Stroud Antiques Roadshow


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Stroud

Members of the public bring along their antiques for examination. In Stroud, Gloucestershire, the experts find a 17th-century cushion mirror and an early marine chronometer.


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"Living down there was like living in a bean pod.

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"Our horizon of woods was the limit of our world.

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"The trees moved in the wind with a dry roaring that seemed a natural utterance of the landscape."

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Lines from Cider With Rosie - Laurie Lee's account of childhood in a small Cotswold village in the 1920s.

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He wrote, "The villagers themselves had three ways of living -

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"working for the squire, or on the farms, or down in the cloth mills at Stroud."

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And many of the old mill buildings are still here. The evidence is all around that,

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for 400 years, Stroud was a leading player in the woollen trade.

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The river which supplied the requisite power was the Frome. At one time, 200 mills lined its banks

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and it's said the water of the Frome changed colour according to the cloth being dyed.

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Often it ran red -

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the mills produced the Stroudwater scarlet, worn by our soldiers in the American War of Independence.

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Napoleon met the Redcoats at Waterloo.

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The colour is echoed in the uniforms of the guardsmen outside Buckingham Palace.

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This picture from the late 18C

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shows the bright red cloth drying in the sun, on tenterhooks.

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So THAT'S where that phrase came from!

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The atmosphere in Stanley Mill is quite suspenseful.

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It's five storeys high and back in 1840, it echoed to the clatter of 100 hand looms.

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It's still working, but stopped producing cloth in the late 1980s.

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These days, the machines burst into life only on special occasions.

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This is a carding machine, that was used to remove the nap from cloth.

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In 1830, this inspired local worker Edwin Budding

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to invent what became the joy and the bane of the lives of homeowners - the lawn mower.

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Stroud was also part of the Cotswolds Arts and Crafts Movement.

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The stained glass windows at Selsley

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were one of the first commissions for William Morris and Company in 1862.

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The aim was to create a band of colour around the church.

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There are windows here by Rossetti, Burne-Jones and Morris himself.

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But today, the brushes are put down and the lawn mowers fall silent,

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as people wend their way to the Stratford Park Leisure Centre.

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There are a few reasons why I'm interested in this bureau.

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It's of a type we see all the time.

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And it dates from...

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-it dates from the 1790s as a piece of furniture.

-Right.

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-And the decoration dates from the 1860s to 1870s, that sort of thing.

-Yes, I thought that might be...

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And it was when there was a revival of the age of Classicism, and a renaissance, if you like,

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of heavily carved furniture of the Carolean and Jacobean periods.

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And you go into various streets in London - Wardour Street, perhaps, or Berwick Street

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and you would find shops

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-where there were pieces of early furniture which you could take home and make into something else.

-Ah!

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They knocked together Elizabethan beds and made cabinets out of them, and things like that.

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At the same time, there was a vogue for flat carving on plain furniture

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to bring it up into fashion.

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We call it, probably rather dismissively, "the vicar's carving class" type furniture.

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I like that!

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Just as there were needlework classes, there were carving and painting and music classes.

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This is an object which was subjected to the vicar's carving class.

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"Daddy, what can I practise on?" "Use the old bureau up in the attic."

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So you have a perfectly good, plain piece of furniture, and let loose upon it with every design there was,

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some young person carved this out of sheer love. "Look what I've done!" They'd have been thrilled with it.

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That's the story of it. The nice thing about it is...

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I'll pull the loper out...

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And there inside is the original interior.

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The plainness of the whole interior, which would have looked like so...

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And around here, nice black line... which is fairly typical of the period 1790 to 1810.

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-Oh.

-These are the original handles. They're lovely.

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And so nice to see.

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-Ironic they did that to the outside of it!

-Yes.

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It's got the original feet and of its type, it's a cracking good example.

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I mean, it's wonderful! There is a market value to it.

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-It would be £1,500 to £2,000.

-Would it?

-Absolutely.

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What a lovely family of game birds! I suppose they're quails.

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-Do you...?

-Yes, they are quails.

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They're in the cornfield - hence the sheaf of corn.

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It's the mother and father quail and the tiny babies.

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Some are hiding under the mother and one's got on top of her back.

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-They're gorgeous little things. Have you had them a long time?

-They were left to my wife over 15 years ago.

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They're marked underneath the base with the Meissen crossed-swords mark.

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-Yes.

-This wonderful crossed-swords mark there, with the shape numbers and the particular form of the quail,

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of the birds, and the crossed-swords mark, puts it in date about mid-19C.

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They're not terribly early in Meissen terms, but they're absolutely, staggeringly beautiful.

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They're some of the nicest Meissen groups that I've seen.

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Wonderful! We must be looking at something worth around about £4,000.

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Is that a surprise?

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-Shocked?

-Well, I've seen people shocked on the Roadshow before - I know what it feels like now!

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Now, Samuel Lysons was a local man.

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His father was vicar of Rodmarton and Cherington, which is not so far from here.

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He was a very clever young man. He was sent off to work for a lawyer in Bath

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and he was later called up to the Middle Temple in London. But he had one abiding passion -

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Roman antiquities.

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This is An Account Of The Roman Antiquities Discovered At Woodchester In The County Of Gloucester.

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Now, before we go on with the book, you've got to tell me

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why it's in this terrible state.

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Well, apparently, it was in a chest

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in the house of a friend of mine and she put some flowers...

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And the bowl leaked into the chest and she didn't realise.

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That's absolutely terrible, because it is the most magnificent book.

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He was introduced to George III.

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He actually dedicates this to "George III, King of Britain".

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This really is a magnificent work.

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One of the plates I really love

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is this little picture of him - he draws a picture of himself

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working outside Woodchester Church and the site of the famous mosaics.

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And the scale of this book - there are 40 plates in it - is just amazing.

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This plate here, which is not an aquatint... It is, in fact, a soft-ground etching.

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A magnificent plate.

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This goes on right the way through. Another magnificent plate here.

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The church again, the River Severn...

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And this is the view of Woodchester

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from Selsley Hill. How he's done it is actually laid this out so that the sunlight

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seems to concentrate exactly where your eye is supposed to be.

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everywhere else is slightly dark,

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but that's where it's supposed to be. It is the most magnificent thing.

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Forty plates...

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and the date of this is 1797, and these had only been found...

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Roman remains, some of the largest in the UK -

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were actually found the year before.

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Forty plates which he actually drew himself

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and then engraved himself. So all this work is absolutely everything to do with him. Quite extraordinary.

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And this is probably the most famous plate in the book.

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It is the picture of the Orpheus pavement here, completely restored.

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He's obviously restored it,

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because I don't think it's quite like that.

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It's in need of tender loving care.

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The paper that all this is on is incredibly strong

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and so can be washed, but it'd cost an awful lot of money to put right.

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I would have thought that, without the stains,

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-um...a fine copy would make £1,000 to £1,500.

-Mmm.

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This copy, with the stains, I suspect, would be more...

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It'd cost too much to put it right. So, unfortunately, it looks like this copy is what we call a "breaker" -

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you'd take out those wonderful plates and clean them and hang them on somebody's wall.

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What a fascinating Arts and Crafts beaker! Tell me about it.

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It belonged, I believe, to Janet Ashbee. It was made by Richard Ashbee, who was her husband,

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for her at some time. Once, when my wife was visiting Janet,

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Janet got up, took that down, gave it to her and said, "Take great care of it - it's yours."

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Gosh, what a wonderful provenance! Ashbee, of course...

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putting Morris's ideas into effect in the metalwork.

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-Yes.

-Silver, copper work and so on.

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In the Arts and Crafts Movement, there was this great ethos

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-that things had to be made using traditional craft methods.

-Yes.

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So you've got this very subtle planishing

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in the surface. The decoration inside is fascinating.

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Down at the bottom there...

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I'm led to believe the decoration is showing the ash and the bee.

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-Yes!

-Connected with the name.

-Ashbee did a lot of the designs.

-Yes.

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-Which were then made by the craftsmen in the guild.

-Yes.

-This idea of the small group working together!

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But to actually have in your hands something where there is this history that it was made by Ashbee,

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I think is magical. It's a very difficult thing to put a value on.

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I've never seen one like this before.

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I would have thought we'd be looking at...

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maybe £500...and if the right people were there...

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-Yeah.

-Knowing that provenance...

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Um...I could see it going well above that.

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My feeling is this could be by John Pearson, who's very popular just now.

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At one time, he worked with the Guild of Handicrafts that were based in London at the end of the 19C,

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and moved to Chipping Campden in the Cotswolds in 1902.

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-What's very nice is the detail in the scales.

-Yes.

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It has been cleaned, but not over-cleaned.

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-And I would have thought, price-wise, probably around about the £800 mark.

-Thank you. I shall keep it.

-Good.

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Pretty amazing!

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It says, "Made in Hungary". I think that probably says it all.

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It's likely to be 1930 or between the wars with that mark on it.

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It's in a bit of a state, I'm afraid.

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I think I wore my first copy out, had to buy another, and now I've even got it on CD.

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So it's one of those albums that stays with you.

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-But in this case, I think it's a fiver.

-Yes.

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Tell me...whose is this?

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It's my grandad's. He was flying a Lancaster in the Second World War.

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Is he on this photograph?

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-Yes, that's him there with the hat on.

-Right. Right.

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-What happened to him?

-He was flying over France

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when he got shot and he had to bail out because it was going to crash.

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Ah, right. It's here -

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"Engines feathered, bombs going,

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"port outer feathered, bailed out."

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-Yeah.

-Landed in France... So, then what happened to him?

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He was saved by the Resistance and he got moved to Switzerland,

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-where he met up with his friends.

-He was lucky, wasn't he?

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-Yeah.

-My goodness! Pilots' log books are usually £250,

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but I feel that there's so much activity in here, plus the fact of a fascinating story

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that we might even be able to double that if it was ever on the market.

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There are two institutions in Britain that look after war memorials.

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-One is The National Inventory of War Memorials.

-They've seen it.

-Fine. So it is listed in their database.

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-The other is The Friends of War Memorials.

-Oh.

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-They're very much involved in the re-siting and the re-dedication of panels that have become detached.

-Ah.

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-So contact them. They have a conservation service who will advise you what to do about display.

-Yeah.

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Because it is not a conventional decorative object. The families of those involved are still in the area,

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and one has to treat it with reverence.

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Things like this are completely uncollectable. They have a meaning far beyond collection.

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They are very important objects to those involved and one must say these have no commercial value.

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As you can see, they're all little signal flags,

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set with different gemstones - rubies, diamonds and sapphires.

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And there are one or two other rubies there... And these are probably tourmalines and citrines.

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Very prettily made, and each of these is a letter - a signal flag letter.

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They're engraved on the back. It spells "remembrance", doesn't it?

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It does.

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These were terribly popular around 1900 and were often made by a firm called Benzie in Cowes,

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so this probably was a present from a rather wealthy yacht owner

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to his wife or lady love.

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You should insure this - you'll be surprised -

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-for about £2,500.

-As much as that?!

-Yes. Yes.

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Living with this display cabinet must be a bit like living in the country -

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it's absolutely full of floral and foliate and field detail, isn't it?

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It is, yes.

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-Is that how you think of it?

-Yes.

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And I always did live in the country. Um...I remember it as a little girl

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with my parents. When they passed away, it came to me. So, we lived in the country.

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It's full of the most beautiful little things. I used to gaze in it.

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What really takes my eye

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is all the marquetry detail you have here in lots of different woods,

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particularly the cow parsley decoration,

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echoed in the carved detail underneath, which is so delightful.

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Even in the legs, you get the sense of the organic, of stems, of growth.

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But what I also noticed

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is this little signature into the marquetry,

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with the magical name of Galle.

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He loved the country and liked to turn his furniture into organic objects.

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If you follow the legs up, and go up and up,

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you can see he continued the theme all the way round - delightful.

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Galle is one of THE names of French Art Nouveau.

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He was working at the end of the 19C. In fact, he died in 1904, so he just went into the 20C.

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If you look at the carving in the gallery,

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-it doesn't have a great deal of detail in it.

-Right.

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And this is somewhat indicative of the more... commercial pieces that he made,

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so there's a mixture between the high quality exhibition pieces and this.

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This is still extremely attractive - people love this kind of decorative object. The sale value...

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-might well be around £3,000.

-Really? Oh!

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I don't know if it is a studio piece in the manner of Burne-Jones

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or if it is by the master's hand.

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It is a conundrum. If you know about Burne-Jones and the studio and the studio process...

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Burne-Jones was a very popular artist - he couldn't supply the demand at certain times in his life,

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and so very early on when he worked with William Morris,

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he employed a studio assistant in the 1860s.

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This was the pattern of his career. And the way it would work was that Burne-Jones drew all the time.

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His nervous tic, if you like, was drawing.

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When he worked on a picture, he'd draw not only a series of drawings,

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but maybe a finished drawing for the picture, and the studio assistant would take a canvas and block it in.

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They blocked it in in monochrome colours. The interesting thing is

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precisely these colours - these sepia browns,

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and then a touch of green in the bodies, etc.

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This is not the canvas that was originally worked on - the canvas was much larger.

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Off the top of my head, this is for the Perseus series -

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one of the great series Burne-Jones did -

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-and it's Perseus going off...

-Yes.

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-..to cut off the Gorgon's head.

-I think this is the Medusa...

-Yes.

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-That's Perseus.

-And she's lost her head, as we say.

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What is this strange animal on this stand worth? It's a slight anomaly.

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-Here you're buying a little piece of Burne-Jones.

-Yes.

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Arguably the best artist in Britain in the second half of the 19C.

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-A very good Burne-Jones is worth over a million.

-Yes.

-A good studio piece is worth under £100,000.

-Yes.

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But this is a fragment of a studio piece, which isn't awfully good,

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although it's part of Burne-Jones. So, I think...

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-perhaps around £10,000 - that sort of value. £10,000 or £15,000.

-Yes.

-It's unlikely to make any more.

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-You've got more at home?

-I've got 200 or 300 dolls,

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400 Pelham puppets, doll's houses, rocking horses...

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It's a bit of a disease when you get to that!

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-Terrible disease!

-Is there a cure?

-No!

-When the money runs out, isn't it?

-Yes!

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What will I do with them at the end?

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Well, let's start with this little one.

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She's very sweet.

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She was made in the Thuringia area of southern Germany

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and she would be dating from... the first half of the 19th century.

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-Wow, she's really old!

-She's really old. She's the oldest one you've got here.

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She's in her original costume,

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but the real surprise and, in fact, the thrill, comes underneath,

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because what looks like a peacock's tail turns her from being a normal wooden doll -

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which is exciting enough as it is - into a fortune-telling doll.

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-I didn't know.

-No?

-I only bought it because I saw the paper skirt

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-and thought, "I haven't got a doll with a paper skirt - I'll have that one".

-Good.

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Let's have our fortune told... Here we go. There's a nice green one...

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It says, "In Cupid's charms

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-"you are safely bound".

-Sounds fun!

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So she's lovely. I mean, she is a valuable,

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as well as being a handsome doll. I would have thought...

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if she hadn't had the fortune-telling aspect,

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-she would have been in the £400 bracket.

-Right.

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-Because she has that, it'll be double or even triple, so something between about £800 and £1,200 for her.

-Gosh!

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A real poppet.

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And this little one...

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couldn't be more different - from a completely different era.

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You've got this curved limb body, which means he can sit up nicely.

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-Yes.

-And then, at the back of the head,

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we've got the FS & Co - Franz Schmidt...

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-Yes.

-And the number 1272.

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Franz Schmidt... His porcelain factory was also based in Thuringia - the same area as the wooden doll,

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but it was really in the early part of the 20th century

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that dolls started to be modelled much more on real-life children

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-than on idealised representations of children.

-Yes. Yes.

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He isn't as valuable as the first one, although he is nicely painted,

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and by a slightly unusual maker.

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-I'd put him in the sort of £400 area.

-Really? Gosh!

0:22:050:22:10

This one is tortoiseshell.

0:22:100:22:12

-We call it that - it's not tortoiseshell, of course.

-No.

-It's turtle shell.

-Turtle shell, yes.

0:22:120:22:18

And it's cut when it's malleable.

0:22:180:22:20

You remember those old 78 gramophone records you used to have, those black discs - I think they're vinyl?

0:22:200:22:27

-Yes.

-Now, if you put them in water, you could bend it any shape - fruit bowls...

-Vases and such, yes.

-Yes.

0:22:270:22:33

Turtle shell reacts the same way to heat, and so is flattened and then can be cut in thin slivers of veneer.

0:22:330:22:40

-Yes.

-And depending on what colour you put underneath it,

0:22:400:22:44

accordingly the colour changes, as it's translucent.

0:22:440:22:47

If you put red, yellow, it will show through varying shades of density. This is a plain cream background.

0:22:470:22:54

This is its natural colour.

0:22:540:22:55

There is actually the perfect colour.

0:22:550:22:58

Only one little cover. The other's disappeared.

0:22:580:23:02

-I've seen it somewhere.

-You've got it somewhere?

0:23:020:23:05

Good. And today, between £1,800 to £2,200

0:23:050:23:09

for insurance purposes - that's how much you'd have to pay to replace it.

0:23:090:23:15

-Thank you!

-Extraordinary.

-Yes!

-The prices of these have gone up and up.

0:23:150:23:19

And so to a slightly earlier one here,

0:23:190:23:22

which is delightful. This is ivory with tortoiseshell.

0:23:220:23:27

A silver escutcheon on the front and its original key.

0:23:270:23:30

And...well, those are replacements, actually.

0:23:320:23:36

I thought it was too good to be true that there were two of them!

0:23:360:23:40

Yes, the original ones have gone. Not to worry - that matters not at all.

0:23:400:23:46

It's still a delightful little caddy. Today, between £2,500 and £3,000.

0:23:460:23:51

-Delightful. That's about 1780, 1790, that sort of date, yes.

-Yes.

0:23:510:23:56

So you've got early 19th century, late 18th century.

0:23:560:24:00

-Right.

-And this one...

0:24:000:24:02

which is absolutely wonderful, is the earliest of all three.

0:24:020:24:07

This was made in India.

0:24:070:24:09

Um...

0:24:090:24:11

Difficult to be precise, but between 1750...

0:24:110:24:14

and 1770.

0:24:140:24:17

That sort of period. The mount here

0:24:180:24:20

is most definitely English.

0:24:200:24:23

Those particular designs went out of fashion by the 1770s.

0:24:230:24:28

And this is inlay.

0:24:280:24:31

And the wood is cut out

0:24:310:24:34

and a piece of ivory cut to fit in.

0:24:340:24:38

This is individually placed little pieces of ivory.

0:24:380:24:42

-They're tiny.

-Oh, it's amazing work, amazing work.

0:24:420:24:46

And then further etched on the surface to give it even more life and realism.

0:24:460:24:52

Then blacked in with ink to show the engraved lines.

0:24:520:24:57

You see that, curiously, it's a stationery box.

0:24:570:25:01

At one time there were two divisions, across from there to there.

0:25:010:25:05

That is absolutely wonderful.

0:25:050:25:07

The timber is, I'm quite certain, either rosewood or coromandel.

0:25:070:25:12

If you wanted to replace this...

0:25:120:25:14

..it would cost you certainly in excess of £10,000.

0:25:170:25:22

This is a very interesting sword.

0:25:230:25:25

-It's called a mandau.

-Mandau.

0:25:270:25:29

-Uh-huh. And it's a Borneo headhunter's sword.

-Good heavens!

0:25:290:25:34

-Has it been used in anger?

-Well, this on the end here is human hair.

0:25:340:25:39

-So the signs are it possibly could have been.

-What a horrible thought. How old is it?

0:25:410:25:47

I would think about mid-19th century.

0:25:470:25:50

-Is this ALL human hair?

-Yes.

-They weren't hunting blondes, were they?

0:25:500:25:55

Well, I suppose it's a grey-haired man, that.

0:25:550:25:59

Wow! And what's it worth?

0:25:590:26:01

Around £250, as near as I can say.

0:26:030:26:06

-Pretty...but nasty.

-Yeah.

0:26:060:26:08

I have to say I have never seen a chatelaine like this before.

0:26:080:26:13

Until I saw this one, I didn't know that such a chatelaine existed.

0:26:130:26:19

You've got Mother and Father there, the next generation across here,

0:26:190:26:23

and then again, coming down, it looks as though they're grading it

0:26:230:26:27

in sort of age of the family, and, of course, these huge Victorian families that they had.

0:26:270:26:34

And so complete! All the contents you've got here - the scissors,

0:26:340:26:39

the pencil... What's this one?

0:26:390:26:41

Oh, it's a penknife.

0:26:420:26:45

Then...

0:26:450:26:46

Oh, pincushion - so, with the velvet, you push your pins down into that.

0:26:460:26:52

As she's moving round the house, she needs to take a few notes,

0:26:520:26:56

so not only has she got the pencil, but she's got a little aide-memoire there with those ivory tablets.

0:26:560:27:03

Now, there should be... Let's see.

0:27:030:27:06

Let's just get that open. Yes, there we are. There should be a thimble,

0:27:060:27:10

and there it is.

0:27:100:27:12

-She was definitely well-equipped with this little chatelaine!

-Yes.

0:27:120:27:17

I would have thought we're talking about at least £1,500, if not £2,000.

0:27:170:27:21

And if it went way beyond that, you know, it just would not surprise me.

0:27:210:27:27

Since I took early retirement, I've taken to going to local auctions and I just fell in love with that pot.

0:27:270:27:34

I loved the shape, I loved the decoration and the colours.

0:27:340:27:39

-You know it's Wedgwood?

-Yes.

-It's a jolly nice Wedgwood teapot.

0:27:390:27:44

Very unusual sort, of a colour that's called Rosso Antico -

0:27:440:27:49

-meant to look like ancient Etruscan pottery.

-Right.

-The red and the black colours.

-Yes.

0:27:490:27:55

Almost looking like Greek or Etruscan ceramics.

0:27:550:27:59

-Yes.

-Which Wedgwood was very firmly into when this was made,

0:27:590:28:04

which was around about...

0:28:040:28:06

1790, 1795,

0:28:060:28:08

so it's 200 years plus.

0:28:080:28:11

-Right.

-It's very unusual. The unusual decoration...

0:28:110:28:14

-It's probably got a little bit dirtied or stained.

-Mmm.

0:28:140:28:18

-Have you had a wash of it?

-I washed it very gently.

0:28:180:28:22

-It has a whiteness on the surface.

-There's a white bloom on it.

0:28:220:28:27

But the pot itself is in splendid condition. I like it very much.

0:28:270:28:31

And you paid £200...?

0:28:310:28:33

-Yes, just over - about £220.

-Very brave.

0:28:330:28:37

-Do you want to know what the value is now?

-I would be pleased to know.

0:28:370:28:41

A rare piece.

0:28:410:28:43

I think probably we're pushing towards, and perhaps above...

0:28:430:28:48

-£2,000.

-Good lord!

0:28:480:28:50

This watercolour transports us off to the Middle East, to the desert here.

0:28:500:28:55

It's a desert scene,

0:28:550:28:57

with Bedouin, I suppose they are.

0:28:570:29:00

-Yes.

-Bedouin tribesmen.

0:29:000:29:02

It's by JA Benwell, 1862.

0:29:020:29:06

Now, that's Joseph Austin Benwell.

0:29:060:29:09

He's not a very well-known artist but he did travel in the Middle East

0:29:090:29:14

and he travelled in India in the 1860s.

0:29:140:29:17

-This actually was a wedding present to us in 1938.

-I see.

0:29:170:29:23

Prices for these pictures are very strong.

0:29:230:29:26

The value of this now

0:29:260:29:30

-is about £6,000 to £8,000.

-Cor, love a duck!

0:29:300:29:33

A lot of the Roadshow is about what might have been. I've got a little story I can weave on that level.

0:29:330:29:40

Um...this, I think, is a device for keeping your cloak round your neck.

0:29:400:29:45

On it, in Arabic, there is an inscription. How good's your Arabic?

0:29:450:29:49

It looks like "John Lewis"!

0:29:490:29:52

-What it says is "Bernard Shaw".

-Really?

-Why should there be a cloak clip with "Bernard Shaw" in Arabic?

0:29:520:30:00

He was on holiday in Egypt and a man came up and said,

0:30:000:30:04

"I can make this for tuppence."

0:30:040:30:07

There was apparently a close friendship between Bernard Shaw and TE Lawrence - Lawrence of Arabia.

0:30:070:30:12

Now, is it therefore possible that Lawrence

0:30:120:30:16

had made this for Shaw as a little jokey present, saying,

0:30:160:30:20

"Bernard, I've got you a present - here is your name in Arabic on a stud."

0:30:200:30:27

-It makes sense.

-A wonderful idea if it could be proven.

-And if it could?

0:30:270:30:31

We'd be talking thousands of pounds, because it's such an item to tie the two together.

0:30:310:30:37

It's lovely looking at this - it's a work of art

0:30:400:30:43

-you can wear.

-It certainly is, yes.

-Is that what attracted you to it?

0:30:430:30:48

-I think so. Anything that's got stitch on is my hobby. I just adore embroidery.

-You're a stitcher?

-Yes.

0:30:480:30:55

Yes, I am, and I teach embroidery too, so it's a joint hobby of mine.

0:30:550:30:59

Right, well what we're looking at here is a Chinese robe.

0:30:590:31:03

-Yes.

-It's got a lot going on,

0:31:030:31:06

as far as the various emblems and what they mean.

0:31:060:31:10

This dragon, for instance, here -

0:31:100:31:14

-emblematic of the emperor.

-Yes.

0:31:140:31:17

We've got... On your side, we've got the phoenix,

0:31:170:31:21

emblematic of the empress. And the Buddhist pearl here -

0:31:210:31:27

the pearl of wisdom.

0:31:270:31:30

Flaming pearl, really.

0:31:300:31:32

Other emblems - we've got the bat...

0:31:320:31:34

One of the five bats, perhaps, known as wu fu.

0:31:340:31:39

So you've got lots of different, very auspicious emblems and characters on here,

0:31:390:31:46

which would mean when you wore it, you'd be shrouded with good luck and so on. And look at the front here.

0:31:460:31:53

You can see how dirty this bit is. This has been replaced, and also...

0:31:530:31:58

the sleeves have been replaced. The sleeves obviously got very grubby

0:31:580:32:03

and, at some point, they've been added on.

0:32:030:32:06

I would put it at around 1900.

0:32:060:32:09

-Perhaps five years either way. I wouldn't put it back much further than that.

-No, no.

0:32:090:32:16

As for value... Condition's not great with these additions,

0:32:160:32:20

although they're old additions. I would have put it around £800 to perhaps £1,000.

0:32:200:32:27

-Really very nice.

-Lovely.

0:32:270:32:30

-But THIS is a completely different category.

-This is my favourite.

0:32:300:32:35

It is just wonderful!

0:32:350:32:37

A wedding kimono, but not one of the under layers, because there are seven different layers

0:32:370:32:43

-for a wedding kimono in Japan.

-Yes, and this is the very top one -

0:32:430:32:47

one that is put on after the obi is put on, which goes round the waist.

0:32:470:32:52

And it looks so fantastic when it's worn.

0:32:520:32:56

This would have been the work, unlike the Chinese robe, of several specialists -

0:32:560:33:02

one who specialised in the dyeing process and so on. As for date,

0:33:020:33:07

I'd put this at perhaps 1920, 1930.

0:33:070:33:10

And I would have thought that,

0:33:100:33:13

in today's terms,

0:33:130:33:15

we'd be talking about perhaps

0:33:150:33:18

£1,500, £2,000, that sort of figure.

0:33:180:33:21

-Do you have these pieces on display?

-No, they're in a box.

0:33:210:33:25

So you haven't seen them before?

0:33:250:33:28

It's the first time I remember seeing them.

0:33:280:33:31

They're lovely things. Beautiful flower painting. Hand-painted -

0:33:310:33:36

not a transfer print. Do you know where they were made or what period?

0:33:360:33:41

Not really. I'm not a china person, but I imagine they may be English.

0:33:410:33:46

But when? I have no idea, really.

0:33:460:33:49

Yes, they are English. They were made at the Worcester factory.

0:33:490:33:53

-Oh, right.

-So that's...that's exciting.

0:33:530:33:56

-This is Worcestershire?

-Worcester. Worcester factory in Worcestershire.

0:33:560:34:02

-They were made about 1765.

-Crikey!

-So...

0:34:020:34:06

235 years old and in pristine,

0:34:060:34:09

-virtually pristine condition - absolutely jewel-like enamel painting.

-Yes.

0:34:090:34:15

They could have been made yesterday.

0:34:150:34:17

-One could forgive anyone for thinking they were modern.

-Yeah.

-But they're absolutely beautifully made.

0:34:170:34:23

Look at the delicate way this twig handle has been made, and the leaves.

0:34:230:34:27

A giveaway to date

0:34:270:34:29

-is this beautiful green. A very Georgian colour, pea green.

-What, on the leaves?

-Yes.

0:34:290:34:35

Wonderful Georgian colour.

0:34:350:34:37

If we have a look at the basket, also centrally painted with flowers...

0:34:370:34:41

It's made in a most interesting way.

0:34:410:34:45

The porcelain, when it's first made,

0:34:450:34:48

when the potter is making it,

0:34:480:34:51

in the green state before it's fired,

0:34:510:34:54

he uses a knife to cut out all these shapes, all by hand.

0:34:540:34:59

They must have lost many pieces and never got them into the kiln, so it's quite an expensive process.

0:34:590:35:05

Have you thought about values at all?

0:35:050:35:08

Well, I really don't know and I have no idea of, really, of value,

0:35:080:35:12

but a guess would be a couple of hundred quid for each item.

0:35:120:35:17

-I've got another stand and basket.

-One more stand.

0:35:170:35:20

-A pair of stands and a pair of baskets.

-Yes.

0:35:200:35:23

-Are they both in this condition?

-Yes.

0:35:230:35:26

All right. Well, we've got tiny little bits of damage on both pieces,

0:35:260:35:31

but an insurance value

0:35:310:35:34

for two stands and two baskets...

0:35:340:35:38

-..would be £12,000.

-Good God!

0:35:390:35:42

Incredible!

0:35:420:35:44

Well, do you know, in 24 years, I think I haven't actually had

0:35:440:35:49

a cushion mirror on this programme? It's called that simply because it looks like a cushion.

0:35:490:35:56

It was, I know, in my grandfather's home and he died in 1927 and it passed to an aunt.

0:35:560:36:03

She was a spinster schoolmistress and most of her things came to me.

0:36:030:36:08

She always referred to it as the Jacobean mirror, but it wouldn't go that far, would it?

0:36:080:36:15

"Jacobean" was used 50 years ago as almost a generic term for anything of the 17C. So Carolean or Jacobean.

0:36:150:36:22

Jacobean describes the first half of the century, before the Civil War, and Carolean afterwards.

0:36:220:36:28

-Yes.

-We didn't have this type of mirror in the first half of the 17C.

0:36:280:36:33

It would come from 1685 to 1700.

0:36:330:36:36

Um...and it's made beautifully on pine

0:36:360:36:40

with these lovely oyster-patterned pieces of laburnum.

0:36:400:36:45

-Yes.

-And laburnum is cut like a French loaf. You cut it across at 45 degrees,

0:36:450:36:51

-It makes ovals - "oysters" - then it's applied in geometric form all the way round.

-Yes.

0:36:510:36:56

And then this cross-banded moulding is applied.

0:36:560:37:01

And that's what looks a bit fragile. But, really, that will never move.

0:37:010:37:06

That little bit of warping, twisting occurred probably within the first 20 years of its life

0:37:060:37:12

-and it's been like that for ever.

-Yes.

0:37:120:37:15

The nice thing about it is...

0:37:150:37:17

is on the back here.

0:37:170:37:20

You can see there are two slots

0:37:210:37:24

which flank that central little hook.

0:37:240:37:27

And that little hook is made and fixed on a piece of iron - fixed on with old, hand-made clout nails.

0:37:270:37:33

-Is it really?

-Yes. Those nails have been on there since the 1690s.

0:37:330:37:38

I mean, I think that's wonderful! And the slots in the back

0:37:380:37:42

were for two tongues which slotted in,

0:37:420:37:46

and it had a cresting rail on the top, which would have probably been finely carved and pierced.

0:37:460:37:53

-I've only seen two or three with the original cresting rails.

-Really?

0:37:530:37:57

They always got lost in moves.

0:37:570:38:00

Now, it's got a new plate in it...

0:38:000:38:02

-Um...I don't know - did you do that?

-No.

0:38:020:38:06

It's a pity they didn't keep the old one, because that would have added a bit to the value, but there it is.

0:38:060:38:12

-A lovely example of a very rare type of mirror.

-Thank you very much.

0:38:120:38:16

It's lovely, just lovely, and the colour is good

0:38:160:38:19

and it should be just as it is. Enjoy it. I would suggest insuring it

0:38:190:38:25

for about £6,000.

0:38:250:38:27

Good heavens!

0:38:270:38:30

It belonged to my grandfather-in-law.

0:38:320:38:35

He was an academic chemist.

0:38:350:38:37

He was a professor at Aberystwyth University. We believe he acquired it in the 1930s.

0:38:370:38:43

You probably heard at the time of the millennium about John Harrison, the discoverer of longitude.

0:38:430:38:50

There were TV programmes and books...

0:38:500:38:53

I'll try and explain briefly what happened after Harrison.

0:38:530:38:57

This instrument - which is a marine chronometer - is signed by Barraud

0:38:570:39:02

of Cornhill in London.

0:39:020:39:04

Harrison won first prize, and it took him a lot of time to get the money.

0:39:040:39:09

There remained some extra prizes

0:39:090:39:11

and a man called Thomas Mudge, an extremely good watchmaker in the 18C,

0:39:110:39:16

set about trying to win that prize, and he made a timekeeper - Mudge's No 1.

0:39:160:39:21

At the same time, the Board of Longitude changed the rules a bit.

0:39:210:39:26

They said, "We don't want one instrument - we want two." So he set about making a pair of instruments.

0:39:260:39:32

He got a little money from the Board, but he never got the second prize.

0:39:320:39:37

He died in 1794, and he had a son called Thomas Mudge.

0:39:370:39:41

-Oh.

-He took umbrage that his dad hadn't been properly recompensed,

0:39:410:39:46

and formed a small factory to make timekeepers on the principles of his father.

0:39:460:39:52

They started making instruments, but they were very complicated

0:39:520:39:56

and they were never really completed. So what we actually have here

0:39:560:40:00

is the remains of an instrument that was never completed, in the style of Thomas Mudge's invention.

0:40:000:40:06

So let me run through with you what is Mudge and what is Barraud.

0:40:060:40:10

First of all, as I've said, the dial and the wonderful silver work -

0:40:100:40:16

applied silver work, the enamel dials -

0:40:160:40:19

follow the design of Thomas Mudge. The difference is, the numerals

0:40:190:40:24

are actually not Roman and Arabic - Roman for the hours and Arabic for the minutes - but Arabic and Arabic.

0:40:240:40:31

That was a peculiarity of Barraud's work. He seemed to like Arabic numerals, which were NOT the fashion.

0:40:310:40:37

And we can date this instrument from its number to approximately 1801 to 1803. OK?

0:40:370:40:44

Inside, you'll see how wonderfully delicate the wheel work is. It's like a spider - beautifully fine,

0:40:440:40:50

very, very high number of pinions.

0:40:500:40:53

And another feature which is straight out of Mudge's original invention

0:40:530:40:57

is Mudge's standing barrel system,

0:40:570:41:00

which he's got here with a ratchet set-up click and a fusee chain there.

0:41:000:41:05

-So all those bits were from the original Mudge copies made by the son.

-Yeah.

0:41:050:41:11

Now, what is interesting about this particular instrument...

0:41:110:41:15

there are possibly up to 20 known surviving instruments of this type -

0:41:150:41:20

half-completed cases, dials, unfinished plates, movements with other escapements, all sorts.

0:41:200:41:26

But only one other

0:41:260:41:28

that is known - certainly that I know of - that has got its original fitted inner box,

0:41:280:41:35

-the inner protecting box.

-Right.

0:41:350:41:38

Which has, by the way, the most fantastic detail.

0:41:380:41:42

-You've got the original key.

-Mmm.

0:41:430:41:46

I was musing on this key, wondering what it's for.

0:41:460:41:50

It's called a crank key. It's got an ivory handle.

0:41:500:41:53

But why this funny end? And then I realised

0:41:530:41:57

that this simple clip lock here... You put the key in the keyhole, turn it...

0:41:570:42:03

-and you're actually locking that so it won't open.

-Oh, OK.

0:42:030:42:08

Once these instruments were set up and went to sea, they must never be touched. They can be wound,

0:42:080:42:14

but the hands must never be touched, so they were locked in the boxes.

0:42:140:42:19

So this would have gone in the box.

0:42:210:42:24

It's got a nice slot to locate it... Locked in the box.

0:42:240:42:28

The captain had a key which doubled for both. Then, through the back,

0:42:280:42:33

you had access through both cases to wind it.

0:42:330:42:36

So only the captain would have that key AND the key to the outer box.

0:42:360:42:41

So, with all the differences and complications and the rest of it...

0:42:410:42:46

Is it thirty...?

0:42:460:42:48

I think...

0:42:480:42:52

I'd say £30,000 to £50,000.

0:42:520:42:55

-£30,000 to £50,000?!

-£30,000 to £50,000.

0:42:560:42:59

Good heavens! What?!

0:42:590:43:02

Wow!

0:43:020:43:04

Like the cloth laid out in the sun at Stroud's old woollen mills,

0:43:040:43:09

we've been on tenterhooks to see what the day would hold. We're well and truly off the hook,

0:43:090:43:15

because it's been as interesting and as busy a Roadshow as any expert can wish for. So, many thanks all round.

0:43:150:43:21

Until next time, goodbye.

0:43:210:43:24

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:370:43:41

Michael Aspel and a team of experts invite members of the public to bring along their antiques for examination. In Stroud, Gloucestershire, they find a strange 17th-century cushion mirror and an early marine chronometer that might be worth fifty thousand pounds. Meanwhile, Michael finds a Borneo headhunter's sword.