Episode 7 Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 7

Antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and Margie Cooper are on the second leg of their road trip. After a disheartening first auction, Margie has a lot of catching up to do.


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It's the nation's favourite antiques experts with £200 each,

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-a classic car...

-We're going around.

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..and a goal - to scour Britain for antiques.

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I want to spend lots of money.

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction but it's no mean feat.

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Oh, no!

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There'll be worthy winners...

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-We've done it!

-..and valiant losers.

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You are kidding me on!

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So, will it be the high road to glory or the slow road to disaster?

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-What am I doing?

-You've got a deal.

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This is the Antiques Road Trip!

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It's round two of our West Country rummage

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around the rugged Cornish rocks.

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Look at the views, look at the views!

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-Holy Moses!

-What's that rock over there?

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Not a clue!

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Absorbing the southwest weather in a vintage Alfa Romeo are dealer

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Margie Cooper and auctioneer Paul Laidlaw.

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What a remote corner of the country!

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You do feel a bit distant from the hustle and bustle and that.

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-Everything's a bit chilled!

-It's like an island.

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Unfortunately, they were a bit chilled in that auction as well.

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It certainly wasn't a cool one for either of our experts

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but Margie's posh tools were a particular disappointment.

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How much loss is that?

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That's just a lot. I think we'll just call it a lot!

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Not that her competitive companion would ever harp on about it,

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of course.

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Margie, Margie, Margie...

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We're in the right place after all! HE CACKLES

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-Sorry, Margie.

-You're rubbing it in!

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It's a rich vein this and I'm obliged to mine it till it's exhausted!

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They both set out with £200 but Margie has so far shrunk hers

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to just £138.56p.

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While Paul's managed a modest increase of £18.46p.

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So, not a lot to boast about, either of you.

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Between us, what have we got?

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-300 quid?

-Yeah.

-That'll buy us two surf boards!

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Come on!

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Hang on, we want money makers, not beach bums.

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Our trip begins close to England's most westerly point,

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at St Buryan and heads both north and east.

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We then take a round-about trip through Wales,

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before arriving at Newent, in Gloucestershire.

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Today, we're starting out in Cornwall, at Wadebridge

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and ending up at an auction on the Devon coast at Seaton.

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Around here, it's all about the bridges.

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The River Camel runs through here

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and until they built the first crossing in the 15th century

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the town was just called Wade, it then became Wadebridge.

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Ah, very straightforward.

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There'd be bargains!

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You don't say bargains in this business, you say good buys!

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-Oh, right.

-Like we haven't done.

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More bridges followed and there's even one from 1991 that was

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built for the TV series Challenge Anneka.

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Speaking of challenges...

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-Morning!

-Morning.

-Morning, Margie.

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-Hi, I'm Mike.

-Hi, Mike, how are you doing? I'm Paul. Good to see you.

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There are three very full floors at Victoria Antiques.

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What you might call a proper antique shop, including oodles of fine

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furniture that will surely be out of their bracket.

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And for those with a thing about barometers...

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Erm, clockwise.

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..Paul's as rigorous as ever but Margie's wandered off-piste.

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It seems the dealer's son, Carl, has a backgammon set for sale.

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-And it's complete?

-Yeah, yeah, it's got all the doubling dice.

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-Probably not old, it's probably about 1970s, '80s.

-Right...

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Why bother with antiques when you can't make money at auction?

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Well, that's right. You can have it for £15.

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Couldn't do ten, though? That would be a real insult.

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-It would, yeah.

-I withdraw that comment, immediately.

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Paul's cribbage board was certainly

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a bit of a letdown at the last auction, Margie.

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It's a good size, that's the thing with it, it's the size that matters.

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Yeah, size isn't everything, though, is it?

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Meanwhile, Paul's found something very familiar.

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Sexy lady!

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The ticket price on that card tray is £55.

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Just slacken the price of that one, testing the water.

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-Pretty well lot of slack, to be honest with you but...

-£30.

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It's getting in the right direction.

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Well, she's certainly a bit pricier than the little Belle Epoque

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dress seal that he acquired earlier on the trip.

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This is going to sound so wrong, she's cheap!

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Yeah...but Paul seems equally enthused. Second time around, then!

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A nice piece of full period, Art Nouveau metal work here.

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That could sit in your hallway for visiting cards or whatever.

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I like that fact that you've got quality modelling here.

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Look at the visage on this lady here.

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She's demure,

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she is holding this oversized tray in a provocative stance.

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-I love this piece!

-Calm down, Paul.

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Mike's telling me that it could be£30.

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Now, there is one fault, you've just got a wee crack there.

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I don't think it's catastrophic, it doesn't help it

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but it may help me get the price down a wee bit more.

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Ah, Margie's made a bit of a find now too.

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-(I'm not sure whether we're allowed in here.)

-It's in the kitchen.

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Wow! A collection of elephants.

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-Ebony.

-And ivory, unfortunately.

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These tusks and his little ivory toes...

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these are pre-1940s.

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Otherwise, we don't want to go anywhere near them!

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You're supposed to have them in your house, facing the door,

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with his trunk up - it's lucky.

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I've got one in my bedroom.

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It's not bringing me much luck yesterday, did it?

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Oh, very nice, Margie, but they're not for sale!

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I wonder what Mike will make of you

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rooting about in his private collection.

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I'm sorry, that's rude. I shall be annoyed if someone did this to me.

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No, it's OK.

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-Occasionally, I do sell them when people ask.

-Do you?

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How much are the bigger ones like him? He's a nice one.

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-He's a nice one, isn't he?

-That's a good one.

-Yeah.

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I believe 45 for that one and he's worth every penny.

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You need an elephant that's got a purpose really.

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Book-ends are good, they don't just sit there

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but I need to get 45 for them and that is it.

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He's lost his tusks, bless him.

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They've dropped out over the years,

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although he's got his... his little toes are all right.

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They've got to go for 60

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and then we've got to take off the commission.

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I just don't think I'm going to make it, do you?

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My last price, I'll give you right now,

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this is the bargain of the day, £35.

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They're just delightful, aren't they?

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-35.

-OK, you've got yourself a deal.

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Now, with Margie and her ebony herd back to the usual customer

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areas, Paul's after a bit of walnut.

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Nice piece of woodcarving, that, isn't it?

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Nice, substantial piece. It's a Victorian piece, late 18th century.

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But who wants such a thing? No-one's got a butler any more.

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Erm, £30, not a lot of money.

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It's good work, it's good work.

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I think I'll find Mike and see what we can do here.

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At least it's not part of his private collection, ha!

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Another well spotted...bargain, erm, £30 on it, you can have it for 20.

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-That's in at 20. What was the lady, 30 or 35?

-30, I think, yeah.

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Would you give me a deal on the two?

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That's got to be 50, hasn't it?

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Does it have to be 50? I'd rather it was a wee bit less than 50.

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-Just a tad.

-No.

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He's standing his ground.

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-It's cheap.

-It's cheap, isn't it?

-That's why you've got a deal. Good.

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-Pleasure.

-You've got some profit there.

-All right, I hope so!

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Another lightning raid there, Paul, but what about Margie?

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She'll be after a real bargain to go with her heffalump,

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I shouldn't wonder.

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Just looking at this silk-work picture.

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It's quite nice. The amount of work that's gone into that!

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It's probably early 19th century.

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Maybe earlier probably earlier, 18th century.

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Look at the work that's been done here.

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Beautiful silk-work.

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Look at the window...look at that! It's beautiful!

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Very attractive but it's just been messed up in this awful frame.

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If you were a wealthy lady, what did you do all day?

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You had the life where you executed stuff like this.

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From someone who can't sew a button on, I just think that's amazing!

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£48...think it's worth asking him if it's any cheaper.

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Look out, Mike, Margie's on a mission!

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This is something that's just taken my eye.

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-Oh, yeah.

-It needs a lot of work, doesn't it?

-£25, there you go.

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You've got to buy it for that!

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I reckon there's got to be a profit in that.

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Yeah, I know, but everybody keeps telling me that and that's

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when I get devastated at the auction.

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She's got a point.

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-Yeah, but it's a good content.

-Yeah.

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-So, how much was the other piece you bought for?

-35.

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-35...

-Yeah.

-If I said 55 for the two, there you go.

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You're a wonderful man, Michael.

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-All right.

-I'll come and see you again.

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£20 for the silk-work, not bad, Margie. And for added value...

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I'm giving my little elephants a bit of a clean up...

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SHE GIGGLES

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..in an effort to make a profit.

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Oh...she's certainly trying her best.

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Now, where's Paul got to?

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Seems our military buff has spotted a shop called The Bunker.

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Stand by.

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Hello, morning.

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-How are you doing?

-I'm Paul.

-Hello, Paul, I'm Bob.

-You're Bob?

-Yeah.

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Good to see you, Bob.

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Yeah, apparently, they've just moved here,

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so most of Bob's stock is still boxed up.

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That won't discourage Paul, though.

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-What's the rocket?

-No, Paul, not that...no!

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Medals, yes, but rockets...

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It's a drone. RAF tow that behind a

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pilot aircraft and the guys track it

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and they open fire on it, basically.

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Man alive, what an interesting thing!

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It's a precision piece of engineering, that, isn't it?

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-Lovely.

-These flash bolts.

-Yeah, yeah, yeah.

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Would you sell it or not?

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Erm, I'd have to think about it.

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How much is that missile in the window?

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Thankfully for Seaton, it doesn't seem to be for sale.

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Margie, meanwhile,

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has travelled south from Wadebridge to St Columb Major.

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It may be peaceful here today but not when they play

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the ancient game of hurling through the streets of St Columb.

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It involves several hundred people fighting over a tiny silver ball

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and all hell breaking loose!

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The town crest features the ball and bears the motto -

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"Town and country, do your best". Go on, Margie, you do your best.

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Oh, no, not another elephant!

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SHOP BELL RINGS

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-Hello.

-Margie, and you are?

-I'm Janet.

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-Hi, Janet.

-Hello, hello.

-Unusual name, your shop.

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-It's good, isn't it?

-It is.

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Ah, yeah, part Brothers Grimm and part Lewis Carroll.

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Very apt for the curiosities collected herein

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and just right for our silver specialist.

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-Look at her, oh, what a little cutie!

-I can't find who she is!

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A little continental thing.

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-She's lovely, isn't she?

-With a little petal hat.

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She's slightly spooky, isn't she?

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-Yes, she is a bit.

-Don't you think?

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-Yeah, little face peeping out.

-I love her!

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Looks like a Cornish Piskie, I'd say.

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I don't think I've ever had a money box.

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Now, why doesn't that surprise me?!

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Mmm, bit strange.

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It's a silver belt buckle.

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I suppose you were bought this when you passed your exams and qualified.

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So, it's quite old, yeah.

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-It's 1901 or '02. How much have you got on it?

-I've got 89 on it.

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Yeah...she'd wear it on her belt buckle.

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They are nice things but that's way out of my league,

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unless you want to be extremely generous.

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Ah, well, at least they're enjoying themselves!

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Early patent Eugen Sandow dumbbells.

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Hey!

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You go like that.

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-They're Sandow, he was the...

-He was Mr Universe or whatever.

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He was, he was the father of modern bodybuilding.

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Wow, yes!

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The former circus strongman invented displays of bulging muscles,

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as well as several devices like these.

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Edwardian merchandising, eh?

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Sandow even coined the term bodybuilding.

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There he is, yeah...

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-with his six-pack.

-Yeah.

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I don't think they're very attractive, six-packs, do you?

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-Not very cuddly.

-It's men who want six-packs but we don't.

-I think so.

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I'd rather have a nice smile.

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-I like a nice smile, that's what we want.

-And a good bum.

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I think muscles are overrated.

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When you finish working out what you really want,

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you might think about buying something.

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How about another look at that buckle, eh?

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Paul did all right with one at the last auction.

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I've never seen a heart-shaped one.

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She would have been so thrilled to receive that, wouldn't she?

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-When she became...then an SRN, it would be, wouldn't it?

-Or an SEN.

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Meaning either State Enrolled or State Registered Nurse.

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But it's not going to make the money that I want it to make,

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otherwise I'd love to buy it.

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SHE PANTS

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You keep coming back to that.

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Oh, yes, I think her heart's set on it.

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With her limited funds,

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she can only afford about half of that ticket price, though.

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Is 38 going to buy it?

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Mmm, no.

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I have had it a while and, you know...

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Get the money, get it into new stock.

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It would be nice to turn it around into something else, wouldn't it?

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-Oh, bless her.

-40 would do it.

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It's just a lovely tactile piece of silver. Oh, come on!

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40 sounds better for you, 38 sounds better for me.

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THEY LAUGH

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Go on, Janet, I'll have it. I'm not going to argue with you.

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-I'll have it.

-Lovely.

-Shake hands on that.

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-We will indeed.

-Lovely!

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That £40 leaves Margie with just £43.56p left to spend.

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But what about Paul, alone in the Alfa?

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North from Wadebridge to the Cornish coast at Tintagel...

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..to visit a ruined castle of Arthurian legend.

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Wow! Do you think I'll ever find a more dramatic parking place?

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-Hello, is it Matt?

-Hi, Paul, pleased to meet you.

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Man alive, that is a view!

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-Are you feeling fit?

-Do I need to?

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Well, we've got to climb up there to see the castle

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but there's a few steps.

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-Lead on.

-I'll come and show you.

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Whether he was real or just a myth, King Arthur has fascinated us

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for many hundreds of years

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and this romantic spot is where it all starts.

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Everyone in Cornwall loves Arthur.

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The Cornish people and the Celts have taken Arthur really to heart.

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You know, it's a great legend!

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And if a legend can't be born here, where can it be born?!

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Cornwall's association with Arthur dates back to 1156,

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when Geoffrey of Monmouth, the cleric and scholar

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wrote the unreliable

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but influential History Of The Kings Of Britain,

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in which he claimed King Arthur was conceived at Tintagel.

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My word!

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So, what we're standing in here,

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this is the courtyard of the old medieval castle.

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So, this was built in 1256 by Earl Richard of Cornwall,

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who was Henry II's half brother.

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He wanted to boost his power by association with

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the Arthurian legend, so he built a grand wall around the outside

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and this big, great hall to make himself look more powerful.

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So, Earl Richard's main castle was at Launceston

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but this was kind of his holiday cottage.

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So, he came here a few times a year

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and then he'd spend a couple of weeks down here but the seaside.

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As you do. Once the Earl died,

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his castle of no strategic value soon turned into a romantic ruin but

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Tintagel's association with The Once and Future King just got stronger.

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What people have done with the legend of King Arthur,

0:15:430:15:45

they've just re-written it,

0:15:450:15:47

fitting for their time and history.

0:15:470:15:49

So, once Geoffrey wrote his book,

0:15:490:15:51

then you've got Morte d'Arthur being written in about 1485 by Malory

0:15:510:15:54

and that time was a time of knights and shining armour and jousting

0:15:540:15:57

and chivalries.

0:15:570:15:59

-Then Tennyson came down here...

-The Romantic Revival.

0:15:590:16:02

Yeah, so he took one look at Tintagel

0:16:020:16:03

and he wrote The Idylls Of The King

0:16:030:16:05

and that's kind of why we're here today because without Tennyson

0:16:050:16:08

and those rich Victorians starting to be the first holiday makers

0:16:080:16:11

and wanting to come and see where all these legends were set,

0:16:110:16:14

and so now we get up to 190,000 visitors a year.

0:16:140:16:16

Tennyson's poems embellished what Geoffrey of Monmouth

0:16:180:16:22

and Malory had already come up with,

0:16:220:16:25

as well as adding a whole new tourist angle to Tintagel

0:16:250:16:27

when he pronounced that this was Merlin's Cave.

0:16:270:16:31

He said that when the baby Arthur was born at the castle,

0:16:310:16:33

Merlin who lived in this cave was given to him at the entrance

0:16:330:16:36

and he took him through the cave and whisked him away.

0:16:360:16:39

-It does have a magical feel to it, doesn't it?

-Doesn't it just!

0:16:390:16:42

And maybe some of that magic will rub off on you!

0:16:420:16:45

THEY LAUGH

0:16:450:16:46

Is the tide coming in or going out, Mike?

0:16:460:16:48

Well, it's supposed to be going out but I think the waves are coming in.

0:16:480:16:51

Maybe we should start to leave. Come on!

0:16:510:16:53

I quite agree but just when it seemed founded on myth

0:16:530:16:56

and legend, archaeologists discovered that Tintagel

0:16:560:17:00

really did once play an important role in history,

0:17:000:17:03

several hundred years before the castle was ever built.

0:17:030:17:06

During the 5th, 6th century,

0:17:060:17:08

so you're talking the early medieval period,

0:17:080:17:10

it was a trading port to the Mediterranean,

0:17:100:17:12

so you've got these rough ingots of tin coming down off Bodmin Moor

0:17:120:17:15

and the guys who lived here were trading with those.

0:17:150:17:18

So, there was boats coming in from North Africa,

0:17:180:17:20

from the Greek Islands, from Southern Spain and they were

0:17:200:17:23

bringing these big amphoras filled with olive oils and spices.

0:17:230:17:26

You've got to imagine it's the middle of summer,

0:17:260:17:28

there's maybe a thousand people living up here.

0:17:280:17:30

They've got all these boats coming in

0:17:300:17:32

there's this trade going on and subsequently we've found more

0:17:320:17:35

bits of pottery here from that period than anywhere

0:17:350:17:37

else in Western Europe.

0:17:370:17:39

So, arguably, the 6th, 7th century is its real historic heyday.

0:17:390:17:42

And that's the Arthur period.

0:17:420:17:44

So, was Arthur really here?

0:17:440:17:46

Recently, this 6th century piece of slate was discovered

0:17:460:17:49

inscribed with the name Arthnoo.

0:17:490:17:52

It's evident that the name Arthur or Artus was being used back then.

0:17:520:17:56

So, if there was a historical Arthur

0:17:560:17:58

and he was born at Tintagel, it kind of fits in.

0:17:580:18:02

It does! It is astonishing!

0:18:020:18:04

Ah, well, back to our own particular Holy Grail.

0:18:070:18:11

Is it possible, Paul, to lose all your money?

0:18:110:18:15

THEY LAUGH

0:18:150:18:18

That's certainly one way of becoming a legend, Margie.

0:18:180:18:20

Night-night, you two.

0:18:200:18:22

Next morning there seems to be an issue with the brakes.

0:18:240:18:27

How brave are you feeling this morning?

0:18:270:18:30

What's happened?

0:18:300:18:32

If I told we have a slight problem with the brakes,

0:18:320:18:34

I would be understating the case.

0:18:340:18:36

What are we going to do, Paul? We've got the whole day to finish!

0:18:360:18:39

-How are your legs?

-Fine!

-Can I jump on, then?

0:18:390:18:42

Piggyback?

0:18:420:18:43

Well, there's nothing in the rules

0:18:430:18:45

to say this can't be done on foot, I suppose.

0:18:450:18:47

Gosh!

0:18:470:18:49

Yesterday, Paul bought a walnut Arts and Crafts tray

0:18:490:18:52

and a silver plated card tray.

0:18:520:18:54

I love this!

0:18:540:18:56

Those set him back £50, leaving almost £170 in his wallet,

0:18:560:19:00

whilst Margie plumped for a heart-shaped buckle,

0:19:000:19:04

a silk-work picture and a pair of elephant book-ends, as you do.

0:19:040:19:07

-Quite nice.

-They are, aren't they?

0:19:070:19:10

Yeah, that lot cost £95. This leaves her with just over £40.

0:19:100:19:14

She'll have to be canny with that today.

0:19:140:19:17

Now, later, they'll be making for an auction in Devon, at Seaton

0:19:170:19:21

but our next stop is Boscastle.

0:19:210:19:23

Come on, Margie, we don't have all day, girl. Buck up!

0:19:250:19:29

This delightful little harbour is a popular tourist destination,

0:19:340:19:38

not least for its connection with Thomas Hardy falling in love

0:19:380:19:41

with his first wife here back in 1870.

0:19:410:19:45

He called Cornwall "Lioness" to evoke the myth and magic

0:19:450:19:48

of the area and Margie's here to find out

0:19:480:19:51

more about the ancient practice of witchcraft.

0:19:510:19:53

-Good morning. You're Joyce?

-I am indeed.

0:19:530:19:56

It's beautiful surroundings.

0:19:560:19:58

-It is. It's a lovely, very magical place here.

-I'm sure it is.

0:19:580:20:01

Oh, yes.

0:20:030:20:04

The museum covers everything from Wiccans to white witches

0:20:040:20:08

and from Mother Earth to mandrakes.

0:20:080:20:10

It was founded by a witch called Cecil Williamson in 1951

0:20:100:20:15

and is said to be the largest of its kind in the world.

0:20:150:20:17

I mean, I'm superstitious like anybody

0:20:190:20:22

so are the roots in witchcraft? Is that where I got my superstition?

0:20:220:20:25

Yes. I mean, what people don't realise is that magic was a hugely

0:20:250:20:29

-important part of people's daily lives.

-Yeah.

0:20:290:20:32

And we still have the vestiges of that in modern times,

0:20:320:20:35

I mean, people still put horse shoes on their doors.

0:20:350:20:38

They still send good luck cards with pictures of black cats on.

0:20:380:20:41

And witchcraft was essentially what happened when this

0:20:430:20:48

traditional folk magic was demonised.

0:20:480:20:50

Our image of a witch on her broom dates largely from the late

0:20:500:20:55

Middle Ages when men and especially women with supposed magical

0:20:550:20:59

powers came to be seen as a threat to society.

0:20:590:21:02

What's a white witch then?

0:21:020:21:04

Somebody who used their magic for benevolent purposes

0:21:040:21:07

but it was still frowned upon.

0:21:070:21:10

Not amongst ordinary people but by the authorities

0:21:100:21:13

because, essentially, it was quite subversive.

0:21:130:21:16

It was something that gave power to ordinary people

0:21:160:21:18

and, in particular, power to women.

0:21:180:21:20

This idea was society turned upside down.

0:21:200:21:23

Witch-hunts began in mainland Europe

0:21:230:21:26

but soon spread to Britain where men like Matthew Hopkins accused

0:21:260:21:31

hundreds of women of sorcery and making a covenant with the devil.

0:21:310:21:35

It's been estimated that of the many thousands of deaths

0:21:350:21:37

throughout the world that resulted from this persecution,

0:21:370:21:40

at least three quarters were women.

0:21:400:21:42

So, we have some really old books here in the library

0:21:420:21:47

dating from the time of the witch-hunts.

0:21:470:21:49

This was written in 1681.

0:21:490:21:53

One of the particularly interesting pictures is this one.

0:21:530:21:56

This was actually a meeting of witches that took place near Wincanton

0:21:560:22:00

in Somerset and you see you've got the group of witches gathered

0:22:000:22:05

-round the devil who actually looks kind of...

-He looks like a minister.

0:22:050:22:08

He does, doesn't he? He doesn't look very devilish at all really.

0:22:080:22:11

And they're holding a little wax image which of course is very much

0:22:110:22:15

the stereotypical image of how you put a curse on somebody.

0:22:150:22:19

So, here you see how magic was being demonised instead of it being

0:22:190:22:23

this natural energy which is what people who practise magic saw it as.

0:22:230:22:27

That the devil is actually giving the magical power to the witches.

0:22:270:22:32

Nowadays, of course, thanks to Harry Potter, witchcraft and wizardry

0:22:320:22:36

has an altogether cuddlier image and as this museum demonstrates, magic

0:22:360:22:40

and especially superstition, are still very much part of our lives.

0:22:400:22:44

So, I recognise the famous witch ball.

0:22:440:22:47

Yes, and of course those belonged to a long tradition of using

0:22:470:22:51

shiny things to reflect away bad luck.

0:22:510:22:55

Things like horse brasses belong to a similar tradition.

0:22:550:22:58

They are also the origin of the Christmas tree decorations but

0:22:580:23:02

there was very much a superstition that you shouldn't sell them.

0:23:020:23:05

One good luck charm that is for sale is this little chap.

0:23:050:23:08

This is actually one from the First World War.

0:23:100:23:14

It's called a thumbs up doll.

0:23:140:23:17

He's got a little wooden head so that you can touch wood

0:23:170:23:20

and these were given by sweethearts

0:23:200:23:23

and family to soldiers who were heading off to the war.

0:23:230:23:27

But his...his hands are held with the thumbs up gesture.

0:23:270:23:31

-Look at that!

-..and although they're kind of slightly bizarre little

0:23:310:23:35

objects, there was behind them this very real awareness that these

0:23:350:23:40

soldiers were going off into deadly peril.

0:23:400:23:44

Another bit of magic that once enjoyed huge popularity was

0:23:440:23:47

the practice of tasseography or the reading of tea leaves.

0:23:470:23:51

Margie could certainly do with a peek into her auction future!

0:23:510:23:54

-You need to drink a bit of that.

-Shall I let you into a secret?

0:23:540:23:59

-I hate tea!

-Swirl it around and tip it into the saucer. That's right.

0:23:590:24:05

-Ah! Right.

-Have we got it?

-We have. Ah, Ooh!

0:24:050:24:08

Now, that's really interesting.

0:24:080:24:10

You've got quite a lot gathered around the snake.

0:24:100:24:13

-Do you see the snake?

-Yeah.

-That's the symbol of wisdom.

0:24:130:24:16

So, you may think that you have made some bad decisions

0:24:160:24:19

but I reckon it's going to turn out...

0:24:190:24:22

And then here, you see, we've got some gathered around the four-leaf

0:24:220:24:25

-clover, so that's a really powerful sign of good luck.

-Oh, terrific.

0:24:250:24:30

Well, I just jolly well hope you're right, Joyce.

0:24:300:24:33

-Magic never lies.

-Well said, Joyce.

0:24:330:24:36

Better not tell Paul, though,

0:24:360:24:37

he might think Margie's enjoyed an unfair advantage.

0:24:370:24:41

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Well, thank you. I'm glad.

0:24:410:24:44

We'd like to give you this witch ball to put up for sale in the auction.

0:24:440:24:48

-Yeah.

-But don't forget that it's unlucky to actually sell them

0:24:480:24:51

directly so you need to sell some kind of token item

0:24:510:24:55

and give the witch ball away with it.

0:24:550:24:57

OK.

0:24:570:24:58

-And to say thanks...

-How about if I buy you a cup of tea?

0:24:580:25:01

-That sounds good to me.

-Let's go.

0:25:010:25:03

We'll be taking that out of your budget, though.

0:25:030:25:05

But while Margie's been in Boscastle for a spell, Paul's made his way

0:25:080:25:13

over to Okehampton in Devon.

0:25:130:25:16

This town's on the northern edge of Dartmoor which,

0:25:160:25:18

just like most of Cornwall, has its fair share of myths

0:25:180:25:21

and legends, ghosts, pixies, hairy hounds

0:25:210:25:26

and even the devil himself have been spotted hereabouts.

0:25:260:25:29

And speaking of the old devil...

0:25:290:25:31

This is where the pigpen once stood.

0:25:340:25:37

Hello there. How are you doing?

0:25:370:25:39

-Very well.

-You are?

-I'm Jo.

-Jo, it's good to see you.

0:25:390:25:42

-You must be Paul?

-I'm Paul. That's right. How goes it?

0:25:420:25:44

-Oh, pretty good.

-Jo's shop has a bit of everything.

0:25:440:25:47

Antiques, collectables and a dollop of retro.

0:25:470:25:51

Plenty to go at.

0:25:510:25:53

And whichever way you rummage, it could take some time.

0:25:530:25:56

I like a piece that's been buried.

0:25:570:26:00

Yeah, he likes that sort of thing, too.

0:26:000:26:02

I love period lighting, full stop.

0:26:020:26:05

Rather nice little counter weighted lamp.

0:26:050:26:07

You think to yourself, "It's just a brass lamp like my granny had,

0:26:070:26:10

"who cares?" Why does it do that? Could be a railway carriage.

0:26:100:26:16

Marine environment's another option.

0:26:160:26:18

Your cruise ship, your passenger ship.

0:26:180:26:20

As the carriage or car rocked, your lamp stayed upright.

0:26:200:26:26

Interestingly, the word nausea derives from the Greek for ship.

0:26:260:26:30

That's a period piece.

0:26:300:26:32

Not some nasty 1980s reproduction which I've probably seen

0:26:320:26:36

a lot of, it's brass.

0:26:360:26:38

No-one wants brass in their house because we're lazy.

0:26:380:26:41

We don't want to polish the stuff and it's not the preferred

0:26:410:26:44

metal of choice in interior furnishings at the moment.

0:26:440:26:46

Everyone wants white metal.

0:26:460:26:48

-Your brushed aluminium, your chrome and your nickel. Jo?

-Yes?

0:26:480:26:51

-I like your funky little lamp.

-I like my funky little lamp.

0:26:510:26:54

Out of a railway carriage or a cruise liner?

0:26:540:26:56

Well, I've got photographs of that identical lamp on the Titanic.

0:26:560:27:00

I'd love to say it came off the Titanic

0:27:000:27:03

but obviously it won't have done.

0:27:030:27:05

But it's that...that's exactly it.

0:27:050:27:07

It's that pattern. Precisely that pattern. I'd love to see the book.

0:27:070:27:13

Oh, dear. Not the Titanic. That'll make it pricey for sure.

0:27:130:27:17

-I'm looking for £60 for it.

-I think he wants to check the facts first.

0:27:170:27:22

-This is bad news, Jo.

-What's it?

0:27:220:27:24

Because there are four lamps in four pictures and none of them

0:27:240:27:29

are identical and none of them are identical to ours

0:27:290:27:32

but I'm still interested, I don't mind telling you.

0:27:320:27:36

Perhaps if he finds something to go with it.

0:27:360:27:38

How sturdy is the steamer chair? Can I sit on it?

0:27:380:27:41

If I can sit in it, you can sit in it.

0:27:410:27:44

Famous last words. I like that very much. Now, what's a steamer chair?

0:27:440:27:49

It's a glorified deckchair,

0:27:490:27:50

in what looks like walnut we're looking at there and I assume

0:27:500:27:55

if we... I don't know, do we lift the seat

0:27:550:27:57

and it starts to all move, or what?

0:27:570:27:58

Right, you have got to lift these.

0:28:000:28:02

Oh, I get it. There's a ratchet at the back. Do you know what I feel?

0:28:020:28:06

-In a really lazy mood. Let's go for...

-Completely.

0:28:060:28:09

I'll have a little sleep.

0:28:090:28:11

Did you know the Titanic carried 600 steamer chairs, of which

0:28:110:28:14

just six survive? And one of those was sold for £35,000 in 2001.

0:28:140:28:19

Here I am.

0:28:210:28:22

My man will be with me in just a second.

0:28:220:28:24

-Or woman.

-Thank you.

0:28:240:28:26

PAUL LAUGHS

0:28:260:28:27

How apt for Laidlaw.

0:28:270:28:29

But I'll tell you, that...is comfortable, isn't it?

0:28:290:28:33

He's keen on both the chair and the lamp, although the asking price

0:28:330:28:37

for the two is almost £150. He's still on the lookout, though.

0:28:370:28:42

Something non-nautical, eh?

0:28:420:28:43

I love that.

0:28:460:28:47

GIGGLING

0:28:470:28:49

1960s...

0:28:490:28:51

Kolster-Brandes -

0:28:510:28:54

they were high-quality manufacturers of radio and television equipment.

0:28:540:28:59

It was an expensive television set, this.

0:28:590:29:02

It was the Royal Star.

0:29:020:29:04

Arguably, it's a portable telly. Look at this!

0:29:040:29:07

This is definitely turning into

0:29:070:29:09

a bit of a theme shop.

0:29:090:29:11

From the late 1950s, these were installed

0:29:110:29:14

on Cunard liners, like the Queen Mary,

0:29:140:29:16

hence the cruise-friendly model name.

0:29:160:29:19

The price on that is...

0:29:190:29:21

£40. It's mad!

0:29:210:29:24

Time to have a word with the captain.

0:29:240:29:26

I've got a shopping list with three things

0:29:260:29:28

that I like, but I want to haggle hard with you.

0:29:280:29:31

How about we start at 150?

0:29:310:29:33

I'll offer you £100 the lot.

0:29:330:29:35

Obviously, I'm not going to accept that.

0:29:350:29:38

I think I've got to say 125.

0:29:380:29:41

It's just a wee bit rich for me, at 125. If I budge another tenner,

0:29:410:29:45

-can we shake hands?

-So, what, 110?

-Yeah.

0:29:450:29:48

115 and you've definitely got a deal.

0:29:480:29:52

-I've definitely got a deal, then, haven't I?

-You have. Good man.

0:29:520:29:56

-Jo, loving your work.

-All right, that's great.

-Magic!

0:29:560:29:58

-Let me give you some money.

-With 165 spent, Paul must be almost done.

0:29:580:30:03

Time to move on.

0:30:030:30:05

-Hello, there.

-Hi, there.

-Can you take me on?

-Yeah, no problem.

-Excellent!

0:30:050:30:09

Not quite the same, is it?

0:30:090:30:11

Margie, meanwhile, is heading east, to Exeter.

0:30:110:30:15

You'll be amazed to learn that the county town of Devon

0:30:180:30:21

is surprisingly free of myth, magic and ancient ball games.

0:30:210:30:24

It does, however, boast several ghosts and, when it comes to

0:30:240:30:29

foretelling the future, Exeter has, for the last ten years,

0:30:290:30:33

been the home of the Met Office.

0:30:330:30:34

-Hello! Good afternoon, Margie. Pleased to meet you. Norman.

-Norman.

0:30:360:30:40

Although this is an antiques centre,

0:30:400:30:43

Stormin' Norman does have quite a few of his own things for sale.

0:30:430:30:46

What he doesn't yet know, of course, is just how little Margie has left

0:30:460:30:50

to spend.

0:30:500:30:52

I've got about £40-odd left. So, I'm not in the best of situations

0:30:520:30:57

at the moment!

0:30:570:30:58

Certainly aren't. There has got to be something, though, for you here,

0:30:580:31:01

love.

0:31:010:31:03

Oh, no - tools. Not coming in there!

0:31:030:31:06

Ho-ho-ho! Those Imari vases would do nicely, though.

0:31:060:31:10

The ticket price is £69 and Margie is nowhere near that.

0:31:100:31:13

-Who owns this cabinet?

-Guess who?

-You.

0:31:130:31:17

How did you guess that(?)

0:31:170:31:19

HE LAUGHS

0:31:190:31:20

-Seriously, yours?

-Yes.

0:31:200:31:22

-Good luck, you two.

-I like them.

-They're nice.

0:31:220:31:25

-Not very old.

-Turn of the century.

0:31:250:31:28

It's a good phrase that, innit?

0:31:280:31:30

SHE GIGGLES

0:31:300:31:31

1910.

0:31:310:31:32

BOTH LAUGH

0:31:320:31:35

The coy courtship ritual

0:31:350:31:37

-of the antiques dealer, eh?

-Quite a handsome pair, aren't they?

0:31:370:31:40

-Interested?

-Well...vaguely.

0:31:400:31:42

How much?

0:31:440:31:45

BOTH LAUGH

0:31:450:31:47

I don't know what's in the tea leaves, but I'm feeling hopeful.

0:31:470:31:50

-Seriously, no joking, all I have got is...

-£40?

-Yeah.

0:31:500:31:58

-Is that pushing it?

-Ooh. I'd be happy with 40, if you are.

0:31:580:32:02

I think you'd do well.

0:32:020:32:03

I'm just nearly there. I'm nearly there.

0:32:030:32:06

Nearly there.

0:32:060:32:08

Hey! Norman's just knocked off over a third, Margie.

0:32:080:32:12

Beggars can't be choosers.

0:32:120:32:14

40, they're yours.

0:32:140:32:17

-I'm boring you now, Norman, aren't I? I can see.

-Not at all, no.

0:32:170:32:20

My indecision is boring you.

0:32:200:32:22

I think our Margie is girding up her loins to make a cheeky offer.

0:32:220:32:25

They are not actually a pair, are they?

0:32:250:32:27

-Can you see?

-Oh, they look identical to me.

0:32:270:32:30

They are a pair, but just a slightly different shape.

0:32:300:32:33

Different shape.

0:32:330:32:34

You can't tip me just a teeny bit more?

0:32:340:32:36

You are a very persuasive, aren't you, person, yeah?

0:32:360:32:40

No, it's only cos I'm in such trouble, Norman.

0:32:400:32:43

HE GUFFAWS

0:32:430:32:45

-You have the last say.

-35.

0:32:450:32:48

-You're a...

-Yeah, 35?

-35. You're a star.

-That's right.

0:32:490:32:54

-You are most welcome.

-Thank you very much, Norman.

0:32:540:32:57

I shall remember you in my will.

0:32:570:32:58

BOTH LAUGH

0:32:580:33:00

Margie, somehow, managed to magic up five items on a very tight budget,

0:33:000:33:04

but as we all know, it's bad luck to auction

0:33:040:33:06

-the witch's ball on its own.

-So, what I'm going to do,

0:33:060:33:10

I'm going to buy a box of matches, which I am going to auction,

0:33:100:33:14

and they get this free!

0:33:140:33:15

Now, please don't think I have gone mad,

0:33:190:33:21

but could I buy a box of matches, please?

0:33:210:33:25

20p.

0:33:250:33:26

That's magic!

0:33:260:33:28

So, short of buying a lottery ticket, our shopping's complete.

0:33:290:33:33

But what did they buy?

0:33:330:33:34

Well, Paul went for a card tray,

0:33:360:33:38

a steamer chair,

0:33:380:33:39

a retro TV,

0:33:390:33:41

a brass lamp and an Arts and Crafts tray,

0:33:410:33:44

spending £165... whilst Margie bagged a buckle,

0:33:440:33:50

some book-ends, a silk-work picture, a pair of vases

0:33:500:33:53

and a box of matches, not forgetting her witch's ball,

0:33:530:33:57

for a cup of tea, making a grand total of £131.70.

0:33:570:34:00

-There you are, madam.

-Thank you so much.

-You are most welcome.

0:34:000:34:02

-It's been a pleasure.

-Pleasure to meet you.

0:34:020:34:04

So, what do Mystic Margie and Predictive Paul foretell?

0:34:040:34:08

My favourite of Margie's purchases is the buckle.

0:34:080:34:11

I love it. Should I love it? No, because it could make her

0:34:110:34:15

a lot of money.

0:34:150:34:16

The walnut tray.

0:34:160:34:18

I think he'd be lucky to get £10 for that.

0:34:180:34:21

Elephants. This is her Achilles heel. Tourist fodder.

0:34:210:34:25

They're not finely executed, but they are book-ends.

0:34:250:34:28

Book-ends are good.

0:34:280:34:29

The steamer chair is interesting.

0:34:290:34:31

£45?

0:34:310:34:32

It's a bit on the edge.

0:34:330:34:35

He could go down with that.

0:34:350:34:37

With all hands, eh, Margie?

0:34:370:34:39

After starting out beside the River Camel at Wadebridge,

0:34:390:34:42

this leg of our trip concludes at an auction in Seaton,

0:34:420:34:45

on the Jurassic Coast. And, fortunately,

0:34:450:34:48

the brakes have been newly settled. Ha!

0:34:480:34:51

-See the wee geek fossil-hunter in me, when I was a wee boy.

-Really?

0:34:510:34:54

With my wee hammer.

0:34:540:34:55

-Really?!

-Oh, a place of pilgrimage!

0:34:550:34:59

Ah. Back in the 19th century, long before young Paul arrived,

0:34:590:35:04

the cliffs and beaches of Lyme Bay were the site of some

0:35:040:35:06

of the first discoveries of dinosaur remains

0:35:060:35:08

and local resident Mary Anning, who, after several amazing finds,

0:35:080:35:13

opened up Anning's Fossil Depot.

0:35:130:35:16

Hey! Ah, your auction awaits, ma'am.

0:35:160:35:19

-Are you excited?

-Stroke terrified?!

0:35:190:35:22

BOTH LAUGH

0:35:220:35:23

Welcome to Lyme Bay Auctions.

0:35:240:35:27

I wonder what auctioneer Kevin Frost thinks of Margie and Paul's

0:35:310:35:34

little collection?

0:35:340:35:36

Paul's steamer chair, I'm quite excited about selling that one.

0:35:360:35:40

That's my favourite of the items.

0:35:400:35:41

The ball with the box of matches.

0:35:410:35:44

It's got mystical powers, apparently. It certainly made me

0:35:440:35:46

feel a bit funny when I saw it.

0:35:460:35:48

If I was a betting man, I would like to put my money

0:35:480:35:51

on Margie's goods making more money today.

0:35:510:35:53

Well, that should keep the chaise longue crowd interested.

0:35:530:35:56

Starting off with Paul's Belle Epoque card tray.

0:35:560:36:00

-It is my strongest lot.

-Yeah, it is.

-So, watch this one break even.

0:36:000:36:05

-and a grown man cry.

-Don't expect sympathy.

0:36:050:36:09

I have several commission bids on this. Starting at £25.

0:36:090:36:13

£25, I have with me.

0:36:130:36:14

25. 30. 35 and 40.

0:36:140:36:17

-Hey.

-Still with me, at 40. 45.

-That's just break even, though.

0:36:170:36:19

50. 55?

0:36:190:36:22

55. 60. 65? £60, with me, on commission, at £60.

0:36:220:36:25

He is still on commission. Come on, bid again!

0:36:250:36:28

62. Now in the room at £62. And selling at £62...

0:36:280:36:34

-That's all right.

-Whew. That bodes all right, yeah.

0:36:340:36:37

Spoken like a true seer.

0:36:370:36:40

Now, what about your lamp with absolutely no provenance, Paul?

0:36:400:36:44

This one was on the Titanic.

0:36:440:36:46

-Oh, get off!

-This was on the Titanic.

0:36:470:36:49

-Why is it not on here?

-Just the small matters of legality(!)

0:36:490:36:52

You know, the Trade Descriptions and all that.

0:36:520:36:54

I have a bid on this. In at £12. £12, I have on the book. 12.

0:36:540:36:58

14. 16. 18. 20. 22? £20, I have with me. At 20. 22? 22.

0:36:580:37:06

Oh, no, not at all. It's a brass lamp. They don't get it.

0:37:060:37:11

25, and you're out? 25.

0:37:110:37:12

28. to the lady, at £28.

0:37:120:37:15

30, anywhere? 30, anywhere? Selling at £28...

0:37:150:37:18

That's really, really unfortunate!

0:37:190:37:22

Oh, control yourself, Margie!

0:37:240:37:26

-But it all helps.

-Thank goodness we have got each other.

0:37:260:37:30

Yeah, cos you're a big consolation, laughing in my face(!)

0:37:300:37:33

Her elephants might just wipe that smile off, though.

0:37:330:37:37

-Slightly damaged on one of them, unfortunately.

-Shut up!

-Bit harsh.

0:37:370:37:40

Start me at £12. 14, anywhere?

0:37:400:37:43

14. 16. 18?

0:37:430:37:45

£16, I have. At 16. 18, anywhere? 18.

0:37:450:37:49

20. £20. 22, anywhere?

0:37:490:37:51

-22, anywhere? 22.

-It's creeping. It's creeping. It's creeping.

0:37:510:37:57

The lady's bid, at £22...

0:37:570:38:00

An even bigger loss, although hardly jumbo. Hoo!

0:38:000:38:04

I've never done so badly on a Trip. It's all your fault.

0:38:040:38:06

What do you mean? You're employing dark forces now.

0:38:060:38:10

You've got witchcraft involved in your battle campaign.

0:38:100:38:13

Yes, quite. Now, for Margie's nice matches.

0:38:130:38:18

Other brands are available.

0:38:180:38:19

Apparently, this witch's ball was given as a free gift.

0:38:190:38:21

We are not allowed to sell anything that a witch has given you

0:38:210:38:25

and I'm not responsible for anything

0:38:250:38:27

that goes wrong in this saleroom. Who will give me a tenner? £10.

0:38:270:38:30

You are very cruel. 10? Thank you, sir. £10.

0:38:300:38:34

Someone he knows! £10, I have. At 10.

0:38:340:38:36

If you get pregnant, it's not my fault.

0:38:360:38:39

LAUGHTER

0:38:390:38:41

£10, with me. 12? £12, anywhere?

0:38:410:38:43

I will sell it. Opening bid of £10.

0:38:430:38:45

-Colin!

-He did a very good job, there.

0:38:450:38:49

Weird.

0:38:490:38:50

Yeah, and what is even weirder is that Margie has made a profit!

0:38:500:38:55

Well, I wish him luck. I wish that nice man a lot of luck.

0:38:550:38:59

Now for Margie's vases. Another profit, please.

0:38:590:39:03

Got several commission bids on this, just in at £20.

0:39:030:39:06

£20, surely that's got to fetch a lot more than that.

0:39:060:39:08

20, 22. 25.

0:39:080:39:10

28. 30. 32. Now in the room at £32.

0:39:100:39:15

-35. 38. 40.

-Yeah, you're all right, it's running.

0:39:150:39:18

£40 I have, 45 anywhere? 45 anywhere?

0:39:180:39:21

I will sell 'em. At just £40...

0:39:210:39:23

-45. Thank you, sir. 45, 50.

-He's coming back.

-Yeah.

0:39:230:39:27

50. 55? No, £50 at the back now.

0:39:270:39:30

We're selling at £50...

0:39:300:39:34

It's just like the tea leaves foretold.

0:39:340:39:36

Time for Paul's other tray, the one Margie thought might make £10.

0:39:360:39:41

80 quid?

0:39:410:39:42

-Ooh, I like the ambition, the optimism.

-60?

0:39:420:39:45

-£40...

-I like that he's trying.

-He is trying.

0:39:450:39:48

Nobody?

0:39:480:39:50

20?

0:39:500:39:51

-20. It's on you, Colin.

-That's the dealer man.

0:39:510:39:54

£20 I have, at 20. 22 anywhere?

0:39:540:39:56

22, 22. Thank you, madam. 25?

0:39:560:39:58

28?

0:39:580:40:00

30? No?

0:40:000:40:01

-£28 to the lady.

-Flying.

-He's trying very hard for us.

-£28...

0:40:010:40:06

So, a small profit for Paul, which is TRAY, TRAY bon.

0:40:080:40:12

Let's just hope that Margie's star buy pays off.

0:40:130:40:16

It's gorgeous. Now, please, let's... let's have a result.

0:40:160:40:22

I've got a bid on this, in at £30.

0:40:220:40:24

35. 40.

0:40:240:40:26

45. 50. 55.

0:40:260:40:29

Now in the room at £55, should fetch more.

0:40:290:40:31

£55 I have, 60 anywhere?

0:40:310:40:33

I will sell it at £55...

0:40:330:40:36

Result.

0:40:360:40:38

Yet another profit.

0:40:380:40:40

Is this the comeback?

0:40:400:40:42

-HE TRILLS A DRAMATIC TUNE

-The witch's ball.

0:40:420:40:45

Not off the Titanic but quite comfy, Paul's steamer chair.

0:40:450:40:49

I'm going to start off at £30.

0:40:490:40:51

Very nice looking chair, £30 I have.

0:40:510:40:53

-Oh, straight in at 30.

-32.

0:40:530:40:55

35. 38. 40. Still with me at £40.

0:40:550:40:58

45. 50. 55?

0:40:580:41:01

Now in the room at £55.

0:41:010:41:03

I'll take that, that's all right.

0:41:030:41:05

£55 and selling...

0:41:050:41:08

-Well done.

-Fair enough.

0:41:080:41:09

So, a small profit after auction costs, eh?

0:41:090:41:12

Next, Margie's silk-work.

0:41:150:41:17

I've got a commission bid on this, in at £30.

0:41:170:41:20

-Get in!

-£30 I have straight in.

-Get in!

0:41:200:41:22

£30 I have with me on the book. 32 anywhere? 32 anywhere?

0:41:220:41:26

-32.

-Ah, there you go.

0:41:260:41:28

In the room at £32. Lady's bid at 32.

0:41:280:41:30

35 anywhere? We'll sell it at £32...

0:41:300:41:34

All sewn up, eh?

0:41:350:41:37

Now, do not adjust your sets, you're on telly, Paul.

0:41:370:41:40

No, I mean your telly's on...telly.

0:41:400:41:44

I wouldn't have a clue about old televisions.

0:41:440:41:47

-See the way you say that!

-I'm very proud to say that!

0:41:470:41:51

I've got several bids on the books. Going to start it off at £40.

0:41:510:41:55

£40 I have with me, 45.

0:41:550:41:57

50. 55. In the room at £55.

0:41:570:42:00

-60 anywhere?

-Come on!

0:42:000:42:02

60. 65.

0:42:020:42:03

-£65 I have, 65.

-Oh, well done!

0:42:030:42:06

-70 anywhere? Selling at £65...

-Done it!

0:42:060:42:09

214.

0:42:090:42:10

A timeless classic, eh? And a very fine profit, too.

0:42:100:42:14

-Profits, profits!

-Happy with that one?

0:42:140:42:17

-We are very happy.

-Total result.

-You did very well.

-You da man!

0:42:170:42:20

So, a good day all round. But Paul has triumphed again.

0:42:210:42:25

Margie began with £138.56, and after paying auction costs

0:42:250:42:30

she made a small profit of £6.88,

0:42:300:42:33

leaving her with £145.44 to spend next time.

0:42:330:42:37

Whilst Paul, who started out with £218.46, made,

0:42:390:42:44

after paying auction costs, a profit of £30.16,

0:42:440:42:48

so he now has £248.62 and a lead of over £100.

0:42:480:42:52

-Well?

-Not too bad.

-What do you mean, not too bad?!

0:42:550:42:57

It was, like, eight profits out of ten purchases.

0:42:570:43:00

Eight profits, but you've crept ahead again. Swine.

0:43:000:43:04

Next time on Antiques Road Trip, hidden treasures,

0:43:070:43:11

nail-biting deals,

0:43:110:43:13

and, best of all, firm friends.

0:43:130:43:15

The sun's shining, the company could be better...

0:43:150:43:19

It's the second leg of the road trip for antiques experts Paul Laidlaw and Margie Cooper. After a disheartening first auction, Margie has a lot of catching up to do, but will her fortunes change as the experts head for an auction in Exeter?