Hartland Abbey 1 Antiques Roadshow


Hartland Abbey 1

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This week, our location has to be our most dramatic setting in this series.

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Nestled near to this rugged coastline is our venue for this week's Roadshow,

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and it's a bit of a find.

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Hartland Abbey in North Devon, about 15 miles from Bude,

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is one of those rare stately homes that's still a home.

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In almost 1,000 years, it's never been sold so,

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not only is it a stunning building, it's also Roadshow heaven, stuffed full of objects with tales to tell.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow, from the point where Devon meets Cornwall.

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BELL RINGS

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Hartland Abbey.

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It may not be on the most visited list of Britain's great houses,

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but it's one of those places that lures you inside with a promise of tantalising stories.

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Today, the Stucleys are guardians to its hundreds of years of family history.

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Whether it's the people in the recent photos,

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or in the ancient family portraits,

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it's clear that every member of the family has made their mark,

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particularly this one, Sir George Stucley. He was MP for Barnstaple in the 19th century

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and he commissioned an ambitious Gothic makeover of the house.

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He commissioned George Gilbert Scott, architect of St Pancras Station,

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to design this incredible Alhambra passageway.

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But, living with an ancestor's taste in interior decoration, can be a mixed blessing.

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Sir George modelled this room on the House of Lords.

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But, by the 20th century, it was all felt to be a bit gloomy,

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so someone decided at some point to put wallpaper on the ceilings and the walls.

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It was only when the current owner stripped away the old paper these fascinating murals were discovered,

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depicting significant moments in history at which the Stucley family were apparently present,

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like the landing of William the Conqueror, for example.

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'The magic of somewhere like this is, you never know what might turn up.'

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Hm. Portraits of the Poltimores.

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That name sounds familiar.

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These are some of the ancestors of our very own picture specialist Mark Poltimore,

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who's related to the Stucleys of Hartland.

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In fact, he used to holiday here as a child,

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so it's only fair that he has opening honours on today's show.

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Well, how wonderful to be in North Devon and to see a picture

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of probably one of the most famous villages in North Devon, Clovelly,

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which is clearly depicted here. What's your connection with Clovelly?

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My family used to have a long association with the ownership of the village of Clovelly,

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and this painting is done by Walter Fane who was my great great grandfather's brother.

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So the whole thing is absolutely heaped in family history?

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That's right.

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Both the village and the artist. Tell me about Walter Fane?

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Walter's day job was a soldier.

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He was born in 1828, and then he joined the army.

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And wherever there was a spot of bother in the Empire, he went out there.

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-So he quelled...

-He was in India, I think, wasn't he?

-That's right.

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-But did he actually live in Clovelly?

-No. He was born in Lincolnshire.

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How come is he painting Clovelly? Was he on holiday?

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Like people of taste and distinction, he came down to North Devon for his holidays and he painted that.

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So here we have distinguished soldier, painting the most beautiful oil painting.

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That's quite something to undertake.

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So he's full of confidence, so much so he's signed it twice,

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on the left-hand side, and the right-hand side.

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Tell me more about the village here because, has it changed much over the last hundred odd years?

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-The roof line of the Red Lion has changed slightly, following renovation eight years ago.

-Right.

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But otherwise, it's exactly the same. We have a lime kiln here. Crazy Kate's Cottage.

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Crazy Kate's Cottage? Tell me about Crazy Kate.

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Kate was the wife of a fisherman.

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-And when she saw her husband drowning, it turned her mind, unfortunately.

-I'm not surprised.

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It's a memorial to her, but it's known as Crazy Kate's Cottage.

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And then these wonderful cliffs, rising 300 or 400 feet above the village.

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-So, have you ever had it valued?

-No, I haven't.

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-Well, I would say something like this was worth between £7,000 and £10,000.

-Yeah.

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I think it's a fantastic view.

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Daily news reports, daily newspapers, and now the internet. They've seen off the barometer.

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It's not something we find practical any more really around the home.

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We know what's going to happen,

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probably the day before we experience the weather of the day.

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Why on Earth do you have this? Do you still use it?

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Well, I do, to a point, I have to say, but it's been very much a family piece, and I love the Art Deco.

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And it's just got a lovely form and shape.

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It has, I think it's that, that's the real appeal here. Where did you get it?

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-Did you buy it because it was a stylish piece?

-No, very much not.

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My grandmother, who is from Cornwall actually, gave it to me as a gift.

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And her sister owned a jewellery shop in Cornwall.

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And I believe it used to be left in the window of the jewellery shop

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and possibly used as a marketing tool, to lure people in to see what the weather might be doing.

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That's great! But the greatest thing about it, is the style.

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-As you rightly say, it just screams Art Deco style.

-Absolutely.

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Use of chrome, very geometric lines, and of course this stepped base here.

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-All sort of suggestive of skyscraper, speed and the machine. Just a wonderful looker.

-Yes.

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-For that reason, I could easily see somebody looking at £350, £400 for it.

-Yeah, wonderful, yeah, super.

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-It's a lovely piece, and something I'd like to display in my home.

-Yes, yes, well you're not going to!

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-Enjoy it, in that case.

-I will do, thank you.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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Mm! Well, there can't be a much better way to start the day

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than with a spoonful of cream.

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-It's fantastic!

-It's not just cream, it's clotted cream. Devonshire clotted cream.

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We've always made it. I was born and bred here.

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-You and your family have been involved in making clotted cream for generations?

-Oh, yes.

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We were all brought up on cream.

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Is this what the clotted cream would have been sold in?

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Well, clotted cream, there's various forms of selling the cream. This was for general...

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Back in the late 1800s, this was how it would have been sold from the local dairies and nationally.

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This pot would have been made in the middle of the 19th century

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when they were able to make pots mechanically because, up until this time they were handmade.

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So you had a pot that was a regular size, so you knew exactly the amount of cream you were going to get.

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-Yes, that's right.

-But I love this one.

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It says: "Cream is recommended for children and invalids."

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Now this is not quite the sort of information that we would be giving these days, is it?

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-Oh, cream's very healthy! Some people say it's fattening, but it's not.

-I couldn't have guessed!

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So, tell me about this bowl in the front here?

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The other things what I've brought you. The milk is put into bowls, similar to this.

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Then it's settled for 12 hours, and gently heated for 20 minutes

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until you get the right scud on the top, or scud, or head, whichever you like.

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Then it's put into a cool place for another 24 hours to let the head rise.

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-Then you dip it off with a skimmer and put it in those.

-So this is a dairy pan?

-Yes.

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Not just a dairy pan, this is a dairy pan with connections,

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because this is the coronet of a viscount.

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-Oh, I didn't know.

-So this pan...

-That's what I want to know, yes, right.

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This pan, made by Mintons in the Edwardian period,

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was for an aristocratic family, household,

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in their own personal dairy.

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And, to show that, it has this viscount's coronet on it.

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So it is a stately cream pan.

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-Very good.

-Oh, I've come up market, then!

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And this fantastic pail.

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A pottery body, with a brass cover,

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made of earthenware, by Malings, which was a very successful pottery in Newcastle.

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It dates from about 1910.

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They became successful on the back of being able to make mechanical cream jars.

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They put the money they made from making those

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into producing much more decorative wares.

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This one would have been on a counter of a shop,

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and the customer would come in with their jug

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-and the shopkeeper then would dip out their milk.

-And pour it into the jug.

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-Proportionately you see, that one is a pint, that's a half pint. You get various sizes.

-Aren't they wonderful?

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-And they hook inside there.

-And so that just stood on the grocer's counter all day to keep it fresh.

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-That's right, yes.

-Well, it's a most beautiful object.

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I suppose we need to think about values.

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This cream pan by Mintons has been elevated from the every day

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just by the addition of the coronet.

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I would put that somewhere around £500.

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The spoon, because they always got broken, is very much a collector's item

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and I would say £200 to £300 for the spoon.

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But of course, the piece de resistance is this fantastic Maling milk pail.

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Beautiful condition.

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Where are you ever going to find another one?

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I think I would expect to have to pay somewhere in the region of £6,000.

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HE CHUCKLES

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Ah, that's a very... I didn't think you'd put it so much as that, to be quite honest.

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You've made me worth a bit more.

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-Not at first sight a particularly interesting object.

-No.

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-Just a sort of brown stick.

-Yes.

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Do you like your brown stick?

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I like it because it was my brother's godmother's,

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-so it gives me a memory of her.

-Right. Did she give it to you?

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No. When she died, the executor of her will gave me the chance to choose something

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-because I'd helped look after her.

-Right.

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And that was always on the table in her drawing room,

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-so it made me think of her.

-Very good.

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We've got here a lotus bud.

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Ah, I wondered what it was.

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So, which religion is associated with the lotus?

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Oh, dear, um.

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-Would that be Buddhism?

-It would, it would.

-Oh, gosh.

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-The Buddha is nearly always shown on a lotus throne.

-Oh, really?

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-It's made of an Oriental rosewood around the middle of the 19th century.

-Yes.

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Extraordinary technical skill

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to get all these runnels carved at exactly the right distance apart,

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not running into one another,

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and ending in very fine inscribed lines.

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-It's a technical tour de force, this.

-Oh, really?

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Although it doesn't look like anything very exciting.

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It becomes more exciting when you take the front off,

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and inside you've got a grotto with swirling clouds.

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You've got inlay in mother of pearl and gold, with a deity. I don't know which one he is.

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It's a thoroughly beautiful object.

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-Its only drawback is this was originally hinged.

-Yes. You can see it's broken.

-It's broken, yeah.

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It would be possible to get it fixed but I don't know that I would bother, really.

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-I think this is a small devotional object for one man.

-Oh, really?

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And he would probably carry this around Japan when he was on his travels.

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Which they all did at that time.

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And he would carry this with him, open it up

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and he would pray to his god, and then close it up again.

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Well, it was a very nice thing to be left, I think.

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How much would one have to pay to own an object like that?

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-Getting on for £1,000.

-My goodness! Such a little thing, good heavens!

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-It's a rarity.

-Oh, it is, oh, thank you.

-It's a rarity, yeah.

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You know the game by now. Paul Atterbury has set us a little challenge.

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Here are three postcards. One, a basic postcard worth a couple of quid.

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One, rather more significant in value, £50.

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And then one is worth £100, which is a fantastic price for a postcard.

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I've no idea which is which but, have a look, try and work it out.

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In the meantime I'll ask our visitors, see if they can help.

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-Do you collect postcards?

-No, I don't.

-Right.

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Basic, £2. Better, about £50.

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-Best about £100.

-Right.

-Which do you think is which?

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And the best is there.

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This style of thing is very popular. If it's popular, people presumably will pay for it.

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It was this.

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It's very unusual. I've seen postcards of these before, and that one. But I've never seen that before,

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-and I'm getting on a bit!

-Madam!

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Basic, better, best.

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There can't be many of them around like that.

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-Can I swap those two?

-Oh, you want to change your mind? OK, hang on.

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Well, lapis lazuli.

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It's called lapis lazuli because it means

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"the stone of the midnight sky".

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I don't think anything could be more poetic than that, could it?

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-Was that one of the reasons you were drawn to it?

-My husband and I went to an auction in Exeter,

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and it was obviously quite near to my birthday.

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We saw the bangle and thought just how beautiful it was. We both like jewellery.

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-Jewellery-buying husbands are incredibly rare, so you'd better keep him on, I think.

-I will.

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-Almost non-existent, especially ones who get it right.

-Yes.

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The shape of it is actually a very ancient shape,

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it's a torc-shaped bracelet. Look at this illusion at least of pure gold.

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It probably isn't made of pure gold but it wants to give that effect.

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It's a shape that derives from the ancient world, from Greek jewellery, and also Celtic jewellery.

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It's interesting because the maker of this object was very interested in the past.

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In the 19th century, there was a supreme lack of self-confidence about design, and they thought

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if they looked to their antecedents,

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that somehow everything that they did would be honourable and worthy.

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So Greek and Roman jewellery was a source,

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Renaissance jewellery a source, Assyrian jewellery was a source.

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And the greatest exponent of that style in London perhaps

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was a man called Robert Phillips.

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He had a tiny premises just south of Trafalgar Square

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which was the venue of the contemporary elite, the intellectual elite,

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the aristocratic elite, the royal elite. Queen Victoria was a customer.

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And this bracelet, presumably made in the 1870s, comes from the finest point of Phillips' career.

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-And it's thrilling to see it.

-It's just a very beautiful piece, it's lovely to wear.

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It's a stunning combination of colours, isn't it? The stone of the midnight sky, buttery yellow gold.

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The surface of this jewel has been enhanced to make it look as if it's pure gold,

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because the torc itself in antiquity would simply open by bending it.

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You'd simply tear it open and put it on your arm and leave it there.

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-But this is actually beautiful engineering as well.

-Superb, yes.

-Hinged and sprung.

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We know that it's by Robert Phillips because there's a little signature here

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which is a trademark really, to alert me and others to the fact this is a very, very distinguished maker.

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He was one of the few jewellers that turned the jewellery world, the goldsmiths' world, round in London.

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And took it from what was really quite banal and mass produced, into high art.

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-Are you going to put it on your wrist?

-Yes, yes.

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I think so, and look at that. And opens and closes.

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-It turns you into Helen of Troy, something like that, do you think?

-Not quite sure.

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-What does it feel like?

-It just feels so glamorous actually, yes, wonderful.

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-And it increases your pulse a bit when you see that?

-Yes, it does, and my husband's, I hope.

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Yes, indeed, absolutely.

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This is the sort of jewellery that's very widely collected.

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It's the focus of a great deal of academic study at the moment.

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So, in every possible way, this is a deeply enviable object. As we can see, everyone's looking at it.

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With that comes quite high value.

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This could fetch £8,000.

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In a wildly impulsive moment, in the right kind of sale, it might go as high as £10,000.

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-I think it would take a great deal more than £10,000 to get that off your wrist.

-Absolutely.

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-It's never going to leave, is it?

-Thank you so much.

-Isn't it marvellous?

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Well, it's windy, it's looking a bit stormy, good for surfing?

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In certain locations here, there's a couple of sheltered bays you could go to.

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-I bet there's a secret surf spot.

-There is, but I'm not telling you, or anybody else.

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-You could tell me and then you'd have to kill me.

-Yeah, I would.

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So let's talk about surfing in the area. I mean,

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presumably Newquay is the centre for UK surfing?

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Yes, definitely in England, definitely.

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-And have you always been a surfer? Are you a Newquay boy?

-No, definitely not.

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I moved from a city to North Devon 18 years ago.

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And why didn't you get any new boards?

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I did to begin with. Then, a couple of years after starting surfing,

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I was out surfing and I'd seen someone riding an old board.

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And the way he rode it just looked nicer than new boards, and that was the start of it really.

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Let's wind back the clock a bit. Because surfing,

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-unlike Australia or California, which had a sort of Hawaiian influence, didn't it?

-Yeah.

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-Surfing started here rather differently. It started really with body boards.

-Yeah.

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There's pictures from the 1920s of people riding these, obviously prone, lying down.

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That continued, still continues.

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There's a world championships in Cornwall every year riding these, no wet suits.

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-You need to be a hardy, hardy animal to be doing that in the Cornish waters.

-Yes, definitely.

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So, we've got represented here, boards from the '60s and the '70s

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-and obviously the

-'50s. Pre, yeah. '40s, '50s, these.

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The bigger boards tend to be from '63, '64, up to '67

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when we had the transitional boards which are these ones. Slighter shorter.

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Bigger fins on them. Then they went to the even shorter boards.

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It basically just follows the fashion.

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I'm just back from Australia and like to think I'm a surfing expert.

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Of course you're going to show how little I know!

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So, the development of surfing in Newquay really didn't start until the '60s, did it?

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No, Doug Wilson and Bill Bailey, the lifeguards,

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and they were using like a hollow plywood board, a kind of rudimentary surfing.

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And an American turned up with a fibreglass board and sold it to them when he left.

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And suddenly the light bulb went on.

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Four Australians came with another board,

0:20:500:20:53

and they got together and basically started Bilbo.

0:20:530:20:55

So it was from there, for 20 years

0:20:550:20:58

-they were making 50, 70 boards a week.

-Which is going some.

-Yeah.

0:20:580:21:03

Now, as far as prices are concerned,

0:21:030:21:07

I know that an absolutely spectacular board

0:21:070:21:11

went for a world record price of US 220,000,

0:21:110:21:15

-and that was a couple of years ago. I guess you're not paying that money for these?

-No, definitely.

0:21:150:21:20

-The American and Hawaiian markets are a different ball game altogether.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:21:200:21:24

-So you're paying what, £200, £300, that sort of figure?

-I've paid £3 for this one at a car-boot sale,

0:21:240:21:29

and I've paid £400 for one of the bigger boards.

0:21:290:21:33

-I have a feeling, after today, you may not be able to get another one for £3, I'm afraid.

-That's right.

0:21:330:21:38

-But the others, yes, are in the hundreds.

-Yeah.

0:21:380:21:41

Fabulous collection, thanks very much indeed.

0:21:410:21:44

-And I'll find out where that secret beach of yours is.

-I'll tell you off camera.

-Off camera, OK.

0:21:440:21:50

-It'll just be yours and my secret.

-Yeah.

-Brilliant.

0:21:500:21:53

SPOOKY VOICE LAUGHS: Wipe out!

0:21:530:21:56

Here you are boss, deal done.

0:22:020:22:04

Many collectors...

0:22:040:22:06

The wind is moving the ship to the left and right.

0:22:060:22:08

HE LAUGHS

0:22:080:22:10

I reckon this is a really nice, lovely early piece of glass,

0:22:170:22:21

and I'm just dying for you to tell me how you know it.

0:22:210:22:24

We found it when we cleared my great aunt's house,

0:22:240:22:27

who was living in Gibraltar.

0:22:270:22:29

And we found it in an understairs cupboard, locked up,

0:22:290:22:31

-wrapped in newspapers.

-Just this piece?

0:22:310:22:34

Along with other pieces.

0:22:340:22:35

There are three like this and about 15 to 20 other pieces of...

0:22:350:22:39

-15 to 20 others?

-Yeah.

0:22:390:22:41

Great. So you arrive at the house, the cupboard's locked, then what?

0:22:410:22:46

We tried to find a key, so we found an old key box

0:22:460:22:48

and in there were all sorts of keys. As we went in,

0:22:480:22:51

we opened the door and there was a treasure trove of things,

0:22:510:22:54

all sorts of things wrapped up in newspaper,

0:22:540:22:57

and as we went further in, we found this collection.

0:22:570:22:59

-How big is this staircase?

-Pretty big.

0:22:590:23:01

-So a Narnia?

-Yes.

0:23:010:23:03

It's quite plain for Spanish glass.

0:23:030:23:07

You know, the Spanish are known for fairly ebullient taste.

0:23:070:23:11

Over-the-top by English standards.

0:23:110:23:13

We like it conservative and kind of Yorkshire pud-like,

0:23:130:23:17

and this is a bit too Yorkshire pud to be on show in a grand house,

0:23:170:23:21

so what we're looking at, I think,

0:23:210:23:23

is a rustic object, so it's glass with a function.

0:23:230:23:27

You actually kept stuff in it.

0:23:270:23:30

You know, it is wonky-donkey but I do love these handles.

0:23:300:23:34

I think they look like, you know, ears...

0:23:340:23:37

You know, with these tiny ribbons, the way they come round.

0:23:370:23:40

There's not a scratch on it and if you think that's late 17th,

0:23:400:23:44

early 18th century, how about that for condition?

0:23:440:23:47

Well, I think on a valuation, this one is worth £2,000.

0:23:470:23:53

So if we multiply £2,000 by 25,

0:23:540:23:57

my maths isn't good, but that's £50,000!

0:23:570:24:00

Wow, wow.

0:24:000:24:03

There is one thing that I might point out,

0:24:030:24:05

is that down where we live we've got some stuff called washing-up liquid.

0:24:050:24:09

SHE LAUGHS

0:24:090:24:10

And I tell you, this could do with a little lick because...

0:24:120:24:15

-The dust is protecting it.

-I reckon you can fill a hoover bag off this.

0:24:150:24:19

LAUGHTER

0:24:190:24:21

Paul Atterbury, you set us quite a challenge with these postcards,

0:24:300:24:34

I have to tell you.

0:24:340:24:35

One worth about £2, wasn't it? Another worth 50 and another,

0:24:350:24:38

what was to me an astonishingly high figure, £100.

0:24:380:24:41

I didn't know you could get postcards worth £100.

0:24:410:24:44

I've had a bit of a go... Basic, better, best, I reckon.

0:24:440:24:49

We see so many postcards.

0:24:490:24:52

The postcard is the sort of e-mail, the Twitter of its time.

0:24:520:24:56

A few words, just a message, off it goes.

0:24:560:24:58

And people sent them in millions and millions and millions.

0:24:580:25:02

Postcards were a big thing from the early 1900s.

0:25:020:25:05

They're mostly just souvenirs but the ones I've picked here,

0:25:050:25:09

all tell different stories.

0:25:090:25:11

Go on, then, put me out of my misery. How does this work?

0:25:110:25:14

Well, you may be a great postcard writer,

0:25:140:25:16

but you're not a great postcard picker, I have to say.

0:25:160:25:20

OK, we'll start at the bottom. Basic.

0:25:200:25:22

Right. Why?

0:25:240:25:26

This is a very pleasant picture

0:25:260:25:28

of some ladies in smart tea gowns on a train

0:25:280:25:31

travelling to Liverpool to catch a ship.

0:25:310:25:33

Good story, nice colour.

0:25:340:25:36

It's early 1900s.

0:25:360:25:38

It was issued by a railway company to promote their services

0:25:380:25:41

and it exists in huge quantities.

0:25:410:25:43

It's part of a series, people collect those series

0:25:430:25:46

but it's not a rare card, so that's the basic.

0:25:460:25:49

Better...

0:25:490:25:50

-is that one.

-I've got it completely wrong!

-I'm afraid you have.

0:25:500:25:55

Oh, goodness! OK, so this... When I touch this and I could feel...

0:25:550:25:58

I wondered if it might be hand-painted.

0:25:580:26:00

You're nearly right. This is what's called...

0:26:000:26:02

Printed by a posh wire process which is a French process

0:26:020:26:06

of the '20s and '30s which is like hand-applied stencils.

0:26:060:26:09

It's hand-printed but not hand-painted.

0:26:090:26:12

And a great category for collectors is signed artist cards.

0:26:120:26:16

This is by an Italian called Giuseppe Meschini,

0:26:160:26:19

and it's a classic Art Deco image.

0:26:190:26:21

It's one of a series, he's famous for these.

0:26:210:26:23

It's like a fashion shot.

0:26:230:26:25

It's wonderful in its printing, its colours.

0:26:250:26:28

It is a hand-crafted object but in a large quantity.

0:26:280:26:31

-Therefore it's only worth about £50.

-Only. But it's still £50 pounds.

0:26:310:26:34

Which brings us to the one

0:26:340:26:36

I thought was the most basic and you say it's the best.

0:26:360:26:39

-Is that because it is of a specific event?

-Yep.

0:26:390:26:42

In 1913 for the first and only time,

0:26:420:26:44

motor racing was held on Weymouth Beach.

0:26:440:26:47

And that is a photograph of that July event in 1913.

0:26:470:26:52

It was taken by a famous local photographer called Seward,

0:26:520:26:55

who did hundreds of Weymouth views, most of which went into postcards.

0:26:550:27:00

It just so happens that this one,

0:27:000:27:02

that may be the only one that survives.

0:27:020:27:05

It was a small issue at the time.

0:27:050:27:07

The event came and passed very quickly, it's all over in a day.

0:27:070:27:11

And there wasn't one in 1914, so the story ends.

0:27:110:27:13

And so this photograph of a Benz motor car sitting on the sands

0:27:130:27:17

in Weymouth is incredibly rare,

0:27:170:27:20

and so that is at least £100.

0:27:200:27:23

It looks dull, but it's the story it tells.

0:27:230:27:25

I must say, it didn't catch MY eye,

0:27:250:27:28

but £100 is an amazing figure for a postcard.

0:27:280:27:30

Are there postcards worth more than £100?

0:27:300:27:33

Yes. £100 is not a lot.

0:27:330:27:35

There are postcards worth many hundreds of pounds.

0:27:350:27:38

In America, for example,

0:27:380:27:40

early shots, by which I mean 1900 shots, of baseball teams

0:27:400:27:44

can fetch 1,000,

0:27:440:27:45

-and the world record for a postcard is £31,700...

-Wow!

0:27:450:27:49

-..set in 2002.

-And what was that of?

0:27:490:27:52

Well, it's 1840.

0:27:520:27:54

Someone did a drawing, put a stamp and address on the back and sent it,

0:27:540:27:58

and it's right at the beginning of postal history

0:27:580:28:00

and it's the first postcard.

0:28:000:28:02

I don't collect them but I'll show you something.

0:28:020:28:05

Here's a slightly different postcard.

0:28:050:28:07

And this is the sort of thing I would collect.

0:28:070:28:09

Miss Pullen.

0:28:090:28:11

Yeah, it's an address, it's blank. There is a picture.

0:28:110:28:14

It's a topographical scene of no particular interest.

0:28:140:28:17

Why do I like that? Look at the stamp.

0:28:170:28:19

It's sideways.

0:28:210:28:23

-That...

-What makes THAT so special?

-There's a whole language of stamps.

0:28:230:28:26

He doesn't need to write a message.

0:28:260:28:28

What that stamp means sideways is "I'm longing to see you".

0:28:280:28:32

It's a love message and there's a whole...

0:28:320:28:35

-Isn't that amazing?

-..story of postcards

0:28:350:28:37

where what is not said is what is important,

0:28:370:28:40

and everybody knew that, so she got that and thought,

0:28:400:28:43

"Ah, he loves me."

0:28:430:28:45

That's all that matters. He didn't need to say a word.

0:28:450:28:47

-You old romantic.

-Ah. It's a postcard. That's my bit.

0:28:470:28:50

You learn something every day on this programme.

0:28:500:28:53

If you've got postcards at home and you want to find out

0:28:530:28:55

a bit more about them, why don't you have a look at our website.

0:28:550:29:00

And if you've got some postcards, bring them along to a programme.

0:29:000:29:03

We'd love to see them.

0:29:030:29:05

It's a jolly good-looking gentleman's watch,

0:29:090:29:12

so obviously not yours.

0:29:120:29:13

No, it belonged to my husband's grandfather.

0:29:130:29:17

-Right.

-Family came from India.

0:29:170:29:19

-Which explains the retailer. Walters & Co of Calcutta.

-Yes.

0:29:190:29:24

It's a lovely thing.

0:29:250:29:26

I really like it. I'm going to take it off its strap.

0:29:260:29:30

What do you think is unusual about that?

0:29:300:29:34

Well, obviously the little...

0:29:350:29:38

-Exactly.

-..cover for the winder.

-Absolutely right.

-Yes.

0:29:380:29:41

And we can unscrew that and access the winding crown there.

0:29:410:29:46

Some would say a possible start of an early waterproof watch.

0:29:460:29:50

I don't know from the dial who made it.

0:29:510:29:56

Let's have a look if there's any possibility of finding out inside.

0:29:560:29:59

It's a screw back.

0:29:590:30:00

The movement is lovely, lovely quality.

0:30:030:30:07

Lever escapement,

0:30:070:30:09

damascene nickel movement, Swiss throughout,

0:30:090:30:12

but not signed by anybody and no factory mark of any sort.

0:30:120:30:16

The case, I see there,

0:30:160:30:18

is very nicely hallmarked in 14-carat gold.

0:30:180:30:22

There were various strange wrist watches

0:30:240:30:28

that seemed to start life

0:30:280:30:30

in the Indian market.

0:30:300:30:32

The West End Watch Co had Swiss products

0:30:320:30:35

that were retailed in Calcutta.

0:30:350:30:38

Also in waterproof-type cases.

0:30:380:30:40

In that instance, they tended to be made by people like Longines

0:30:400:30:44

and shipped out to the Indian market.

0:30:440:30:47

And this is an item, frankly, that is really quite scarce.

0:30:470:30:51

The date - round about 1920.

0:30:530:30:56

All the luminous paint is still on there.

0:30:560:30:59

When do you last recall it being used?

0:30:590:31:02

-Never.

-Never!

-It's been in the drawer.

0:31:020:31:05

Oh, what a shame.

0:31:050:31:07

So nobody... You haven't seen anybody wear it at all?

0:31:070:31:09

No. No, I haven't.

0:31:090:31:10

Well, the reason it's in such great condition

0:31:110:31:14

is it HAS sat in the drawer for all those years.

0:31:140:31:16

I love it!

0:31:160:31:18

There's a great interest in early wrist watches,

0:31:180:31:21

particularly wrist watches of this sort,

0:31:210:31:24

and the condition is all-important.

0:31:240:31:27

-It's mint.

-Wow!

0:31:270:31:29

Well, I'm sure most wrist watch jewellers would very happily pay

0:31:290:31:33

a minimum of £1,500 to £2,000 for it.

0:31:330:31:38

Well, that's lovely.

0:31:380:31:39

It would've been an expensive thing new.

0:31:390:31:42

-Yes, yes.

-I love it.

0:31:420:31:44

The garnets on this Reliquary are blazing red,

0:31:460:31:50

and they're blazing red because it's a reminder of the fact

0:31:500:31:53

that this is a relic of the true cross

0:31:530:31:55

and it's a reminder of Christ's blood.

0:31:550:31:57

It's an object of veneration. Tell me about it with you?

0:31:570:31:59

Well, it's been in the family for quite a long time.

0:31:590:32:03

It was given to a member of the family,

0:32:030:32:05

I suppose about 100 years ago.

0:32:050:32:07

And it was supposed to have been passed down

0:32:070:32:10

by Sir Thomas More through that family.

0:32:100:32:13

It's a most marvellous relic indeed and although it's not impossible

0:32:130:32:17

that the relic within came from Saint Thomas More,

0:32:170:32:20

we can actually rule out the fact that it's any earlier

0:32:200:32:23

-than the mid-19th century.

-Oh, really.

0:32:230:32:26

It is a supreme example of exuberant Neo-Gothic design

0:32:260:32:31

perfectly suited to contain a relic of what is presumed to be

0:32:310:32:35

a relic of the true cross

0:32:350:32:37

and somebody venerated and believed in it,

0:32:370:32:39

-and that's what really counts.

-Yes.

0:32:390:32:41

So do you feel a little bit about that

0:32:410:32:43

when you heard about it or not?

0:32:430:32:45

-I didn't really think it was probably quite as old as I'd been told.

-No.

0:32:450:32:48

But, you know, it meant a lot to my grandmother,

0:32:480:32:51

-who was an ardent Catholic.

-Yes.

0:32:510:32:53

When we were children and anything special was happening,

0:32:530:32:56

or when we went away, she would make us kneel down in front of this

0:32:560:32:59

-and kiss it, to make sure that we were safe.

-Wonderful.

0:32:590:33:04

I think all this is very, very fascinating

0:33:040:33:07

and the great cliche about relics of the true cross

0:33:070:33:09

is that they proliferate to the extent where it's said that

0:33:090:33:12

you could build a boat with them as there are so many

0:33:120:33:15

and amongst them perhaps, perhaps, perhaps, some are genuine.

0:33:150:33:18

It would be lovely to think that.

0:33:180:33:20

But the thing about relics is, it's not their authenticity that matters,

0:33:200:33:24

it's the history of their veneration which is so deeply fascinating.

0:33:240:33:27

There's been an exhibition at the British Museum of relics,

0:33:270:33:30

and people have come in profusion to see that.

0:33:300:33:32

Enormous number of people have visited it,

0:33:320:33:35

and it's interesting that you refer to Saint Thomas More

0:33:350:33:38

because he is a late saint,

0:33:380:33:40

and the idea that he should own fragments of the true cross

0:33:400:33:43

is very, very captivating.

0:33:430:33:44

Perhaps somebody believed in that and then commissioned

0:33:440:33:47

a silversmith or jeweller in the mid-19th century to contain that.

0:33:470:33:52

The craftsmanship of the object itself is very redolent

0:33:520:33:55

of John Hardman Powell, who was a manufacturer in Birmingham

0:33:550:33:59

who worked for Pugin and for William Burgess

0:33:590:34:01

and it is somewhat of a Gothic fantasy

0:34:010:34:04

and we're in the most embarrassing position of having to value it.

0:34:040:34:08

And I think it's utterly absurd to try to value it as a true relic

0:34:080:34:13

because it would be almost heresy to do that,

0:34:130:34:16

so we'll just put that aside completely

0:34:160:34:19

and try to value it as a piece of 19th-century decorative arts,

0:34:190:34:23

and I feel in a way that somebody would be very pleased

0:34:230:34:26

to give £2,000, maybe £3,000 for it, if it found the right place.

0:34:260:34:31

Gosh, that's very nice, I must say.

0:34:310:34:32

But the right place is with you, isn't it?

0:34:320:34:34

It is. And then with my children.

0:34:340:34:36

Yes. I envy you. I think it's marvellous.

0:34:360:34:40

What a stunning little object.

0:34:430:34:46

A model of Brighton Pavilion.

0:34:460:34:49

I think it's a piece of tourist ware.

0:34:490:34:52

When Brighton Pavilion was first built,

0:34:520:34:55

nobody had seen anything quite like it, with its turrets...

0:34:550:34:59

So in the early 1800s when Prince Regent was visiting Brighton,

0:34:590:35:04

this sort of tourist ware was there on sale.

0:35:040:35:07

It would date from about the early 1800s. Did you buy it?

0:35:070:35:12

Nearly 30 years ago, and I was offered three objects.

0:35:120:35:16

This and a similar, little unscrewable thing, a wooden thing,

0:35:160:35:22

and a piece of glass, I think, out of a washboard. I don't know why

0:35:220:35:25

but they insisted I had to have all three.

0:35:250:35:27

They said, "No, that's it, three of those."

0:35:270:35:29

-So the price you paid?

-£21 for the three.

0:35:290:35:32

-£21, what a bizarre figure.

-It was a lot of money then.

0:35:320:35:36

So, what is it?

0:35:360:35:38

I didn't know when I bought it, but if you unscrew the top...

0:35:380:35:42

-..off it comes and here is a grater which is loose...

-How brilliant!

0:35:440:35:51

..so we'll take him off...

0:35:510:35:53

and that piece and then... squeaky noise.

0:35:530:35:57

-Perfect.

-And there...

-Is the nutmeg.

0:35:570:36:00

-..is a piece of nutmeg.

-So, it's a treen spice tower.

-Right.

0:36:000:36:04

-The grater sits at the top.

-Indeed.

-The gratings fall down

0:36:040:36:09

into compartment number two and the storage compartment

0:36:090:36:12

-is compartment number three.

-Yes.

0:36:120:36:15

That really is a most fantastic little thing.

0:36:150:36:17

This would have had this slightly treacly-coloured glaze over it.

0:36:170:36:22

So the foundation is a simple wood, a local wood.

0:36:220:36:27

It could have been beech, a soft wood, which would have been turned,

0:36:270:36:31

then it would have had some sort of base layer of paint,

0:36:310:36:35

then it would have been decorated on the top and then varnished.

0:36:350:36:39

Of course, over time, these were used, they were novelties,

0:36:390:36:43

they were in the kitchen, but they were decorative ornaments as well,

0:36:430:36:47

so the varnish has gone. However, to me, the appeal of it is

0:36:470:36:51

-that it just sings old kitchen, life, food...

-Yes.

0:36:510:36:57

Nutmeg was a fantastic spice because it could be used

0:36:570:37:02

for puddings as well, fruit... It was being used all the time.

0:37:020:37:06

Grated on scrambled eggs, whatever you want,

0:37:060:37:09

-and kept in the thing so it would keep it fresh.

-Yes.

0:37:090:37:12

Your little jewel is worth...

0:37:120:37:16

..£3,000.

0:37:180:37:21

THEY GASP

0:37:210:37:23

No, you can't be right.

0:37:230:37:25

Have you any more at home like this?

0:37:250:37:27

THEY LAUGH

0:37:270:37:29

No, I'm afraid I haven't. I wish I had, I wish I had.

0:37:290:37:32

So we've got these two notebooks with quite sort of boyish writing.

0:37:370:37:41

-Who is. . ?

-That was my brother, 15-years-old...

-Right.

0:37:410:37:46

-About 1944, 45 and I was ten-years-old.

-Right.

0:37:460:37:49

-He was writing these notes every day during that period...

-During the war?

0:37:490:37:54

..of every plane that he saw going over the house or round about.

0:37:540:37:58

-In Reading, this was.

-Right.

-So he was noting it down.

0:37:580:38:01

-Fantastic, and even drawing them on occasions.

-Yeah, all on his own.

0:38:010:38:05

-English planes going away...

-Yes, the bombing raids.

-Rather than

0:38:050:38:09

German planes coming over us, he was noting us going to them.

0:38:090:38:12

It's a great bit here. One night, "about 250 to 300 Halifaxes

0:38:120:38:16

"and a few Lancasters,

0:38:160:38:18

"flying south east." I mean, that's a lot of planes.

0:38:180:38:21

Just after the bombing raids. And there's another one in there,

0:38:210:38:25

850 Lancasters accompanied by a Liberator

0:38:250:38:29

going to bomb Cologne.

0:38:290:38:31

But he would have only known that the following day when the reports...

0:38:310:38:35

He counted all these Lancasters going out.

0:38:350:38:38

-There is one extraordinary entry in here.

-There is.

0:38:380:38:42

Friday, December 15th, 1944

0:38:420:38:44

and he notes in the afternoon that a Norseman was going east, south east.

0:38:440:38:49

Well, a Norseman is an American military transport plane.

0:38:490:38:52

-Now, Glen Miller... the famous American...

-Band leader, yeah.

0:38:520:38:56

-..musician, flew out of England...

-On that day, on this day here.

0:38:560:39:01

As far as we understand, there was only one Norseman

0:39:010:39:04

that flew that day, so your big brother is standing in Reading,

0:39:040:39:07

-"Oh, look, there's a Norseman." Had no idea of the significance.

-No.

0:39:070:39:11

And then the next day, Glen Miller is gone.

0:39:110:39:13

-Disappeared in the Channel.

-So that's the very plane.

0:39:130:39:16

In 1969, he read in the newspaper that that's the day...

0:39:160:39:19

and he put the two together.

0:39:190:39:20

How extraordinary is that?

0:39:200:39:22

I'm emotional when you think, crumbs, that can't be.

0:39:220:39:25

Puts you completely in touch with a well known moment in history.

0:39:250:39:30

Yes, it does.

0:39:300:39:31

And those are the only two books you've got?

0:39:310:39:33

Yeah, only two books, yeah.

0:39:330:39:36

So, what are they worth? I suppose they might make...

0:39:360:39:39

-the best part of £1,000 at auction.

-Oh, that's...

0:39:390:39:43

Yeah, emotional and fascinating and poignant, the whole thing is.

0:39:430:39:47

So, we've got a pin cushion, some samples of cloth and scissors.

0:39:530:39:57

So we know he's a tailor,

0:39:570:39:58

but an extraordinary depiction, riding on a goat.

0:39:580:40:02

-What's the family history?

-Well, he belonged to my great grandfather.

0:40:020:40:07

I don't know how... where he got it from, but he used to be

0:40:070:40:11

a Sandon of Savile Row who were quite famous tailors.

0:40:110:40:14

Oh, right. Namesakes of ours but a tailoring firm.

0:40:140:40:17

They were a tailoring firm, yes.

0:40:170:40:19

And the window of the firm had a black velvet covering to it,

0:40:190:40:23

and just this standing in the middle of it.

0:40:230:40:25

-Oh, well it's a very appropriate thing to advertise a tailor's ware...

-Absolutely.

0:40:250:40:29

..because, of course, this is perhaps one of the most famous tailors of all.

0:40:290:40:33

-We have here Count Bruhl's tailor.

-That's right, yes.

0:40:330:40:38

Count Bruhl was the wealthiest man in Saxony

0:40:380:40:40

and was famous for his lavish banquets.

0:40:400:40:43

And the story goes that on one occasion

0:40:430:40:45

he wanted a very special set of clothes made for an upcoming banquet,

0:40:450:40:49

and he said to his tailor that,

0:40:490:40:52

"If you can make them in time and really well, you can have anything you want."

0:40:520:40:55

And the clothes were duly delivered and the tailor said,

0:40:550:40:59

"Well, yes, I'd like my reward, please."

0:40:590:41:01

He asked for an invitation to come to the banquet himself,

0:41:010:41:04

to attend the fantastic banquet.

0:41:040:41:07

And this was an astonishing thing for a humble tailor to ask of poor Count Bruhl,

0:41:070:41:11

and it was unheard of for a tailor to come to the lavish court of Augustus and Bruhl.

0:41:110:41:18

So, as a result, the Count says, "Well, I'll see what I can do."

0:41:180:41:22

But Count Bruhl owned the Meissen porcelain factory

0:41:220:41:24

and he had a word with the modeller there, Kaendler,

0:41:240:41:27

and says, "Can you make a model of my tailor on a goat,

0:41:270:41:30

"so that then we can have him on our table,

0:41:300:41:33

"so he sits at the king's table, at the banquet."

0:41:330:41:36

But not really there, just in porcelain.

0:41:360:41:38

-So here we have the Meissen porcelain version of Count Bruhl's tailor.

-Right.

0:41:380:41:43

Sitting at the banquet in all his finery.

0:41:430:41:46

And this is the sort of clothes... I don't know...

0:41:460:41:49

Did Sandons of Savile Row make suits like that?

0:41:490:41:53

No, they didn't. They made uniforms, army uniforms, I think.

0:41:530:41:58

Here we've got the most splendid costume,

0:41:580:42:00

all of it decorated in gold, but they're making fun of the poor chap.

0:42:000:42:05

They put him on a goat,

0:42:050:42:06

which rather sort of suggests his more lowly origins,

0:42:060:42:09

but pretending to be a fine gentleman.

0:42:090:42:12

These were made in several sizes, normally they're little ones.

0:42:120:42:16

-Right.

-But this the jolly big full size. And really quite wonderful.

0:42:160:42:21

-I mean we're looking here, an example from the 1840s, that sort of time.

-Right.

0:42:210:42:26

When this particular subject was particularly popular in Britain.

0:42:260:42:31

You see far more of the Count Bruhl's tailors in England

0:42:310:42:33

-than you do in Germany.

-Oh, right.

0:42:330:42:36

But they're rarely in as good a shape as this.

0:42:360:42:40

-Stuck in the window where it was, I guess it was looked after.

-Yes.

0:42:400:42:43

Because I can just see a tip of a horn missing here but...

0:42:430:42:47

-That happened during the war.

-Oh.

0:42:470:42:49

My mother used to put velvet cushions on top of him,

0:42:490:42:52

so that the bombs wouldn't get at it, and one day she broke the horn.

0:42:520:42:58

Well, it's actually quite an expensive chap, nowadays.

0:42:580:43:01

I suppose a good large size Count Bruhl's tailor...

0:43:010:43:06

-£12,000.

-GASPS

0:43:060:43:08

SHE GIGGLES All right, that's very nice to know, yes.

0:43:100:43:15

-It's lovely to meet him and to meet a namesake.

-Yes, yes.

0:43:150:43:19

Of all the things we've seen at the Roadshow,

0:43:190:43:21

I never thought I'd see a collection of surf boards,

0:43:210:43:24

let alone hear that the most valuable surf board ever

0:43:240:43:27

was US220,000, my goodness.

0:43:270:43:31

But I suppose we are in the part of Devon famous for its surfing.

0:43:310:43:34

Very close to the beach and in this kind of weather,

0:43:340:43:37

who wouldn't want to surf?

0:43:370:43:38

From the Antiques Roadshow in Hartland Abbey,

0:43:380:43:41

until next time, bye-bye.

0:43:410:43:43

Fiona Bruce and the team head to Hartland Abbey in Devon.

Amongst the items catching their eyes are the World War II notebooks of a young plane-spotter who may have witnessed Glenn Miller's last flight, a collection of pottery used for making clotted cream and a colourful assortment of early surfboards.


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