Nottingham Antiques Roadshow


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Nottingham

With Michael Aspel. Discoveries of note include a pair of outsize boots, an important collection of memorabilia from the Nuremburg trials, and an Andy Pandy memento.


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Welcome to Nottingham, city of legends and lace, of Robin Hood,

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HP Sauce and Raleigh bicycles. Land of DH Lawrence and Lord Byron,

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of William Booth - salvationist, and Jesse Boot - chemist.

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Long before that illustrious list, Nottingham was established as Snottingaham -

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the tribal leader bearing the proud name of Snot.

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Happily, the invading Normans found that difficult to pronounce.

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And, at certain times, the name of this inn would be difficult to say -

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it's one of the oldest in England. The Crusaders used to stop off on their way to the Holy Land.

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"Trip" in Old English means "stopping place".

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And legend insists that Robin Hood and his men made merry here

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while the Sheriff of Nottingham held court nearby at Nottingham Castle.

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It has been destroyed and rebuilt many times in its turbulent history.

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The Civil War began here in 1642,

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when Charles I raised his standard

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to enlist men to fight a rebellious parliament.

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If walls could talk, these would have a lot to say for themselves.

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The rock they stand on is soft sandstone, ideal for scooping out nice cosy caves.

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Indeed, in Alfred the Great's time,

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the city was known as "the house of caves".

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Generations of Nottinghamians lived in them.

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In 1330, Edward III's supporters used this passage to retake the castle from Roger Mortimer

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who had murdered Edward's father and slept with his mother.

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Mortimer was dragged down here and hauled off to London

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where he was hanged, drawn and quartered.

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Spin forward 500 years and we find young Jesse Boot,

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who, at the age of 13, is running his parents' chemist shop.

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He hit on the novel idea of buying in bulk and selling many items for a small but copious profit.

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Jesse Boot became the owner of the UK's largest chain of chemist shops.

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He was also a great benefactor of the University of Nottingham,

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providing land and a fine pharmacy department.

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And fittingly, for a town which boasts the world's oldest football club,

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today's Antiques Roadshow comes from a sporting venue - the Harvey Hadden Sports Centre.

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-Now, when you were given this, did you think it was a brooch?

-Yes.

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I only ever saw my grandmother wear it as a brooch,

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so I didn't think it was anything else, and it's got a pin on the back.

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There's a clue to the fact that it was to be worn in another way.

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-Right.

-Have you unscrewed this?

-No.

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-And there it falls away.

-Oh!

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And that's the key to another function to this very pretty jewel.

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-It seems freer without it, doesn't it?

-Yes.

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-In the fitted box in which this was originally sold, there would be a long tortoiseshell comb...

-Yes.

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..and it could be screwed into the back there, and in the same box

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-would be some enormously long white egret's feathers - aigrettes.

-Oh!

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-So before you were married, you'd be wearing it in your hair like this.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah,

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-and it would have huge white feathers jutting out at the top and you'd be the belle of the ball.

-Wow!

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The word "aigrette" is a corruption of the word "egret" because the feathers came from the white egret.

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Very spiky, very sort of shaving-brushy-looking feathers.

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-Yes.

-And very, very elegant.

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This was what a girl would wear before she was married, before she could wear a tiara.

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-Only married women can wear tiaras in their hair.

-Right.

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-And this would be part of etiquette in... What date do you think?

-I've no idea. It was my grandmother's,

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and I believe that she inherited it, but other than that, I don't know.

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Well, we're pushing it a little bit further back,

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-probably 1870s to 1890s.

-Wow!

-And it's hugely versatile.

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It HAS lost its feathers, they perished long ago. In fact, most of the egrets perished.

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They were hunted to nearly extinction to get these feathers.

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The velvet case has gone, the tortoiseshell comb has gone...

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-Well, it's a blaze of diamonds, it's wonderful.

-It's a bit sparkly.

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Along the bottom here is a gallery, which raises the diamond work up

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when it's worn as a brooch, to let the light come through.

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Pierced by hand, drawn out with a little diamond work and then filed.

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Then the silver settings are let into this, tubes of silver,

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and each diamond is rubbed round and cut down. They call them cut-down settings.

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-So it's a hugely sentimental one for you, isn't it?

-Oh, yes, it will be passed on to my daughter.

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Well, that's wonderful, but I think we've got to make a stab at value.

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-I think, let's put it down at £3,000 for insurance.

-Goodness me!

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That'll give my husband a shock!

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All you've got to do is look after it, and wear it for him.

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-Yes.

-Very posh. Lucky chap!

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Signed on the silver dial here - Hall & Co of Manchester.

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He was a retailer rather than a maker,

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but looking at the quality of the three-train movement,

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-I would have said this is a comparatively late clock. Had you any thoughts of date?

-No.

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Well, looking at the case, we would say just prior to 1800,

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-but this movement, I think, is about 1855-1860.

-Really?

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-Which would account for the retailer's name on the dial rather than a specific clockmaker.

-Yes.

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Still, a nice three-train movement,

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rather tiny little gong and interesting...

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If I move that slow-fast, you can see the cam just at the back there,

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which is moving the pendulum up and down to regulate the time.

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Have you had it running recently?

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-I have it running regularly.

-You do?

-Yes.

-It could do with a clean.

-Yes!

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So the case, stylistically, just before 1800...

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Very pretty case, very handsome.

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Because we've got the glass sides, we can see the chain fusee

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-and you can see above that, the little pinned barrel for the quarter-chiming work.

-Right.

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We've also got this rather nice repeat facility here,

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which will make it strike and quarter chime

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to the preceding quarter hour.

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-So you'll hear the full three-quarters and then the single one on the gong.

-Yes.

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Well, even though it's a late clock, it's a handsome three-train bracket clock.

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If you put that to auction today,

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you would get an absolute minimum

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-of about £2,800.

-Thank you very much.

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-My grandfather was an Arsenal physio.

-Was he?

-Yeah.

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After the 1950 FA Cup Final, when they went to the dressing room,

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Joe Mercer kindly gave him the cup-winning shirt, which is this.

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-He played left half, didn't he, Joe Mercer?

-Yeah.

-Terrific.

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-In those days, they called it the Final Tie, not the Cup Final.

-Yeah.

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And it's Saturday April 29th 1950 at 3pm - at Wembley, of course.

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So was your father there as well?

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My father was in the crowd, but my grandfather was on the Arsenal bench.

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-The cap is... Oh, it's an England International cap.

-Yes.

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That is from my grandfather again. It was given to him by Laurie Scott,

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-who was the Arsenal number seven.

-That's right, yes.

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-Um...

-It's inscribed - "Very best wishes, Laurie Scott".

-Yeah.

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-Do you know what international it was awarded for?

-I think...

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-it may be against Argentina.

-Right. Because that can affect the value.

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Let's start with the programme - always keenly sought after -

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Cup Final programmes - and I'd think a programme from the 1950 Final

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is probably worth £80 to £120.

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The England cap, although not relating to the Cup Final,

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nevertheless is a good England cap in nice condition, made of velvet,

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and the fact that it's got the inscription inside from Laurie Scott

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adds to its value. I would think that cap at auction would fetch

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£500 to £600.

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And then we come to the shirt, worn by Joe Mercer, captain of Arsenal

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and captain of England at the time,

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-and then went on to be a manager for Manchester City and others.

-Yeah.

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Well, interestingly enough, a shirt from this Cup Final

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came up at auction not so long ago, belonging to Laurie Scott,

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so that gives a guideline.

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But this is more important because Mercer was England's captain.

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If this shirt came up for auction,

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it wouldn't surprise me if it fetched £5,000.

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Made out of spelter...

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-Excuse me, John.

-Yes?

-Any suggestions?

-Um, let's have a look.

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Well, I think they're probably for somebody who has dire gout,

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identical gout in either foot, bandaged their feet,

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and when they're wheeled around town they are to hide the bandages.

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So a gout man's boots.

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A likely story. Thank you!

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It's an unusual table - German, because of the type of wood,

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but, more importantly, the type of veneer on here,

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-this parquetry veneer all the way round, geometric parquetry.

-Yes.

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With this leg which is rather fat at the top

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and going smaller as it goes down the cabriole. How did you find this?

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I was on a visit to London with my family and we went shopping to buy a dining table,

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and we visited an auction room in North London

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and this table was there with four or five items stacked on top.

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-So you couldn't see it?

-No, I couldn't see anything but the sides,

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-but I loved the work and the shape of the legs.

-It's not that old,

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-but there's something here...

-When we lift it, the top moves.

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-So which way?

-Anticlockwise. The top moves up...

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I don't think they were made for outside use, or not for walking in.

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I think they were made possibly for insulating the feet against something...maybe on a stagecoach?

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I think that they weren't for walking in,

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they're for an invalid, perhaps, outside to keep his feet warm.

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Carry on!

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Put that slightly down, leave it down, and it does...

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What do they say - "Vorsprung durch Technik"!

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Never seen these from any other country except England. It's German,

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-the wood is walnut, the underframe is pine...

-Yeah.

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The origin of this type of capstan table, as it's called in England,

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originated in London in about 1830.

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-Right.

-It's a firm called Johnson and Jeans,

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based on a patent by Jupe.

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-But I'm talking about 1830.

-Yes.

-This table is clearly much later,

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-but I think it predates the Second World War.

-Oh.

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-Well, I'm going to have to ask you how much you paid for it!

-Right,

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I paid £100 plus commission with two other items,

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so the three items and the table - £100.

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I'd give you £100 for it now! You couldn't buy this

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-for less than £1,000.

-Right, yes.

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-And I think that's conservative. What do you think?

-That's excellent!

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-Vicky, excuse me.

-Good grief! They must have belonged to the fattest man in the world -

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-Daniel Lambert. He came from Stamford, near here, and he weighed 52 stone.

-Wow!

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There's a picture of him with gaiters coming down to where those boots would have fitted.

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-Thank you very much!

-Not a bit.

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Rather boot-shaped, isn't it? I assume that the prongs at the bottom

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-are for pushing into the ground?

-I think so.

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I assume you give this a clout with a stick and a ball is projected?

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Yes. I think it's called a trap ball, but it has lots of different names.

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I believe it was played between the 14th century and the 18th century in England,

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and it appears to be a forerunner of rounders. You were right -

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you place a ball - which I assume was leather - on this,

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you hit it with a stick on there

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and you hit it with a bat. So one of the names is "bat, trap and ball."

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It's difficult to date it exactly. It's just a carved piece of oak,

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the metalwork is hand-forged and the screws are handmade,

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which indicates it's 18th century rather than 19th century.

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It's a difficult thing to value. I'd see it at around about £500-£800.

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Nice thing, unusual.

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Thank you very much.

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My grandfather was art director of Royal Crown Derby up until 1936.

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-Oh, right. He was?

-Thomas Amos Reed. And these were test pieces, I believe -

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only done on one side, or slightly differently on both sides,

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to evaluate whether a design was viable or not.

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So why waste paint if you weren't going to make it?

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Obviously the art director played a vital role in creating the designs.

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-He was a very good artist.

-Would he have decorated these or designed...?

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I don't know. One of them is signed by Gregory, so...

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He got a friend. Albert Gregory's signature is on the panel there,

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but the piece itself is clearly a trial in some way,

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-It's a most strange design.

-Yes.

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I've never seen the design in production in Derby and no factory mark, so never put on sale,

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-just things he kept in the family.

-Just at home. Though he didn't like patterned things to eat off.

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-He had all white plates.

-He was designer at the factory for how long?

-I'm not sure.

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-He retired in 1936. I think he was there for quite a few years.

-I seem to remember he left in the 1920s.

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I think his designs were too traditional for the time.

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The designs were the Victorian designs that Derby had always made,

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but then in the '20s, Art Deco was coming in

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-and Derby fell a bit behind - maybe they wanted somebody modern.

-Yes.

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-These designs were old-fashioned.

-Yes.

-Fascinating trials.

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-But these are finished.

-Yes.

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We were always told they were christening cups.

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One is my father's, the green one,

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and the other one is his brother's,

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-They were Thomas Amos Reed's sons.

-"Donald Howard Reed."

-My father.

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And Gordon Vernon Reed was his older brother, who was killed in World War I.

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-So this was made when he was born.

-Yeah.

-That's the factory mark there.

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That's what - 1902? Oh, we've got the inscription there -

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born February 10th 1903. What special productions to commission

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-and create.

-Yeah.

-As art director you could do some wonderful work.

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And here is the proud factory mark

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and marvellous decoration.

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These are both signed by Gregory.

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He was particularly good at flower painting. These flowers were typical of the sort of work he did as well.

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So the best artist chosen to do a lovely design, special commission,

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-proudly kept in the family.

-Yes.

-In terms of value, of course, they're worlds apart.

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Experimental vases without tops...

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A curiosity like this is going to be worth a few hundred pounds.

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They tell a story of what was going on at Derby.

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But pieces like these are now enormously expensive.

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Are they covered by insurance? Are they properly valued?

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Not specially, no.

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Because these pieces are stunningly beautiful and so desirable

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as pieces of jewelled porcelain.

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A cabinet object of that quality by Gregory with that gilding - you've got to be, I suppose...

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£7,000.

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-Is that each, or for the pair?

-Each.

-Oh, my God!

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-Now, we all know you as Lord Oaksey, but we're not going to talk about racing today.

-No.

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But why are you here? What is your connection with this material?

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My connection is through my father.

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He was appointed... as one of two British judges

0:18:000:18:06

on the International Military Tribunal

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which was set up to try the Nazi war criminals.

0:18:100:18:14

-This was the Nuremburg trials?

-Exactly.

-Right.

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So he was what? The presiding judge?

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-He turned out to be the presiding judge, yes.

-Right, so what are these?

0:18:200:18:25

-Well, my mother went out to Nuremburg with my father.

-Right.

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And she decided to compile a record, her own photographic record.

0:18:290:18:34

So this is a record of your father's involvement with the trials?

0:18:340:18:38

Yes, entirely personal.

0:18:380:18:40

Now, the Nuremburg trials, I think, from memory, was October 1945 to October '46, wasn't it?

0:18:400:18:46

Lasted about 11 months, that's right.

0:18:460:18:48

Right. And I think that it was the trial that established the precedent

0:18:480:18:53

-that when you say as a defence, "I was only following orders", that doesn't hold water, right?

-Yes.

0:18:530:19:00

So the patterns set at Nuremburg are now part of our cultural history.

0:19:000:19:05

-I hope so.

-Now, that's your father?

-That's right.

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And here we've got your father on duty, as you might say,

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and these are the various passes issued that he wore. "IMT",

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and he was number one, so he was top of the list, wasn't he?

0:19:180:19:23

So there he is, on the job.

0:19:230:19:26

I think what we've got here is a sort of chronological record, is that right?

0:19:260:19:32

More or less, yeah.

0:19:320:19:34

Now, here are all the judges and the prosecutors.

0:19:340:19:39

So there's... That's your father.

0:19:390:19:42

That's my father and that's Biddle.

0:19:420:19:45

-Who was the American one.

-Yes. He thought that he should have been presiding.

-So he was cross about it?

0:19:450:19:51

-Yes.

-So we've got Russians, Americans, British and French.

0:19:510:19:56

-That's right.

-So this was the establishment

0:19:560:19:59

of this sort of four-power rule of conquered Germany, wasn't it?

0:19:590:20:03

-Very much so.

-Or it reflects that, rather. So there we are.

0:20:030:20:07

The interesting one is Jackson, who had stepped down

0:20:070:20:11

from the Supreme Court in America to head up the prosecution,

0:20:110:20:15

and, in fact, made a nonsense

0:20:150:20:18

-of cross-examining Goering.

-Oh, really?

-He was really a failure.

0:20:180:20:23

-He wasn't a good cross-examiner?

-No.

-Here's the dock and there's Goering.

0:20:230:20:28

-Gosh, doesn't he look thin?

-Well, that's the amazing thing.

0:20:280:20:33

He had lost four stone, four stone in weight,

0:20:330:20:37

and had come off main-line heroin

0:20:370:20:39

and so it was an incredible achievement that he became...

0:20:390:20:45

because he did become the outstanding figure in the dock.

0:20:450:20:49

-He defended himself and his colleagues.

-Never said sorry at all.

0:20:490:20:53

No, exactly.

0:20:530:20:55

Who are these girls? Translators, are they?

0:20:550:20:58

-The one who sticks in my memory is the lady on the right.

-That one?

-Yes.

0:20:580:21:03

Who was German-into-English,

0:21:030:21:06

and she was known throughout the English team, so to speak, as the "Passionate Haystack"

0:21:060:21:13

because sometimes her hair would be piled up like that,

0:21:130:21:17

sometimes it would be sort of Veronica Lake style,

0:21:170:21:22

-so we used to bet on what style...

-On a day-to-day basis? Good odds?

0:21:220:21:26

Well, Passionate Haystack was six to four.

0:21:260:21:29

-Was she aware of this? Obviously not.

-I think not.

0:21:290:21:33

-One of the great personalities of the court.

-Yes.

-What have we here?

0:21:330:21:37

-"Picnics. Spring 1946"

-LORD OAKSEY LAUGHS

0:21:370:21:41

So you have images of what went on.

0:21:410:21:44

-It was rather beautiful countryside.

-Well, Brecht's garden was nearby.

0:21:440:21:49

-Yes, we went there.

-So, in a sense, a complete package of international life

0:21:490:21:54

is transported to Nuremburg for the duration of the trial. What's this?

0:21:540:21:59

Oh, look, these are drawings by Nikichenko, the Russian prosecutor.

0:21:590:22:04

-Who was a charming man from the Ukraine.

-Right.

0:22:040:22:08

-And we found him easily the most charming of the two Russians.

-Yes.

0:22:080:22:14

-The other one we thought had just a touch of KGB about him.

-Runstedt,

0:22:140:22:19

-Speer, Papen - who was acquitted, wasn't he?

-Got off, yes, mmm.

0:22:190:22:25

Wonderful drawings of these people. It was a cartoonist's heyday.

0:22:250:22:30

-I suppose it was, and...

-Several times you've said "we". I mean, how is it "we"? Were you there?

0:22:300:22:36

I was there for a whole summer holiday,

0:22:360:22:40

-when I was 16, 17, sort of thing.

-So you have memories of it?

-Oh, rather!

0:22:400:22:46

-So the Passionate Haystack you saw?

-I certainly did!

-Did you bet?

0:22:460:22:50

Well...yes!

0:22:500:22:53

More to the point, more to the point, was the PX rations, because coming from rationed England,

0:22:530:23:00

suddenly to be pitchforked into PX rations -

0:23:000:23:04

two bars of Hershey chocolate, 200 cigarettes, which was like gold.

0:23:040:23:10

-I couldn't play in the black market.

-Nylon stockings!

-Yes!

-All those things Americans were famous for.

0:23:100:23:17

-Exactly.

-Now, what's this?

0:23:170:23:19

-Well, I'm sorry to say that's me...

-There you are!

0:23:190:23:24

-So you have memories of the trial?

-I have indeed.

0:23:240:23:28

-I wish I'd taken more notice.

-You sat in the public galleries?

-Oh, rather.

0:23:280:23:33

-So you saw all these people?

-Absolutely, with my headsets on.

0:23:330:23:39

I must ask you quickly, what's this? Why have you got a Union Jack?

0:23:390:23:43

Oh, the Union Jack, which flew in the courtroom

0:23:430:23:48

over where my father sat and there were, of course, the other flags too.

0:23:480:23:54

-This is the actual one?

-Yes.

0:23:540:23:56

These books are part of your family history. Where are they now?

0:23:560:24:00

-Do you keep them at home?

-No, we've lent them to the Galleries of Justice at Nottingham.

0:24:000:24:06

-The only legal museum in Britain.

-Yes.

0:24:060:24:09

-I gather it's on open access - there's a microfilm or microfiche version of it?

-Yes.

0:24:090:24:15

-So any historian can consult it.

-Yes.

0:24:150:24:19

But it's a Roadshow convention that we value things. Frankly, I don't know where to begin.

0:24:190:24:25

-There is no archive like this. One can't break this up.

-No, no.

-Clearly you'll never sell it.

-Never.

0:24:250:24:32

But for insurance purposes - I suppose one's got to think about

0:24:320:24:36

£20,000 - £30,000, which is a meaningless figure in terms of the value of it,

0:24:360:24:42

-but it gives us something to go by.

-Yes.

-But value's unimportant.

0:24:420:24:46

This is just such an incredible vision into this, as I say,

0:24:460:24:51

this vital moment in our history which we are still benefiting from.

0:24:510:24:55

I would feel very, very ashamed if I ever even thought of selling them.

0:24:550:25:01

-I'm sure you won't.

-No.

-Thank you very much for sharing it with us.

-Not a bit. Thank YOU.

0:25:010:25:07

I've always worked in the shoe trade and a friend got them at an auction

0:25:090:25:13

because he thought I might be interested

0:25:130:25:16

and that got me going... collecting various other things.

0:25:160:25:21

Well, these are most lovely quality.

0:25:210:25:24

They're marked "left and "right" and they're also...

0:25:240:25:29

They're made in London in...1800.

0:25:290:25:32

I think they're absolutely, absolutely beautiful...

0:25:320:25:36

-and then you've got a very, very nice meat skewer here.

-Yes.

0:25:360:25:40

The only thing about that is that most I've seen have sharp edges

0:25:400:25:45

-and that one seems to be pretty blunt.

-Indeed.

0:25:450:25:50

But it was made in the 18th century, in 1796,

0:25:500:25:54

-and you tend to find that this flat edge is 18th century.

-Yes.

0:25:540:25:59

In the 19th century, you get them with bevelled edges, rather sharper.

0:25:590:26:04

-But it was a meat skewer, now used as a letter opener...

-Yes.

0:26:040:26:08

-It's damn rich to have a meat skewer like that, but rather fun.

-Yes.

0:26:080:26:13

I'll tell you the thing that really intrigues me is this.

0:26:130:26:18

I bought it at an auction.

0:26:190:26:22

-It was the first item to come up on the auction.

-Yeah.

0:26:220:26:26

-I bought it for £200 as a vinaigrette.

-Ye-es...

0:26:260:26:33

Um, I've been told that it's probably a snuff box,

0:26:330:26:38

that was later turned into a vinaigrette.

0:26:380:26:42

Well, this really, really, really intrigues me.

0:26:420:26:45

It was made in 1817.

0:26:450:26:50

And...I think I would agree initially that, yes,

0:26:510:26:56

this is a snuff box, but the hinge is exactly the same there -

0:26:560:27:01

the same working of hinge - as is on the back

0:27:010:27:05

and that is marked...1817. It was made by William Elliot,

0:27:050:27:11

presumably for Mr Fry,

0:27:110:27:14

whose name is punched through as part of the work there.

0:27:140:27:18

"I Fry." Jonathan Fry, James Fry, whatever.

0:27:180:27:23

But I've never seen such a huge vinaigrette,

0:27:230:27:27

and I would stick my neck out

0:27:270:27:30

and say it is absolutely right,

0:27:300:27:33

it HAS to be right, which makes it INCREDIBLY rare.

0:27:330:27:37

I have never seen anything like it.

0:27:370:27:39

It's also very beautiful, a lovely shape,

0:27:390:27:42

-it's dated...1818 as an inscription...

-Yes.

0:27:420:27:48

..and it was made the year before, which all ties in so well.

0:27:480:27:53

I find it a very intriguing piece

0:27:530:27:56

and I don't know what to put on it. I tell you,

0:27:560:28:02

-it's a hell of a lot more than £200!

-Well, that's very gratifying.

0:28:020:28:05

-£800.

-That's amazing.

-Maybe more.

0:28:080:28:11

I think it's a wonderful and exceptional, rare interesting thing.

0:28:110:28:15

The largest vinaigrette I've ever seen and the most extraordinary.

0:28:150:28:20

..Banners were a great feature of late 19th-century working-class life.

0:28:200:28:25

We associate them particularly with the trade union movement.

0:28:250:28:30

From the 1860s, trade unions were about getting membership,

0:28:300:28:34

making unions acceptable, raising funds,

0:28:340:28:37

and these banners. They survive because many unions, although amalgamated, are still there.

0:28:370:28:42

This one is for hospitals.

0:28:420:28:45

Nottingham and Notts Sick and Annual Societies, Children's Hospital Cot and Free Medicine Fund.

0:28:450:28:51

What is unusual about it is that it survives. The date is, I'd think,

0:28:510:28:55

the 1890s, 1900s, certainly well before the First World War -

0:28:550:29:00

-I'm looking at her uniform.

-Yes.

0:29:000:29:02

The image is wonderful, so lively - the way the girl is painted.

0:29:020:29:06

And women in medicine were still a new phenomenon. Where is it from?

0:29:060:29:11

-I bought it from a second-hand furniture dealer in Derby.

-Long time ago?

-No.

0:29:110:29:17

I bought it nearly two years ago but it took me nearly 18 months to get it to my home.

0:29:170:29:24

Because it was so large, I had to wait until my son bought a bed from the same dealer

0:29:240:29:29

-and we had them delivered together.

-It's very hard to value. I think...

0:29:290:29:35

-something between £1,000, £2,000 to £3,000...

-Oh!

0:29:350:29:39

-..because it's such a rare item.

-Oh, dear!

0:29:390:29:42

-Do you know who it represents?

-No. I think it looks a bit like Punch.

0:29:420:29:47

Oh, right. In fact, it's a man called Ali Sloper,

0:29:470:29:51

who was a cartoon character in the late 19th century. He started in America, but was popular over here,

0:29:510:29:59

and he was known for his outsize nose, as is represented here.

0:29:590:30:03

It's also hallmarked - made in London, the date letter is "f" -

0:30:030:30:08

which from memory I think is 1881, so we can date it accurately.

0:30:080:30:13

The head is carved horn. How did you come by it?

0:30:130:30:18

-Well, I remember it in my grandma's hall stand.

-Right.

-She'd be about 130 if she'd been alive.

-Yes.

0:30:180:30:25

That ties in with the date. This is unusual. I haven't seen Ali Sloper on a stick before.

0:30:250:30:30

If this came up at auction, you would expect to get...

0:30:300:30:34

-between perhaps £500 or £600 for it.

-Amazing. Absolutely amazing.

0:30:340:30:39

Crown Staffordshire, the name of the factory, then it's made in England,

0:30:390:30:43

made after 1891, about 1900, and Celia is the name of the pattern.

0:30:430:30:49

Very nice. Obviously it would have been part of a much bigger service,

0:30:490:30:53

-but that's all you've got left, is it?

-The two.

0:30:530:30:57

They're only printed. The pair of them with their ladles are probably worth £100 to £120.

0:30:570:31:03

This is a little bit older.

0:31:030:31:05

Samuel Fielding and Company, and the name of the pattern is Kent and patent registration number.

0:31:070:31:13

And then we have the date, which is...

0:31:130:31:16

June 1884.

0:31:160:31:19

-How many of those have you got?

-Three.

-Three.

-That's the small one.

-That's the small one,

0:31:190:31:24

so this one is worth about £40,

0:31:240:31:27

-and they'll go up in value as they get bigger.

-Large ones.

-Large ones could be £150 to £200,

0:31:270:31:33

because everybody likes them for their dresser.

0:31:330:31:37

-It was left to my great-grandmother.

-Yes.

-She was a housekeeper

0:31:370:31:42

and it was given to her by the family. I remember seeing it in her house.

0:31:420:31:47

So when was it given to your great-grandmother? I don't know. It must have been the '40s, '50s?

0:31:470:31:54

-I'm imagining that's...

-But that is a very generous family she worked for.

-Yes.

0:31:540:32:01

-They must have really adored her.

-They did.

-What do you know about it?

0:32:010:32:05

Only about the artist being local.

0:32:050:32:08

-Laslett Pott born in Newark.

-Exactly.

-I think 1837.

0:32:080:32:12

-'36-37, whatever.

-Whatever.

0:32:120:32:15

-That's really all I know about him.

-I know Laslett John Pott very well.

0:32:150:32:21

When he went down to London, he consistently,

0:32:210:32:24

for about 40 or 50 years, exhibited at the Royal Academy.

0:32:240:32:28

He is a perfect academic artist.

0:32:280:32:31

The first thing I think about when I look at paintings like this

0:32:310:32:35

is the sheer craftsmanship, the artisanship of the artist...

0:32:350:32:40

This is a very beautiful painting, but underlying all good art

0:32:400:32:45

is the craftsmanship of an artist learning how to use his tools.

0:32:450:32:50

The marvellous thing about Victorian paintings

0:32:500:32:54

is the underlying craftsmanship that they really learned at the schools -

0:32:540:32:58

at the Royal Academy schools and other schools -

0:32:580:33:02

how to push paint around with their brush.

0:33:020:33:05

So that's the first joy in seeing a picture like this.

0:33:050:33:08

The second joy is that it's in its original frame, behind glass,

0:33:080:33:12

which has kept it in beautiful condition.

0:33:120:33:16

Being behind glass preserves the surface of the picture.

0:33:160:33:20

-You have never had this picture cleaned?

-No.

0:33:200:33:24

I am sure your great-grandmother never had it cleaned. She received it,

0:33:240:33:29

and yet it looks as though it was cleaned yesterday,

0:33:290:33:33

because the grime of the atmosphere does not attack the varnish

0:33:330:33:38

and it preserves the varnish - which turns yellow very easily.

0:33:380:33:42

Victorian times were filled with grime and dust and smoke. It's very, very beautiful.

0:33:420:33:48

So much has been restored since the war, it's good to find it in this condition. With all that in mind,

0:33:480:33:56

this picture would certainly make between £6,000 and £8,000,

0:33:560:34:01

but I believe it would make well over £10,000.

0:34:010:34:04

-As an insurance value - £15,000.

-Great, lovely. OK.

0:34:040:34:11

-Who's the Andy Pandy fan?

-My mum. She used to eat her roast dinners on it,

0:34:110:34:17

because when they ran out of chairs, she used a small chair on top.

0:34:170:34:21

-It's in incredible condition.

-Is it?

-Yes, immaculate. Like brand new.

0:34:210:34:26

Now, Andy Pandy, I'll tell you something... I'm interested in it

0:34:260:34:31

because my mother was a puppeteer

0:34:310:34:33

-and she was the puppeteer who operated Andy Pandy.

-No! Was she on the TV programme?

-Yes.

0:34:330:34:39

-She wasn't seen, but she pulled the strings.

-Oh, yeah.

0:34:390:34:43

-And she did Flowerpot Men and things like that.

-Really?

-Yeah?

-Wow!

0:34:430:34:48

-So this, for me, is a wonderful thing.

-Yes.

-It's great to see it,

0:34:480:34:51

and there is even a little story which I'm going to deny immediately,

0:34:510:34:56

which is that when Andy Pandy was being made in the 1950s,

0:34:560:35:01

-I was that boy.

-Really?!

-Can you see the likeness?

-Oh, no, definitely!

0:35:010:35:06

-Blue eyes, the nose...

-All the fair hair.

-Oh, he's got blue eyes, you've got brown. Sorry!

-No good.

0:35:060:35:12

-Anyway, this sort of memorabilia is very popular now.

-Yeah.

0:35:120:35:17

This is in such great condition. I think, to an enthusiast,

0:35:170:35:21

this material, for children's programmes particularly,

0:35:210:35:25

this could be £150, as much as that.

0:35:250:35:29

-She will be pleased.

-So tell your mother to stop eating her lunch off it.

-Yes! Take it away from the fire.

0:35:290:35:35

I bought it about six years ago. I was looking for a piece like this

0:35:350:35:41

for about two years and then saw this and I just fell in love with it, so I bought it.

0:35:410:35:47

-This drawer originally would be called a brushing slide.

-Yes.

0:35:470:35:52

I think probably people could use it for a writing surface,

0:35:520:35:56

but it's really for laying out things and brushing them down. That's what I was told, yeah.

0:35:560:36:02

-The baize has been replaced here.

-Yes.

-It's in nice condition.

0:36:020:36:07

This is a lovely shape, this serpentine shape here.

0:36:070:36:11

Push that back.... These edges have just warped a tiny bit, look.

0:36:110:36:15

-A tiny bit of movement on that.

-Oh, yes.

-Both edges.

-When I bought it,

0:36:150:36:21

-there was a cut-throat razor in there.

-Ah, right.

0:36:210:36:24

I've never seen them complete,

0:36:240:36:27

but I've seen them with the, um... often with these.

0:36:270:36:30

-Sometimes this has been stripped out which would ruin the value.

-Yes.

0:36:300:36:35

But with these here, very nice.

0:36:350:36:37

-Along the front row, each one has got another box inside it.

-Oh, that's nice.

0:36:370:36:43

Along the front, to the shape of the serpentine.

0:36:430:36:46

Oh, that's quite rare, and if they're still there, that's lovely.

0:36:460:36:51

What a nice feature. But I love the thing for the cut-throat razor.

0:36:510:36:55

It's a glorious thought, isn't it? But it's a gentleman's piece.

0:36:550:36:59

Because of the razors, a gentleman's dressing chest, it would be called.

0:36:590:37:04

Very nice shape. The serpentine line which helps me date it.

0:37:040:37:09

-Have you any idea what the date is?

-Well, I was told it was George III.

0:37:090:37:14

-Is it about 1780?

-A bit earlier than that, I'm glad to say.

0:37:140:37:18

-I think it's basically a Chippendale sort of design.

-Yes.

0:37:180:37:22

Chippendale is a word that's used everywhere for mahogany furniture,

0:37:220:37:27

but there are certain features which are similar to Chippendale's work.

0:37:270:37:31

Chippendale's first book was in 1754 - the Gentleman and Cabinet Maker's Director -

0:37:310:37:37

and he produced other versions in the 1760s, so it's 1760-1770 -

0:37:370:37:41

-earlier than 1780.

-Earlier.

-This serpentine line here

0:37:410:37:45

is typical of that Rococo mid-18th century period,

0:37:450:37:49

but the feature I like most is this fretwork.

0:37:490:37:53

-The blind Gothic. Isn't it lovely?

-Beautiful.

-And that you'll see

0:37:530:37:57

-if you get Chippendale's book.

-That was one of the things that drew me to it.

0:37:570:38:03

Really? Chippendale copied a lot of his designs from other people,

0:38:030:38:08

but also from other pattern books of the 1720s and '30s, so he put all the information he got in his book -

0:38:080:38:14

that's why he's so famous.

0:38:140:38:16

This is influenced by him, but not necessarily made by him. If we could pin it down to Thomas Chippendale,

0:38:160:38:23

-it would be a different story.

-Correct, yes.

-But I like it and I admire your courage

0:38:230:38:28

for spending two years to find it. These have gone up a lot -

0:38:280:38:34

I won't ask what you paid for it - I just hope it's gone up in value - it must have done in six years.

0:38:340:38:41

-Prices have gone up a lot since the mid-'90s. You bought this retail, did you say?

-I did, yes.

0:38:410:38:48

Today, a retail price would be... well, verging on £20,000.

0:38:480:38:53

-Goodness me!

-I only hope it's gone up in value.

0:38:580:39:03

Goodness me! Now you have shocked me!

0:39:030:39:06

Deary me! Well, thank you very much.

0:39:060:39:10

-Has it gone up in value?

-Just a bit, yes!

-Brilliant.

0:39:100:39:14

-Will you take it off?

-If I can get it off...

0:39:140:39:17

It IS a beauty, isn't it? My goodness. What do you know about it?

0:39:170:39:23

Very little, really, which is one of the reasons I came to see you.

0:39:230:39:27

Right. Do you know what the stone is?

0:39:270:39:31

Um, it's a hard stone, I would have thought.

0:39:310:39:34

-Cornelian?

-Cornelian is bang on.

0:39:340:39:37

It's obviously a neoclassical ring and it's carved down into the ring.

0:39:370:39:43

It's not a cameo, the relief isn't raised, this is an intaglio -

0:39:430:39:48

it's cut into stone. It's rather like a seal ring,

0:39:480:39:52

and it's one of the masterpieces of the gem engraver's art.

0:39:520:39:57

In the 18th century,

0:39:570:39:59

gem engraving was viewed as extension of sculpture

0:39:590:40:03

and aristocrats would collect engraved gems of exactly this sort.

0:40:030:40:08

They'd keep them in cabinets to admire them and show them to friends

0:40:080:40:13

and it was the pursuit of princes ever since remotest antiquity,

0:40:130:40:18

to have their lives decorated with stones of this sort

0:40:180:40:22

and it IS a most remarkable stone. Have you thought about the subject?

0:40:220:40:26

-It appears to be Greco-Roman... I think I recognise Pan...

-Mm-hm.

0:40:260:40:31

-Um...

-Yeah.

0:40:310:40:33

Well, that's absolutely on course for the period of the ring,

0:40:330:40:37

-but it's actually Silenus, who's a Roman god of wine.

-Oh!

0:40:370:40:42

And he's being drawn along by his attendants

0:40:420:40:46

in a state of severe drunkenness. He's lolling around, and he's going to fall off the ass in a second,

0:40:460:40:52

and that moment has been captured by the gem engraver.

0:40:520:40:56

-Where did you find this?

-In a teapot.

0:40:560:40:59

In a teapot?! You didn't?

0:40:590:41:02

I did. I bought some pots at auction

0:41:020:41:05

because there were some things that matched a service I had at home

0:41:050:41:10

-and there was an awful teapot in it. That was in the spout.

-It wasn't!

0:41:100:41:14

-How much was the teapot with the...?

-Well, the whole box was about £20.

0:41:140:41:19

-£20, my God, and so somebody..

-It's a long time ago, though.

0:41:190:41:24

So it was hidden there by somebody who thought it was a safe place,

0:41:240:41:29

and you were the lucky recipient. Anyway, to take it further,

0:41:290:41:34

it's not only the gem that's neoclassical, it's the ring itself,

0:41:340:41:39

and you can see on the shank here, a little neoclassical mask

0:41:390:41:43

and in the face of the mask is a diamond.

0:41:430:41:48

So it's a most ravishing thing.

0:41:480:41:50

It is a princely piece of jewellery. I think it's all 18th century,

0:41:500:41:55

I don't think that this is an engraved gem from an ancient one.

0:41:550:41:59

Very sophisticated - perhaps just a tiny bit too sophisticated, giving its origins away, late 18th century,

0:41:590:42:05

probably early 19th century, could come from a famous collection. Maybe we'll track that down.

0:42:050:42:11

But as to value - enormously difficult,

0:42:110:42:14

it's still a relatively esoteric area of collecting,

0:42:140:42:18

it still demands, you know, a certain amount of scholarship,

0:42:180:42:22

so if you wanted to buy that again they might ask you...

0:42:220:42:26

£5,000 for it.

0:42:260:42:28

-You're joking!

-No.

0:42:280:42:31

-Oh, I don't believe it!

-No, I'm not joking at all, I'm deadly serious!

0:42:310:42:37

-My £20 box of pots!

-I know. Can I come to tea?

0:42:370:42:40

-I've still got the cups and saucers!

-Brilliant!

0:42:400:42:44

Well, I doubt if the Harvey Hadden Sports Centre

0:42:440:42:47

has seen so many unusual and desirable objects for quite a while.

0:42:470:42:51

This dining table that opens up like a lens is an amazing piece of work,

0:42:510:42:57

but, at the end of the day, I think my favourite

0:42:570:43:00

would be this elegant gentleman's dressing chest. Very nice indeed.

0:43:000:43:05

So many thanks to Nottingham for having us. Until next week, goodbye.

0:43:050:43:10

Subtitles by BBC

0:43:360:43:39

Michael Aspel and a team of experts invite members of the public in Nottingham to bring along their antiques for examination. Discoveries of note include a pair of outsize boots, an important collection of memorabilia from the Nuremburg trials, and an Andy Pandy memento which is closely related to one of the experts. Plus a shirt worn by an Arsenal player in the 1950 Cup tie and a valuable ring found in a teapot spout.