Guernsey Antiques Roadshow


Guernsey

Fiona Bruce and the team set sail for the Channel Islands where the people of Guernsey give them a warm welcome at Saumarez Park.


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Transcript


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I'm going to start this programme with a little bit of an apology.

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You see, it's been 15 years since we last came to Guernsey,

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and our Channel crossing is long overdue,

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so time to make up for lost time now.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow.

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Guernsey seems such a tranquil island,

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a place surrounded by such calm waters

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that it's easy to forget its turbulent past.

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But a huge network of fortifications,

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built from medieval to Napoleonic times,

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stand testament to over 600 years of conflict with nearby France.

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Guernsey fought off all attempts by the French to capture the island,

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but nothing could stop the onslaught of the Nazis.

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On the afternoon of June 28th 1940,

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six bombers from Hitler's Luftwaffe attacked Jersey and Guernsey.

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Like the rest of the Channel Islands, Guernsey was completely defenceless.

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When the German invasion force landed,

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islanders had no choice but to surrender.

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One of Hitler's first acts was to fortify the island

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with vast concrete gun emplacements and observation towers.

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It feels quite eerie to be stood here by one of these concrete monoliths

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and though they may scar the beautiful coastline here,

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it seems only fitting that they should remain

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as a reminder of a bleak period in this island's history.

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These German building works

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were coordinated from a French-style chateau in Saumarez Park.

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It had been commandeered by the German Labour Corps,

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who stripped it of its fine furniture and fittings.

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Today, in these more peaceful times, it's a residential home

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in the heart of one of the island's most popular parks.

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And plenty of people have turned out to see us, I'm glad to say.

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So over to our experts.

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I can see you're a wine drinker.

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-Yes, indeed.

-Do you have wine out of here ever?

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No, I haven't done, because I haven't had any claret.

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-I think you're permitted to put something else in, if you want to.

-That's a good idea.

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-Yes.

-Yeah, I think you must.

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Yes, yes.

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It's such a beautiful object.

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I was immediately taken by this glass

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and the way it's been cut,

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-and this is called rock crystal engraving.

-Oh.

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And it was a technique which was done largely in Stourbridge,

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-just south of Birmingham.

-Yes.

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Many factories could have done it, but Webb is a strong contender.

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Dates from the last years of the 19th century,

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or the early 20th century.

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In fact, these ran up to the '30s.

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It's been mounted in what we call parcel-gilt,

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which means that it's silver which has had gold onto it.

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-In places, not all over.

-Hmm-mm.

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And we can get the date of it from the date letter here, which is 1900.

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Oh, I'd never noticed that.

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Ah, you see, that's why we're here.

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Now, I want to know...

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did you buy it, for a start?

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-Yes.

-And what did you pay for it?

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I can't remember whether it was £70 or £700.

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-Really? Now, wait a minute...

-It was a long time ago!

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..if I give you an IOU, this could be money in this somewhere.

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Very interesting. How long ago?

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15 years ago.

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At £70, it would have been seriously cheap,

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unless you were really very lucky.

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-So I think you must have paid £700 for it.

-Hmm.

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Well, what's it worth today?

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Yes.

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The real wine buffs are... decanting wine.

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They don't need to decant wine, because it's not throwing a sediment

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but they're decanting it

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because it shows off the colour of the wine so well.

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So you take it out of that dark bottle

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and you pour it into here,

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and the colour absolutely comes to life,

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-particularly with rock crystal engraving.

-Oh.

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Your smart claret drinker is going to want that

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and he's going to pay for it.

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He would, you know, this is a top-of-the-range model, almost.

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Um, I think that would make somewhere around £2,000 to £3,000.

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-Wow!

-You did all right.

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Wow! I sure did.

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The jewellery,

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the lady wearing one of the pieces of jewellery,

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who was she?

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She was, er, Doris Clapham

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and she was one of the original Tiller Girls

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in the beginning of the century, taken in by my grandmother.

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-Right, right.

-Because she didn't get on with her step-mother.

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Oh, interesting, interesting.

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-What made her become a Tiller Girl, all those years back?

-Well, I think she was a dancer.

-Yes.

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When she left home, I suppose it was one way to earn a living.

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Apparently, the early ones nearly all married into the aristocracy.

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Oh, really?

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And she married Fred Day of Francis, Day & Hunter, music publishers.

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He went to see her every night when she was a Tiller Girl.

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They got married and lived a very high life after that.

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What year did she get married, then?

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-Er, 9...8...1912.

-1912.

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-1912.

-Yes, because that's her diamond wedding.

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All right, the brooch that she's wearing here, in the painting,

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is this brooch here, made in platinum,

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in around about 1925.

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Diamonds, and look at the very white diamonds here,

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in two-row formation,

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in little borders of what are called calibre-cut sapphires.

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-Baton-shaped sapphires.

-Yes.

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But this is a really pretty brooch, wearable.

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These two pieces here are not in the painting,

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so what do we know about these?

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They were given to her by her husband Fred,

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and apparently she lost the bracelet

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at some point when they were in Paris.

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-Oh, really?

-And he had another one made.

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The bracelet itself has got a highly technical name

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that we describe these, which is called Tutti Frutti.

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-Tutti Frutti, yes.

-Quite clearly, you can see they are a pair.

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Now, these are later than the brooch.

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These were probably made in around about 1935

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and they are a tour de force

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-of colourful, bold, strong, society jewellery.

-Yes.

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And the gems themselves are interesting because,

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when you look closely, you will see that they're carved leaves.

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They carved leaves here of emeralds,

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rubies and sapphires, in diamond frames.

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-Tutti Frutti, would you not agree, is very descriptive?

-Yes.

-Hmm.

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Let's move on to... some prices for you.

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Well, the painting itself,

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let me explain, I know NOTHING about pictures,

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but I'm reliably informed by my colleagues that it's painted by a man called Cooper,

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who was a society painter in the '20s and '30s, which figures.

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-Hmm, yes.

-That's what we see here.

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Now, the painting is damaged.

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It's severely suffering from flaking here, caused by damp.

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Apparently, I'm told it's worth £400 to £500.

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The jewels themselves...

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The diamond and sapphire brooch with its strength, its power, its beauty,

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I suppose if I were selling that today - £6,000 to £8,000.

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I think for that grouping, that style,

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-I'm thinking about £20,000 to £30,000.

-Hmm.

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It's beautiful.

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You can imagine that when she went on holiday to Vienna -

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they used to spend a lot of time at Vienna -

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she probably travelled with all this.

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Well, there she was, style, panache.

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She was a woman with individuality, with jewellery to match.

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Well, we've done a number of dressers on the Roadshow

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over the last 25, 30 years, but none better than this base.

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This is an extremely interesting base, from my point of view.

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-It's got cabriole legs, which is the most desirable type, OK.

-Mm.

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And we can put it round about 1735 to 1770.

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Difficult to be more precise because they made them in the country the same way.

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Once a fashion had come in, it tended to stay.

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We can tell also that it's western seaboard.

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So not necessarily a Welsh dresser,

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but certainly up from there going north,

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Chester, way up on the western seaboard.

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And that's usually denoted

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by this type of mahogany crossbanding around an oak drawer.

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Got nice little details, a little extra curl here,

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which was an overhang, really, from 1710s, 1720s,

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and an overhanging drawer front.

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All these little details go to confirm that sort of period.

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So if we say mid-18th century, it's pretty safe.

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-That's the base part. That's the valuable bit.

-Right.

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This is later.

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This is nothing to do with it, originally.

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A pair of old doors, nice doors here,

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and this part is not as old as the doors.

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So we have a dresser base, which is valuable in its own right

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and a later adaption of a top,

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which adds utility value to it, but not commercial.

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If this were on the market you'd take that bit away,

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and probably hang it on the wall as a separate item,

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and sell that part, which is the valuable bit.

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-Good heavens.

-Now, I'm interested because it's quite insecure.

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I mean, it's probably screwed to the base.

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But an original one would have a retaining moulding around.

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It wouldn't just sit, plonked on the top.

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So is this where you screw it back to the wall

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for security or something like that?

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No, that has an interesting history, actually.

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The dresser belonged to my grandparents,

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who left the island hurriedly in June 1940,

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and when they came back five years later, they discovered that,

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like many local houses, theirs had been requisitioned by the Germans,

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and they found that somebody had taken a pot shot

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at the quails in that picture.

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-This plate?

-Yes.

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I think it's cloisonne,

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-and because of that, they knew it wouldn't break.

-Good Lord.

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They could have gone mad and smashed all the other ones,

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but they just chose that plate, because you can see the two corresponding bullet holes.

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-These are actual bullet holes?

-Yes. Yes.

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I've never been able to find the bullets, sadly.

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Look at...now!

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If we were on a crime TV series,

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we'd get a rod and we could tell at what angle they were -

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were they standing up or sitting down?

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-Absolutely.

-Ttfff!

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I've always believed that they were two bored Germans,

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sitting one winter's evening in chairs either side of the room,

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-and one took a shot at the quail from one angle...

-Yeah.

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..and the other, from the other.

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-Fantastic!

-Both missed.

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-They missed the quail.

-Yes.

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Well, I... That's a unique story.

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There's nothing like that I've ever encountered.

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All I can tell you is this part, this bit,

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-is probably worth between £4,000 and £6,000 as it is.

-Good heavens!

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That part is priceless. Absolutely priceless.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Well, you are Lord de Saumarez

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and we're standing here in Saumarez Park,

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which you know very well, don't you?

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Yes, it's the old family seat

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that my grandfather sold in 1936 to the States.

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And you've brought along today an interesting sword.

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Something that, actually, I recognise

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and I recognise it by this incredibly distinctive grip,

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the hilt, in the form of a crocodile.

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I recognise this as a copy of the sword

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that was presented to Nelson

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to commemorate the victory at the Battle of the Nile.

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Now, after the Battle of the Nile,

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-his captains met on Saumarez's ship, the Orion.

-That's right.

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And they decided to invite Nelson to accept a sword, paid for by them,

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and a portrait that they were going to have painted later.

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I don't think that ever happened.

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I don't think it did. They also inaugurated the Egyptian Club.

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-The Egyptian Club, sometimes called the Crocodile Club.

-Yes.

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And this sword is one of the swords

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that some of the captains had made for them afterwards.

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Nelson had the original, which was made in gold,

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and then his prize agent

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arranged for several copies for the senior captains,

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of which I guess your ancestor would be one, Saumarez would be one,

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to have some copies made in gilded brass and this is -

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and I can't believe I'm actually holding it -

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this is Saumarez's actual sword.

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It is, and I believe it's one of the few still in the possession

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-of the family of one of the Band of Brothers.

-Because many of the others were sold, of course.

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Let's take a look at this sword.

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The hilt is made in the form of a crocodile

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because of the Nile crocodiles, and there's an oval plaque here

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that says "Victory of the Nile, 1st August 1798"

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and that was the date, of course, of the great victory over the French.

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And on the other side...

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..it says - I can't quite read that.

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-What does it say?

-"Captain James Saumarez, His Majesty's Ship Orion".

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He was second in command at the Battle of the Nile.

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-So he was Nelson's deputy, if you like?

-Yes, yes.

-How astonishing!

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Now, I wonder what the blade is like?

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Let's just take this... My goodness, that's stiff!

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Aah! Good. Can I ask you to hold that?

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That's a beautiful blade.

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Now, if we turn it this way, we can see that, originally,

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this would have been blued and gilded,

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which is, which would be sumptuous,

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beautiful blueing and gilding.

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We can just see traces of the blueing and gilding left.

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We've got a crown there, the King's crown,

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and GR for George, George III of course,

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and that's the period that this sword was made in.

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But it's a fabulous piece. It's a really, really fantastic item.

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And it does actually have quite a significant value.

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Not many of these ever turn up on the open market today,

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but if this ever did, it would sell for

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somewhere between £150,000 and £200,000.

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Not for sale.

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-You can't be tempted?

-No.

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I'm glad to hear it.

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I find myself in a very lucky situation today of being faced by two very lovely ladies.

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-Yourself.

-Thank you.

-And Lady Penelope Creighton-Ward.

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Now, for all of those people who were growing up in the '60s,

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-I'm sure they'll all remember Lady Penelope from Thunderbirds.

-Yeah.

0:16:300:16:35

Now, this is what appears to be an oil painting

0:16:350:16:37

and I want to know how you happen to have an oil painting of Lady Penelope.

0:16:370:16:42

Well, my husband worked at Century 21.

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-Really?

-In Slough.

-Right.

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And it was given to him when the firm closed.

0:16:480:16:52

Right, OK. Now, can you tell me what your husband did at Century 21?

0:16:520:16:55

Obviously that was Gerry and Sylvia Anderson's production company,

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which made all the shows like Thunderbirds, Stingray, Captain Scarlet.

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Did he work on all of those productions?

0:17:030:17:05

Yeah, he did all the explosions.

0:17:050:17:07

-He did all the explosions?!

-Yeah.

-Fabulous!

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Of course, as a boy, that was the bit I probably most liked.

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-You would.

-With all the explosions.

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-All those fabulous models that used to sadly get destroyed.

-Yeah.

0:17:150:17:20

Interestingly enough, this is not what it appears to be at first sight.

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In fact, even though it appears to be an oil painting,

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it's in fact an overpainted photograph.

0:17:270:17:29

Really?

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-It's in the, um, Penelope's house.

-Was it really?

0:17:310:17:34

OK. It's been overpainted by hand and we can see that actually,

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because if you look at the detail in her face,

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just here we can see there's some print work just under here.

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So, er, it's not quite what it appears to be at first sight.

0:17:440:17:47

-Oh.

-But I don't think that really matters,

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because I think it's quite a lovely little memento.

0:17:500:17:53

-It is, yes.

-Of that time.

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Forgive me for asking, is your husband with you? Is he...

0:17:540:17:58

-No. No.

-He's passed away, has he?

-Yeah.

0:17:580:18:01

Well, in many respects, I think this is kind of a fitting little memento to him.

0:18:010:18:05

-It is lovely.

-Because without people like your husband,

0:18:050:18:09

boys like myself wouldn't have been entertained.

0:18:090:18:12

-True, true.

-I adored anything to do with Thunderbirds.

-Yeah.

0:18:120:18:16

In fact, I have an old car that I've actually called Thunderbirds Two.

0:18:160:18:21

Did your husband ever appear in any of the productions?

0:18:210:18:24

-Er, only once.

-Once. What was he doing?

0:18:240:18:28

-They used his eyeballs.

-They used his eyeballs?

-Yeah.

0:18:280:18:32

What I liked about Supermarionation

0:18:320:18:34

was that occasionally they would insert a real hand, wouldn't they?

0:18:340:18:38

-That's right.

-And one day he happened to be there and his eyeball came in useful?

0:18:380:18:42

-Yeah, it did.

-Wonderful.

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It's an object that I almost hate to talk about value

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because it has a great deal of meaning to you.

0:18:470:18:49

-Yeah.

-But I'm going to have to.

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It's priceless to you, but on the open market,

0:18:510:18:53

to a serious collector of Thunderbirds memorabilia,

0:18:530:18:56

I think it would certainly be worth around about £200 or £300.

0:18:560:18:59

-OK. That's fine.

-I've really enjoyed looking at it.

-Thank you.

0:18:590:19:03

-It's made me very nostalgic too.

-Good.

-Thank you.

0:19:030:19:05

Thank you very much.

0:19:050:19:07

Sue, you're matron of the residential home here behind us.

0:19:100:19:13

Is this from inside the home?

0:19:130:19:15

We've been guardians of it for nearly ten years now.

0:19:150:19:17

And what is it?

0:19:170:19:18

We believe that it's a Victorian jockeys' weighing machine,

0:19:180:19:24

but it was used in a local sports shop for many, many years

0:19:240:19:29

to weigh everybody, before bathroom scales and things like that.

0:19:290:19:33

-Oh, I see!

-People went along to the shop and they were weighed.

0:19:330:19:36

And if it's a jockey's one, then,

0:19:360:19:38

was it for weighing adults or for weighing children?

0:19:380:19:41

I would imagine that originally it was for adults, but we don't know.

0:19:410:19:45

So this is something that is a common sight in Guernsey?

0:19:450:19:48

This has been around at least 95 years,

0:19:480:19:51

because some of the residents can remember paying their penny to be weighed on it,

0:19:510:19:55

when they were small.

0:19:550:19:56

-On this actual chair?

-On that chair.

0:19:560:19:58

It's known locally as the Podgers' scales, after the shop.

0:19:580:20:02

The Podgers' scales. OK, hands up, anyone here been weighed?

0:20:020:20:05

Oh, look! Lots of you!

0:20:050:20:08

You were weighed on here as well? How extraordinary!

0:20:080:20:12

Well, I've got to give it a go.

0:20:120:20:13

-Yes.

-So... Well, I know what I think I weigh.

0:20:130:20:16

-Right.

-This could be quite embarrassing.

0:20:160:20:18

But how much have you got on there now?

0:20:180:20:21

-Um...

-28.

-That's two stone.

0:20:210:20:23

Well, it's going to be more than that.

0:20:230:20:25

Two, four, five, six stone at the moment.

0:20:250:20:27

All right. I've got to say, I weigh more than that. OK, see how we go.

0:20:270:20:30

OK, we'll try these.

0:20:300:20:32

Right, OK. Here we go. Ready?

0:20:330:20:38

-CLUNK

-Oh, OK.

0:20:380:20:40

I think we're going to need considerably more weight.

0:20:400:20:43

-More weight.

-Er, now, we have a little assistant here.

0:20:430:20:46

Rob, lovely Antiques Roadshow assistant here.

0:20:460:20:48

Ooh, listen, hang on, that's a bit over the top!

0:20:480:20:52

That's another four stone, Fiona.

0:20:520:20:54

What, ten?! How much do you think I weigh?!

0:20:540:20:56

Right, OK.

0:20:560:20:57

-Oh!

-Ah, nearer there.

0:20:580:21:00

-Hang on, is that too much or too little?

-Too much.

0:21:000:21:04

Oh, you are kind.

0:21:040:21:06

That's it!

0:21:060:21:07

LAUGHTER

0:21:070:21:10

And what did that weigh, then?

0:21:100:21:12

How much is it? That's the 64,000 question.

0:21:120:21:15

How many?

0:21:150:21:17

Ten stone, four pounds.

0:21:170:21:19

Ten stone four?!

0:21:190:21:21

I don't weigh ten stone four!

0:21:210:21:24

Fiona, they always weigh more.

0:21:240:21:27

So you're all right.

0:21:270:21:30

It's not even, it's not on an even surface.

0:21:300:21:32

Can I just say for the record, nine and a half stone.

0:21:320:21:36

I knew I shouldn't have had that pudding last night.

0:21:360:21:40

This is a most impressive picture and, do you know,

0:21:420:21:45

I've hardly ever seen any work by this artist

0:21:450:21:47

and it's signed on the left here, A.B. Cull,

0:21:470:21:50

which I know as Alma Burton Cull.

0:21:500:21:51

Whenever I see his work, it's usually watercolours,

0:21:530:21:56

not big oils like this.

0:21:560:21:58

Now, I know that he lived down at Lee-on-Solent,

0:21:580:22:01

and I also know that when he died in 1931,

0:22:010:22:05

his wife put his pictures into store in Portsmouth,

0:22:050:22:08

and of course, Portsmouth was very badly bombed in 1940,

0:22:080:22:11

the majority of them were destroyed,

0:22:110:22:14

and that's probably the reason one doesn't see so many oils like this.

0:22:140:22:18

Do you know about the fleet here?

0:22:180:22:19

Yes, the ship in the front is the Dreadnought,

0:22:190:22:23

which, of course, was the name of the ship

0:22:230:22:27

that gave birth to a generation of big-gun warships.

0:22:270:22:32

And that was built in about 1906, wasn't it?

0:22:320:22:34

1906, and the other six are two different following classes

0:22:340:22:40

before they started changing the design.

0:22:400:22:42

They were the first really super battleships.

0:22:420:22:45

They were the super battleships of the 20th century.

0:22:450:22:48

And where did it come from?

0:22:480:22:50

Well, um, I saw it in a ship's periodical for sale.

0:22:500:22:56

I've always loved this picture since seeing it,

0:22:570:23:01

a photograph of it in a... On the wall at school.

0:23:010:23:05

-Mm-hm.

-And I've always thought it was fascinating.

0:23:050:23:09

Suddenly it came up for sale, 30 years ago.

0:23:090:23:14

And may I ask you what it cost then?

0:23:140:23:16

-Um, well it cost me £2,000.

-£2,000?

0:23:160:23:21

£2,000, and it was a silly price I offered,

0:23:210:23:25

and in the end, I got it for the silly price.

0:23:250:23:28

Well, I think it's a very wise investment

0:23:280:23:30

-and you obviously like naval scenes.

-Indeed.

0:23:300:23:33

What is so incredible about this, is the light on the sea.

0:23:330:23:36

-You've got these dark clouds, really very ominous.

-Yes.

0:23:360:23:39

And then you've got the sun setting in the background there,

0:23:390:23:43

and this is just superb, absolutely superb.

0:23:430:23:45

There would be a lot of demand for this.

0:23:450:23:47

I imagine one of the big museums or naval museum

0:23:470:23:50

might be interested in this, if this was ever sold.

0:23:500:23:53

To put a price on this is very difficult.

0:23:530:23:55

I mean, I've sold his watercolours for, you know, £1,500, £2,000.

0:23:550:23:59

With so much atmosphere, I mean, I'm going to say...

0:23:590:24:03

that's going to be worth

0:24:030:24:05

certainly £20,000 to £30,000 at auction, and that's conservative.

0:24:050:24:10

-You obviously love it very much.

-Very much, my pride and joy.

0:24:100:24:13

But it's only leaving my house with my coffin.

0:24:130:24:15

My goodness me!

0:24:180:24:20

I do get excited when I see a very large gem stone.

0:24:200:24:25

Do you know what it is?

0:24:260:24:27

I think it's a sapphire.

0:24:270:24:29

-I'm not sure. It's my father's.

-Right.

0:24:290:24:32

Um, and he calls it the maharajah's hatpin.

0:24:320:24:36

Why is that?

0:24:360:24:37

That's what my father calls it.

0:24:370:24:40

It was given to him by his father,

0:24:400:24:43

-who was a purser for P&O on their flagship.

-Oh, wow.

0:24:430:24:47

He used to do a regular run from England to India

0:24:470:24:52

in the early 1920s, and he got friends out in India, acquaintances,

0:24:520:24:58

-and apparently, he was given this on one of his trips.

-By a maharajah?

0:24:580:25:04

Um, as far as I know, yes.

0:25:040:25:06

Well, that would make, I mean,

0:25:060:25:08

India is just a complete wealth of stones

0:25:080:25:11

and the knowledge of stones and they really appreciate gem stones,

0:25:110:25:15

so that would actually make complete sense.

0:25:150:25:17

We see a lot of jewellery,

0:25:170:25:18

and what's so wonderful is to see a stone on its own,

0:25:180:25:23

and that's the beauty of it.

0:25:230:25:25

What's interesting is that a lot of people imagine sapphires just to be blue,

0:25:250:25:29

but sapphires come in all colours.

0:25:290:25:31

Greens, um, yellows,

0:25:310:25:35

and sapphire is part of the corundum family,

0:25:350:25:39

which is made of aluminium oxide,

0:25:390:25:41

and depending if there's too much chromium or iron,

0:25:410:25:44

-it is either a ruby or a sapphire. So they're the same family.

-Mm-hm.

0:25:440:25:49

It's just such a wonderful colour

0:25:490:25:51

and it probably will have come from Sri Lanka.

0:25:510:25:54

Now, what is interesting about this as well,

0:25:540:25:56

is that because of its intensity of colour, one would have to,

0:25:560:26:00

to be absolutely certain,

0:26:000:26:02

you'd have to take it to a laboratory to get it tested,

0:26:020:26:05

to make sure that it hasn't been heat-treated.

0:26:050:26:08

Sometimes when you heat-treat a stone,

0:26:080:26:11

it can just intensify the colour.

0:26:110:26:13

It's permanent.

0:26:130:26:15

To find something of a natural colour like this,

0:26:150:26:18

and I'm assuming that it is, is just quite stunning.

0:26:180:26:21

It's quite deep,

0:26:210:26:23

because the cutter has made sure to capture the maximum colour.

0:26:230:26:27

It's needed the depth to bring that colour back up to the eye.

0:26:270:26:31

This weighs about 90 carats.

0:26:310:26:33

If this was a natural coloured sapphire,

0:26:330:26:37

then I would say it's going to be in the region of about £12,000 to £15,000.

0:26:370:26:42

-Not bad.

-Very good.

-Very good.

0:26:440:26:47

And if it was heat-treated, then it would be more like £4,000,

0:26:490:26:52

so there is a big difference.

0:26:520:26:54

A reputable laboratory would be able to tell you the difference.

0:26:540:26:58

But I just think it's fabulous. I really do.

0:26:580:27:00

I mean, you can just lose yourself in it, couldn't you?

0:27:000:27:03

Well, this is the precursor to the waiter's friend, isn't it?

0:27:040:27:11

-Yes.

-Corkscrew.

-Corkscrew.

0:27:110:27:13

-And it belonged to?

-It belonged to my late mother.

0:27:130:27:16

She bought it in a box at an auction,

0:27:160:27:21

a lot of bric-a-brac, for a pound or two.

0:27:210:27:24

She wouldn't have paid more than that, some 20-odd years ago.

0:27:240:27:27

I wish I could find something in a box of bric-a-brac like this.

0:27:270:27:31

Well, she just stuck by it and felt there was something more to it.

0:27:310:27:35

Well, I'm delighted you brought it in.

0:27:350:27:37

-Well, for a start, you know how it works?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

0:27:370:27:41

So we screw it down and that comes up.

0:27:410:27:49

That comes up.

0:27:490:27:50

-Yeah.

-So you're in, you're now in. It's holding here on the bottle.

0:27:500:27:55

-And here is what we call the worm.

-Mm-hm.

0:27:560:28:00

Now, the most important thing,

0:28:000:28:01

when we're talking about an expensive corkscrew,

0:28:010:28:05

or any corkscrew,

0:28:050:28:07

the worm has got to be pointed like that, it mustn't be blunt.

0:28:070:28:11

-Right.

-Otherwise it loses its value.

0:28:110:28:14

So then you take the handle...

0:28:140:28:17

I'm imagining we're into a damn good bottle of claret.

0:28:170:28:21

Mm, that would be nice.

0:28:210:28:23

-And out comes the cork.

-Comme ca.

0:28:230:28:25

It's a Royal Club patent,

0:28:250:28:27

and it's by Charles Hull,

0:28:270:28:31

patented in 1864,

0:28:310:28:33

and it's patent number 480.

0:28:330:28:36

-Right.

-So you can look it up, anywhere in the corkscrew books.

0:28:360:28:42

It's a serious corkscrew.

0:28:420:28:44

Plus the fact that the worm point is wonderfully un-blunt. It's pointed.

0:28:440:28:51

The remains of the sort of gilding is still on it,

0:28:510:28:55

-which is a kind of orange paint.

-Mm-hm.

0:28:550:28:57

It's in very good condition.

0:28:570:29:00

It's worth between £2,500 and £3,000.

0:29:000:29:04

Good golly! Puh!

0:29:040:29:06

I will open a bottle tonight.

0:29:060:29:08

I think this is just the most wonderful object.

0:29:130:29:16

-I adore it.

-Oh, good.

0:29:160:29:19

-Do you know what it is?

-Palanquin?

0:29:190:29:21

Palanquin.

0:29:210:29:22

-Palanquin.

-Well, that's what we, in Europe, call it.

-Mm-hm.

0:29:220:29:26

But, of course, this is not European.

0:29:260:29:29

It's Japanese,

0:29:290:29:31

and there it would be called a kago,

0:29:310:29:35

and it would have been used -

0:29:350:29:37

I mean, the full-sized one, not this - the full-sized one

0:29:370:29:41

would have been used for carrying somebody of some substance.

0:29:410:29:46

It is effectively a sedan chair.

0:29:460:29:51

The person that would have been in it,

0:29:510:29:53

would be identifiable by this,

0:29:530:29:57

which is a mon, or badge.

0:29:570:30:01

So we could find out. I don't know who it is, but we could find out.

0:30:010:30:04

The reason these were made is absolutely extraordinary.

0:30:040:30:10

The Japanese are, or were, a very war-like nation,

0:30:100:30:16

and they weren't just fighting other people

0:30:160:30:19

like the Chinese or the Koreans or wherever.

0:30:190:30:22

They were fighting themselves,

0:30:220:30:23

and the samurai were going round the country with their swords,

0:30:230:30:26

chopping people to pieces. Each other.

0:30:260:30:29

And the shogun at the time, in the 16th century,

0:30:290:30:34

called Ieyasu Tokugawa,

0:30:340:30:38

he thought of this brilliant plan,

0:30:380:30:41

which was to have a castle at Edo,

0:30:410:30:45

which is now Kyoto,

0:30:450:30:47

and he said to the samurai and the daimyo,

0:30:470:30:51

who were the lords round the country,

0:30:510:30:54

"You will send me for six months of the year

0:30:540:30:58

"your wife and your children."

0:30:580:31:01

So you can't fight one another, because if you do...

0:31:020:31:06

So these were moving round Japan,

0:31:080:31:14

along the Tokaido road, the whole time.

0:31:140:31:20

And here we've got one, which I suspect was made

0:31:200:31:24

right at the end of the period when these would have been in use,

0:31:240:31:30

-which is about 1870, 1880.

-Mm-hm.

0:31:300:31:35

It's made of wood

0:31:350:31:36

and it's been lacquered,

0:31:360:31:38

and we've got metal mounts all over it,

0:31:380:31:41

which have been beautifully engraved,

0:31:410:31:43

and as the original would have,

0:31:430:31:47

we have a sliding door.

0:31:470:31:49

This one's been decorated as an original would be,

0:31:510:31:54

with painted paper on the walls

0:31:540:31:58

-and a brocade cushion.

-Mm-hm.

0:31:580:32:03

Because it's such a decorative object,

0:32:030:32:06

I think that would make,

0:32:060:32:08

even though the market's difficult at the moment,

0:32:080:32:11

-somewhere around £3,000 to £5,000.

-Mm!

0:32:110:32:16

-Not bad for a spare bedroom.

-My goodness.

0:32:160:32:19

I have to ask, what on earth is this?

0:32:230:32:25

Well, Fiona, this is something I've dug out from the Occupation Museum.

0:32:250:32:29

The Germans used a lot of horses during the occupation.

0:32:290:32:32

They had 700 of these, and they had this obsession with gas,

0:32:320:32:36

so they had gas masks for horses.

0:32:360:32:39

-So these two cones goes up a horse's nostrils.

-No!

0:32:390:32:44

They wouldn't go up yours, but they would go up a horse. Yes.

0:32:440:32:49

What do you think? It's a look!

0:32:510:32:53

But any horse would be terrified!

0:32:530:32:56

Yes, when a local farmer, not far from here, saw it, the horse actually bolted.

0:32:560:33:00

And did they ever actually get a horse to put this on? Comfortably.

0:33:000:33:04

Well, they did... They did practise, because it was part of their drill.

0:33:040:33:08

And so the Germans were worried, what, that the British forces would gas...

0:33:080:33:12

What, gas the good people of Guernsey along with the Germans?

0:33:120:33:15

Well, obviously, but we had civilian gas masks

0:33:150:33:18

which was issued at the outbreak of war in 1939,

0:33:180:33:22

and the Germans brought their own gas masks in their canisters,

0:33:220:33:26

and these were specifically for horses.

0:33:260:33:29

But gas was never used.

0:33:290:33:31

So when the Germans surrendered in 1945,

0:33:310:33:33

what happened to all the horses?

0:33:330:33:35

Well, before that, in June 1944, with the invasion of France,

0:33:350:33:40

we were cut off in the Channel Islands,

0:33:400:33:43

and there was very little food coming in.

0:33:430:33:45

In fact, there was nothing coming in,

0:33:450:33:47

so by the end of '44, the Germans were consuming,

0:33:470:33:49

they were actually eating their horses.

0:33:490:33:51

-Oh!

-And they were also catching a lot of fish.

0:33:510:33:54

The locals had to catch fish

0:33:540:33:56

and a percent of the catch went for the Germans.

0:33:560:33:58

So by liberation, out of 700 horses, there was only 302 left.

0:33:580:34:04

Well, I hate to think of a horse having to wear this.

0:34:040:34:08

I think it would be cruel in the extreme, I must say.

0:34:080:34:10

-But I've loved seeing them, thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:34:100:34:13

Just looking at this dress, it takes me back immediately to the 1920s.

0:34:130:34:20

To flappers, to parties,

0:34:200:34:22

to women emancipated after the First World War,

0:34:220:34:25

-women really having their own place in society now and enjoying it.

-Yes.

0:34:250:34:30

So is this dress related to someone in your family?

0:34:300:34:34

Um, well, she wasn't a direct relation. We called her Aunt Mary.

0:34:340:34:38

We were close neighbours and my mother-in-law helped her and looked after her.

0:34:380:34:42

She got very old. She lived to 92,

0:34:420:34:44

and it was left to my mother-in-law and it passed to me.

0:34:440:34:47

-And this is the lady, this is...

-That's Mary Rust, yes.

0:34:470:34:50

-This is the lady who wore this fantastic dress.

-Yes, that's right.

0:34:500:34:54

-I mean, she was obviously a beauty in her time.

-Yes.

0:34:540:34:58

And what was her story? What was Mary's story?

0:34:580:35:01

Well, she was born in Louisiana, and she was in a relationship

0:35:010:35:06

with a young man that the family didn't approve of,

0:35:060:35:08

so they sent her to China, where they...

0:35:080:35:11

I mean, being sent to China,

0:35:110:35:13

it must have been a very, very unfortunate relationship,

0:35:130:35:16

-because I mean, Louisiana, Deep South in America, very strict moral values.

-Yes.

0:35:160:35:21

And of course, anything, any impropriety, you would be sent away.

0:35:210:35:25

I think she had missionaries in the family that were in China at the time.

0:35:250:35:29

Ah! So they decided, get Mary, pack Mary off...

0:35:290:35:32

They took her under their wing

0:35:320:35:34

and she went to, sort of, tea parties and social occasions.

0:35:340:35:37

I must say, with a dress like this, she went to more than tea parties!

0:35:370:35:43

-I think this was not a sedate tea party.

-Started off with tea parties.

0:35:430:35:48

-She obviously got rid of the missionaries quick.

-Yeah.

0:35:480:35:51

-But, no, because this was the height of fashion.

-Yes.

0:35:510:35:54

Women for the first time in public, smoking and drinking and having great fun.

0:35:540:35:58

Mm, that's right. She met a young man called Oliver Hume,

0:35:580:36:02

who was a self-made man,

0:36:020:36:04

and he became the postmaster general of China,

0:36:040:36:08

and she mixed in very high society

0:36:080:36:11

and she met the Emperor of Japan and such people.

0:36:110:36:16

-Shanghai was an open port.

-Yes.

0:36:160:36:19

And it was very much high society.

0:36:190:36:21

This was the period everyone came into Shanghai.

0:36:210:36:24

It was lots of wealthy people, lots of merchants

0:36:240:36:27

and lots of fantastic parties,

0:36:270:36:29

and I mean, a dress like this

0:36:290:36:31

would absolutely have been the height of fashion.

0:36:310:36:34

You would have worn this at something -

0:36:340:36:37

-I should think with a little slip underneath...

-Yes.

0:36:370:36:39

-You would have worn this...

-She was quite small, she wasn't very tall.

0:36:390:36:43

It's absolutely beautiful at the front and then again,

0:36:430:36:46

when you turn it round onto the back,

0:36:460:36:48

it's got that incredible beaded train.

0:36:480:36:50

I mean, this is so lovely.

0:36:500:36:52

You can just imagine her dancing with that.

0:36:520:36:55

I mean, really, really beautiful thing.

0:36:550:36:58

Just the detail of it is just fabulous.

0:36:580:37:01

I hope she had some nice shoes.

0:37:010:37:02

-Oh, I bet she had wonderful shoes.

-Yes.

0:37:020:37:04

Ooh, yes. Ooh, I think so.

0:37:040:37:06

A dress like this, so redolent of that period,

0:37:060:37:10

in such beautiful condition, so beautifully done.

0:37:100:37:13

Normally, these dresses I would say about £200 to £300.

0:37:130:37:17

That tends to be...

0:37:170:37:18

Good ones might go for a little bit more, maybe £500.

0:37:180:37:22

This one, I have no hesitation in saying it's £1,000 plus.

0:37:220:37:27

That's right. It's got to go in a glass case really, doesn't it?

0:37:270:37:31

It does, and I'm sure Mary would be delighted that we were looking at it.

0:37:310:37:35

Aunt Mary would love it and she'd be pouring herself a gin.

0:37:350:37:39

These candlesticks I would love to see on my dining room table.

0:37:500:37:54

-Really?

-They are gorgeous.

0:37:540:37:56

-What can you tell me about them?

-Er, not a lot.

0:37:560:37:59

Really can't, because they belong to my partner,

0:37:590:38:03

and they were left to her by her late husband,

0:38:030:38:06

who died ten years ago.

0:38:060:38:08

-Right.

-We know he acquired them, we don't know when,

0:38:080:38:10

we don't know much about them at all.

0:38:100:38:12

We love them because we put them on the table when we have a dinner party

0:38:120:38:16

and they just set the scene very nicely,

0:38:160:38:18

but Georgian is the one word that I know may apply. That's about it.

0:38:180:38:22

-Fair enough. In fact, they just scrape into Georgian.

-Right.

0:38:220:38:26

The dates are interesting.

0:38:260:38:28

-In fact, we've actually got two pairs here.

-Oh, right.

0:38:280:38:30

-One pair was made in 1715.

-Wow.

0:38:300:38:34

And the other pair was made in 1716.

0:38:340:38:38

-Really?

-But actually, they were probably all made together.

0:38:380:38:41

They were made over Christmas and New Year.

0:38:410:38:44

Well, in fact, May, middle of May,

0:38:440:38:46

because the goldsmith's year runs from May of one year

0:38:460:38:49

-to May of the next.

-Oh, I see.

0:38:490:38:51

So literally, they could have gone and -

0:38:510:38:53

one pair into the assay office on a Tuesday,

0:38:530:38:55

the next pair on the Wednesday.

0:38:550:38:57

So the fact they're two -

0:38:570:38:58

-if they were chairs or something, you wouldn't know.

-Yes.

0:38:580:39:01

But because they're silver,

0:39:010:39:04

we've actually got...

0:39:040:39:05

-that's the A for 1716 on that one.

-Right. Yes.

0:39:050:39:09

And let's see what we've got on this one.

0:39:090:39:12

-We've got - and that is the date letter for 1715.

-Oh, I see.

0:39:120:39:17

The other marks we've got there are for Britannia standard silver.

0:39:170:39:21

Oh, that's a very high quality silver.

0:39:210:39:23

The highest quality, historically, that we had.

0:39:230:39:27

-The maker is David Green.

-Is that London?

0:39:270:39:33

Oh, yes, they're London candlesticks,

0:39:330:39:35

and David Green, specialist candlestick maker.

0:39:350:39:38

And within goldsmithing, you have these specialties -

0:39:380:39:42

-spoon making, candlestick making.

-Yes.

0:39:420:39:44

All each to their own in that sort of way.

0:39:440:39:48

So, where do we go with value?

0:39:480:39:51

I'm going to be a bit conservative,

0:39:510:39:54

because the market's a little bit funny at the moment.

0:39:540:39:58

I would suggest we're looking at a value, at auction,

0:39:580:40:03

of at least £10,000.

0:40:030:40:06

-Good Lord, really?

-Yes.

-My word.

0:40:060:40:09

If they went towards 15, it wouldn't surprise me.

0:40:090:40:13

Good heavens, that's fantastic. Very unexpected. Thank you.

0:40:130:40:17

I wonder what we have in this little manila envelope. Ah!

0:40:180:40:21

It's an interesting banknote. A £1.

0:40:210:40:24

It's an occupation note, isn't it?

0:40:240:40:26

-Yes.

-That's been specially printed during the occupation of the island,

0:40:260:40:31

and I can see it's dated 1st January 1943.

0:40:310:40:34

What's the story behind it?

0:40:340:40:37

Well, from what I can gather,

0:40:370:40:39

my father, at the end of the occupation,

0:40:390:40:42

had a carrier bag of these notes.

0:40:420:40:46

Right. A carrier bag full of these notes?

0:40:460:40:48

I don't know how full they were, but he definitely had them in a carrier bag.

0:40:480:40:52

He also had quite a lot of German memorabilia

0:40:520:40:55

because my mother sort of said that when the Germans left the island,

0:40:550:40:58

-they just left everything.

-Right.

0:40:580:41:00

So you'd be walking around and you'd see German helmets and things just...

0:41:000:41:05

-Just left scattered everywhere.

-Yes, it was just left.

0:41:050:41:08

And so they thought nothing about it,

0:41:080:41:11

and then in the '60s and '70s,

0:41:110:41:14

my father realised that these might be collectable,

0:41:140:41:17

so he started selling them to local dealers for pocket money, really.

0:41:170:41:22

Can you remember how much money they were taking these for?

0:41:220:41:25

No, I don't, I don't know,

0:41:250:41:27

but it came to the thing when the dealers were coming to him

0:41:270:41:31

and asking if he had any more notes to sell.

0:41:310:41:34

Did that ever arouse any kind of suspicions?

0:41:340:41:36

Did you ever worry or did he ever worry about it?

0:41:360:41:39

No, no, we just laughed because it was just my dad,

0:41:390:41:42

you know, getting a bit of extra money.

0:41:420:41:44

Generally, I suppose that something like this probably isn't worth much money at all.

0:41:440:41:48

Do you have any idea of what it's worth?

0:41:480:41:50

No, I have no idea. Um, no idea.

0:41:500:41:54

No idea. OK. Well, if I were to tell you that this £1

0:41:540:41:59

was worth £500, you'd be pretty surprised wouldn't you?

0:41:590:42:02

-Yes.

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:42:020:42:03

Well, not only is it worth £500,

0:42:030:42:06

it's worth six times that.

0:42:060:42:08

It's worth £3,000.

0:42:080:42:10

This is one... This is one of the rarest occupation notes there is

0:42:100:42:14

and this genuinely is worth £3,000.

0:42:140:42:18

Oh, my goodness!

0:42:180:42:19

To be honest with you,

0:42:190:42:21

it's a shame that your father gave away, or sold, so many.

0:42:210:42:25

Yes, well, there should be four others in existence,

0:42:250:42:28

because when he was coming to the end of the carrier bag,

0:42:280:42:31

-my mum gave one to each of her existing grandchildren.

-Right.

0:42:310:42:35

-So...

-So what you need to do is track them all down.

-Is track them down.

0:42:350:42:39

Because in reality, you have £15,000 worth of these,

0:42:390:42:42

if you can find them all,

0:42:420:42:44

-and...

-Good heavens.

0:42:440:42:45

-There was one sold recently on the island, I think...

-Yes, yes.

0:42:450:42:49

..which made exactly £3,000, and it genuinely is worth that.

0:42:490:42:53

Flabbergasting, isn't it?

0:42:530:42:55

Absolutely!

0:42:550:42:57

This wins the prize for the most unusual thing I've seen today.

0:43:010:43:03

It's a little handmade wooden box.

0:43:030:43:05

Inside...

0:43:050:43:07

..a little brush, look.

0:43:080:43:10

And what do you think those bristles are made of?

0:43:100:43:12

Believe it or not, the man who made it, it's his beard!

0:43:120:43:16

He had a long auburn beard

0:43:160:43:18

and he cut it off and put it into the bristles.

0:43:180:43:21

Which is charming...I think.

0:43:210:43:23

Anyway, from Saumarez Park in Guernsey,

0:43:230:43:26

we've had a great day, hope you have too.

0:43:260:43:28

From the Antiques Roadshow, bye-bye.

0:43:280:43:31

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