Royal Holloway 1 Antiques Roadshow


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Royal Holloway 1

Antiques show presented by Michael Aspel. The team visit Royal Holloway College in Surrey, where their finds include a set of rare costume designs.


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The River Thames is dotted with historic landmarks.

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18 miles from London is perhaps the most important.

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We're in the borough of Egham and Runnymede.

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It was in this meadow, as every schoolchild knows,

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that on June 15th, 1215, the seeds of modern democracy were sown.

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At a meeting between King John and a group of barons whose possessions

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and patience were taxed to the limit,

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the royal seal was put to the charter which became a symbol of civil liberty and freedom.

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In time, the Magna Carta went far beyond limiting royal authority -

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it became the foundation for the constitutions and legal systems of countries such as India and the US.

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This elegant memorial was erected by a grateful American Bar Association.

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President John F Kennedy included principles from the Magna Carta in his inaugural speech -

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"We shall pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend, oppose any foe,

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"in order to assure the survival and success of liberty".

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A less far-reaching event, but historical nevertheless -

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happened on Priest Hill - the last duel fought in Britain.

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It was pistols at dawn for two Frenchmen, who for some reason came here

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to settle political differences.

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It was a fight to the death.

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-GUNSHOT

-The man who lost, Frederic Cournet, is buried in Egham churchyard.

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His end must have come as a great surprise to him - he had on him a return train ticket to London.

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Egham also boasts one of the most breathtakingly extravagant examples of Victorian architecture.

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Royal Holloway - built by Thomas Holloway, who made his fortune selling ointments and pills.

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Holloway was keen to spend his money to perpetuate his name and to give something back to society,

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particularly - at his wife's suggestion - to female society, who, she said, suffered most.

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So he built his college for women.

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Today, Royal Holloway is part of the University of London and an honoured seat of learning.

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Next week we'll learn more about the building and its namesake.

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Meanwhile, it's the setting for today's Roadshow.

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-Tell me where you got it from.

-It's been in the family for a generation

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-and, about 30 years ago, my father gave it me as a wedding present.

-Really?

-Yeah.

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-Delightful. What do you think it's made of?

-I don't know.

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-I thought that maybe it is ceramic.

-Ceramic?

-Ceramic, yes.

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Well, you're quite close, really.

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-This is actually made of hundreds of thousands of tiny little pieces of glass.

-Really?

-Yes.

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-Unbelievable!

-It's micromosaic.

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If we look carefully, the size of the pieces of glass varies tremendously.

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Here you've got really quite big bits

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and in her hair, tiny, tiny, tiny little bits.

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-And these are called filati.

-Filati.

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This technique was revived in Rome at the beginning of the 18th century,

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where they took long, thin strands of glass

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and cut them into little pieces and then glued them together,

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-making up a picture.

-Amazing.

-Micromosaic. Very beautifully done.

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And the colour? I mean, how did they manage to do the colouring?

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It was the colour in the glass.

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-And the delight of a sort of ceramic item is that, as the years go by, it doesn't fade.

-Yes.

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It may get dirty on the surface, but you can clean that. And you retain the brilliant colours.

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A delightful image - a pretty classical lady.

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-Yes.

-Holding a garland of flowers.

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Thoroughly attractive. The very early originals dated from Roman times.

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Then it was a technique which was lost,

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and, as I say, revived in Rome at the beginning of the 18th century and continued into the 20th century.

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One of the ways you can find out what the age is likely to be,

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is to have a squint at the back.

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-May I remove the back cover?

-Yes.

-See what...

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So the back board is just cheaply made of timber.

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And... Ah-ha! This is where the secret gets revealed.

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That back plate is made of metal -

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japanned iron.

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The japanning is flaking off.

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If we turn it over, you can see that the outer border

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of this back plate, the metal,

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comes all the way round the outside.

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A typical 19th-century technique.

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-It gives you an idea as to how those hundreds of thousands of pieces of glass are held in place.

-Yes!

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There's adhesive underneath each piece and then the surface is finished so it's completely flat.

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-Amazing.

-A beautiful object.

-It is.

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For insurance purposes, you should probably cover it for about £12,000.

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Unbelievable! I didn't know...

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-Miscellaneous for both of them.

-Thank you...

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It belonged to my father-in-law, who was always interested in guns.

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-First and foremost, the lock is on the wrong side.

-Oh!

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You see, this pistol... All the locks are on the right-hand side.

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-Oh.

-When a man fires it, then the lock is slightly to the right, not in front of him.

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-I see.

-If a man fired this with the right hand,

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he might get injured through the sparks or whatever. OK?

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-I see.

-So it seems to have been made for a left-handed man.

-Oh, right!

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-Which is most unusual.

-Really?

-Yes, most unusual.

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The cock itself is what they call a dog lock -

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because when it's cocked, that little fellow goes in there and makes it safe.

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-So that when the flash pan is closed, it can't misfire.

-Mm-hm.

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-Now, the whole shape of this tells me that it's Scandinavian.

-Oh, really?

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-That's interesting.

-And I would think that it's Danish.

-Oh.

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-The pistol is a holster pistol, to be used in a holster.

-Mm-hm.

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Could be 1790, a little after 1800.

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But as it's Scandinavian...

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-in demand, left-hand lock - most unusual...

-Yes.

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This, if it came into auction today,

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-I would think it would fetch in the region of £1,500 to £2,000.

-Good heavens!

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My family had plantations in Jamaica, Barbados, British Guyana and Surinam...

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And my husband, not to be outdone, searched around HIS family, cousins and all...

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and he outdid me with this beautiful, beautiful shield

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of all his family

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that went out to the West Indies after the Battle of Worcester.

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They fled after the battle, having changed sides several times.

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-This is in the 17th century...

-Yes.

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..when most of the Jamaican plantocracy started.

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One of George Needham's grandsons, this fellow here...

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And this was obviously collected around his lifetime.

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-The...the whole thing?

-The whole thing, with relatives going back through the generations.

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-So it's an assembly of miniatures that was assembled right at the end of the 18th century.

-That's right.

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-Just when Jamaica and all the other West Indies were teetering towards abolition of the slave trade.

-Right.

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-Delightful - it represents a very interesting period.

-Yes.

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To put a name to all of these miniature-painters would take some time, but I can identify three -

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Gervase Spencer, at the top... This is Charles Jagger...

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and Daniels of Bath and Plymouth.

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Those are, if you like, the three best recognisable miniatures.

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Looking at it commercially, there are a few things to take account of.

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-Sometimes if people are slightly less than picturesque...

-Yes, she's a bit hook-nosed.

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-That's reflected in value. Likewise if they are very handsome.

-Yes.

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And it's a West Indies-related group,

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so it would have interest for a number of quite wealthy West Indians.

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-They all had plantations.

-Yeah. For present-day collectors,

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we have to take account of the West Indies link and I'm going to say...

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we should be thinking, in terms of insurance value...

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around £20,000, £25,000.

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Yes... That's, uh...very good.

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-How long did they take you to collect?

-About five or six years.

-30 years ago?

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-Yes, about 30 years ago.

-And you've never bought a piece since?

-Er... No, I haven't.

-Why is that?

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-I took on a mortgage.

-But you still like it?

-Yes.

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The thing about the Doulton factory is that everything is different.

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The individual artists assembled there from 1871,

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doing their OWN thing alongside the drainpipes, the bottles - all the standard stoneware production.

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Girls and boys from art school - suddenly free to decorate pottery in a new way.

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-This presumably is Hannah Barlow?

-Yes. With the rabbits.

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It's not marked but it looks a bit like her, probably her early period. Her early pieces aren't marked.

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This is right at the beginning of the Doulton story - 1871, 1872...

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This is the first style. Minimal... Blue not very effectively put in. Straightforward, unsophisticated...

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And a very basic mark on the bottom - just "Doulton".

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No artist. This is where it starts.

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It's a very interesting piece because we are at the beginning.

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I like that one for the same reason, although it's much later.

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-About a hundred I think I paid for it. But I just love...

-Not cheap at the time.

-No.

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This is an artist called Louisa J Davis.

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I haven't seen her doing this sort of Hannah Barlow-type work, normally it's much more colourful. 1877.

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But harking back to that early style. Similarly, that piece. To me, I suppose...

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-George Tinworth.

-Lovely.

-With his very clear monogram.

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-He was the only one, I think, that used...

-Who signed on the body, yes.

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And you've got these blues and purples and greens... It has this wonderful turbulent life.

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Partly coming from the Rococo, partly from Art Nouveau, partly from William Morris... Different sources.

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-And to me that's the high point. And yet it's still drawn with very, very great freedom.

-Yes, yes.

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-I'm less excited by Florence Barlow.

-Yes.

-I know people rate her work highly.

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To me, the way the birds are painted - although it's very much her thing - is slightly sort of ponderous.

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Very much part of the aesthetic tradition of that period.

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The General Gordon one's interesting.

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They did do commemorative pieces and we forget that.

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Dying at Khartoum in 1884 - a real national hero.

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His death was marked by the Queen, by so many people...

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-And Doulton jumped on the band wagon.

-Yes.

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-What did you pay? £100... Less for most pieces?

-I didn't pay over £100 for anything, I don't think.

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-Let's start with that. He's such a good artist, he's so popular... £800 to £1,000.

-Eh...

-Too much?

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-Not too much, but...

-Surprising.

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The Barlow...

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-300 or 400.

-Oh, really?

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-If that wasn't cracked - again, high hundreds.

-Yes.

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-I would think you're looking at at least £5,000 for the lot.

-Really?

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My husband was a great collector.

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You know, boxes... Everything.

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-But

-I

-was not, until he brought this home.

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I wondered about this - I couldn't think what wood it could be.

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A conundrum. Very decorative outside

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with these brass strap hinges

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and a little pietra dura plaque, which is possibly English or maybe brought from the Continent -

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because it's extremely decorative with delicate little jasmine flowers set into the wood.

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Very dynamic, very strongly figured.

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But when you look closely, you find that it is actually grained.

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This black decoration is PAINTED on to make it look like walnut.

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Very lively walnut! But in fact I've been looking quite closely at what is underneath.

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It looks like a figured beech. Beech was often used for grained and painted furniture.

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-Of course.

-To look like walnut.

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-Right.

-Fascinating sort of trompe l'oeil effect.

-Right.

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But it doesn't detract in any way from the quality of the box itself.

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The style, I think, suggests a date of about 1860.

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I'm going to open the lid

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and immediately the contents become clear. It's a games compendium.

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But the freshness of the inside...!

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Absolutely stunning.

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Beautiful, isn't it?

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-A chess set and a cribbage board, I think...

-That's right, yes.

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And dice and these extraordinary little scoring devices of some sort.

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-And yet this little hand moves round.

-My husband was a great games man.

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-He played a lot of chess, backgammon... Shall I show you that?

-So there's backgammon included?

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It should come out. It should drop out... There we go. Right.

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So you've got chess here, right?

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-Beautiful. Looks like coromandel wood.

-That's right.

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-And bone or ivory set into that.

-Ivory maybe.

-The colours...!

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And then you've got backgammon.

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The fresh colours are what really strike me.

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Tulip wood, I would say.

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Orange tulip wood, coromandel and ivory... Spectacular.

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And inside here - this to me looks like satin birch. Pale, yellowy...

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-Which is the English equivalent, if you like, of satin wood.

-That's right.

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Then you've got this little button in the back which you press...

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to open a secret drawer of dice...

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Isn't that wonderful? And the little throwing pots.

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-And dominoes...

-And the old cards... They were never marked.

-No.

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With symbols but no numbers. This belonged to your husband?

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-It did, yes.

-And how did he get it?

-Well, he was a great racing man. He travelled all over England

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to all the different race courses, and always brought something back!

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He brought this back at some point,

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but I don't know where he got it.

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Well, to collectors of games, you're certainly looking at...£1,000-£1,500.

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-Really? Really...

-A lovely thing, in beautifully fresh condition.

-Yes. Amazing...

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Amazing...

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What a splendid pot! With a liner... Made by Minton, of course. Majolica.

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We see a lot of majolica,

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-but this is unusual with these... pigeons at the base.

-Pigeons, yes.

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Wonderful, aren't they?

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-How did you come by it?

-It was an elderly lady we knew - used to keep an eye on us sometimes.

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And in her will she said that I could have one item of her bits and pieces.

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-And I'd always admired this one, so that was it.

-You chose it?

-Yes.

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-I've always liked it.

-It's jolly good.

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-Such things have risen enormously in value.

-Really?

-Highly collectable.

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I think the value is somewhere about £4,000.

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-You're joking! Four...?

-A very, very nice gift to take.

-It was, yes!

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Thank you very much! Thank you!

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It's very short. Nice silver top... See the hallmark? Have we got a name?

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-Enrico Caruso... I don't believe it!

-It is.

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London, 1904...

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And some little musical notes! How amazing!

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-Where did you get it?

-We were clearing a house for some elderly relatives. It was in the hall stand.

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Completely black, no visible silver...

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and my son noticed this writing here, cleaned it up, and that's what we found.

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-Talk about a genie rubbing the lamp!

-Absolutely.

-What a nice surprise!

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-That explains why it's so short!

-He was very short.

-A very short man.

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-I would think getting on for £1,000.

-Really?!

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I have here a Bible...

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-Well!

-..which I found 30 years ago in a hedge.

-In a hedge?

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I TRIED to bet someone the other day

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that the first book that I saw at a Roadshow would be Brown's Self Interpreting Bible.

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Although it's a fantastic object, it's one of the most commonly found Bibles at the Roadshow.

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it's an absolutely wonderful thing

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with these great metal clasps and beautiful illustrations, but it was produced in huge quantities.

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And actually it's quite appropriate to have it here in Holloway College

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because it's it's all part of this big Victorian ideal of trying to educate people,

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and impart knowledge to a much wider population,

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and the Reverend Brown produced this Bible which was intended to be easier to understand

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with marginal notes and footnotes...

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-to help you to understand the meaning of the text.

-How old is it?

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The couple were married in 1880 and I imagine that it was a wedding present to them, so it was brand-new in 1880.

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These kinds of chromolithographs, these colour pictures, are typically late 19th-century,

0:20:120:20:18

so it was probably an expensive wedding present.

0:20:180:20:21

It's worth just a few pounds. Thank you very much for bringing it in.

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-I wish someone had taken me up on my bet!

-Many thanks.

0:20:270:20:31

A watch in a rosewood box usually means it's something quite interesting and indeed this is.

0:20:310:20:38

We can tell who the maker is

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without even opening the watch - it's marked Albert Potter and Company.

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He was an interesting man because he was American. Although there were some very good American watchmakers,

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they were not known for making individual technical pieces,

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and Albert Potter, who dates to something like 1836 to 1908,

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was one of the few American makers who's known for individual watches

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unlike, say, Waltham and Elgin, who made very good watches,

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but not the individual craftsmanship.

0:21:110:21:14

It's a strange thing for somebody to have. Can I ask where you...?

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-AMERICAN ACCENT:

-Family. My husband's family.

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"Cousin Henry" collected it and so we've had it many years.

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You see the stunning quality -

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myershall plates, beautiful quality balance wheel... AND a pivoted detent escapement -

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these were the final answer, really, to chronometers at sea,

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but they made very high precision pocket watches

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with the same escapement, and this is one of them.

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They are SO rare that it's difficult to know how much it would fetch.

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Have you got a figure in mind?

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Well, it was valued about 11 years ago, for...£15,000.

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It hasn't changed, surprisingly, that much. I would say now it should definitely be 20.

0:22:040:22:11

Wonderful.

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-I rescued them from a dustbin.

-You didn't!

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I did, yes! I studied at an art school.

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And when I was working at a studio that did painting for costumes and films,

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they were throwing them out, so I said, "May I have them, please?" I've had them for 40-odd years.

0:22:270:22:34

This is by Roger Furze - a superb draughtsman.

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For Lady Hadley in Woman Hater. Edith Evans.

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Wonderful! It's... For me, it's a drawing in itself with the watercolour on top.

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It's obviously meant to be exactly how they were going to clothe her -

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what she had to wear underneath...

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And her sable... Wonderful. It even looks like her.

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And it's only meant to be for the costume!

0:23:020:23:06

This is another well-known costume designer called Berkley Sutcliffe. Moira Lister...

0:23:060:23:13

-We don't know what this was for?

-I think Sweetest and Lowest.

-I love the pinched-in waist.

0:23:130:23:19

Wonderful. I think this fashion ought to come back, don't you?

0:23:190:23:24

It's very much a fashion of the '40s, isn't it?

0:23:240:23:28

Very much, very much. And beautifully executed.

0:23:280:23:33

Very fragile, so... Amazing they didn't scrunch it up!

0:23:330:23:37

-I'm glad they didn't.

-Yes, so am I!

0:23:370:23:40

-This is a splendid one, look at this.

-This is for Hermione Gingold.

0:23:400:23:45

Hermione Gingold, holding what is meant to be a Venetian mask.

0:23:450:23:50

Look at the eyelashes - aren't they wonderful?

0:23:500:23:54

Again by Berkeley Sutcliffe - Sweetest and Lowest.

0:23:540:23:58

Moira Lister and Hermione Gingold in the same production.

0:23:580:24:03

-Absolutely wonderful.

-Again, very decorative.

-Very decorative.

0:24:030:24:08

And I think, in a way, the value lies in that.

0:24:080:24:13

The Roger Furze was almost more collectable than any of the others. So the Roger Furze one...

0:24:130:24:19

We're talking about maybe £200.

0:24:190:24:22

This one, as it's Hermione Gingold,

0:24:220:24:24

there's a great following of her

0:24:240:24:28

and collectors will probably pay somewhere around 100, 150, possibly 200.

0:24:280:24:34

But you've got a huge collection!

0:24:340:24:38

So if you really work it out on an average of 100 to 250,

0:24:380:24:43

-I think you must have probably £5,000 worth there.

-Probably, yes. Thank you.

0:24:430:24:49

-I've got a lot more, actually, at home.

-HAVE you?

-Yes.

-Oh, my goodness!

0:24:490:24:55

-But this one is, I think, one of the nicest.

-I think so too. Wonderful.

0:24:550:25:01

-How did you come by these?

-Handed down from my great-grandfather.

-Your great-grandfather.

-Yes.

0:25:010:25:07

-From the First World War, I think.

-They're nicknamed Bradburys,

0:25:070:25:12

-as they were signed by John Bradbury. Not individually, of course.

-OK.

-But the print was signed.

0:25:120:25:19

John Bradbury was the first Permanent Secretary to the Treasury.

0:25:190:25:24

He was Permanent Secretary of the Treasury in 1914 when war was declared.

0:25:240:25:30

And they suddenly decided... Till that time the coinage was gold coins.

0:25:300:25:35

And they suddenly realised that they couldn't keep on using gold,

0:25:350:25:40

so they had to produce notes quickly, pound notes and ten shilling notes, as emergency money.

0:25:400:25:48

They look like this - cheap -

0:25:480:25:51

because they were printed on stamp paper.

0:25:510:25:54

They were printed by the people who printed postage stamps.

0:25:540:25:59

These notes have the same watermarks as the stamps of the period.

0:25:590:26:05

They are quite rare now.

0:26:050:26:08

-This one is not in good condition.

-OK.

-If you came to sell it, in this condition, you're still looking at...

0:26:080:26:15

-something well over £100, £150.

-Ohh! Yeah!

-The ten shilling note is not quite as rare.

-OK.

0:26:150:26:21

Four million of those were issued and this one is probably worth

0:26:210:26:26

in this condition, £80 to £150.

0:26:260:26:30

-So don't play Monopoly with them!

-Thank you!

-Lovely story.

0:26:300:26:34

-One piece of jewellery?

-That's it.

0:26:360:26:39

-There was a pair, originally.

-Yes. Made for a theatre?

-I think so.

0:26:390:26:46

A rubber base cast face and hands.

0:26:460:26:48

-1960s, do you think?

-I've no idea.

-Judging by the fabric, by the look.

0:26:480:26:54

Could be 1950s. Certainly post-war.

0:26:540:26:57

-Great fun. You'll never see another!

-No!

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you!

0:26:570:27:02

As far as I understand, that was brought back by my great-grandfather from Japan

0:27:020:27:08

-at the turn of the century, as a wedding present.

-Do we know the date?

0:27:080:27:13

-Well, he married in 1898 and he died in 1912.

-So somewhere in-between. Is this transfer printed?

0:27:130:27:22

I'd always thought so.

0:27:220:27:25

Let's see. The hut...

0:27:250:27:27

Everything on there is done by hand.

0:27:270:27:30

It's a completely hand-painted scene.

0:27:300:27:33

If you look... Every single little line in here is painted by hand.

0:27:330:27:38

Even more miraculously, the whole blue ground, these flowers...

0:27:380:27:42

every single little blob has been put on there by hand

0:27:420:27:47

and then all the gold has been put in by hand.

0:27:470:27:51

Each is a little landscape in its own right

0:27:510:27:55

and then this beautiful little bird.

0:27:550:27:57

If this were a transfer print, you'd just go slap-bang, and that was it.

0:27:570:28:04

THIS would take two or three hours to paint and you've got the complete service! Not least the teapot!

0:28:040:28:12

-It would have been very expensive when it was new.

-Mm-hm.

0:28:120:28:16

Now, normally, an eggshell porcelain Japanese service

0:28:160:28:22

-of, say, six settings is worth no more than £60.

-Mm-hm.

0:28:220:28:27

but because it's hand-painted,

0:28:270:28:30

I'm going to stick a nought on the end and say £500 to £800.

0:28:300:28:35

-I was offered 40 quid for it four years ago!

-Oh, dear, oh, dear!

0:28:370:28:43

This is a very typical North Country or even Scottish feature - this type of oval fan or shell medallion.

0:28:430:28:49

The colour...! A wonderful contrast

0:28:490:28:52

between the original interior colour

0:28:520:28:55

and the colour here where it's been in the sun for a hundred years or so!

0:28:550:29:01

I like that patination. The original colour is too bright nowadays.

0:29:010:29:06

Where did you get this furniture?

0:29:060:29:09

It was made by my grandfather, who, when he married, was listed as a chairmaker,

0:29:090:29:16

a cabinet maker and journeyman.

0:29:160:29:19

They are part of a set, and, er...

0:29:190:29:23

He was born in 1865, married when he was 22, and, uh...

0:29:230:29:31

they had three children - the youngest was my father, John Lambey.

0:29:310:29:37

-Lambey?

-Yes.

-I must confess I don't know of any cabinet maker...

0:29:370:29:42

-Have you ever found anything about him at all?

-No, we've got absolutely no data on him at all.

0:29:420:29:48

But I'm told that the town where he was born and worked, Lochwinnoch, in Renfrewshire,

0:29:480:29:55

was a centre of the trade - a lot of cabinet makers worked there.

0:29:550:30:00

Very much so. The west side of Glasgow generally...

0:30:000:30:05

-A lot of workshops. Sweat shops, some of them.

-I'll BET they were.

-Second half of the 19th century.

0:30:050:30:11

So, when was this made? I mean, stylistically, looking at it...

0:30:110:30:17

-The way he's put this together, and the table, smacks more of 1890.

-Oh, well, yes...

0:30:170:30:24

-He'd only be about 30, so that's a likely date.

-In his prime.

-Yes.

0:30:240:30:30

I think people forget... These wonderful mahogany planks...

0:30:300:30:34

-The actual physical work - it was hard work.

-I imagine so.

-No machines.

0:30:340:30:39

They were working probably ten hours a day in Glasgow at that time. Six days a week, certainly.

0:30:390:30:45

-The apprentice came on a Sunday to sweep up... Your grandfather had a hard life.

-I imagine so.

0:30:450:30:52

-This sort of thing he'd do by hand?

-Well, that's turned on a machine.

0:30:520:30:57

If he could afford it, he probably bought things like this baluster turning-in and the handles.

0:30:570:31:05

-Sure. Yes.

-Bought that from a shop in London or Glasgow.

0:31:050:31:10

That could be Arts and Crafts of around 1860 or '70.

0:31:100:31:14

But the marquetry is very individual, as is this ogee shape.

0:31:140:31:19

So within this ogee, you've got this unusual marquetry

0:31:190:31:23

-and I think this is a device he's come up with himself.

-I see.

0:31:230:31:28

It does look to me that he's made it for his own use. It's not commercial furniture. It's very individualistic.

0:31:280:31:34

-I think he made it for the proportions of his own house.

-Yes.

0:31:340:31:38

What a nice suite of furniture.

0:31:380:31:41

-I can only really value what I see here, but you've got more.

-Of course, yes.

0:31:410:31:47

-But a piece like this, I can see this in a shop at about £3,000.

-I see.

0:31:470:31:53

A good table, very useful size...

0:31:530:31:55

-Possibly a bit less, but £2,500 up to £3,000.

-I see.

-So we've got between £5,000 and £6,000 here.

0:31:550:32:02

Well, the furniture's going to my daughter, my older daughter.

0:32:020:32:07

-I'm sure she'll never sell it...

-But she should insure it.

0:32:070:32:11

More importantly, she should contact museums or St Andrews University, where they research these people,

0:32:110:32:18

-to see if Mr Lambey is recorded anywhere.

-Thank you.

0:32:180:32:23

-I'm told that you know this place better than anyone here.

-Could be.

-Why's that?

-I was the butler here.

0:32:230:32:30

I came in 1936.

0:32:300:32:33

And, uh...I retired in 1977.

0:32:330:32:37

-What have you brought?

-A painting. One of Mr Carey's - the curator employed by Tom Holloway.

0:32:370:32:43

And it was given to me on my retirement by Dr Busbridge.

0:32:430:32:48

-So when was this done?

-Oh, I should think that must have been done pre-war, I should imagine.

0:32:480:32:54

-This is as it was then, is it?

-Yeah.

0:32:540:32:57

That was the south terrace.

0:32:570:33:01

When they had a garden party for 1,500 people, the band of the lifeguards used to play along there.

0:33:010:33:09

Tea was served all round, and it took us a week to wash up.

0:33:090:33:14

1,500 people.

0:33:140:33:16

-The gardener would go mad today - these people on his grass!

-Yes!

-THEY LAUGH

0:33:160:33:23

Can I see what you've brought?

0:33:230:33:25

-This necklace.

-Let's have a look. Now, what's the story behind that?

0:33:250:33:31

I only know that it came here from the Far East in the First World War.

0:33:310:33:38

Far East. Someone travelled to China?

0:33:380:33:41

Somebody mentioned Burma.

0:33:410:33:44

-Burma?

-Yeah.

-Well, that surprises me.

0:33:440:33:48

Looking at the style of the gold and the ring at the back, the bolt ring -

0:33:480:33:53

it's got some little marks on that secondary ring

0:33:530:33:58

-that tell me that it's French.

-Oh!

0:33:580:34:01

So someone may have been travelling out there and bought it out there. But it's definitely a French piece.

0:34:010:34:07

And I would date that to, what, around about, say, 1900.

0:34:070:34:13

And this is a wonderfully large and strong-looking lump of turquoise.

0:34:130:34:18

I mean, look at the depth of it.

0:34:180:34:21

Mounted in gold in this rather pretty scallop-type setting.

0:34:210:34:25

-Yes...

-These are all real pearls.

0:34:250:34:28

-Right.

-And then all these are high-carat gold settings and links

0:34:280:34:34

and then the chain is blue enamel - it's not actually turquoise.

0:34:340:34:39

-Oh, right.

-So it's a really rather well-made piece.

0:34:390:34:44

-Very desirable. Turquoise is such a pretty, feminine-looking stone.

-It's my birth stone.

-Is it?

-Yes.

0:34:440:34:51

I would suggest, in auction, we're looking at £800 to £1,000 today.

0:34:510:34:56

-I'm surprised! Lovely.

-Thanks for bringing it. An excellent piece.

0:34:560:35:01

You're welcome.

0:35:010:35:03

That's a face you wouldn't want to meet on a dark night!

0:35:040:35:09

And his lady companion over here doesn't really fare much better!

0:35:090:35:14

You sure...? Oh, yes, she IS a lady.

0:35:140:35:17

-The material is stoneware.

-Stoneware.

0:35:170:35:19

One's always tempted to pick one up and look for marks.

0:35:190:35:23

There should be a mark...

0:35:250:35:27

and I'm sorry to say there isn't one.

0:35:270:35:30

Nor on that one.

0:35:300:35:32

But I really don't need to see the signature because, um...

0:35:320:35:38

if you know anything about the Martin Brothers and their stoneware that was made in Southall in London

0:35:380:35:44

at the end of the Victorian age,

0:35:440:35:47

these shout, "I was made by the Martin Brothers."

0:35:470:35:51

They're from a series of figures known as imp musicians.

0:35:510:35:56

And I suppose the other term that's often given to them is grotesques.

0:35:560:36:03

There's quite a healthy demand for Martinware,

0:36:050:36:09

not just in this country

0:36:090:36:12

but in the last 20 years or so, the Americans have become very interested in the work of the Martin Brothers.

0:36:120:36:18

These two characters weigh in at

0:36:190:36:23

-about £1,500 for the pair.

-Oh, really...?

0:36:230:36:29

-And had they been signed - nearer £2,000 so...

-Really?

0:36:290:36:34

That's very interesting. Thank you.

0:36:340:36:36

If you came on the bus, can I recommend you go home in a taxi?

0:36:360:36:41

It came through the family to my mother

0:36:410:36:45

-and I've had it for about 40 years.

-What you've got here is...

0:36:450:36:50

very good quality marine painting.

0:36:500:36:53

It's a beautiful handling of paint.

0:36:530:36:55

-It's painted on panel, in oil.

-Yeah.

-And what is also nice...

0:36:550:37:00

is that you can see the artist's brushstrokes

0:37:000:37:03

in the impasto here - in the thicker paint.

0:37:030:37:08

The way the whole light falls on it

0:37:080:37:11

makes me feel it's by a good artist.

0:37:110:37:14

And from a stylistic point of view, it's definitely a Dutch painter of the 19th century.

0:37:140:37:21

Down here there is a signature. I think it's an artist called Schotel.

0:37:210:37:28

-He was working in the second half of the 19th century and his work is quite sought-after.

-Mm.

0:37:310:37:37

I suppose that if this picture were in an auction,

0:37:370:37:41

-it would make somewhere between £1,500 and £2,500.

-Mm!

0:37:410:37:46

-So you perhaps should be insuring it for £3,000.

-Jolly good.

0:37:460:37:50

It's always been in my mother's family. They were blacksmiths

0:37:500:37:55

-at a village called Much Hadham in Hertfordshire.

-Ah!

0:37:550:37:59

And it's believed that these notches

0:37:590:38:02

were for the all different children

0:38:020:38:06

-who were pulled in it when they were small.

-Wonderful! Much Hadham...

0:38:060:38:11

-I've traced it to an exhibition that was in one of the auction houses in London.

-Oh, right!

-In 1988.

-Yes.

0:38:110:38:20

-The description said it was made for the grandfather of the present owner, who'd be your mother's cousin.

-Right.

0:38:200:38:27

-Made in 1851 by the wheelwright of Much Hadham.

-Oh, right!

0:38:270:38:33

-So we must have the right one.

-Yes.

0:38:330:38:36

-Beautifully made and obviously a professional maker, not home-made.

-Oh, right.

0:38:360:38:42

A wheelwright's the head of his profession.

0:38:420:38:45

It's got painting - red and yellow faded lines round the wheels...

0:38:450:38:50

They'd like that, the children.

0:38:500:38:52

Yes. And the wheels themselves are works of art

0:38:520:38:57

-because although they're wood underneath, there's a steel rim on the outside.

-Oh, right.

0:38:570:39:03

-Even the steering wheel, which feels a bit...slack.

-Feels wobbly.

0:39:030:39:08

It is a little bit loose, this nail.

0:39:080:39:11

But it's lasted a long time, and should go on lasting.

0:39:110:39:15

-Nothing I need to have done?

-I don't think so.

0:39:150:39:19

Children must have had great fun. They'd have put a little cushion in.

0:39:190:39:24

Two at a time with the well for their feet

0:39:240:39:28

-and these elbow rests, which I love.

-Are they?

0:39:280:39:32

-I thought it was just decoration.

-No, no. I can just imagine them saying "Faster, faster!"

0:39:320:39:38

-What are these metal things?

-I think...

-For a canopy?

0:39:380:39:42

-A canopy with four uprights - to protect them from the sun.

-Yes.

0:39:420:39:48

-Um, you have never had it valued for insurance or...?

-No, I haven't.

0:39:480:39:53

It is a wonderful early tumbrel, as they call it, a cart.

0:39:530:39:58

I should insure it for at least £2,000.

0:39:580:40:03

But I guessed £100!

0:40:030:40:05

To get one rare Delft plate is quite something. To get a pair...!

0:40:050:40:11

I'm gobsmacked. Where have they come from?

0:40:110:40:15

Well, they came from my grandfather. I don't know any further history.

0:40:150:40:21

What we have here are Delft plates made to commemorate the battle in 1746 of Culloden.

0:40:210:40:28

We have "Duke William for Ever" and the date 1746.

0:40:280:40:33

Duke William, the son of George II, was the leader of the English

0:40:330:40:39

against the Scottish clans who'd risen up...

0:40:390:40:43

Well, for the English, a glorious defeat -

0:40:430:40:47

but for the Scottish, quite a terrible event, wasn't it?

0:40:470:40:52

They're quite unusual plates.

0:40:520:40:55

Not many were made to commemorate that event.

0:40:550:40:59

The Delftware industry was starting to go into decline by the 1740s -

0:40:590:41:05

porcelain from China was replacing it.

0:41:050:41:10

But the advantage of Delft is that it can be painted and fired very quickly

0:41:100:41:14

so you can do an instant commemorative of an event.

0:41:140:41:19

So the Duke of Cumberland could then be commemorated on plates that would go on sale straight away.

0:41:190:41:27

But not many commemorative plates were done of this event -

0:41:270:41:32

on the whole this is one of the earliest you get of military commemoratives made of Delft.

0:41:320:41:41

The material is covered with a thick glaze and chips really quite easily - I see you've got a few chips.

0:41:410:41:47

I guess they've been there a long time, but really extremely few.

0:41:470:41:52

This one - no actual cracks... They look astonishing, condition-wise.

0:41:520:41:57

The painting very well done.

0:41:570:42:00

It's not easy to paint pictures on Delft because you're painting on to basically unfired glaze, wet glaze.

0:42:000:42:07

It's like painting on blotting paper.

0:42:070:42:09

You can't rub out and start again - you have to quickly paint the design.

0:42:090:42:14

And that gives them a spontaneity which is really rather charming.

0:42:140:42:19

They are extremely rare

0:42:190:42:22

and to find an unrecorded pair of plates is really something.

0:42:220:42:27

They're worth quite a bit of money.

0:42:270:42:30

I'm thinking in terms of... One plate alone to a Delft and military history collector

0:42:300:42:37

£10,000.

0:42:370:42:40

-Goodness me!

-That's ONE! Here you've got twice as much.

0:42:400:42:47

£20,000 for... two extraordinary plates.

0:42:470:42:51

-Goodness me!

-Er...

-Wow...!

-Thank you!

0:42:520:42:57

I wonder what Mr Holloway would have thought of our invasion

0:42:580:43:01

of his hallowed premises. I hope he would have been pleased,

0:43:010:43:04

because we're coming back next week for another Roadshow

0:43:040:43:07

and for a look at he buildings and the man behind this whole astonishing enterprise.

0:43:070:43:12

Until then, from Royal Holloway, goodbye.

0:43:120:43:15

Subtitles by Anne Morgan BBC - 2001

0:43:210:43:24

Michael Aspel and the team visit Royal Holloway College in Surrey, where their discoveries include a collection of West Indian paintings worth as much as £25,000, a selection of costume designs rescued from the dustbin worth £5,000, a very short walking stick which belonged to Enrico Caruso and a pair of Delft plates which delight John Sandon.