St Andrews University 1 Antiques Roadshow


St Andrews University 1

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Welcome to St Andrews,

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which sits at the edge of the North Sea on the east coast of Scotland.

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In medieval times, the shrine of St Andrews

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was one of the most important places in the world for pilgrims.

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These days, pilgrims come here for very different reasons -

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to play on famous golf courses, to attend Scotland's oldest university

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or just to soak up the history that can be found all around the town.

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Welcome to the Antiques Roadshow from beautiful St Andrews.

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Until the 15th century,

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if you lived in Scotland and wanted a serious education,

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you had to travel, sometimes to England and mainly to France,

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but when political and religious tensions erupted across Europe,

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it became too dangerous for Scots to travel abroad

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to foreign universities.

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There was only one thing for it. The country needed its own university.

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And the ideal place was St Andrews which was, by then,

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a thriving cathedral city full of theologians and monks.

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Perfect to take on the task of educating Scottish students.

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With the Pope's blessing,

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the university first opened its doors in 1410

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but it wasn't until a few years later

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that Scotland's oldest university celebrated

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with a service in the cathedral and bonfires in the streets.

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# Jesu Christe

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# Jesu Christe... #

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Life for the students was monastic.

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Aged 13, they'd be up at five, mass at six,

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lessons at seven, all in Latin, all before breakfast,

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and then afterwards more lessons and more prayers,

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and they certainly weren't allowed to enjoy themselves.

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I mean, they weren't allowed out without permission.

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Very different from student life today.

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One tradition the students DO still enjoy here is Raisin Monday.

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For centuries, when freshers begin here at university,

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an older student took them under their wing to show them the ropes,

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and to show their gratitude,

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the freshers presented the senior student,

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here in the cloisters, with a pound of raisins,

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which was once a very expensive treat.

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These days, more likely to be a bottle of wine.

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600 years on, the university has recently launched its celebrations

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with a visit from a famous couple who met while studying here at St Andrews.

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Who could I possibly mean?

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Of course, I'm referring to Prince William and Kate Middleton,

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now the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

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Following in those royal footsteps are our specialists,

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who are soaking up the surroundings of St Andrews' oldest college,

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St Salvator's.

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If I was going to have a wee dram on a cold morning in St Andrews,

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this is certainly a nice, big piece to take it out of.

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I think you're right!

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And where did you get this wonderful piece?

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Well, I retired in 1996

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and I was invited to take my office furniture with me.

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The centrepiece of my office

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was a three-piece leather Chesterfield suite.

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I didn't need it but there was no point in leaving it behind

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so I just took it away.

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Simultaneously, my stepdaughter had bought a little hotel in the country

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and rummaging around in the attic one day she came across this whisky jar.

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Now, she had no use for the whisky jar

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and I had no use for this suite, so we did a swap.

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There was a problem, however,

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because the cork seal, or gasket,

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had dried out over the years

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and you couldn't get the top off.

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So, I filled a bath with hot, soapy water,

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and my wife was kind enough to pass this in to me

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and I wrestled with it like... Rrr! And I got the top off it!

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We then got it all cleaned out and washed out

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and filled up with the finest Speyside malt.

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And are you a fan of the finest Speyside malt?

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Oh, I think so, yes! Everyone in St Andrews is a fan,

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or at least all my friends are.

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They certainly are! Well, it's a marvellous jar.

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Obviously originally for a retailer, maybe a pub, maybe a shop somewhere.

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Yep.

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Possibly made by...

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I've seen some of these made by a company in Glasgow

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-called John Baird & Son Glassmakers.

-Right.

-Not definitely but possibly.

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It's a wonderful shape and lovely little detailing here

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-with the "Old Scotch" on it.

-Yeah.

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And made in the late 19th century, so...

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It would certainly take quite... Do you know how much it actually takes?

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No, I've never had enough money to fill it right up!

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-It could certainly take quite a lot.

-More than a case.

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-It would take more than a case.

-Yep.

-What does it taste like, dare I ask?

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-Do you want a wee taste?

-A wee dram?

-A wee dram!

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-Yous just help yourself, lassie.

-Oh, right!

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Well, this is a first.

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Not that I would ever have a wee nip of whisky at this time in the morning,

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-but there you go.

-Quite right.

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Oh...!

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Wonderful!

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I'd be accused of advertising if I said what whisky it was, I suppose.

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I think you would... Oh, wow! That's...glorious.

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This is a lovely piece and I think if you came to sell this,

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it would go for £800 to £1,000.

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Well, I'll no' be selling it, so it doesn't matter!

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I'd be a social outcast in St Andrews

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if that were to disappear from my dining room!

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I understand this is a real Scottish heirloom?

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Apparently.

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This, here, is what it's all about. Could you read that for me?

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I'll have a go. "This China Dish was used by His Royal Highness, Prince Charles Edward,

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"as his Porridge Cup when halted in the house of the Reverend Alexander Keith

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"from Inverness. After the disaster of Culloden it was obtained by his daughter,

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"afterwards Lady Naismyth, and left by him as an heirloom to the family."

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Fantastic, so... Sorry, that was Charles Edward Stuart?

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-Bonnie Prince.

-Bonnie Prince Charlie.

-Yep.

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Bonnie Prince Charlie.

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-We have this on a paper label on this bowl.

-Mm-hm.

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Can you tell a bit me more about how this came into your family?

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It was Reverend Alexander Keith, my six-times great-grandfather,

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so it's come through the family line from there,

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through Lady Naismyth and then to our line.

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Ah. That's very, very good.

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-Now, Bonnie Prince Charlie. Culloden was, what, 1746?

-Yeah.

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That's right. So after 1746, we're talking about.

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Let's have a little think about this story, let's look at the bowl.

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Japanese porcelain around about 1680, 1700,

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-so actually that could possibly tie up.

-Yes.

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This sort of porcelain was made in Arita. It's Imari-decorated.

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And it was made for the great houses of Europe.

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It was made for the royal palaces and stately homes.

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So this is the sort of place that Bonnie Prince Charlie

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might've gone to.

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I'm usually very suspicious of paper labels on objects.

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You see pieces of wood saying, "A piece of the true cross."

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How many pairs of Queen Victoria's stockings have we seen

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with labels saying that?

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This label, without you being able to verify that,

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-is more or less...

-Take it with a pinch of salt.

-Absolutely.

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But you can trace that back through the family

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-and that counts for a great deal.

-Right.

-Very, important.

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-So don't lose it.

-Absolutely.

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Well...

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From a commercial point of view it's quite...an interesting...one.

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If you take away the label and the provenance attached to this bowl,

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on the market it's maybe £150, £200, even though it's 300 years old.

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Yep, yep.

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If this can be backed up, this label...

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Right.

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If you all, through the family,

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can confirm that that is absolutely right,

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-it's going to be...ten times that.

-Oh, right.

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-Maybe, it could be 2,000, maybe £3,000...

-Gee, whiz!

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-..as a piece of Jacobite memorabilia.

-Right.

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So, here we are looking at an old lady.

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-I don't know who she is. Who is she?

-She's my four-times great-granny.

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-Four times?

-Four times.

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And she's known in the family as Granny Melville

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but she was Margaret Iles when she was born,

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and the name's been handed down and I'm the fourth one.

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You're the fourth Margaret Iles?

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-Yes, it misses a generation each time.

-Oh, I see.

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-How many children did she have?

-13 that we know of.

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She must have...

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She must be the progenitor of most of the families round here then.

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That's what it says, progenitor of many families in Kirkcaldy -

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the Beveridges, the Guthries

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and I can't...the Williamsons - and I can't remember all the others.

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I picked this out because I thought it was just such a good portrait

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of about 1860 I'd say. Would that be right for the date of the lady?

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She was born in 1778 and she died in 1874.

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She was 96 years and seven months when she died.

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-Crikey, she did terribly well.

-She outlived her husband by 50-odd years.

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Obviously she wasn't worn out!

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I just thought it was such a good portrait, so psychological somehow,

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and it's caught a wonderful sense of humour, which she'd have needed

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with 13 children, that's for sure, and incredible strength of character

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and a twinkle in her eye. It's completely beguiling, isn't it?

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I love looking at it.

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I'm afraid I don't know who it's by, which...

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-That's what I really wanted to know.

-Of course it is. But, you know,

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sometimes you can't know, it's just not possible.

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There are too many local people, you see,

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and they are all of them trained. At this time in the 1860s,

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there were plenty of people who could have done it.

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But a way of finding out - you need specialist local knowledge -

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-is to write to the Scottish National Portrait Gallery...

-Right.

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..and show them a photograph of it. There may be some local suspects

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who could fit the bill and give you an idea at least.

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In market terms - worth about £1,000 to £2,000 at the very most.

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-In personal terms...

-She's priceless.

-..incalculable.

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-Yes.

-Thanks ever so.

-Thank you.

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Every week at the Antiques Roadshow we see countless objects that,

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to the untrained eye, can look almost identical.

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I mean, I often wonder why a teapot, for example, can be worth

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a few pounds and then another teapot can be worth thousands of pounds.

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Well, to test my powers of observation and yours at home,

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our experts are setting us a challenge in this series,

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bringing along objects that perform an identical function,

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but have very different values.

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This week it's the turn of jewellery specialist Geoffrey Munn.

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He has brought along three cigarette cases.

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Now have a look - one is a basic model worth £150 to £200.

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One is a better model - well, considerably better

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because it's worth £7,000 to £8,000.

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And then the best one is worth,

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in my mind anyway, a staggering £100,000.

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Now he'll be telling us a little bit later on, which it is,

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but, first of all, I'll ask our visitors to see if they can guess.

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Come on, guys, have a look. One of them is a hundred grand.

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So, what do you think?

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You're all pointing at something different, that's no help at all!

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The decision to admit women to the university in 1877

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was very controversial. It was thought by the men

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that this was not a good...not a good move, to maintain standards.

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And indeed there was a protest by the students

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and the members of College at the time,

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where they walked down to the pier.

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At the end of the pier, they hurled their academic caps into the sea.

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That's the reason why there are no degrees for men

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at St Andrews that actually have an academic cap.

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It was also decided therefore, that women couldn't be...

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get the same degree as a man.

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-So they dreamed up this new scheme which was a lady's degree...

-Yes.

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..LLA or Lady Literate in Arts. And it was given to them,

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-they wore it on a sash, and this is an original sash.

-Like this, yes.

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-They wore that and it was in the place of a gown or cap.

-Excellent.

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Where did you get them from?

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Well, this one came from...I bought it in '84 soon after I arrived here.

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And that came from what you might describe as a junk shop

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in Garbridge quite nearby, long since gone.

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-I think I paid £8 for it.

-Right.

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-Well...

-I thought it was desperately rare until about a week ago,

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when, on an internet site,

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-I found this.

-Well I'm glad to say they are both silver, these,

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and for £8 I think your investment was rather good.

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From one side of the world, we go right across to

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the other side of the world

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because you've got a really lovely decorative silver goblet here,

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that, I think it's not too hard to see -

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-with all these figures on the side - that it comes from China.

-Mm-hm.

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It's got typical sort of really profuse figures

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and foliage round the side, absolutely what you'd expect

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from a piece of silver made in the last quarter of the 19th century.

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Most importantly, if we turn it up and look at the bottom,

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it's got the mark LC - that's for Leeching of Shanghai,

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prolific maker in the 1870s-1880s.

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So you've actually got a very nice piece of silver by a good maker.

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And if we start with the two badges,

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their value is almost certainly going to be

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to someone in and around St Andrews. They could be worth hundreds,

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it just depends who would want them, and how much they would want them,

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but they're certainly lovely things, rare things.

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The Chinese goblet though is rather a different matter.

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Can you remember what you paid for it?

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-I think about £140.

-140?

-It was a lot of money in those days, to me.

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-That was. It's a lot of money to everyone.

-Mm-hm.

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But not as much as it's worth now, because I would comfortably

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say that's worth at least £2,000 now, probably more.

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-Good grief!

-Yeah.

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They came into our family in 1939 through a great-aunt.

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Was she out in China? A missionary or something?

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No, as far as I know,

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she was a nursing attendant to Reginald Johnston.

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-Who he?

-He was in fact the tutor to the last emperor in China.

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-Ah, to Pu Yi.

-Pu Yi, yes.

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-Now prior to that, we would need to go back to Yuan Shih-kai.

-Yes.

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Who tried to reinstate dynastic rule in 1916.

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Yeah, yeah, so the question is - are they made for the Emperor Pu Yi,

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or Yuan Shih-kai, or are they Republic?

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Yuan Shih-kai gifted them to the Emperor,

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who, in turn, gifted them to Reginald Johnston

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who took them back.

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That is the most fantastic pedigree, if we can prove it.

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-There is a slip of paper, yes.

-A slip of paper?

-Yes.

-Perfect.

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That's just what we want,

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I mean - you know - that is as good as it could get, really.

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Yeah, poor Pu Yi - he was the last emperor and he ended his days,

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after the Republic was declared, as a gardener,

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which he was for 60 or 70 years, something like that.

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There was that wonderful film

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that was made of the sort of end of his time.

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My favourite bit was - actually, I'm not sure it came in the film,

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maybe it was in the book. Once he was banished,

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the Forbidden City was emptied and this retinue of the emperor -

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ex-emperor -

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and all the servants, the concubines,

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and wives - everybody came out in a file,

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and it took something like ten hours for them to all empty out

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and in the middle were the eunuchs.

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Now, eunuchs actually controlled everything in China -

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they were the administrators.

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And they came out weeping copiously because their livelihoods

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were now gone, and holding a little jar in which was their testicles.

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THEY CHUCKLE

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Maybe they were hoping they could be put back, I don't know.

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-And then he ended up in a garden.

-That's right, yes.

-As a gardener.

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-Yes.

-And apparently was quite happy.

-Yes.

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We're talking about a date in the early years of the 20th century,

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and this kind of painting that we've got on here is much more akin

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to classical scroll painting than it is to ceramic painting.

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And this way of treating a tree with a black trunk and branches,

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and little dots of colour for the leaves

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or flowers, very characteristic of the period,

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as is this wash of green with the black on it.

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So I have no doubt that they date from that period.

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What one would like to find on the bottom is a Yuan Shih-kai mark.

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And we don't got - as the film says.

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Yes, we've got - that's "hall", that's "made for" -

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so it's made for the hall of the "benevolent"...

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And benevolence, yes.

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They made various changes to this mark, for different halls,

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but what's nice about it is it's brilliantly painted -

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that is a really top-class mark.

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The handles are unusual, dragon handles.

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The emperor's symbol was a dragon.

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Sadly we've got a lot of damage to the handles -

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they've been off and stuck back again - but it's not a killer.

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The Chinese market, as you probably realise,

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has gone mad in the last two or three years.

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They like very much porcelain which up to this point

0:19:280:19:34

we would not have rated.

0:19:340:19:37

A few years ago, I would have put that in a sale...

0:19:370:19:41

those pair in a sale with the damage,

0:19:410:19:44

£200 to £300 and they wouldn't have fetched any more than that -

0:19:440:19:48

that's all they would have made.

0:19:480:19:51

And now, with fingers crossed,

0:19:510:19:56

we could be looking at £20,000 to £30,000.

0:19:560:19:59

But if they made more, I would not be in the least surprised.

0:20:010:20:06

The bad hair, the maniacal grin, the knobbly knees,

0:20:090:20:13

it could be me at the end of an Antiques Roadshow day,

0:20:130:20:17

but in fact it is, of course, Dennis the Menace and his dog Gnasher.

0:20:170:20:21

And I'm surrounded by Beano, Dandy,

0:20:210:20:24

Warlord, they're sort of icons, certainly these two are,

0:20:240:20:27

from my childhood.

0:20:270:20:28

Wonderful pieces of artwork. How did you get them?

0:20:280:20:32

We were surveying a warehouse that we'd purchased in Dundee,

0:20:320:20:37

formerly a DC Thomson's warehouse.

0:20:370:20:40

Now, we ought to say DC Thomson is perhaps THE best-known publisher,

0:20:400:20:46

dealing with comics and still in business today,

0:20:460:20:49

printing newspapers and so on.

0:20:490:20:50

But Dundee is perhaps best known for DC Thomson and in fact I think

0:20:500:20:54

-in Dundee there is a statue, isn't there, of Desperate Dan?

-Yes.

0:20:540:20:57

Striding down Dundee High Street.

0:20:570:20:59

Yes, and in part of the warehouse there was an old boiler housing,

0:20:590:21:03

obviously not used for decades. Black, no electricity, no lighting,

0:21:030:21:08

so had the torches out, having a good root about to see what was in there.

0:21:080:21:12

-As you do.

-As you do.

0:21:120:21:14

And there was some boarding over in the far corner,

0:21:140:21:18

so these were facing the wall, so we couldn't actually see what they were,

0:21:180:21:22

and then when we pulled them back, to reveal these,

0:21:220:21:24

I thought, "They're fantastic."

0:21:240:21:26

Now, I hope I'm right in saying that

0:21:270:21:31

-DC Thomson are aware that you have these.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:21:310:21:34

A representative for them came along to the building. There was some other

0:21:340:21:38

artwork there and they actually destroyed it on the spot.

0:21:380:21:41

-What, tore it up?

-Tore it up.

0:21:410:21:43

And we said, "And these?" They said, "No, they're old display boards,

0:21:430:21:47

"we're not interested in retrieving those, you can have them."

0:21:470:21:50

-So you basically got sign-off.

-Yeah.

-Right, great.

0:21:500:21:53

Well, I mean let's just talk a bit about these images.

0:21:530:21:56

The Beano started in 1938, Dennis the Menace with his... What was it?

0:21:560:22:01

Not as fine a dog as yours here,

0:22:010:22:04

but I think wasn't Gnasher an Abyssinian wire-haired tripe hound?

0:22:040:22:10

-OK.

-Something like that, obviously not as purebred as your own.

0:22:100:22:13

As far as dating the artwork is concerned,

0:22:130:22:16

there are some clues, and that is that Dennis

0:22:160:22:21

didn't actually make it onto the front cover of Beano until 1974.

0:22:210:22:26

With Dandy, Desperate Dan didn't make it to the front cover

0:22:260:22:31

of Dandy until about 1985.

0:22:310:22:35

And as we know, Warlord didn't exist before 1974,

0:22:350:22:38

it went out of business in 1986,

0:22:380:22:41

so I would say that these are all dating from that '83-'84-'85 period.

0:22:410:22:46

So that sort of nails the date.

0:22:460:22:48

As far as value's concerned,

0:22:480:22:51

I am sure that we're talking about

0:22:510:22:55

a couple of thousand pounds each, if not more.

0:22:550:22:58

Typical things to sell on the internet,

0:22:580:23:01

if you ever decided to part with them.

0:23:010:23:04

But no, I mean, to me, it's brought back

0:23:040:23:07

a lot of memories, and thanks very much indeed

0:23:070:23:09

-for bringing them in.

-Thank you.

0:23:090:23:10

# Dennis the Menace

0:23:100:23:13

# He's a bundle of dynamite

0:23:130:23:15

# Oh, the things he says and the things he does

0:23:150:23:18

# Will make you shake with fright... #

0:23:180:23:21

-What are you studying?

-Maths.

-Well, that's no use at all.

0:23:210:23:25

# You'd better be on your toes... #

0:23:250:23:27

I think this one's the best.

0:23:270:23:29

# Bound to be a calamity no matter where he goes... #

0:23:290:23:32

-If I get the 100,000 one right, do I get it?

-Sadly, no.

0:23:320:23:37

Nice try, though.

0:23:370:23:38

# When he looks at you with those eyes of blue

0:23:380:23:40

# He'll steal you heart away... #

0:23:400:23:43

I think your bronze

0:23:470:23:48

might be described as something of a conversation piece,

0:23:480:23:52

so I'm intrigued to know for how many generations

0:23:520:23:55

she's been causing a little bit of chat in your family.

0:23:550:23:59

Well, my great-grandfather bought her, so I'm told,

0:24:010:24:07

and she's just always been in the family.

0:24:070:24:10

In fact quite a few of the family possessions were used

0:24:100:24:14

-during the Great Depression to pay bills.

-OK.

0:24:140:24:18

So this is one of the few things that survived.

0:24:180:24:21

So let's have a look at your lady

0:24:210:24:23

and I have to say that I find her totally fascinating and beguiling

0:24:230:24:29

because I've never seen a posture of... No, I didn't!

0:24:290:24:34

-Would you please?

-LAUGHTER

0:24:340:24:36

I've never seen a posture of this type before.

0:24:360:24:40

And so it comes under the heading of innovative,

0:24:400:24:43

and then I look at the way that it's been worked. And I'm thinking

0:24:430:24:48

this has been made to go in a certain position,

0:24:480:24:53

either in a library -

0:24:530:24:54

I mean it's got a more of a gentleman's feel to it.

0:24:540:24:57

And I notice there's a signature round here -

0:24:570:25:00

if I can show it - down here.

0:25:000:25:01

And it says "Crenda". Now, I don't know who Crenda is -

0:25:010:25:06

I've got to put my hand up - but what I do know

0:25:060:25:09

is that he is a very credible sculptor,

0:25:090:25:12

because I think that this just needs a sort of a waxing

0:25:120:25:16

and it'll be brought back to, you know, total life.

0:25:160:25:19

-Does she have a name in your family?

-My mother just said she was Psyche.

0:25:190:25:26

Psyche. So what price

0:25:260:25:28

a bronze which, date-wise, I would suggest

0:25:280:25:31

is probably around about 1895-1905?

0:25:310:25:37

But you know, if I wanted to buy your Psyche,

0:25:370:25:40

well, I would say round about £1,500 to £2,000.

0:25:400:25:45

-Oh, really?

-So I think this is a treasure.

-Thank you.

0:25:450:25:49

She is to us and she'll always stay in the family.

0:25:490:25:52

Earlier on, our jewellery specialist, Geoffrey Munn,

0:26:000:26:03

set us all a challenge.

0:26:030:26:04

He brought along three cigarette cases, one a basic model

0:26:040:26:07

worth about £150 to £200,

0:26:070:26:09

a better case, worth in the region of £7,000 to £8,000

0:26:090:26:13

and then the best one, worth a whopping £100,000.

0:26:130:26:17

Our visitors have all had a go at guessing,

0:26:170:26:19

I think I could fair say guessing, so have I.

0:26:190:26:22

Now, Geoffrey, I have to say, this was, so far for me, the hardest,

0:26:220:26:27

because I'd absolutely no idea. Why cigarette cases?

0:26:270:26:30

Because that's not what I would have thought you would bring along.

0:26:300:26:33

Well, they're sort of an extension of jewellery in a way.

0:26:330:26:36

It's a high form of dress

0:26:360:26:37

and there was a time when people

0:26:370:26:39

said they "wore" a cigarette case, because they'd go out to dinner

0:26:390:26:42

in white tie, fantastic studs, cuff links,

0:26:420:26:45

so it was a status symbol at the highest possible level

0:26:450:26:48

and of course the craftsmanship lavished on it

0:26:480:26:51

was also marvellous, as you see here.

0:26:510:26:53

-I mean, deeply unfashionable now...

-Yes.

0:26:530:26:55

..to have a cigarette case.

0:26:550:26:57

When were they introduced? When did they become...?

0:26:570:27:00

Well, when people stopped snuffing which was...

0:27:000:27:03

Do you snuff? You stopped in time?

0:27:030:27:05

I've never... No, I have snuffed on a Roadshow once, horrendous!

0:27:050:27:09

Well, snuffing gave way to cigarettes and to smoking,

0:27:090:27:12

and it's just another way of getting the nicotine.

0:27:120:27:15

Well, I decided, just to be contrary,

0:27:150:27:17

because this LOOKS the most expensive,

0:27:170:27:19

-I put it as basic because I thought you might be playing a trick.

-Me?!

0:27:190:27:23

-Better - even though this is older.

-Yes.

0:27:230:27:26

Best because it's got an inscription that might add to its value.

0:27:260:27:29

-But, to be honest, I've no idea. So, go on.

-Help us?

0:27:290:27:34

What should we be looking for?

0:27:340:27:35

Well, in a funny way,

0:27:350:27:36

it was a challenge for me to bring something to muddy the waters

0:27:360:27:40

and you might have assumed that that was the best,

0:27:400:27:43

because it's a massive show

0:27:430:27:44

of gold and it's by Cartier which is one of the great firms.

0:27:440:27:49

-I didn't spot that.

-No, no, but anyway that doesn't matter.

0:27:490:27:52

But it's evident and it's an extraordinarily chic object

0:27:520:27:55

and so you could easily be forgiven for thinking that that's best

0:27:550:27:59

and it's a great guess. And then better and why not?

0:27:590:28:02

But the core of this one is silver

0:28:020:28:04

and it's been overlaid with nine-carat gold.

0:28:040:28:06

So its intrinsic value and its status value isn't quite the same.

0:28:060:28:10

The fact that both are engraved detracts from their value.

0:28:100:28:13

-Oh.

-Yes, because unless it's a very, very serious provenance,

0:28:130:28:17

perhaps you don't really want to have somebody else's cigarette case

0:28:170:28:20

with a presentation inscription in it that doesn't refer to you.

0:28:200:28:24

The most mysterious and the best one really is this one here.

0:28:240:28:29

-So the one that I put as basic, is the best one?

-Well, frankly, yes.

0:28:290:28:33

-And everything else is wrong as well.

-Oh, gosh! Right. OK.

0:28:330:28:38

And so the trick has worked. I have beguiled you.

0:28:380:28:41

-I've befuddled you in front of millions of people.

-Great.

-Great.

0:28:410:28:46

-I'm not at all embarrassed.

-Yes.

-No.

0:28:460:28:49

All right. So, the basic one is which one, then?

0:28:490:28:53

The basic one is here, and the better one is there

0:28:530:28:56

and the best one is there.

0:28:560:28:58

-Excellent, so all wrong.

-A three-card trick.

-OK.

0:28:580:29:01

But it's a very specialist area

0:29:010:29:03

and these things are sought after for different reasons.

0:29:030:29:06

So why is this the best one?

0:29:060:29:09

I think, if angels were smoking, this would be their cigarette case.

0:29:090:29:12

This is the most beautiful piece of goldsmith's work

0:29:120:29:16

you could ever hope to see.

0:29:160:29:17

It's so sophisticated.

0:29:170:29:20

It's a complete swan song of goldsmiths' work.

0:29:200:29:23

It comes from 1915 but what makes it so desirable

0:29:230:29:25

and so collectable is that it's made by the most famous goldsmith

0:29:250:29:29

ever to have lived, and it's by Carl Faberge.

0:29:290:29:32

I should have known there'd be a Faberge.

0:29:320:29:34

-You should have known.

-Gosh. And where...? How can you tell?

0:29:340:29:37

Well, tiny, tiny marks on the inside.

0:29:370:29:40

The signatures are on the inside.

0:29:400:29:41

-So that's the Faberge signature there.

-Yes.

0:29:410:29:44

And the purity of the gold.

0:29:440:29:45

And these here are tiny diamonds, are they?

0:29:450:29:48

Tiny rose diamonds set into platinum, just to help you find

0:29:480:29:51

the clasp for your Faberge cigarette case, when you are at a ball

0:29:510:29:56

-in St Petersburg, dancing.

-As you do.

-As you do.

0:29:560:30:00

To walk out into the snow where your troika awaits you

0:30:000:30:03

to take you back to your palace with your box, like snow on the ground.

0:30:030:30:07

I mean, that's what that's all about, it's poetry in goldsmith's work.

0:30:070:30:11

Well, given that I thought £100,000 of Faberge cigarette case

0:30:110:30:14

was worth about 150 quid,

0:30:140:30:15

I won't be applying for an apprentice job

0:30:150:30:17

with Geoffrey any time soon.

0:30:170:30:20

Oh, dear. Anyway, if you have a cigarette case at home

0:30:200:30:23

and want to know about how you can tell what it might be worth,

0:30:230:30:26

find out a little bit more about it,

0:30:260:30:27

why don't you look at our website?

0:30:270:30:30

Whenever I see paintings by this particular artist,

0:30:400:30:43

I feel I need my sunglasses on.

0:30:430:30:46

Tretchikoff has always been imprinted in my mind

0:30:460:30:49

as the prints one sees in people's houses,

0:30:490:30:51

certainly in the '50s and '60s -

0:30:510:30:53

because he became well-known through his prints.

0:30:530:30:55

-Yes.

-And here we have two original Tretchikoffs. How did you get those?

0:30:550:31:00

Um, I bought them off the internet.

0:31:000:31:04

I've been collecting the prints for years,

0:31:040:31:07

his most iconic print is The Green Lady.

0:31:070:31:11

Absolutely.

0:31:110:31:12

And I've got Miss Wong, and I've got about over 50 original prints,

0:31:120:31:19

but I was really wanting an original.

0:31:190:31:23

And just tell me, do you know the title of this one?

0:31:230:31:26

-Yes, it's Beyond Reality.

-And how do you know that?

0:31:260:31:29

The gentleman I bought it off, I've got this catalogue.

0:31:290:31:34

-You found the catalogue?

-Yeah.

-Could I have a look at it?

-Yeah.

0:31:340:31:38

And here we have, listed in this catalogue,

0:31:380:31:41

number 13, Beyond Reality,

0:31:410:31:43

and, interestingly enough, the exhibition was in Durban.

0:31:430:31:48

As we know, he's a South African artist - actually a Russian artist.

0:31:480:31:51

-That's right.

-Tretchikoff, who, born in 1913,

0:31:510:31:54

went to South Africa and became very well-known there.

0:31:540:31:59

And the famous print of the lady that you saw,

0:31:590:32:01

produced by Frost and Reed over here - and you often see it

0:32:010:32:04

in all the houses - and that's how artists become well known.

0:32:040:32:08

-They paint a picture, but through prints...

-Yes.

0:32:080:32:10

It's a classic thing, you know, about Tretchikoff

0:32:100:32:13

-how he became so well known through his prints.

-Yeah.

0:32:130:32:17

And here we have two originals. So you bought them on the internet.

0:32:170:32:21

-Yeah.

-And what did you pay for them?

0:32:210:32:23

I paid about 3,500 for two of them,

0:32:230:32:27

but I had to pay a further 1,000 to get that one restored.

0:32:270:32:31

OK. This one is absolutely beautiful

0:32:310:32:35

and I think that that's worth £10,000 to £15,000.

0:32:350:32:39

-That's fabulous.

-Yeah. And it could make more.

0:32:400:32:43

That one there, value on that

0:32:430:32:46

would be somewhere in the region of £4,000 to £6,000,

0:32:460:32:50

-maybe £5,000 to £7,000.

-That's good too.

0:32:500:32:52

And I think it's extraordinary you bought them

0:32:520:32:55

off the internet for £3,500 for two,

0:32:550:32:58

-because three years ago...

-Yeah.

0:32:580:33:01

..when you purchased these, these were making very good money,

0:33:010:33:05

-so you did jolly well.

-Yeah, that's smashing.

0:33:050:33:07

Just popped out from work

0:33:100:33:12

for a brief minute and I've got something in my bag

0:33:120:33:14

that I wondered if it would be of any interest, not an antique?

0:33:140:33:17

-What have you got?

-It is a programme from a fashion show -

0:33:170:33:20

the Don't Walk Fashion Show - that Kate Middleton appeared in

0:33:200:33:24

when Prince William was in the audience.

0:33:240:33:26

-The transparent thing with her underwear on display?

-Yes.

0:33:260:33:29

-Let's see.

-Her name's quite clearly mentioned.

0:33:290:33:32

"Kate Middleton" - how fantastic.

0:33:320:33:35

Don't Walk Fashion Show.

0:33:350:33:38

Because, of course, we have seen that image

0:33:380:33:40

and now the dress has sold for a lot of money, hasn't it?

0:33:400:33:43

-Mm.

-It's been bought by a private collector.

-It has.

-So were you

0:33:430:33:46

-at the fashion show?

-I was at the fashion show with my sister

0:33:460:33:49

-and we were near William when he was watching...

-How exciting.

0:33:490:33:53

..watching her coming down the catwalk.

0:33:530:33:55

How extraordinary. And, of course, after the wedding and, you know,

0:33:550:34:00

so much in the news now, William and Kate, aren't they?

0:34:000:34:03

You've got two copies of it, why's that?

0:34:030:34:06

The top copy is my own copy and the second copy,

0:34:060:34:09

I believe, belongs to William himself.

0:34:090:34:12

I collected it from the table he was sitting at,

0:34:120:34:15

with his party, after they'd left.

0:34:150:34:17

-So that was William's one?

-This is William's copy.

0:34:170:34:20

And it's got his thumbprint on it, just there.

0:34:200:34:23

THEY CHUCKLE

0:34:230:34:26

-I can't believe it. You just walked in here with this.

-Mm.

-Fantastic.

0:34:260:34:30

I didn't think it was going be of any interest, really.

0:34:300:34:33

Well, it is. It may be of value. I couldn't say but you need to see

0:34:330:34:36

-one of our experts. Great.

-Good, thank you very much. Thank you.

0:34:360:34:39

-It was very kindly given to me by an elderly aunt.

-Really? Recently?

0:34:410:34:46

-Um, yes, a few months back.

-And what's her back story with it?

0:34:460:34:49

I mean, just to be given a piece of Moorcroft like this is one thing,

0:34:490:34:53

-but what's the background?

-If I'm honest, I don't know.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:34:530:34:57

Had you always admired it, or did it arrive in out of the blue?

0:34:570:35:00

More or less, yes. I'd never seen it before.

0:35:000:35:02

I was delighted when I opened it.

0:35:020:35:04

Wow. And was there any sign of sentiment about why it was given?

0:35:040:35:07

As a gift? Or was just time to move it on to a new owner?

0:35:070:35:10

Just time to move on, yeah.

0:35:100:35:12

So takes pride of place in your home, I assume?

0:35:120:35:16

-No, in the spare bedroom out of the hands of small children.

-Oh, really?

0:35:160:35:21

-Yeah.

-How small?

-Very small.

-Oh, that small? OK.

-Yes.

0:35:210:35:25

Well, it's probably not a bad idea.

0:35:250:35:28

This is Moorcroft quite clearly, but for me this is...

0:35:280:35:32

this is Moorcroft with just some added essence.

0:35:320:35:35

I mean, Moorcroft laid his hands on every single piece that he made,

0:35:350:35:39

every single piece that was decorated in the factory,

0:35:390:35:42

because he was responsible for drawing the tracing paper designs

0:35:420:35:46

that would then be handed to the outliners.

0:35:460:35:49

They would trace over them, onto the body of the pot to tube line,

0:35:490:35:53

but they were following his line,

0:35:530:35:55

they were following his designs.

0:35:550:35:57

So for me, unlike many other pottery designers

0:35:570:35:59

who just handed their work away,

0:35:590:36:01

there is an essence of William Moorcroft

0:36:010:36:03

in every single piece that he produced.

0:36:030:36:05

-And he never relinquished that, you know.

-OK.

-He stuck with that.

0:36:050:36:09

And this is him on a particularly good day, if you ask my opinion.

0:36:090:36:13

Date-wise, we're somewhere between 1900 and 1905.

0:36:130:36:17

It's that early period where he's found his feet,

0:36:170:36:21

he's working for James Macintyre,

0:36:210:36:24

he's been given this artistic freedom to just go for it,

0:36:240:36:28

and, boy, hasn't he done it here?

0:36:280:36:30

A combination of wonderful shape, beautiful, sinuous handles

0:36:300:36:34

and a pattern that we call "freesia".

0:36:340:36:36

-Freesia, OK.

-Absolutely.

0:36:360:36:38

And not only that, it's freesia on a white ground.

0:36:380:36:41

Now, Moorcroft - it is one of those names,

0:36:410:36:44

it's known the length and breadth of the country -

0:36:440:36:47

we all know it.

0:36:470:36:48

But what a lot of people maybe don't realise

0:36:480:36:50

is quite what's happening to Moorcroft at the moment.

0:36:500:36:54

And I am continually stunned on a daily, weekly, monthly basis

0:36:540:37:00

as I watch these pieces change hands from one person to another.

0:37:000:37:03

There seems to be this never-ending admiration

0:37:030:37:07

and respect for a designer of this calibre.

0:37:070:37:11

So that comes down to the point of,

0:37:110:37:12

what would somebody exchange to take this away from you?

0:37:120:37:16

I sense it would have to be something serious, in fact

0:37:160:37:19

-I sense that you love this.

-I do, although it's in a spare room,

0:37:190:37:23

I do, I love the colour and the fact it's got the three handles.

0:37:230:37:26

But, yeah, it is quite special.

0:37:260:37:27

Well, "special" is absolutely spot-on, perfect word.

0:37:270:37:31

And special to me, means that if you had to go and replace this,

0:37:310:37:36

and go to a specialist dealer, or somebody who really is

0:37:360:37:39

at the top of the game, and the top of the market with this,

0:37:390:37:42

you're going to have to part with about £8,000.

0:37:420:37:46

Well...

0:37:460:37:47

Now, there's a phrase that has emerged, I don't know why,

0:37:510:37:54

over the last few years, which I am sure you've used, I've used,

0:37:540:37:58

everybody here has used - you see it in every gift shop in Britain,

0:37:580:38:02

-which is...

-"Keep calm and carry on."

0:38:020:38:05

And so when I unroll this,

0:38:050:38:08

no-one's going to be surprised at what they see.

0:38:080:38:10

-No.

-Because I'm sure everyone's got one somewhere in their office.

0:38:100:38:16

-You seem to have quite a few of them.

-Yes, yes.

-Why?

0:38:160:38:19

Well, I believe I acquired them

0:38:190:38:22

from my father who was in the Royal Observer Corps.

0:38:220:38:26

I believe that's where my mum and dad actually met.

0:38:260:38:29

The actual background to this famous message runs back to 1940.

0:38:290:38:35

The Germans are about to invade Britain and there was a real fear

0:38:350:38:39

that that was actually to happen, and everybody knows

0:38:390:38:42

if we hadn't won the Battle of Britain, they might have.

0:38:420:38:45

-Yes, yes.

-And every post office, every public body in Britain,

0:38:450:38:50

was issued with posters like this and the orders were,

0:38:500:38:54

the moment the Germans set foot in Britain, the posters go up.

0:38:540:39:00

So what the Government was telling the Great British nation

0:39:000:39:04

was, "Keep calm and carry on."

0:39:040:39:06

Yes.

0:39:060:39:07

And, of course, September 1940, invasion off, posters useless -

0:39:070:39:13

-in the bin.

-Yes.

0:39:130:39:15

And that was the end of the story

0:39:150:39:17

and of course it was then forgotten about.

0:39:170:39:21

Many, many years ago on a completely different Roadshow,

0:39:210:39:25

a lady came who'd been a postmistress

0:39:250:39:28

in a village in a remote part of Britain, and she brought in a couple

0:39:280:39:33

which were the small size and she told me the story.

0:39:330:39:36

She said that she had them ready, drawing pins in hand,

0:39:360:39:39

and, of course, then nothing happened and in fact,

0:39:390:39:41

at the end of that day, she gave me one of those. She said,

0:39:410:39:45

-"I'm going to throw them away, so have one."

-Crivvens.

0:39:450:39:47

And so I did, and I took it home and thought nothing of it.

0:39:470:39:51

This was years ago. Then I read an article in a paper which said that

0:39:510:39:54

this has become so famous because there are no originals,

0:39:540:39:58

all the originals have been thrown away,

0:39:580:40:01

there's only one or two surviving and they're...terribly rare.

0:40:010:40:06

And I thought, "Well, that's a bit odd, I've got one on my wall!"

0:40:060:40:10

And, blow me, you've got one, two, three... How many have you got?

0:40:100:40:14

There's five there - these are the five best ones -

0:40:140:40:16

and approximately 15 in this pile, but I haven't counted them properly

0:40:160:40:21

because I'm scared of damaging them even more than...

0:40:210:40:25

I have to say, these are in very good condition.

0:40:250:40:27

These ones, I can see they've had a harder life.

0:40:270:40:30

So why did you come today?

0:40:300:40:32

Some months ago, last year, I believe, I was watching The One Show

0:40:320:40:37

when there was an article there about a bookshop

0:40:370:40:40

somewhere in England, Barter's Books, who had found a poster in the loft.

0:40:400:40:44

And, of course, after watching that, I thought,

0:40:440:40:47

"Well, I've got about 20 of those.

0:40:470:40:48

I have had another assessment done of the posters but I was told

0:40:480:40:53

they're common as muck, they're worthless,

0:40:530:40:55

and it made me almost think twice about coming today, but I thought,

0:40:550:40:59

"No, I'll go for a second opinion from the respected..."

0:40:590:41:02

OK, I'll give you a second opinion.

0:41:020:41:05

Common as muck is, I have to say, completely untrue

0:41:050:41:09

but I think I read an article in a national newspaper which said,

0:41:090:41:12

"There is only one known survivor." That is also completely untrue.

0:41:120:41:16

So somewhere between those two stories we have the truth.

0:41:160:41:20

The point is, rarity is very important.

0:41:200:41:23

Everyone has forgotten, from the reproductions,

0:41:230:41:27

that there actually was an original.

0:41:270:41:28

-Yes.

-This is the original. This is as issued in 1940.

0:41:280:41:33

Now, do you realise you're probably sitting on

0:41:330:41:35

the world's stock of original "Keep Calm And Carry On" posters?

0:41:350:41:40

I had never thought of it like that.

0:41:400:41:44

I knew they were originals but I never,

0:41:440:41:47

never thought of it in worldly terms.

0:41:470:41:50

-You have the monopoly.

-Wow. Oh, wow.

0:41:500:41:53

Gosh.

0:41:530:41:55

I think if one of these came up for sale, it would fetch £1,000.

0:41:550:42:03

-For one?

-For one. Because they're perceived to be so rare.

0:42:030:42:07

How many have you got, 20 or so?

0:42:070:42:11

20, not all in as good condition as this.

0:42:110:42:13

No. There's an interesting debate here.

0:42:130:42:15

If you've only got one and it's worth £1,000,

0:42:150:42:21

it's worth £1,000.

0:42:210:42:22

If you suddenly say, "Oh, but I've got 19 more,"

0:42:220:42:24

is that another £19,000?

0:42:240:42:27

-Or does the price suddenly collapse?

-Yes, I had thought of that.

0:42:270:42:30

-Because all the under-bidders in the world can now have one.

-Yes.

0:42:300:42:34

Well, the answer is, we don't really know until we try.

0:42:340:42:38

I think you have got a very rare and unusual item.

0:42:380:42:41

Potentially, I don't think you've got £20,000...

0:42:410:42:44

-No.

-..because it doesn't work like that.

-No.

0:42:440:42:47

-But you've got several thousand pounds, possibly £10,000...

-Gosh.

0:42:470:42:51

..if there are enough in good condition.

0:42:510:42:54

I've got another one at home. LAUGHTER

0:42:540:42:56

Keep calm and carry on -

0:43:020:43:03

that could be our motto at the Roadshow, because you never know

0:43:030:43:06

what'll turn up, what the weather's going to throw at us.

0:43:060:43:09

Oh, in case you're wondering about those programmes

0:43:090:43:12

for the fashion show that Kate was at with her transparent dress,

0:43:120:43:15

Paul Atterbury had a look at those and thought probably about £500.

0:43:150:43:19

So not bad, given the lady who brought them had popped in

0:43:190:43:22

for five minutes from the office.

0:43:220:43:24

We've had a great day here at St Andrews.

0:43:240:43:26

Until next time, from all the Roadshow team, bye-bye.

0:43:260:43:29

Fiona Bruce and the team head to Scotland to visit St Andrews University. Amongst the items under scrutiny by the experts are a small bowl believed to have been owned by Bonnie Prince Charlie, early Chinese vases from the Forbidden City, and an extraordinary hoard of posters from World War II.


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