Sudeley Antiques Roadshow


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Sudeley

Michael Aspel is in the gardens of Sudeley Castle to see a regulator clock, a sapphire pendant and a pouch traded with a dentist in exchange for pulling teeth.


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It's wagons roll again as we hit the tarmac

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for a brand-new series of the Antiques Roadshow. Welcome back.

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Exceeding 70 is quite a good thing,

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although we don't insist that antiques are more than 100.

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As usual, our ageless experts are looking out anything interesting from your attic.

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In the months ahead, dust sheets will be flung off across the land.

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We'll be in Bala, on the doorstep of Snowdonia,

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Mount Stewart, a stately home in Northern Ireland,

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and Dumfries, the town that inspired Robert Burns.

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We have Woburn Abbey, Dyrham Park near Bath,

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and the RHS Gardens at Wisley in Surrey.

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We'll visit the brewery town of Burton upon Trent,

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rugby league territory in Wigan,

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and Kendal, gateway to the Lakes.

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All that and more lies ahead of us, but today,

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I'm in the Cotswolds, heading for the town of Winchcombe.

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We've set up camp at a castle fit for a king.

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Sudeley has royal connections spanning 1,000 years.

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Ethelred the Unready was prepared to give the original Saxon manor house to his daughter,

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but it wasn't fortified until the reign of King Stephen.

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By 1535, the castle was owned by Henry VIII,

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seen here in his wedding robes for marriage number six.

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Catherine Parr was a radiant bride,

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and when Henry slipped off his garter for the final time,

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she set up home here with her new husband, Sir Thomas Seymour.

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A topiary portrait of Catherine - with roses and a prayer book -

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now graces the route of her daily walk to St Mary's church,

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where her mortal remains were eventually entombed.

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Sudeley might still be a royal castle but for the Civil War,

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when Parliamentarians rendered it unusable.

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Sudeley was derelict for 200 years until the estate was restored

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by the Dent family, glove-makers from Worcester.

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In the 15th century,

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there were fruit and vegetable and herb gardens here.

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Today, the lawns are trembling beneath legions of antiques lovers,

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all heading for our experts, so let's not hold them back.

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Can you show me how it works?

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-Just push it round like that.

-Is it stiff or is it...?

-No, no, no.

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It looks as though it's been bathed in sunlight for a long time. Is it?

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No, it isn't. It's generally been folded over.

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When it's open, it always has a cover on it. This must have been before it came into our family.

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-Right, and when did you acquire it?

-We think it's about 55 years.

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It belonged to our father, who died recently.

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-And it was always closed, pushed up against the wall?

-Yes.

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-At mealtimes we'd have to pull it out, cos there's seven of us.

-Yes.

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-All of you round the table?

-Yes.

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Well, you're using it in exactly the way that it was always conceived to have been used.

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It is a swivel-action form that you usually see on card tables and tea tables.

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And this was always conceived for a dining room -

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beautiful fiddle-back mahogany.

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You've got this rich parallel lines within the graining,

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but it's obviously been exposed to very strong sunlight at some time

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because, as opposed to that rich lustrous reddy-brown that you get on good quality Cuban mahogany,

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-it's got slightly sort of jaundiced, yellowy-greenish surface.

-Yes, yes.

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-And that is the polish being applied on a very sun-bleached surface.

-Oh.

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I rather like nice old surfaces that have been worked up,

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but when you compare it to the colour on the frieze,

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-it is, you know, certainly... certainly a darker colour.

-Yes.

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The quality of the piece is fantastic, actually.

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It's beautifully made - these very bold kind of trestle-end supports.

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-In terms of date, I'm sure you know it...

-No, we don't how old it is.

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-Oh, you don't?

-No.

-It's inspired by Regency prototypes

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of around 1800-1810, but the treatment of the carving

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is slightly denser and fatter,

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so I think it's perhaps closer to 1815-1820, while still Regency,

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but it's got a little bit more of that kind of gutsy...form to it.

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I think the quality is very, very good. Nice surface carving,

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sea scrolls, very, very good dense timber and nice lacquered brass -

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original fittings, so it's in very pure condition.

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If you were to buy this in a shop today, you might have to spend...

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-£4,500 - £5,000.

-Right. OK.

-Very nice.

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Lovely thing.

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It's a sunny day here at Sudeley

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and all the butterflies have come out.

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This is an amazing collection. Where did you get them from?

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I got them from an antiquarian book dealer in Petersfield.

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-Was this very long ago?

-Um, it was probably about four years ago.

-Yes.

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Well, they are the most beautiful 1840s, 1830s watercolours,

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SO detailed, but they're absolutely immaculate.

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The butterflies are fabulous,

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and the backgrounds - the leaves and the nettles -

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are just absolutely incredible.

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Look at the translucence of this one.

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You can actually see through that. It's on a sort of iris. Tremendous.

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This one is very bold and very sombre, really, isn't it?

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-I can see that doing a lot of damage somewhere.

-Yes, if it's life size!

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Terrifying, but it really is extraordinary.

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And I notice at the top it says, "Van Diemens Land Lepidoptera",

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and I notice on this one it says, "Chinese Lepidoptera".

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Now, I do know of an author who did a book on Chinese Lepidoptera

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-and his name was Donovan.

-I have seen a copy of it.

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-And was it exactly the same?

-It was exactly the same.

-And it presented exactly the same way round?

-Yes.

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I think that he was thinking of doing other books on Lepidoptera,

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-but the Chinese one, particularly, was the one that he published.

-Yes.

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Look at this, this is a grasshopper,

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and the most wonderful sort of canna lily.

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-This one is almost so delicate, it looks Chinese almost.

-Yes, yes.

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But they just are absolutely incredible watercolours.

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And this - that's a Gingko biloba that they're sitting on.

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-That's the tree.

-Oh? Where the little pills come from?

-Probably!

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-Those little pills that are supposed to make you think better.

-Yes!

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-Yes.

-Well, there we are, we've looked at only seven,

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but the quality of them, of these 22, is absolutely incredible.

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-Now, how much did you pay for them?

-Well, I bought them with a friend.

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-He has 22, I have 22 and we paid about £400.

-Right.

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Right, I think you'd better go and buy the others off him!

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-I think - he wouldn't sell them?

-No.

-Well, I think your 22 - it's such a pity to break them up -

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-but your 22 are worth in the region of £10,000.

-No!

-That's what I mean,

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-you must go and buy the other ones back!

-Definitely!

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-It's an early piece of English porcelain.

-Yes.

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-It's made in Worcester.

-Uh-huh.

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And around 1775, but it's a very interesting piece

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in terms of the shape and design. Quite sumptuous for this time.

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What's its background?

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My grandfather used to go to lots of house sales locally,

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and my grandmother gave it to me when I got married.

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-Are there any other pieces?

-No.

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-The shape itself is based on English silver.

-Oh, right.

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But the decoration is much more complicated,

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-because you've got these curious Rococo cartouches round here...

-Yes.

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..these mirror-shaped panels here.

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But they've got this trellis work which is based on Chinese design.

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-Oh, right.

-Then this pattern round the rim

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-is, in fact, based on a Meissen pattern.

-Oh, right.

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-As are the flowers.

-Oh, right.

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So, again, we have these dialogues between East and West,

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and I think it's a beautiful object.

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Very unusual to get the tureen with the cover and the stand.

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I'd expect this, under the hammer, to make between...

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£3,000 and £4,000 - maybe a little bit more. CROWD GASPS

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-Certainly in a shop, it would sell for double that, probably.

-I don't believe you!

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There you go - a wonderful object.

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It's always a pleasure to see a good little camera, particularly a Leica,

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and this is a nice one because it's an early model.

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-It's a four-digit Leica - we've got a number here, 6806.

-Right.

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This is a Leica 1 and that number there denotes it's 1928.

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-Oh, gosh.

-So it's an early Leica. Very interesting, though.

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It's exceptionally clean for its age...

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Well, we had it restored - a gentleman in Scotland did it.

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-We were recommended to have it done.

-Yeah.

-It cost £200 to £300.

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He has done a very nice job on it,

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but to me that is very important as to the price of it.

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-An original version of this camera, is worth around about £1,000.

-Yes.

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My feeling is, I'll be honest with you,

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-is that it's probably worth around about £400 or £500.

-Right.

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These are sailing boats by Wade of Ireland. Have you had them long?

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-No, I purchased them a few years ago from a friend of mine.

-Right.

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-And how much did you pay for them?

-Just a few pounds.

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They are rare, made by Wade of Ireland.

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-Wade moved to Ireland in 1947.

-Yes.

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So, they're fairly recent but they're very, very collectable.

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-Wall decorations. Little hole in the back to hang it on the wall.

-Yes.

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-Then you could arrange them, sailing along.

-Yes.

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Collectors would go mad for these.

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If they went into auction, they'd be estimated at maybe £200 to £300,

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-but they could sail away to quite a bit more, I think.

-Gosh!

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-I wasn't a teddy-bear child.

-Really?

-No, or a doll child.

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-What were you, a Meccano child?

-I had a stuffed toy on wheels

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that was my substitute teddy, yes.

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Right. Well, he's lovely and I think

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he could be described almost as a psychedelic bear, couldn't he?

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He's got this wonderful two-tone fur where the base part is pink

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and the very tips have just been bleached, I suppose,

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to give it an "of the moment" look.

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-Girls might like to copy this kind of look.

-Very fashionable.

-Very.

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He's got very bright and quite large eyes.

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The feet are a giveaway as to who might have made him,

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and the soles of his feet are pear-shaped,

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small at the top and then they go out to the bottom,

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-and I think all that adds up to the maker Jopi - J-O-P-I.

-Right.

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And the one thing that is the clincher is this...

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-MUSIC TINKLES

-His box.

-His squeeze box.

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-Yes, it's got a squeeze box.

-Well, because you didn't play with him,

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he's in really good condition. I would have said that he's worth...

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-£500, perhaps as much as £700.

-You're not serious?

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-Yes, do you want to sit down?

-Oh, you're not serious?

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Yes, and dating from... They first made them in 1925

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and they went on until the 1950s, so I would have said maybe 1930.

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Standing in the heart of the Cotswolds, as we are,

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what I would hope to see is Cotswold furniture.

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The Cotswolds produced artistic furniture from the 1890s.

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Great names - Gimson, Barnsley - people who were classic figures

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in English Arts-and-Crafts furniture all worked round here.

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Now, I've a perception of what their furniture looks like,

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and it doesn't quite look like this, so tell me what you know about this.

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-This is a dental cabinet which I inherited...

-A dental cabinet?

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-Yes, which I inherited when I took a dental practice over in 1975.

-Yes.

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And this came with it.

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It was commissioned by one of my predecessors in the early 1920s,

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-by... I think it was done by Mr Gimson in Sapperton.

-Right.

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So, it's a very different piece of Cotswold furniture.

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Most Cotswold furniture is domestic.

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They wanted that handmade beautifully finished traditional Arts-and-Crafts look.

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What I've never seen before is a piece that is specifically made

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for a particular industry - if I can call it an industry.

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Now, it looks like a dental cabinet, it's got all the drawers...

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wonderful little thing there for putting your drill bits in...

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-Are they called drill bits?

-Yes.

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Um, everything about this is to do with its function.

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One of the most classic things which underlines that to me is...

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Normally cupboards open that way, but these open the other way...

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God, it smells of the dentist in there!

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It's that terrible smell I used to hate as a child.

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-Sorry, I shouldn't say that to you.

-All right.

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This is for practicality.

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I imagine the nurse would prepare things on top here

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with a glass plate, and would get in the cupboards without having to...

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-lean across. Does that make sense?

-Yes, it does.

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So, the design of the piece has been driven by its function,

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but all the Cotswold techniques are still here - the revealed structure,

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the use of oak, the visible dowel pins which hold it together,

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the way the dovetails are part of the design,

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the whole sense of simplicity. Now, you say Gimson -

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Gimson was the key figure, 1864-1919,

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-but there's a problem. If it was made in the '20s, he was dead.

-Yes.

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Gimson and two Barnsley brothers - Sidney and Ernest -

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were the founder figures of the Cotswold style.

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-A Mr Hawkins was the dentist in the early '20s.

-Yes.

-His father practised there before that.

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Maybe we can take it back another generation. If you want Gimson -

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it's got to be before World War I.

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Equally, it could be a Sapperton piece of the 1920s

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by a lot of other makers who set up in business there,

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so I'm not going to put a name on it without more research,

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but if it's Gimson you're going to be looking at...

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at least £5,000, possibly more.

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If it's by one of the followers in the 1920s,

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you're looking at £3,000 to £5,000, which is still a good price

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-for something that came with the job.

-Mmm.

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I've waited all day for someone to turn up with some Winchcombe pottery

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and at last, two people turn up, both connected with the pottery.

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Yes. Yeah, I went there as a young boy about 1948.

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-Yes.

-I was 12 years old.

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Good Lord. And your father was, of course,

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-at Winchcombe pottery back in the old days?

-He was, yes,

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from when he was 14. He's 89 now.

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The Winchcombe pottery has been a very dear one to my heart.

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At first they used the clay dug from the field behind the pottery.

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-Yes.

-That's right.

-Used the brickyard clay, I think, first.

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-But I think this one probably was made...

-Brickyard clay that one.

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Brickyard clay, yes. And this is inscribed Winchcombe

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in Michael Cardew's own lettering.

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Very typical beautiful lettering round there.

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-Your father was Sidney Tustin who made all these pieces.

-He did, yes.

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-And he used his own personal mark, didn't he?

-That's right, yeah.

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This one has got the Winchcombe pottery mark, WP,

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-and ST for Sid Tustin.

-Yes.

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These were all made for your family, were they?

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-The green set, a complete tea set, was made for my sister.

-Yes.

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And the brown set was made for myself,

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when we were sort of five, six...

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And this comes from a much more recent period of production.

0:17:540:17:59

This is from Nigeria, isn't it?

0:17:590:18:01

That's one of Cardew's assistants in Abuja.

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When Cardew left Winchcombe, he got a job with the government in Africa

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and that's by one of his assistants.

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-It's a built pot, not thrown.

-No.

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-She came to England and made two in Winchcombe.

-This is Ladi Kwali?

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-Ladi Kwali.

-And you actually met her when she was in England?

-Yes.

0:18:210:18:26

Yes, I see her build two. She put them on my wheel

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-and spun them and they were perfect.

-Heavens!

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You'd have thought they were thrown on wheels.

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She used a five-gallon oil drum.

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She put a ring of...sort of reeds or something on a bit of calabash,

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started with a big lump of clay, pinched it out and pulled it up,

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put bits on and built them round,

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-walking backwards.

-Good Lord!

-Singing and dancing, lovely.

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These are very much local and very personal -

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they're priceless in the family, aren't they?

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A jug like that is probably going to be £500, £600 now,

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highly collectable, these things.

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But a Ladi Kwali vase like that - God knows, I don't know...

0:19:100:19:14

-What did you pay for that?

-Do you want to know?

-Yes, please.

0:19:140:19:18

-£12.

-No! £12?!

-That was a lot of money!

0:19:180:19:24

Yes, but £12! Now, a pot by Ladi Kwali, highly collectable potter,

0:19:240:19:30

would be I suppose £5,000, £6,000, £7,000.

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-So your £12 has done very, very well!

-Mmm.

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What a beautiful vase. Absolutely wonderful. African and yet,

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mixed up with Winchcombe at the same time. Wonderful.

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Where did this furniture come from?

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I bought them from local auctions about seven or eight years ago.

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I collect porcelain and pottery and I bought them to display them.

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-Oh, perfect, perfect!

-But also with this one,

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I've always been interested in things made of timber and inlaid and marquetry furniture

0:20:030:20:09

and I was attracted by this, by the complicated inlay on it.

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-I am not sure quite where these came from.

-I see.

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China is pretty obvious as a possibility,

0:20:180:20:21

but I think they could have come slightly further west than that.

0:20:210:20:26

It's an export piece, it was never made for indigenous use.

0:20:260:20:30

-No.

-Made from an Oriental rosewood.

0:20:300:20:34

If you think about carving that...

0:20:340:20:37

with the design of this scrolling lotus in relief,

0:20:370:20:43

-you're cutting away the background.

-Carved from solid, I think.

0:20:430:20:47

-Carved from the solid - that is laborious.

-Yes.

0:20:470:20:51

-Date of this - mid-19th century...

-Mm, I see.

-..something like that.

0:20:510:20:56

This one's very nice. It's actually Japanese, not Chinese,

0:20:560:21:00

-did you know that?

-Yes, I did, yes.

-And slightly later -

0:21:000:21:04

we're looking here into the 1870s. Again an export piece

0:21:040:21:08

and what's unusual about this one is that it's symmetrical.

0:21:080:21:13

-Oh, I see.

-Everything balances.

0:21:130:21:16

-Right.

-And that is untypical, until you get to the very bottom element.

0:21:160:21:20

-Yes.

-Where suddenly it's asymmetrical.

-Yes.

0:21:200:21:24

-We've got little, wonderful sliding doors.

-Yes, amusing, that.

0:21:250:21:32

And, of course, in Japan the houses are made of wood and paper

0:21:320:21:36

and perhaps, when this was new, those were infilled with paper.

0:21:360:21:41

-I see, a bit like the houses.

-Just like the houses -

0:21:410:21:45

that's how their doors worked, so they reproduced it.

0:21:450:21:48

-Amusing temples here.

-And a little bridge.

-A little bridge! Wonderful!

0:21:480:21:53

-You'll have to get some porcelain figures to put on the bridge.

-Yes.

0:21:530:21:57

This class of ware was hugely popular for export

0:21:570:22:01

both to America and to Europe in the 1870s.

0:22:010:22:04

-Mmm.

-Made by marquetry

0:22:040:22:09

onto a pine base.

0:22:090:22:11

And what we've got on here is different woods -

0:22:110:22:16

these are sample woods to show what was available.

0:22:160:22:19

This is probably walnut, and this is probably a calamander...

0:22:190:22:24

on a typical pine base,

0:22:240:22:27

all cut and set in position.

0:22:270:22:30

The interesting thing... I'd be quite interested to know...

0:22:320:22:35

what you paid for that one.

0:22:350:22:39

-Yes, that was £700, I think.

-Oh, how long ago was this?

0:22:390:22:43

-Six or seven years ago.

-Oh, that was a very good price.

0:22:430:22:47

-You did well on that one.

-Yes.

0:22:470:22:50

I mean...a retail price on that one today would be...

0:22:500:22:55

-£1,200 - £1,500.

-Yes.

-And this one?

0:22:550:22:58

-I paid £500 for this one.

-This was?

-About seven years ago, again.

0:22:580:23:04

That's a perfectly good price.

0:23:040:23:06

If that had come up in a London auction that time ago,

0:23:060:23:10

-it would have made at least double that if not more.

-Yes, mm.

0:23:100:23:14

You've done very well.

0:23:140:23:16

-You've doubled up your price.

-Mm.

-No doubt about that.

-Very nice.

0:23:160:23:21

Simon, some time ago we featured a watch with a luminous face

0:23:230:23:27

and then we got a letter warning us about the dangers of radioactivity.

0:23:270:23:31

Mm, in fact, in the old days,

0:23:310:23:33

radium, that Marie Curie used, was considered to be harmless

0:23:330:23:37

and occasionally you'll find a little bottle of it

0:23:370:23:40

in a very old doctor's surgery kit,

0:23:400:23:43

but in terms of watches, it's the luminous dials that are dangerous.

0:23:430:23:47

They're not dangerous per se and I'll explain more about that.

0:23:470:23:51

I've actually managed to purloin a watch today.

0:23:510:23:55

This is probably '50s and we're OK, cos in the '50s they changed over.

0:23:550:24:00

Where it becomes dangerous - it's rather like asbestos -

0:24:000:24:04

it's safe if you don't play with it,

0:24:040:24:06

you don't inhale it and you leave it where it is.

0:24:060:24:09

So, fundamentally, an old watch, especially one made before the war,

0:24:090:24:15

if it's got a luminous dial, is safe enough if you don't open it

0:24:150:24:19

and you don't get the radium in contact with yourself.

0:24:190:24:23

-What's the history of it?

-They used to mix it with zinc sulphide

0:24:230:24:29

and paint it onto the watch dial. Now, the ladies that did it,

0:24:290:24:33

had a tendency, with a very pointed brush, to lick the end of the brush,

0:24:330:24:38

to sharpen it up, to pick up the radium and put it on the dial.

0:24:380:24:42

And huge numbers of people dying of cancer of the tongue and the throat.

0:24:420:24:46

-So what do you do if you want to get it repaired?

-Well, YOU don't!

0:24:460:24:52

You get a man who does.

0:24:520:24:54

In fact, if you write to someone like the British Horological Institute,

0:24:540:24:58

they will recommend a watchmaker who can remove it safely.

0:24:580:25:02

One way is by immersing the dial into oil,

0:25:020:25:05

then it can be gently scraped off and the material is kept in the oil and can be disposed of safely.

0:25:050:25:11

What you DON'T do is scrape...

0:25:110:25:14

Right(!)

0:25:140:25:16

This was painted by my grandmother's uncle.

0:25:160:25:21

I'm not sure of the date, but way back in the 1850s.

0:25:210:25:25

And as I understand it,

0:25:250:25:27

the lady who is in the centre of the picture, who is dying,

0:25:270:25:32

was his mother, and that would be his wife and one of his daughters.

0:25:320:25:38

Yes. It's quite remarkable to think

0:25:380:25:41

that somebody would have the presence of mind or the ability

0:25:410:25:45

to record the scene.

0:25:450:25:47

We have his portfolio here

0:25:470:25:50

and his name - RP Cuff,

0:25:500:25:52

who I don't recognise as any particularly noted artist.

0:25:520:25:56

The name means nothing to me other than he's in the family history.

0:25:560:26:01

But this quite often happens.

0:26:010:26:03

It's extraordinary that somebody with so much ability did this,

0:26:030:26:07

and probably did one or two other watercolours and not much else.

0:26:070:26:11

But just examining the painting, as I'm sure you have for years,

0:26:110:26:16

moving around the fruit, and I think this is a cheese...

0:26:160:26:20

-Oh, it is. Incredible detail.

-Yes. We have the artist's palette

0:26:200:26:26

and possibly some water and some other drawings here.

0:26:260:26:31

And here, this wonderful posy here, the still life of flowers

0:26:310:26:35

and the family Bible, or a prayer book...

0:26:350:26:38

Yes, they would have been Bible readers.

0:26:380:26:41

-Yes, yes.

-We showed it at Sotheby's and Phillips and one of them said,

0:26:410:26:46

"Oh, the lady there, she's got such a pallid uninteresting face."

0:26:460:26:51

Well, if I may say,

0:26:510:26:53

speaking as a doctor, that face depicts precisely

0:26:530:26:58

-the disease she was dying from. She was dying from tuberculosis.

-Yes.

0:26:580:27:02

And that is a very clear, precise painting of that.

0:27:020:27:07

-Yes, yes.

-And people dying of tuberculosis DON'T look very happy.

0:27:070:27:12

Of course they don't, no, no.

0:27:120:27:14

But what WE like about it is the warmth of the family care.

0:27:140:27:18

Yes. I would have thought that a figure of something like...

0:27:180:27:22

£2,000 or £3,000 is what it's worth.

0:27:220:27:25

-Thank you. Pleasure to have it appreciated.

-Good.

0:27:250:27:30

It was bought in 1960 or thereabouts,

0:27:300:27:33

in an antique shop in South Kensington

0:27:330:27:37

and that lady left it to a lady friend of mine,

0:27:370:27:41

a long-time lady friend,

0:27:410:27:44

-and she died and left it to me.

-Oh, wonderful.

0:27:440:27:47

It is a Tunbridge-ware box. You'll know all about Tunbridge ware,

0:27:470:27:51

but it's a fascinating technique.

0:27:510:27:54

It came in at the end of the Georgian period,

0:27:540:27:57

going right through the 19th C. The way they decorate these panels

0:27:570:28:02

is with little tiny bundles of different coloured woods

0:28:020:28:05

and they clip them off and put them into the patterns here,

0:28:050:28:10

so it looks rather like a pixelated photograph,

0:28:100:28:14

-like something you see on a computer now.

-Yes.

0:28:140:28:17

They were very popular. This is a particularly fine example

0:28:170:28:22

and it is a workbox. There's a castle on top,

0:28:220:28:25

-which is a favourite.

-Very ingenious.

-It is. Isn't it clever?

0:28:250:28:30

They had time in those days to do these things! But look inside. Wow!

0:28:300:28:35

-I love the colour of the silk.

-Mm.

0:28:350:28:37

-It must have been much-loved and much used, this box, I feel.

-Yes.

0:28:370:28:41

And it'd have an underneath tray.

0:28:410:28:43

-Let's take that out. Oh, gracious, we've got a letter in here.

-Yes.

0:28:430:28:48

That's from a gentleman of 1857

0:28:480:28:51

to a lady asking her if she would like to accept it,

0:28:510:28:55

-which she obviously did.

-Great.

0:28:550:28:58

And it's stayed with it all those years. Isn't that wonderful?

0:28:580:29:02

"John Kitchener's respectful compliments

0:29:020:29:05

"begs Mrs Jones' kind acceptance of the workbox

0:29:050:29:09

"as a token of regard and esteem." Wonderful!

0:29:090:29:13

It's a long time since gentlemen have esteemed ladies!

0:29:130:29:17

I'd like to be esteemed. 1857.

0:29:170:29:19

I think if it was sold today, you would be talking somewhere between

0:29:190:29:23

-£700 and £1,000 at auction. Thanks for bringing it in.

-It's a pleasure.

0:29:230:29:28

-Do you know what that mark is?

-I can't read it, it's too corrupted.

0:29:310:29:36

-1860?

-Or later.

0:29:360:29:37

That dragon is the sort of thing you see in Liberty designs.

0:29:370:29:41

-Are you a family of letter writers?

-Not really.

0:29:410:29:45

It was my great, great uncle's,

0:29:450:29:48

-and we've had it ever since then.

-Well, I love these things.

0:29:480:29:52

I think no country-house hall would be complete without them.

0:29:520:29:56

It is made of oak - Victorian miniature letter box -

0:29:560:30:00

and they're always conceived to go on a hall table.

0:30:000:30:04

The postman would pick up the mail every day from it.

0:30:040:30:08

The earliest ones of these tend to be made

0:30:080:30:11

in the second quarter of the 19th century,

0:30:110:30:15

but they continued being made until the early 20th century.

0:30:150:30:18

But very nice colour. They are very popular. Have you had it valued?

0:30:180:30:23

-Don't think so, no.

-If you were to go to a dealer or a fair,

0:30:230:30:28

-you might well have to pay... £2,000 to £2,500.

-£2,500?!

0:30:280:30:34

Right.

0:30:350:30:37

I don't want to be rude, but she appears to be going bald,

0:30:370:30:41

she hasn't got any eyes,

0:30:410:30:44

her hands are all bashed up, she's got dirty socks,

0:30:440:30:48

but I'm sure you love her?

0:30:480:30:51

I do, yes. She was given to me as a little girl

0:30:510:30:54

-and I've treasured her ever since.

-And did you damage her?

0:30:540:30:58

-I played with her and cut her hair.

-YOU did that?

0:30:580:31:02

-I did, yes, cut her fringe.

-What about her eyes?

0:31:020:31:05

Her eyes fell out. The head got glued on and the eyes got left out,

0:31:050:31:09

-so I haven't tried to dismantle her again.

-Where are the eyes?

-At home.

0:31:090:31:14

-Oh, you've still got them?

-Yes.

0:31:140:31:17

Has an expert looked at her?

0:31:170:31:20

They said she was worth about £1,000 as she is now.

0:31:200:31:24

-So you must have caused about £10,000 worth of damage!

-Yes.

0:31:240:31:31

This is a painting of a Hurricane from WW2. Whose plane is it?

0:31:310:31:35

-That's my father flying that plane in the Battle of Britain.

-Right.

0:31:350:31:39

And your father was by rank...?

0:31:390:31:42

-Squadron Leader Ginger Lacey, DFM and Bar.

-Really?

0:31:420:31:47

-One of the well-known aces of the last war.

-Yeah.

0:31:470:31:50

Ranking up there with Johnny Johnson and the rest.

0:31:500:31:53

-We like to think of him as better than most.

-Right!

0:31:530:31:56

Well, this is his flying logbook, which is wonderful. I've had a peep.

0:31:560:32:01

-Now...the fascinating thing is here this entry about the Heinkel.

-Yes.

0:32:010:32:07

"Heinkel 111 destroyed. Remember, must leave bombers alone in future -

0:32:070:32:13

"they're shooting me down too often." What's the story?

0:32:130:32:17

If you look at the date - September 13th -

0:32:170:32:20

it says, "Intercepted single HE 111."

0:32:200:32:24

That was the one that bombed Buckingham Palace,

0:32:240:32:27

-when the Queen Mother said she could look the East End in the face at last.

-Yes.

0:32:270:32:33

Father shot him down, but he was shot down himself

0:32:330:32:37

-"by rear gunner who knew his stuff" and had to bail out.

-Oh, right.

0:32:370:32:41

I would put a value on this one - my first thought was £500 -

0:32:410:32:45

but because it is what it is, it could fetch £1,000 in auction

0:32:450:32:50

because it's so desirable to collectors.

0:32:500:32:53

Not that any collector's ever going to get hold of this!

0:32:530:32:56

Of course!

0:32:560:32:58

My late husband was a US navy pilot

0:32:590:33:02

and he was a native of Sacramento but grew up in Oregon.

0:33:020:33:07

His mother was called McCulley and...

0:33:070:33:12

-That would be what this is here, this card.

-Yeah.

0:33:120:33:15

-Dr McCulley was a dentist.

-Right.

-And, as it says,

0:33:150:33:19

the office was over Wilber's Drugstore in Snohomish, Washington.

0:33:190:33:24

He used to trade with the Indians - he'd pull teeth or something.

0:33:240:33:28

Well, they were penniless and...

0:33:280:33:31

-And he took these in payment, did he? For pulling teeth?

-Yes.

0:33:310:33:36

And the tribe?

0:33:360:33:38

Well, my husband told me it was the Klickitat Indians.

0:33:380:33:42

-Right, OK.

-Now, I've no history of that,

0:33:420:33:46

-but he said they no longer exist.

-This doll here is very simplistic,

0:33:460:33:51

and obviously made for a child.

0:33:510:33:54

We've got horsehair for the hair, which is interesting, and beadwork.

0:33:550:34:01

This, I feel, is post-1900 so after 1900,

0:34:010:34:04

but what very much interests me is this,

0:34:040:34:07

which is a pouch. The thing about beadwork, Native-American beadwork,

0:34:070:34:13

is that in fact an awful lot of it was actually made for trade.

0:34:130:34:18

A nice pair of moccasins would have a very European influence -

0:34:180:34:23

they'll be decorated in foliate bands and things.

0:34:230:34:27

They can be hard to date, but often trade items are very easy to date

0:34:270:34:31

because of those characteristics. I look at this and think,

0:34:310:34:35

probably about 1870-1880. It's actually an old piece in real terms.

0:34:350:34:40

I look at the characteristics of it

0:34:400:34:43

and I don't see many European influences in it, which is good,

0:34:430:34:47

I really like that.

0:34:470:34:49

It fascinates me that this was traded for tooth pulling.

0:34:490:34:53

I think that this pouch is probably worth about £1,500 to £2,000...

0:34:530:34:57

And I think the little doll,

0:34:590:35:01

which is charming, although later,

0:35:010:35:04

-very naive, but very charming, I think is worth £500 to £800.

-Uh-huh.

0:35:040:35:09

They were my mother's. She was very interested in blue and white,

0:35:090:35:13

particularly copies of Chinese patterns.

0:35:130:35:17

Interesting that she collected Chinese patterns... You're right,

0:35:170:35:21

what you have here are English examples

0:35:210:35:25

of English manufacturers attempting to produce Chinese-style porcelains.

0:35:250:35:29

-Actually you've got three different factories represented here.

-Right.

0:35:290:35:34

Here we've got the latest piece which is from the Caughley factory -

0:35:340:35:41

a miniature coffee pot which is quite rare

0:35:410:35:45

and produced around about 1778-1780.

0:35:450:35:48

Beautifully made with a very, very pretty little Chinese pattern

0:35:480:35:53

-of a river island and two Chinese-style pagodas.

-Mm, OK.

0:35:530:35:58

And here you've got the Worcester factory,

0:35:580:36:02

with a pattern called Rock Warbler - very, very Chinese inspired design -

0:36:020:36:07

-and it looks in perfect condition.

-Mmm.

0:36:070:36:10

-Underneath the lid we have a workman's mark.

-Yes.

0:36:100:36:14

This was piece work, so they'd get paid for each piece they painted.

0:36:140:36:18

This one - a sort of TF mark.

0:36:180:36:21

Sometimes individual painters' pieces got separated

0:36:210:36:25

and didn't go together.

0:36:250:36:27

-Is there a TF under this one? No, painted by a different person.

-Oh!

0:36:270:36:32

But when it came to be put together, just a lid that fitted pretty well

0:36:320:36:37

-and off it went.

-Mm.

-Worcester, 1755, Rock Warbler pattern,

0:36:370:36:43

-so older than the Caughley piece.

-Yes, yes.

0:36:430:36:46

In between the two, a factory in East Anglia, the Lowestoft factory -

0:36:460:36:52

these wares produced about 1765.

0:36:520:36:55

Again, looks in perfect condition which is really surprising.

0:36:550:36:59

You've got the teapot, the cream jug

0:36:590:37:01

and the sucrier, which reverses in the Chinese style to be a saucer.

0:37:010:37:06

-Do you think their value is limited by their size?

-Um, yeah.

0:37:060:37:12

I would have thought that something so small couldn't be worth much.

0:37:120:37:16

Well, it's the reverse in that small is beautiful.

0:37:160:37:21

The Caughley coffee pot

0:37:210:37:23

would have an estimate at auction of £600 to £800.

0:37:230:37:27

-Mmm.

-And could probably do better. The little Worcester teapot -

0:37:270:37:32

-I think would be estimated at £1,000 to £1,500.

-Wow, yeah.

0:37:320:37:37

And the group of Lowestoft wares -

0:37:370:37:40

the three pieces together -

0:37:400:37:43

-£2,000 to £2,500.

-Gosh.

-Beautiful things.

0:37:430:37:47

The light here shows us how very white these diamonds are

0:37:490:37:53

-because this is a diamond parure of jewellery. Parure - a set.

-Yes.

0:37:530:37:57

Brooch and matching eardrops.

0:37:570:37:59

The period of design for something like this

0:37:590:38:03

is very much late 1940s, start of the 1950s,

0:38:030:38:06

when London jewellers used to make jewellery like this -

0:38:060:38:11

very white, using brilliant cuts - which are the round diamonds

0:38:110:38:16

and, in this case, baguette-cut diamonds. You know the way it is,

0:38:160:38:20

ladies would go to cocktail parties and wear their sets of jewellery.

0:38:200:38:24

Sometimes with these drops for the ears, you could remove the diamonds.

0:38:240:38:28

-And I see you can, can't you?

-Yes.

0:38:280:38:30

You could wear them as cluster clips on the lobe during the day,

0:38:300:38:35

and at night, you would put your baguette diamond drops on.

0:38:350:38:39

-Yes.

-Night-time/day-time earrings -

0:38:390:38:43

very practical indeed.

0:38:430:38:45

With the brooch, you can remove it from the frame like that -

0:38:450:38:50

you pull back these clip fittings - you just pull that like that -

0:38:500:38:55

that dismantles...

0:38:550:38:59

and then you can wear one on one side of your lapel

0:38:590:39:02

-and one on the other.

-Were clips fashionable in the '50s?

0:39:020:39:06

-Very much so, and in the '30s too.

-Were they? Yes.

0:39:060:39:10

And you could imagine how striking that would look.

0:39:100:39:13

Now, you've also brought in something that is utterly different from this.

0:39:130:39:18

You couldn't get pieces that were so different in design.

0:39:180:39:22

This is a totally aesthetic piece of jewellery, isn't it? Very subtle,

0:39:220:39:28

it's very delicate. Whereas this is all flash and show,

0:39:280:39:32

this is far more gentle. Do you know about this?

0:39:320:39:35

I'm assuming that they didn't come from the same place?

0:39:350:39:39

I don't know. This belonged to my grandmother,

0:39:390:39:42

so it won't have come from the same place as this jewellery,

0:39:420:39:47

and my grandmother gave me that when I was 21.

0:39:470:39:50

The jeweller who's made this has used different coloured sapphires.

0:39:500:39:55

These are blue ones and here we've got some pink sapphires

0:39:550:40:00

and these are almost like moonstones but are actually a white sapphire,

0:40:000:40:06

and they're from Ceylon, I think,

0:40:060:40:08

that's where we get all these different coloured sapphires.

0:40:080:40:11

Then you've got the frame which is all enamelled in bright green,

0:40:110:40:16

so there is a sense of contrast between the stones and the frame.

0:40:160:40:20

Now, the key about this is you've got a cartouche-shaped maker's mark

0:40:200:40:26

-at the top there.

-Yes.

-That tells me that this is a piece of jewellery

0:40:260:40:31

made by that famous house who worked in Victorian times called Guiliano.

0:40:310:40:37

-It is them?

-It is. Did you have a suspicion that it might have been?

0:40:370:40:42

I've never ever had anybody look at it before, but, um...

0:40:420:40:46

I hoped that it might be.

0:40:460:40:48

Well, I'm delighted to confirm that it is.

0:40:480:40:50

It's not Carlo Guiliano, the father,

0:40:500:40:52

-it's actually the sons - they've got a slightly different mark there.

-Oh.

0:40:520:40:57

We can date this piece to about 1890...

0:40:570:41:00

getting towards the end of the Victorian period.

0:41:000:41:04

-You've also got a matching chain to go with it as well.

-Yes.

0:41:040:41:08

Although that hasn't a maker's mark.

0:41:080:41:11

But this is absolutely right and proper for the period,

0:41:110:41:15

by this maker.

0:41:150:41:17

-Yes.

-And it's colourful, it's delicate, it's wearable

0:41:170:41:22

-and it's deeply commercial.

-Oh, thank you!

-Right, well, values.

0:41:220:41:26

The diamond clip brooch -

0:41:260:41:29

each side here has got about 6 carats of diamonds,

0:41:290:41:33

that makes about 12 carats,

0:41:330:41:36

so a basic break-up price for this diamond brooch

0:41:360:41:41

would be maybe £4,000 or £5,000.

0:41:410:41:43

The earrings - the fact it's a set adds a little boost to it as well -

0:41:430:41:49

so I think those earrings are around £3,000 to £3,500.

0:41:490:41:54

And then we move to this.

0:41:540:41:57

I think that if this was being sold the interest would be comprehensive

0:41:570:42:02

and I think it'd be worth something in the region of £6,000.

0:42:020:42:06

-Yes.

-That's the key name.

-Yes.

0:42:060:42:08

-Terrific, thank you very much indeed.

-Thank you too.

0:42:080:42:13

And, so, the new series is off and running.

0:42:130:42:16

We have to leave the lovely grounds of Sudeley Castle and head home.

0:42:160:42:21

We've had one or two letters

0:42:210:42:23

about this lovely blue car that features in our opening titles.

0:42:230:42:27

There's one here from Ron Magill of Surrey,

0:42:270:42:31

who sees a resemblance between the driver and Tony Blair

0:42:310:42:34

and sends a cartoon to illustrate that.

0:42:340:42:37

Nice work, Ron.

0:42:370:42:39

And another picture from C Tilley of Newark,

0:42:390:42:43

who tells us that in 1928, when he was four, his father took him

0:42:430:42:47

to collect a grandfather clock in a motorcycle and sidecar.

0:42:470:42:52

The question most people ask about our title sequence is,

0:42:530:42:57

"Where was the last bit filmed?"

0:42:570:42:59

It's Hay Bluff near Hay-on-Wye,

0:42:590:43:01

where the sun always seems to shine.

0:43:010:43:04

Until the next time, goodbye.

0:43:040:43:06

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:370:43:39

Michael Aspel presents the show in which members of the public are invited to bring along their antiques for examination. In the gardens of Sudeley Castle, Gloucestershire, the experts look over a fine regulator clock, a sapphire pendant, Winchcombe pottery and a pouch traded with a dentist by Cligatac Indians in exchange for pulling teeth.