing, but it is fun.

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And we're going to quite a sort of doggy, farming part of the world.

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-I'll give Luke 25 for the Cruft's.

-Right.

-That'd be perfect.

-Good.

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-Thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you.

-Very good day's shopping.

-HE LAUGHS

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Ah, James! You're "best in show," you know!

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Meanwhile, Anita's quite happy with her morning's shopping,

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so she's driving just outside Holt where she's

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spending the afternoon visiting Voewood House...

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This looks interesting, doesn't it?

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..a beautiful country home built in the Arts and Crafts style,

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and meeting its hirsute, top-flight antiquarian book dealer, Simon Finch.

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How lovely's that?

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-Come in! Very nice to meet you.

-It's so nice to meet you.

-Thank you for coming.

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I have been so looking forward to seeing this house.

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As well as housing Simon's enviable and quirky collection

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of art, antiques and furnishings,

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the house is also one of the finest examples of the architecture in its style.

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the Arts and Crafts Movement was a gentle revolution in design

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which took place in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Its proponents championed loving craftsmanship and historic artistry,

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which they felt the Victorian rise of mass production had diminished.

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Simon's taking Anita into the main body of this finely-crafted home,

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which was finished in 1905.

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-Is this the main hall?

-The main hall is by far...

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I mean, some people describe some Arts and Crafts houses as sort of

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country house as cottage.

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I mean, this is by far the biggest space.

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A lot of the rooms are on quite an intimate scale,

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so it actually is a very liveable house.

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It was built for the Reverend Percy Lloyd and his family.

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Their family made a big fortune out of publishing and so forth.

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But tell me about the architect - who was the architect?

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He's called Edwin Schroeder Prior, and I think with this house,

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in Percy Lloyd he found a client who was very tolerant,

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because the budget was meant to be 15, 20,000, and it cost 60.

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Ha! Pricey, eh? The Arts and Crafts ethos demanded that local artisans

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and local materials be used to build it.

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It actually was a pure Arts and Crafts house,

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in the tradition that the house should actually grow from the land

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it was built on, using natural materials, using local materials,

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using local craftsmen, gathering as much material from the actual site.

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But it's an immensely sophisticated and complex building, as well.

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One of the things that struck me, even just walking through,

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was the wonderful quality of light that we have here.

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I know that we've got lots of these wonderful leaded glass windows,

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but there is a shape to the house.

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It's built on a butterfly principle, with the main body and two wings.

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This bit's directly south facing.

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And this allows the natural East Anglian light to flood the open spaces.

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The house was built as a large home,

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but sadly, the wealthy clan who commissioned it never lived here.

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He never lived here, no. His wife is meant to have not liked it.

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Choosy, eh? Instead, the house passed to different tenants.

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It was a boys' boarding school until the outbreak of World War I,

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and later became a sanatorium, and then a care home.

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It was only in 1998 when Simon purchased the property

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that it was finally used as a domestic residence.

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Isn't that nice?

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So, Simon's taking Anita outside to get a view of the whole property.

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That's a very dapper outfit, Simon.

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Ah, isn't that absolutely wonderful?

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Isn't that absolutely wonderful?

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-It's fabulous.

-Is this one of the architect's iconic buildings?

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It's unquestionably his domestic masterpiece.

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Unquestionably. But Anita needs to be on her way.

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She needs to get a bit Artsy and Craftsy herself.

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Meanwhile, James has driven the seven miles

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on to the town of Sheringham.

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The coastal town of Sheringham is known for inspiring great works.

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The composer Ralph Vaughan Williams, poet Stephen Spender and writer Patrick Hamilton

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all lived in the town at one time or another.

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So, it's the perfect place for James to muse on his next buy.

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He's strolling towards Sheringham Collectables,

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where he's making a new friend.

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Welcome.

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DALEK VOICE: Exterminate!

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He's meeting dealer Christian.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-James.

-Christian.

-Nice to meet you, Christian.

-And you.

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Great.

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James is keen to see if Christian might have any new stock he could strike a bargain on.

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I'll give you a fighting chance if I can.

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-That's really kind.

-Working man, and all that.

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I hardly call this tomfoolery work!

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Silverware's been going well at the moment.

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What have you got on the silver front?

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I put an absolutely gorgeous stamp box out this morning.

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-Have you? Let's have a look at that.

-You're keen, James.

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-The shape of a knife box.

-Oh, a sort of novelty thing.

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What an unusual item!

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It's a box for storing loose stamps. It's made of hallmarked silver

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and modelled to resemble an 18th-century knife box.

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Its hallmarks date it to 1904 with a London manufacturer.

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Ticket price is £65 and it's gorgeous.

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Rather fun, isn't it?

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It's got that sloping side so you can pick out those loose stamps.

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So, this was before stamps were... Oh, hello!

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-This is from... Ooh!

-HE GROANS AND CHUCKLES

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-Sorry.

-Old age.

-No, it's just the agility of an athlete like myself.

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Yeah. A - you're not Mo Farah,

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and B - what could Christian do on the price of the stamp box? Give it a good licking?

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40 would buy it today.

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And I'll buy it, Christian. That's really kind.

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Thank you very much indeed.

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Yeah, deal done with extreme haste.

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-Good. Thanks a lot, Christian. There we are.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Hand over the stamp box and I'll be on my way.

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James, you do seem very keen to spirit that away. I wonder why?

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-Good seeing you. Bye!

-Bye-bye.

0:18:240:18:25

And with that enthusiastic buy, James and Anita

0:18:250:18:28

are reunited in the car at the end of a jam-packed day one.

0:18:280:18:34

Night-night, you two.

0:18:340:18:35

But the dewy sunrise finds them back in the 2CV,

0:18:370:18:40

just revelling in the fine spring morn.

0:18:400:18:43

-It's lovely and sunny, but still...

-There's a wee nip in the air.

0:18:450:18:49

The sunnnies are on, but the gloves are still there.

0:18:490:18:51

Yeah - and the woolly whatsits.

0:18:510:18:53

That's enough about your woolly whatsits, Anita.

0:18:530:18:56

But it's quite snug in our little cabin, isn't it?

0:18:560:18:59

-Aw, yeah, especially with you, James.

-Yeah.

-Oh, sweet!

0:18:590:19:03

So far, James has splashed his cash on four items -

0:19:030:19:06

the Wilkinson dinner service, the millefiori brooch,

0:19:060:19:11

the 1920s Cruft's prize and the little silver stamp box.

0:19:110:19:17

He still has a generous £165.10 to play with.

0:19:170:19:21

While Anita's been playing it very canny,

0:19:240:19:27

spending only £20 on two items -

0:19:270:19:30

the paperweight with the porcelain hand

0:19:300:19:32

and the nine-carat gold brooch.

0:19:320:19:35

She still has £177.50 in her sporran.

0:19:350:19:39

And James is already crowing about his bumper day's buying yesterday.

0:19:410:19:46

When I went to Sheringham, walked into a shop,

0:19:470:19:50

and I bought an item within three minutes.

0:19:500:19:52

Really? Oh, James, you've got me worried. Or is this just a tactic?

0:19:520:19:56

No, it isn't. I wouldn't toy with you.

0:19:560:19:59

-Wouldn't you?

-No.

-What a pity!

0:19:590:20:01

THEY LAUGH

0:20:010:20:02

Spring is in the air, clearly.

0:20:030:20:05

James is beginning the day in the town of North Walsham.

0:20:050:20:09

The parish church of St Nicholas dates from the 1300s.

0:20:090:20:12

In 1381, the warlike Bishop of Norwich ordered

0:20:120:20:16

rebels in the Peasants' Revolt to be slaughtered in the church.

0:20:160:20:20

He was aptly named...

0:20:200:20:22

Henry the Dispenser.

0:20:220:20:24

HE GIVES A TERRIFIED CHUCKLE

0:20:240:20:26

Let's hope that things proceed more peaceably this morning,

0:20:260:20:29

as mafioso James struggles out of his car and into the first shop of

0:20:290:20:34

the day, Timeline Antiques Centre, where he's meeting dealer Michael.

0:20:340:20:38

-Good morning. James.

-Michael. Welcome.

-Hello.

0:20:400:20:44

-Very nice to be here.

-You are so affable, James. It's a delight.

0:20:440:20:48

-You lead on.

-Yes, sure.

0:20:480:20:50

-Lovely.

-Do you know, this is no time for a sit-down, James.

0:20:540:20:57

Come on, boy, buck up. It looks as if he's found something, though.

0:20:570:21:02

Interesting items. We've got a nice Doulton jug there.

0:21:020:21:06

Beautifully made object.

0:21:060:21:07

It's a Victorian beer jug by manufacturer Royal Doulton,

0:21:070:21:12

which was founded in 1815.

0:21:120:21:14

It's modelled in the shape and texture of a traditional

0:21:140:21:17

leather ale tankard, and bears an intriguing applied motto.

0:21:170:21:21

Price, £65.

0:21:210:21:23

I can't wait to read what the verse is.

0:21:230:21:27

It'll be some improving verse.

0:21:270:21:29

"He that buys land buys stones

0:21:290:21:31

"He that buys flesh buys bones..."

0:21:310:21:33

That's jolly(!)

0:21:330:21:35

"He that buys eggs buys many shells

0:21:350:21:38

"He that buys good ale buys nothing else."

0:21:380:21:42

That's more like it!

0:21:420:21:44

James is smitten with the jolly jug, but first

0:21:440:21:47

he has to ascertain which of the dealers in the centre owns it.

0:21:470:21:50

That's lovely.

0:21:520:21:53

Now, Michael, do you think somebody might accept £38 for that?

0:21:530:21:57

Let's just have a look at the ticket.

0:21:570:22:00

"MJ" - who's that? Michael...?

0:22:000:22:03

-It's me.

-JAMES LAUGHS.

0:22:030:22:05

I think I'm a mind-reader.

0:22:050:22:08

-What's your best on that, Michael? I want you to be happy.

-40.

-40?

0:22:090:22:14

-40, Michael - I'll give you 40.

-Thank you.

-Love that.

0:22:140:22:18

Another very decisive buy, and James is rolling onwards.

0:22:180:22:21

Anita, meanwhile, has busked on to the city of Norwich.

0:22:280:22:32

The attractive cathedral city of Norwich retains much

0:22:330:22:37

of its medieval charm, particularly on this historic street, Elm Hill.

0:22:370:22:42

Anita's soaking in the atmosphere as she ambles

0:22:430:22:46

into Elm Hill Collectables, where dealer Paul will assist.

0:22:460:22:50

-Hello! I'm Anita.

-Hello, Anita. Pleased to meet you.

0:22:500:22:54

She's on the hunt for an auction-winning bargain

0:22:540:22:57

to best James, and it looks like she might have spied a handsome one.

0:22:570:23:01

-Paul?

-Yes, Anita?

0:23:130:23:15

-There's a lot of good-looking guys in Norwich - am I right?

-Are there?

0:23:150:23:19

-I hadn't noticed!

-ANITA LAUGHS

0:23:190:23:22

And I've seen one that I fancy.

0:23:220:23:24

He's got a good body on him. It's this guy here.

0:23:240:23:27

Oh, the one with all the pictures on him?

0:23:270:23:29

Yeah, he's interesting, isn't he?

0:23:290:23:31

I think it's quite good fun, and it's visually interesting.

0:23:310:23:35

It's a male mannequin of modern manufacture,

0:23:350:23:38

decorated with scraps in the technique known as decoupage.

0:23:380:23:41

There's no ticket price on him, so Anita will have to enquire.

0:23:430:23:46

Is he a terribly expensive guy?

0:23:500:23:54

You can have him for £20.

0:23:550:23:58

Sounds like a cheap date.

0:23:580:24:00

It's got to be £20, Anita. Deal?

0:24:000:24:03

Thank you very much.

0:24:030:24:04

Deal done, then,

0:24:040:24:05

and she's spotted another couple of things just next to her new beau.

0:24:050:24:09

But this... This here, the jacket and hat...

0:24:090:24:12

The jacket and the hat, yes?

0:24:120:24:14

It's a mid-century British Merchant Navy cap,

0:24:140:24:18

and an Air Force blazer of more modern vintage.

0:24:180:24:21

-You can have the jacket reasonable.

-How much is reasonable?

-A tenner.

0:24:210:24:26

-That probably fits me.

-Try it on.

0:24:270:24:30

-Mm! Suits you.

-I'm the captain.

0:24:310:24:34

-You're in the Navy, and I'm in the Air Force.

-Oh, right!

0:24:340:24:36

-Goodness me, look at this!

-ANITA LAUGHS

0:24:360:24:40

If you two are quite finished playing dressing up...

0:24:400:24:43

Well, they say all the nice girls like a sailor.

0:24:430:24:45

-Yeah, but this is Air Force.

-Oh, right.

-Aye, aye!

0:24:450:24:48

-Ticket price on the hat is £30, but what can Paul do it for?

-15.

0:24:480:24:54

-You know this stuff. What's the best buy?

-Well, I said that for 15.

0:24:540:24:58

You'll make money on that.

0:24:580:25:01

Anita leaves the blazer but takes the Merchant Navy cap

0:25:010:25:04

at a cool 50% discount, so she has her boy toy and headgear

0:25:040:25:08

for £35 dead.

0:25:080:25:10

James has also made his way onwards to Norwich.

0:25:130:25:17

With all his items for auction already in the bag, he's going

0:25:190:25:22

to spend the afternoon ringing the changes at St Peter Mancroft Church

0:25:220:25:26

in the centre of the city,

0:25:260:25:27

where he's meeting Simon Rudd - for a ruddy good time, we hope.

0:25:270:25:32

-Ah. Hello. James Braxton.

-Simon Rudd. Pleased to meet you.

0:25:410:25:45

-Very nice to meet you.

-And you too.

-And you're chief bell-ringer?

0:25:450:25:48

I'm the master of the St Peter Mancroft Guild of Ringers.

0:25:480:25:51

Simon indeed heads the illustrious guild of bell-ringers

0:25:510:25:54

based at this magnificent 15th-century church.

0:25:540:25:57

Is this merely a church, or is it a cathedral?

0:25:570:26:00

It's one of the Greater Churches Group in the country.

0:26:000:26:03

One of the glories of the city, indeed.

0:26:030:26:05

One of the glories of East Anglia.

0:26:050:26:07

-What are you going to show me today?

-I'd like to take you down

0:26:070:26:09

and have a look in the treasury, if I may.

0:26:090:26:11

-Oh, yes, please. Lead on. It's glorious, isn't it?

-It is.

0:26:110:26:15

Simon is taking James on into the treasury in the north

0:26:150:26:18

transept of the church to explain a little more about the long

0:26:180:26:22

history of bell-ringing at St Peter Mancroft.

0:26:220:26:25

The type of bell-ringing, or campanology,

0:26:250:26:28

practised in English churches is known and change-ringing.

0:26:280:26:31

Its history has strong ties to this area and to this very building.

0:26:310:26:35

Lovely flowers.

0:26:350:26:37

The art of change-ringing itself developed very much in East Anglia -

0:26:370:26:42

had its inception, if you like, in East Anglia -

0:26:420:26:45

in the late 17th century,

0:26:450:26:46

and throughout the 17th century and into the early part of

0:26:460:26:50

the 19th century, the band of ringers here at St Peter Mancroft

0:26:500:26:53

were almost pre-eminent.

0:26:530:26:54

They were the renowned as the leading experts of the art, which is

0:26:540:26:58

evidenced by the fine peal of 12 bells we have here already.

0:26:580:27:02

The guild here also has another claim to be

0:27:020:27:04

a major place of bell-ringing history.

0:27:040:27:07

They were the first band to ring a full peal on church bells,

0:27:070:27:11

and that was accomplished on the 2nd May in 1715.

0:27:110:27:15

The full peal is the ultra-marathon of the bell-ringers' art -

0:27:150:27:19

a fiendishly complicated performance that requires huge concentration

0:27:190:27:23

and stamina, and today can involve up to three and a half hours

0:27:230:27:27

of continuous ringing.

0:27:270:27:28

Normally, it's a feat of memory

0:27:280:27:30

because you're not ringing with any music -

0:27:300:27:33

you're purely memorising the patterns you have to ring,

0:27:330:27:37

and if anything goes wrong and it comes to a stop,

0:27:370:27:40

that's it - it's gone.

0:27:400:27:42

These hugely difficult peals are only performed on special

0:27:420:27:45

occasions - thankfully for James.

0:27:450:27:48

I hope you're not going to make me ring a peal, are you?

0:27:480:27:51

Well, we'll see how you get on.

0:27:510:27:53

-I've only got two hours!

-A couple of minutes, maybe.

0:27:530:27:57

-Lead on, Simon.

-OK, come up the tower and meet the band.

0:27:580:28:01

-And they're heading up to the bell tower.

-You're joking?

-No, I'm not.

0:28:010:28:06

-I've got to get through that...?

-You might get in sideways.

0:28:060:28:08

Breathe in, Brackers.

0:28:080:28:11

-Goodness me.

-Here's the jolly band of St Peter Mancroft Ringers.

0:28:130:28:18

Hello. Good afternoon. Fabulous. They all look keen.

0:28:180:28:22

-LAUGHTER

-Yes.

0:28:220:28:24

We have about 30 members in the St Peter Mancroft Guild

0:28:240:28:27

and, as you can see, about half of them are here this afternoon to do some ringing.

0:28:270:28:31

Will you ring the tenor, please?

0:28:310:28:34

Neil, will you ring the 11th? Pete, will you ring the 10th, please?

0:28:340:28:36

Mugs, will you ring the 9th?

0:28:360:28:39

-JAMES LAUGHS

-I might get clobbered!

0:28:390:28:41

Yeah, stay out of the way, James - health and safety.

0:28:410:28:44

We're just going to ring a few really nice rounds, on 12.

0:28:440:28:47

-Thank you.

-Down.

0:28:470:28:49

BELLS RING IN REPEATED DESCENDING PEAL

0:28:490:28:54

-JAMES APPLAUDS

-Very good.

0:29:070:29:09

Who's your oldest serving member?

0:29:100:29:12

-I think that would be David Cubitt.

-Ah, which one?

0:29:120:29:15

-This is David over here.

-You look the youngest, sir.

0:29:150:29:19

LAUGHTER

0:29:190:29:21

-How long have you been ringing for?

-Oh, my goodness. Over 50 years.

0:29:210:29:24

And does it get easier?

0:29:240:29:25

-No.

-It doesn't?

-Not at all!

0:29:250:29:28

Well, that bodes well, as virgin bell-ringer James gives it a pull.

0:29:280:29:32

-So, you find me in the peak of physical fitness, Simon.

-Right.

0:29:320:29:36

What do you want?

0:29:360:29:37

OK, um, we wouldn't normally teach beginners from scratch here,

0:29:370:29:41

because our bells are quite difficult to ring.

0:29:410:29:43

We're just going to give you a taster of what it feels like

0:29:430:29:46

to ring a bell, so if you'd just like to stand straight there.

0:29:460:29:49

-Square-on?

-Square-on indeed. OK. I'll deal with...

0:29:490:29:52

-This woolly part here is called the sally.

-That's the sally.

0:29:520:29:56

-Sally belongs to me, so I'll look after that.

-OK.

-OK? Are you ready?

0:29:560:30:00

-Yeah, I'm ready.

-Here we go. Here we go.

0:30:000:30:02

-And... Gently down, gently down.

-SINGLE BELL RINGS

0:30:030:30:06

-That's it. And up again.

-BELL RINGS REPEATEDLY

0:30:060:30:09

And gently down. Good.

0:30:090:30:12

I am concentrating here.

0:30:120:30:14

-Good.

-I'm both concentrating and trying not to stick my tongue out,

0:30:140:30:18

which I normally do when concentrating.

0:30:180:30:20

I don't know if I could do three hours of this.

0:30:200:30:23

-It's bit like fishing, really.

-Well, if you say so, James.

0:30:240:30:27

Right, so I think that qualifies you for membership of the guild,

0:30:270:30:30

and I think it's a £50 membership fee, isn't it?

0:30:300:30:32

LAUGHTER

0:30:320:30:33

Well, that's enough to ensure James thinks it's time to be ringing off.

0:30:330:30:37

Thank you very much. It's been a real privilege. Goodbye.

0:30:370:30:40

Thank you. Bye-bye.

0:30:400:30:42

Now, Anita's about ten-minutes' walk away, back on Elm Hill,

0:30:470:30:51

where she's about to scour Mr P Milne's Antiques & Curios

0:30:510:30:56

for her very last item.

0:30:560:30:58

She's meeting dealer James.

0:30:580:30:59

-Hello. I'm Anita!

-Afternoon. Nice to meet you.

0:31:010:31:05

This is really the weird and the wonderful.

0:31:050:31:09

This shop is indeed stuffed with quirky and curious objects -

0:31:090:31:13

right up Anita's street.

0:31:130:31:15

This shop is full of things that I don't know what they are.

0:31:150:31:21

What's that?!

0:31:210:31:23

Quite scary.

0:31:240:31:25

And - what do you know? - she's unearthed a particularly

0:31:250:31:29

macabre item.

0:31:290:31:31

James?

0:31:310:31:33

What have we got here? SHE LAUGHS

0:31:330:31:35

Tell me about this.

0:31:350:31:36

A kind of restraint.

0:31:360:31:38

It's a device for restraining prisoners,

0:31:400:31:42

comprising a seasoned wooden beam

0:31:420:31:44

with some fearsome-looking iron manacles.

0:31:440:31:47

I think, James, that maybe we'd a post there.

0:31:480:31:51

-You know, like idea of stocks.

-Literally crucifies...

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:31:510:31:55

And the person would be handcuffed to it, and they would throw...

0:31:550:31:59

..buns or something at them!

0:32:000:32:02

I very much doubt they would be pelting them with pastries, Anita!

0:32:020:32:05

How old could this be?

0:32:050:32:07

You know, I really couldn't say, it looks positively ancient.

0:32:070:32:10

-Positively ancient.

-Certainly a well seasoned beam.

0:32:100:32:12

-We have the key for those.

-You do?

0:32:120:32:15

I suppose what we're seeing here is an old piece of mechanism.

0:32:150:32:19

Absolutely, yes. And to have the key is certainly a nice touch.

0:32:190:32:22

And it makes it quite practical as well.

0:32:220:32:25

SHE LAUGHS Well, let's hope not!

0:32:250:32:27

Quite!

0:32:270:32:28

It is an interesting item and it's an odd item.

0:32:280:32:31

-I see that you don't have a price on it...

-You can make me an offer.

0:32:310:32:35

Can this be bought for in the region of £20?

0:32:350:32:39

If we can do 25, yes.

0:32:390:32:41

Right, James, 25, that's lovely, thank you very much.

0:32:410:32:45

And with that final deal locked down tight,

0:32:450:32:48

Anita has all her lots for auction.

0:32:480:32:51

Time for both our avid antiques aficionados to rendezvous

0:32:510:32:56

back in St Peter Mancroft Church and unveil their buys.

0:32:560:33:00

-Reveal all.

-Right.

-My word! What on earth is this?

0:33:000:33:05

Now, a mannequin decorated in decoupage,

0:33:050:33:07

where they've stuck all these things on and varnished it over.

0:33:070:33:11

-This man has a great body, but not much in the way of brains.

-How much?

0:33:110:33:16

-20 quid.

-That's cheap, isn't it?

-It's not bad.

0:33:160:33:19

-Now, what is this gruesome item?

-This is...

0:33:190:33:22

I think it's stocks, from ancient Norwich.

0:33:220:33:27

And I thought, as well as wonderful, let's try weird.

0:33:270:33:32

How much is weird?

0:33:320:33:34

-25 quid.

-And your lovely... What's this gauntlet? A paperweight?

0:33:340:33:38

This is a little paperweight,

0:33:380:33:39

Victorian thing, not very dear, eight quid.

0:33:390:33:43

-Cheap enough, isn't it?

-He seems impressed, but still unruffled.

0:33:430:33:47

I have done the absolute converse of what you've done.

0:33:470:33:53

So, I have spent some money here today. I went mad!

0:33:530:33:56

-I bought a dinner service.

-But this is a lovely dinner service.

0:33:560:33:59

-And Art Deco, from the 1930s. How much?

-£50.

0:33:590:34:04

Tell me what this is, James.

0:34:040:34:06

Just rather fun, it's first prizes of Cruft's.

0:34:060:34:09

What I liked about it was that it was framed in a diamond,

0:34:090:34:12

and it has a sort of decorative look to it.

0:34:120:34:15

You don't seem to be sniffing around much on that, Anita.

0:34:150:34:19

-But what about the ace up James's sleeve?

-What is your little box?

0:34:190:34:23

-This is my bargain, this is my winner.

-Uh-huh.

-Have a feel of it.

0:34:230:34:26

-Oh, it's a stamp box.

-A stamp box.

-How much, James?

0:34:260:34:30

-How much would you value it at?

-I would put that at 100 to 150.

0:34:300:34:33

Touched hands with the man at £40.

0:34:330:34:36

Oh, I don't believe it!

0:34:360:34:38

-Believe it, Anita!

-Let's go and have a cup of tea...

-I think we need one.

0:34:380:34:42

..to celebrate.

0:34:420:34:43

Anita has done very well, you know, a scary item, the stocks, it's quite

0:34:450:34:49

a funny, quirky conversation piece, and at £25, it's not expensive.

0:34:490:34:56

East Anglia has been kind to me,

0:34:560:34:57

but as I know, the rug can quickly be pulled.

0:34:570:35:01

James has spent an awful lot of money!

0:35:010:35:06

He had a false sense of security and he has been a bit scatter-cash.

0:35:060:35:10

Whereas I have been a wee bit careful.

0:35:100:35:13

It might be my downfall! But I liked that stamp box that he bought,

0:35:130:35:19

but the dog thing...

0:35:190:35:21

I think that means she doesn't like it. Lordy!

0:35:220:35:25

On this show, Anita and James have cruised through Norfolk

0:35:260:35:30

from Holt, to find themselves nearly at their auction in Diss.

0:35:300:35:34

Diss, which lies near the border of Norfolk and Suffolk, has been

0:35:340:35:38

a quintessentially English market town for more than 500 years.

0:35:380:35:43

So, what better place for Anita and James to hawk their wares?

0:35:430:35:46

The busy TW Gaze auction room has been a mainstay of Diss life

0:35:460:35:51

for more than 150 years.

0:35:510:35:54

James, it's just as well we've got the bunnets on today!

0:35:540:35:57

I know, it's very, very rainy, isn't it? Come on.

0:35:570:36:00

Better get inside, quick!

0:36:000:36:02

Today's auctioneers, Elizabeth Talbot and Edward Smith,

0:36:020:36:05

will be sharing gavel wielding duties. But before the off,

0:36:050:36:08

what does Elizabeth make of our happy pair's lots?

0:36:080:36:13

I like James's Wilkinson pottery dinner service.

0:36:140:36:18

Very jazzy, it's very Art Deco, and actually quite modern.

0:36:180:36:20

The item of James's I don't warm to particularly, I'm afraid,

0:36:200:36:24

is the Cruft's certificate with photograph.

0:36:240:36:27

There has been quite a lot of interest in Anita's mannequin,

0:36:270:36:29

so I think, surprisingly, she is going to do quite well with that.

0:36:290:36:32

So, I rate that highly for Anita.

0:36:320:36:35

Anita started this leg with £197.50.

0:36:350:36:39

She spent quite a parsimonious £80, but has five lots in the sale.

0:36:390:36:44

While James began with £297.10, he spent a more generous £172

0:36:470:36:54

and also has five lots to show for it.

0:36:540:36:57

The sale's about to begin.

0:36:570:36:59

-Here we go.

-Here we go. Aah! I get quite excited.

-I know you do, Anita.

0:37:000:37:06

First up is James's massive Wilkinson dinner service.

0:37:060:37:10

Will the crowd think it's worth a nibble?

0:37:100:37:13

40 bid, sir, thank you.

0:37:130:37:14

40, I have, the gallery's bid at 40, I'll take 42. 42 downstairs.

0:37:140:37:18

45, 48.

0:37:180:37:20

50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75,

0:37:200:37:25

80, 85, £85, are you all done?

0:37:250:37:28

A very tasty profit.

0:37:290:37:31

-Well, that was a good start.

-Good start.

0:37:320:37:35

First for Anita, her paperweight with modelled hand.

0:37:360:37:39

Will it point to a profit?

0:37:390:37:42

Start me at 30.

0:37:420:37:44

30 bid, the lady bid at 30, where's 32? 32, seated. 35, 38, 40,

0:37:440:37:51

where's 42? At the £40, it will sell.

0:37:510:37:55

It grabs a sizeable chunk of change.

0:37:550:37:58

-That is very good.

-It's a good start for Anita, isn't it?

0:37:580:38:01

Next, Anita's decoupage mannequin.

0:38:030:38:05

As auctioneer Edward takes the stand,

0:38:050:38:08

will the crowd fancy him as much as Anita does?

0:38:080:38:12

I have bids on, I have to start at £30.

0:38:120:38:15

Well done, straight in.

0:38:150:38:17

A super piece. 32, 35, 38, 40, 42, 45,

0:38:170:38:23

-48 is with me.

-Yes!

-50, 55, 60, 65, 65 is bid, is there 70?

-Yes!

0:38:230:38:30

We are selling at £65.

0:38:300:38:33

Well, he's caught a few eyes, and the profit to prove it.

0:38:330:38:37

The mannequin, I mean.

0:38:370:38:39

-Well, he was a good-looking guy.

-He was a good-looking guy.

0:38:390:38:42

Now, it's James's Cruft's certificate.

0:38:420:38:45

Anita is not keen on it, might he be barking up the wrong tree, then?

0:38:450:38:49

10 and bid, then, 10, I have, is there 12?

0:38:490:38:52

For the £10, are we all done?

0:38:520:38:54

Oh, dear. It was a dog, after all.

0:38:560:38:59

You were right, Anita.

0:38:590:39:00

-Oh, darling, I'm sorry.

-Don't worry, the big guns are yet to come.

0:39:000:39:04

Ahoy, sailor! It's Anita's Merchant Navy cap next.

0:39:040:39:09

Straight in at £30, 30 I have, who wants 32?

0:39:090:39:12

32, 35, 38, 40, 42, 45, 48, 50,

0:39:120:39:16

we sell at £50.

0:39:160:39:18

And it snags a very nice price.

0:39:180:39:21

£50?!

0:39:210:39:24

A bit overboard, do you think, James? Hah!

0:39:240:39:27

-Now, it's Anita's, um, interesting stocks.

-We have to start at £60.

0:39:270:39:33

60 I have, where is 65? It's the stocks here, 65.

0:39:330:39:37

70, 75, 75 I have, is there 80? Selling at £75.

0:39:370:39:44

Another lovely profit. James took a beating on that lot.

0:39:440:39:48

Blimey, you are on a roll! I had better look out!

0:39:480:39:53

So, can James gain some ground with his beer jug?

0:39:530:39:57

Let's HOP so! Sorry.

0:39:570:40:00

I have interest at £40. 40 I have, who wants 42? 42, 45, 48, and 50...

0:40:000:40:06

I think they've got somebody on the phone.

0:40:060:40:09

60, is there a 65? Selling at £60.

0:40:090:40:14

A delicious pint of profit to James.

0:40:140:40:18

-Well done, darling, well done. You happy with that?

-Happy with that.

0:40:180:40:21

Next, will Anita's little nine carat brooch strike gold?

0:40:210:40:26

-Oh, look, Elizabeth's back. Coo-coo!

-Pretty little brooch there for £20.

0:40:260:40:30

Where are you? Come on.

0:40:300:40:31

-Struggling, James.

-Thank you, 22, the gallery.

0:40:310:40:34

At £22, the gentleman has bid at £22, and selling.

0:40:340:40:38

Another gold star for Anita.

0:40:390:40:42

That's just about what it was worth.

0:40:420:40:44

It's the battle of the brooches,

0:40:440:40:46

as James's millefiori brooch meets the crowd.

0:40:460:40:51

-Pretty little piece there, come on...

-Oh, dear! Struggling.

0:40:510:40:54

20 I have on commission, 20, I'll take 22.

0:40:540:40:57

It's for nothing on 20, the little brooch, are you all done?

0:40:570:41:00

Better than a poke in the eye, eh?

0:41:020:41:04

Battle of the brooches.

0:41:040:41:06

Hey, that's my line!

0:41:060:41:07

Finally, it's the little silver stamp box for James.

0:41:070:41:11

Is a profit in the post? First class!

0:41:110:41:14

I'll start at £60, £60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90,

0:41:140:41:19

-95, 100, 110, 120...

-Crikey!

0:41:190:41:22

120, with me at 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170, 180...

0:41:220:41:27

-Quite a lot of competition!

-With me at 180 now.

-180!

0:41:270:41:30

-180, I do have at 180. 180, 190, 200, 210, 220...

-James!

0:41:300:41:36

230, 240...

0:41:360:41:38

-Oh, James!

-Any advance on £240?

-Wonderful.

0:41:380:41:43

£200 profit? Cor, sterling work, eh?

0:41:430:41:48

Oh, James! That was great!

0:41:480:41:50

-Oh, that was so exciting, wasn't it?

-240! That is indecent, almost.

0:41:500:41:56

That was wonderful. Shall we go and have a cup of tea? You're buying!

0:41:560:42:00

-I will.

-I should jolly well think so, too!

0:42:000:42:04

So, it was a terrific sale for both of them,

0:42:040:42:07

but James's stratospheric profit on the stamp box

0:42:070:42:10

completely blew Anita out of the water.

0:42:100:42:12

Anita started today with £197.50.

0:42:120:42:16

After paying auction costs, she made a very tidy profit of £126.64.

0:42:160:42:22

She has £324.14 to carry on to the next leg, which ain't half bad.

0:42:220:42:29

But the victorious James began with £297.10

0:42:290:42:34

and after paying auction costs, he made an absolutely smashing profit

0:42:340:42:38

of £168.30 and ends up with £465.40.

0:42:380:42:44

Whoopee!

0:42:440:42:45

-Well, James, that was absolutely wonderful.

-We are both winners.

0:42:490:42:54

Yeah, we are both up there again.

0:42:540:42:56

-But we mustn't be too smug or complacent.

-Quite right, James.

0:42:560:43:00

Off you pop, we'll see you on the next leg.

0:43:000:43:03

On the next Antiques Road Trip, James is under fire.

0:43:050:43:09

-I don't know what...

-Oh, mind your head!

-Getting attacked!

0:43:090:43:12

-And Anita is building her empire.

-I'm awful tempted with Napoleon.

0:43:120:43:18

SHE CHUCKLES I think a lot of women were!

0:43:180:43:20

On the second leg of their road trip through Norfolk, James Braxton tries his hand at bell ringing in Norwich and Anita Manning travels to Holt to visit a unique arts & crafts stately home.