Chenies Manor 2 Antiques Roadshow


Chenies Manor 2

The Antiques Roadshow returns to Chenies Manor, where the team learn of an extraordinary update about an ornate French plant stand last seen on the Roadshow in 1991.


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Transcript


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If you want history and beauty together in one knockout package,

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you've come to the right place.

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We've returned to Chenies Manor in Buckinghamshire,

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and dating from 1460, it's thought to be

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the oldest brick-built domestic dwelling in the country.

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And some of the original paintwork still remains.

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400 years ago, the Earl of Bedford,

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who owned this lovely home, was worried that the plague

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would be carried on prevailing winds from nearby London,

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so when a new extension was added, they came up with a solution.

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And this is it. This wall, which faced the capital,

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had no windows and no doors,

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so not even the slightest breeze could pass through.

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Any that you can see are much more recent additions,

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and this design is just as radical on the inside,

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where its architecture influenced domestic dwellings

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for centuries to come.

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Bedrooms for a start.

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It's the norm nowadays, but for 16th-century England,

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this is probably a first -

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for members of the household to have their own private space,

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their own individual sleeping quarters.

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Each bed chamber had a fireplace, another domestic first,

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and that wouldn't have been possible without the prominent buttresses

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on the exterior wall which incorporated chimney stacks.

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But most surprising of all is this - an en suite privy.

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Now it might look pretty basic, but in the 16th century,

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this was the ultimate luxury.

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I imagine the wind must have whistled up there!

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It was known as "the divine drop".

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Who'd have thought such a barrier to prevent the plague

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would lead to such mod cons

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and the kind of domestic design we live with today?

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There are no barriers to today's visitors,

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who are arriving in force, I'm glad to say.

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Let's go to our specialists, already hard at work in the garden.

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And if you'd like more information about the programme,

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please log on to our website at...

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Well, how appropriate!

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We just happen to be in one of the most beautiful gardens in England

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on a stunningly beautiful day,

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and you bring along a very lean, dare I say, flower seller.

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I need to know how long this flower seller

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has been sharing a life with your good self.

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Well, she shared a life with my mother first of all,

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and we had a flower shop in Hereford,

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so she's always been much appreciated.

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And do you know where your parents purchased her,

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or were they given it?

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They got married in 1931 and bought several ornaments after that,

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so probably about 1932, but I don't know exactly what date it is.

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OK, and if she was to speak to me, she would speak to me in Italiano.

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-Yes.

-Because you and I know that there's a mark on the base

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-telling us that this lady hails from Turin.

-Yeah.

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-And she was made by the famous Lenci factory.

-Yes.

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And the lady responsible for this very stylish lady is Konig Scavini.

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Oh, right.

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And let's just have a look at the gown,

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let's give her a quick twirl...

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-because that is one very chic flower seller.

-Yes.

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-So look at the way the hair's been bobbed as well.

-Yeah.

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Because that is a period dress.

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You can see where the actual skirt itself there is just mid-calf,

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and so from a fashion point of view, they're very exciting.

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-And we'll just have a quick look at the mark, shall we?

-Yes.

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It just says, "Lenci, made in Italy, Torino"

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and that's the original sort of paper label.

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It's always a bonus from a collector's point of view.

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So when it comes to value, I am pretty certain that

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if I wanted to take this girl home, I would go into a gallery

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and have to write a cheque for about

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£5,000.

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Wow. Wow!

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LAUGHTER

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Our daughter, Michelle, is going to be a happy bunny.

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-Can I give you some advice?

-Yes.

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Keep her waiting as long as you can.

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OK, yes.

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-Well, it's really important to look at pictures...

-Yes.

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..and so many people don't.

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And at first glance, you may think this was a Scandinavian picture.

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-I did.

-Oh, you did, did you?

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I did.

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Well, if you look very closely,

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you'll see the signature here says "IF Choultse"

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and that is Ivan Fedorovich Choultse

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-and he was a Russian painter.

-Oh.

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-And he was a Russian painter who was born in 1874.

-Yeah.

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And he died in 1939.

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-So he lived through this amazing period of Russian history.

-Yes.

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He studied in St Petersburg

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where all good Russian artists studied,

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and he became well-known for painting very gentle,

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charming landscapes with great attention to the sort of colouring.

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-Yes.

-So they're usually very bright,

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and he was particularly good at doing sunsets and sunrises,

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and I think we have a lovely example here,

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because what we have is a beautiful landscape

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-with the sun on this mountain top.

-Yes.

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And I think what is so interesting now about Russian art

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is that for the first time - I would say in the last ten years,

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in fact - Russian art has gone from strength to strength.

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The oligarchs and the Russian people are making so much money

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-and they are beginning to buy back their own art.

-Ah.

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-And that's what's so exciting about it.

-Yes, absolutely.

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So it's interesting because Choultse fled the revolution,

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we assume in 1917/18, and came to live in France,

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because he exhibited quite a lot in France in 1920

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and then we know he went to Norway and we know he went to Finland

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and he had various one-man shows around Europe.

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-OK.

-So this could be a Scandinavian view.

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Did you inherit this, or...?

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Yes, it was... My father used to buy,

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and there were things that were just in the house.

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You didn't really take much notice that they were there.

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Mm. Your father bought it because he liked the subject

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rather than the fact he thought,

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"Ooh I'm interested in Russian art," I guess.

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Oh, no, he bought things because he liked the subject.

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Best reason. Because it's by this great Russian artist Choultse,

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I would say it's worth between

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£20,000 and £30,000.

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-Does that give you a surprise?

-OK. Yes, it does.

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But it just illustrates how passionate the Russians are

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about buying art and also, you know,

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how strong this market is at the moment.

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I'm not often lost for words but I am now.

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Thank you very much. I had no idea.

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So what you've brought in is probably the most famous

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piece of British glass that I know about, it really is.

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This is all-singing, all-dancing Whitefriars.

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So what's the link to you?

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Well, we came here today

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because it would have been my mum's birthday. She recently passed away.

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She's had this vase wrapped up

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and she's always, always wanted to come to somewhere

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like the Antiques Roadshow and get it valued,

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and because it was her birthday today,

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my family and I decided we're going to bring it along here.

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-Sweet!

-And do what she would have, would have liked us to do,

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and what she would have liked to have done.

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God, I've got goose bumps. Look, I'm breaking out in 'em.

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-So have I, so have I.

-Yes, wonderful.

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So she's looking down and smiling, I hope.

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But the real connection is my dad was a Whitefriars glass blower.

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-Yes!

-And he worked at Whitefriars from the day he left school,

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which was around about 14, to the day the factory closed in 1980

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in Wealdstone and so that's roughly 30-odd years he worked there.

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He went from being a lowly glass helper, or whatever,

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-up to being a glass blower.

-Master blower.

-A master blower, he was.

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And he was very proud of that, and we were very proud of him.

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Yeah, well, he's not around any more, but this is.

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No, so, it's been wrapped up really for a long time

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and we thought, "Let's get it out." Show it the daylight, so to speak.

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-Well, give that daylight and what does it do?

-It shines.

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I mean, I think that's visible from outer space, isn't it?

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I mean, that is the most... What's interesting about these is,

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is that they were almost universally bought by women.

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These were not blokey pieces,

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they were bought by women in the late '60s - the date of this

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is what, '66, '67 - and they were bought by women who were liberated

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and saying, "I'm going to put my pin money into buying something for me."

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You can see sort of why it's called "the banjo"

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but it's not very banjo-esque.

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So how are you going to sort this?

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-You say you've got this entire tribe.

-Oh, I don't know.

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Who's going to get it? It's the best bit.

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Well, that's always what my mum said.

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You know, "You can't divide it into three pieces."

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So that was why she always wanted to get it valued.

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But I don't know, we're kind of quite attached to Whitefriars.

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We've got a lot of Whitefriars bits and bobs at home as well.

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But I think these are just pulsating pieces that just work,

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all designed by Geoffrey Baxter, and they still work,

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and not a lot of stuff does, from that kind of date.

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So look, the current market price of these is

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700-800 quid, that's what it would cost.

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And it's sentimental to us.

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Mum and Dad, isn't it?

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It's my mum and dad, yeah. Means a lot.

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Yeah.

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This is a magnificent clock.

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It's all brass-mounted.

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You've got these fabulous brass caryatids down the side.

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You've got this wonderful

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brass dial, fully engraved,

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and then you've got these spectacular large enamel dials

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with the subsidiaries at the top.

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The subsidiaries are the extra dials,

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so you have your music selection, your strike/silent

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and this signature at the top.

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So where does it come into your life?

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I bought this clock in 1993

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when I was working for the British Council in Beijing.

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And one of the girls I worked with happened to mention one day

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that her grandmother had a musical box and was quite keen to sell it.

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I eventually went out to the west of Beijing

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and, if you can imagine, a very simple dwelling.

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All she had in this single dwelling house was a little coke stove

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in the corner, and a piece of furniture which looked as if

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it had been made out of orange boxes or something.

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And sitting on top of this piece of furniture was this clock

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with a cloth over the top.

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And I took the cloth off,

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and I just couldn't believe what I was looking at,

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bearing in mind the environment it was in.

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And I thought, well, it's not a musical box.

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The old lady had only ever pulled the strings to play the music.

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She'd never used it as a clock.

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And after a bit of negotiation, we eventually managed to buy it.

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Well, I think that's a fantastic story

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and the tune is very, very pretty.

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CLOCK CHIMING

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Can I ask you, what did you pay for it?

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I think it was probably around about £1,000.

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You might think actually finding a clock

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-like this in China is quite unusual.

-Yeah.

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You know, considering it's from 1760.

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The maker, Thomas Best of London, is recorded working

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around the sort of the mid to the late 18th century,

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so that's during the reign of George III.

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Also at that period, the Emperor was actually a huge collector of clocks.

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You can go to the palace - the Forbidden City -

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and you can see an outstanding collection of clocks,

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-one of the best in the world.

-Right.

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Traders at that time were desperate to trade with China,

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so they would actually give clocks as gifts to the Emperor

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-and to dignitaries to buy favours.

-Right.

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And so the Chinese really loved the English clocks.

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They had their own clockmakers copy similar English style,

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but what they particularly liked were musical clocks

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and big, grand, ornate clocks, and this would have been

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-magnificent and the Chinese now are still buying them.

-Really?

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They are very interested in English clocks, particularly musical clocks,

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and you paid the equivalent of £1,000 for it.

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If it was in an auction, I think a sensible estimate

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would be in the order of

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-£15,000 to £20,000.

-Really?

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My...

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Well. That was a good buy, then.

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When the Antiques Roadshow visited Cleethorpes back in 1991,

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our ceramics expert, Eric Knowles, spotted a jardiniere -

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essentially a posh flowerpot -

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that belonged to Terry Norrish, and had been in his family since 1946.

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Well, it was bought in a job lot by my father

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straight after the war with two vases

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and a couple of pieces of furniture.

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And that's all I can tell you, it just came into the family from that.

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It's by the firm of Christofle, a top French metalworkers

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and of course they were a top maker of silverware,

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right through into this century.

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Date-wise, here is the date - 1874.

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And by the 1860s-'70s, the influence of Japanese art

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was creeping into Western art,

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and the French were one of the first to pick up on it,

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and so this type of object is regarded as being Japonaise.

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It's a magnificent object,

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it's the best I've ever seen on the Antiques Roadshow.

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Welcome back to Terry Norrish and Eric Knowles.

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Now the reason your jardiniere's not here is because you've sold it.

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But before we get to that, tell me what happened after Cleethorpes,

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all the... What? 20-odd years ago now.

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Well, we were a lot more careful when we took it home,

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because we brought it in the back of a pick-up, and so taking it home,

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we did bring some bags to sort of make sure it didn't roll about.

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And it didn't always get treated with the respect it deserved,

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-did it, Terry?

-Erm, no.

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I didn't know until we put it up for sale,

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that the kids had used it as a goalpost an odd time or two.

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-No!

-They played pool around it.

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Now why did you think it was so special? Tell us a bit about it.

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Well, this is the actual auction catalogue, prior to being sold.

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First of all, you've got this decoration

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on the actual jardiniere itself,

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which is a sort of champleve technique.

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That's where the actual metal is cut away and the enamels are laid in.

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On top of that, you've got these wonderful Manchurian cranes,

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so you've got a sense of movement,

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and then you get these magnificent handles which, you know,

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look as though they've almost got a Samurai connection.

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Plus, it had a label on it saying it had been shown by Christofle

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at the 1874 exhibition, gave it such a remarkable pedigree.

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And there's even a photograph of it in situ,

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at the actual exhibition, so it just brings it alive.

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Well, let's have a look at what you valued it at.

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I mean, have you given thought to the value yourself? Have you got it insured?

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Um... Well, various friends have looked at it

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and they've all sort of said Oriental and hazard guesses from about £2,000.

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Right.

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Well, if... At auction, I would probably see the bidding going -

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starting at 2,000, going to 3,000

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4,000, 5,000, 6,000, 7,000 -

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at £7,000 - 8,000, 9,000.

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£10,000, at £10,000, at £10,000, I think,

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it's fair to say, you just might see it go.

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I don't know if I'm more astonished by the valuation

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or how much you've both changed.

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-What about that moustache?

-Yeah.

-My goodness me!

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So you held on to it then for 20 years.

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-You decided to sell it.

-Yeah.

-What? A couple of years ago now?

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-Yeah, yes.

-What did it sell for?

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£560,000.

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-ALL GASP

-5...! 560,000?!

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-Yeah.

-Crikey!

-Yeah.

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So what happened in the interim?

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Well, you valued it... I mean, did you spectacularly under-value it?

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-Or has the market completely changed?

-Well, it is so different,

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but it's a very good question to ask, that, isn't it?

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Er... But the truth of the matter is, way back then,

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there was not the same demand for Japonaise examples.

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So it's a market that has literally sort of sprung out of nowhere.

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It's fair to say that my estimate -

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it may seem a little bit on the low side -

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however, the auction estimate

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-was something like £60,000 to £80,000 a couple of years ago.

-Yeah.

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So if you think that it made half a million pounds

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more than the auction estimate...

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Because the right buyer just happened to turn up.

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-The right under-bidder was there with the right buyer.

-Right.

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So, um, nobody could possibly offer that today

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and give you a cast-iron guarantee

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-that you would get the same sort of money now.

-No.

0:18:260:18:28

Wow, well, just as well you held on to it for 20-odd years.

0:18:280:18:32

-Well, absolutely.

-I'd say that was incredibly prescient of you.

0:18:320:18:34

You obviously had the crystal ball,

0:18:340:18:36

and that's a life-changing sum of money. What have you done with it?

0:18:360:18:40

Um, give a lot of it away actually.

0:18:400:18:43

-Did you?

-Yeah, to family.

0:18:430:18:45

We've had some very good holidays, hence the sun tan.

0:18:450:18:49

A nice car... There's a little bit left. We're enjoying it very much.

0:18:490:18:54

Well, I'm sure you're glad you came along to that Roadshow

0:18:540:18:57

-all those years back...

-I certainly am.

-..in 1991.

0:18:570:18:59

It made Eric's day, he's been talking about it ever since,

0:18:590:19:03

and how lovely to see you again.

0:19:030:19:05

Well, thank you very much for asking. It's lovely.

0:19:050:19:07

Normally, when you see a cheeseboard,

0:19:090:19:11

it's some lovely, bucolic landscape, Constable-esque

0:19:110:19:14

-or beautiful flora and fauna.

-Yeah.

0:19:140:19:17

You've got a cheeseboard of the building of the M1.

0:19:170:19:21

I have used it several times at parties,

0:19:210:19:23

which makes quite a good conversational piece and, um...

0:19:230:19:27

Gosh, they must be riveting, those dinner parties(!)

0:19:270:19:30

Chatting about the M1.

0:19:300:19:31

-You never see it that empty these days, do you?

-No.

0:19:310:19:34

Here's a pair of two-handled vases that I'm sure get noticed

0:19:340:19:39

-when people come into your home.

-Absolutely.

0:19:390:19:41

You've got a hint of psychedelia, almost.

0:19:410:19:44

It's the sort of perfect present - had he been alive -

0:19:440:19:46

-for Jimi Hendrix.

-Yeah, absolutely.

0:19:460:19:50

I was excited, but it's not my thing and I didn't want to unpack it

0:19:520:19:56

and potentially damage its value, so...

0:19:560:19:58

OK, well, let's have a look, what is it?

0:19:580:20:01

Trains.

0:20:010:20:02

I mean, it's never... Are you telling me it's never been undone?

0:20:040:20:07

Er, as far as they know, it's never been unpacked.

0:20:070:20:10

I had a quick look in the engine one because that's been opened.

0:20:100:20:13

-OK, let's have a look.

-But I just didn't want to disturb it.

0:20:130:20:16

-I mean, it's like Christmas, isn't it?

-It's unbelievable.

0:20:160:20:19

Ah, it's got all the original packing too. Wow, fantastic.

0:20:210:20:25

-So is the owner here?

-Owner's here.

0:20:250:20:27

And, I mean, we've just got to look at it in closer detail.

0:20:270:20:30

I mean, I don't want to do it here but we can get a table

0:20:300:20:32

-and put some things out.

-Exactly.

0:20:320:20:34

But, you know, to have them untouched.

0:20:340:20:36

-Brilliant, I'm so excited.

-So exciting. Brilliant.

0:20:360:20:39

Well, I think this is the prettiest little girl

0:20:420:20:44

that I've seen for a long time.

0:20:440:20:46

What do you think?

0:20:460:20:47

-She is pretty, isn't she?

-Yeah.

0:20:480:20:50

Did you go out and buy this?

0:20:500:20:53

No, my grandma gave it to me.

0:20:530:20:55

Oh, right, yeah.

0:20:550:20:56

Why did she choose you to have this pretty picture?

0:20:560:20:58

Um, because it looks quite like me.

0:20:580:21:01

I think it looks almost exactly like you,

0:21:010:21:02

-except the hair's a bit different.

-Yeah.

0:21:020:21:04

-Yeah. I like the way her dress matches her eyes as well.

-Yeah.

0:21:040:21:07

-Did you notice that?

-Yeah.

-And then in the background,

0:21:070:21:10

-the leaves are sort of greeny-blue, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:21:100:21:12

They go with it too.

0:21:120:21:14

Really nice. How old do you think she is?

0:21:140:21:17

Um, nine or ten.

0:21:170:21:18

-Nine or ten, younger than you. You're 11, aren't you?

-Yeah.

0:21:180:21:21

Yeah. Was it Grandpa's picture?

0:21:210:21:23

Yeah, it was my grandad's, yeah.

0:21:230:21:25

Was it one of his favourites?

0:21:250:21:26

Yeah, it was... Yeah, it was his favourite.

0:21:260:21:29

-Yeah, and I think also that she's quite a poor girl, isn't she?

-Yeah.

0:21:290:21:33

-Don't you think?

-Yeah.

0:21:330:21:35

Because she's not wearing a very expensive dress, by the looks of it.

0:21:350:21:39

-Do you think she might have been the sort of gardener's daughter or something?

-Yeah.

0:21:390:21:42

Yeah, anyway it's by a woman artist called Helen Allingham

0:21:420:21:46

and she apparently, by all accounts, was an extremely nice woman.

0:21:460:21:49

Her husband was called William Allingham and he was a poet,

0:21:490:21:53

and this is about 150 years ago,

0:21:530:21:56

and they lived together in Chelsea,

0:21:560:21:58

where they knew lots of other artists,

0:21:580:22:00

and they were a very fashionable set.

0:22:000:22:03

Usually, she painted pictures that were much bigger

0:22:030:22:05

and they had cottages with pretty, little roses going up them,

0:22:050:22:09

a few children, some ducks and very nice roofs.

0:22:090:22:13

She always painted really nice roofs.

0:22:130:22:15

But her little portraits of children

0:22:150:22:17

are the nicest things you'll ever see.

0:22:170:22:18

They're so sympathetic.

0:22:180:22:20

I've got to talk about money.

0:22:200:22:22

RUPERT LAUGHS

0:22:220:22:24

That's my job, you know, I've got to tell you how much it's worth.

0:22:240:22:27

Have a few guesses, come on. What do you think?

0:22:270:22:29

Um, 100?

0:22:290:22:32

-100, as much as that?

-Yeah.

0:22:320:22:34

RUPERT INHALES DEEPLY

0:22:340:22:36

No, I think we'll... I think we'll go with 2,000.

0:22:360:22:39

WOMAN GASPS

0:22:390:22:40

-£2,000.

-What? SHE CHUCKLES

0:22:400:22:45

-That's a lot, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:22:450:22:47

And, in fact, I might say that it's worth £2,000 to £3,000.

0:22:470:22:50

-Whoa!

-Yeah, it could be because everyone's going to love that.

0:22:500:22:53

Everyone does love that.

0:22:530:22:55

Such a pretty thing.

0:22:550:22:56

-You're going to treasure it for ever though, aren't you?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:22:560:22:59

This is the most extraordinary collection,

0:23:020:23:04

in the most extraordinary condition.

0:23:040:23:07

Now, I would say that you are much too young to have had this yourself.

0:23:070:23:11

-Ah, yes.

-So where, where did it come from?

0:23:110:23:14

Well, it belonged to the husband of my godmother.

0:23:140:23:18

-OK.

-And it was put together...ooh, between the two world wars.

0:23:180:23:24

It was packed away when they got married, and, in fact,

0:23:240:23:27

that was in 1928 and there it stayed, so it was in a box for 70 years.

0:23:270:23:34

-It's a bit like Sleeping Beauty.

-Mm!

0:23:340:23:36

Did you awake it with a kiss when you opened the box?

0:23:360:23:38

Er, with some surprise,

0:23:380:23:40

but I didn't kiss it.

0:23:400:23:41

LAUGHTER

0:23:410:23:43

Well, opening this box

0:23:430:23:46

was a bit like getting into Sleeping Beauty's castle

0:23:460:23:49

because you felt that nothing had been touched.

0:23:490:23:52

I mean, I felt slightly in awe of even undoing the packaging

0:23:520:23:59

-because the tissue paper has never been unwrapped.

-No.

0:23:590:24:03

But what this box tells us

0:24:030:24:04

-is really a history of the British toy train industry.

-Yeah.

0:24:040:24:08

Because you've got great names, you've got Hornby,

0:24:080:24:11

you've got Bassett-Lowke, you've got Leeds - the top three,

0:24:110:24:15

really, of the locomotive and rolling stock makers.

0:24:150:24:21

Before Hornby, there was a company called Bassett-Lowke,

0:24:210:24:25

and Bassett-Lowke set up his toy train company,

0:24:250:24:30

really looking at the success of the big German companies,

0:24:300:24:34

particularly Marklin and Carrette and Bing,

0:24:340:24:37

that were so successfully exporting into the UK.

0:24:370:24:41

But he looked at that and he said,

0:24:410:24:43

"Hmm, perhaps I can do a bit of that."

0:24:430:24:45

So, cleverly, he got those three big makers to start making things for...

0:24:450:24:51

particularly for Bassett-Lowke, which he then retailed.

0:24:510:24:54

And we've got one of those locomotives here which, um,

0:24:540:24:58

I don't even... Well, I am going to take it out,

0:24:580:25:01

but I do feel that I'm the first person to have handled this train

0:25:010:25:05

for... Well, decades and decades and decades.

0:25:050:25:08

-Well, yes.

-I feel incredibly privileged,

0:25:080:25:11

so here we have a precursor locomotive,

0:25:110:25:14

a 4-4-0, with its...tender here,

0:25:140:25:20

and when I say it is new, mint condition,

0:25:200:25:24

you know, that's often used by auctioneers to describe something

0:25:240:25:29

-that's pretty good.

-Mm.

0:25:290:25:30

-But actually this is completely mint condition.

-It is, isn't it?

0:25:300:25:33

I've never seen anything like...

0:25:330:25:35

It's as if it's come straight off Gamages' toy shelf.

0:25:350:25:39

Quite extraordinary.

0:25:390:25:41

You can imagine, after the First World War,

0:25:410:25:44

-there was a certain anti-German feeling...

-Mm.

0:25:440:25:47

..and that really was the open door for Hornby - for Frank Hornby -

0:25:470:25:54

to push against, to create his own range of British-made locomotives.

0:25:540:26:01

Mm-hm.

0:26:010:26:02

Frank Hornby, everybody knows, he started Meccano,

0:26:020:26:06

that was his start in the toy business

0:26:060:26:10

and in 1920, he began to make toy trains, and again,

0:26:100:26:14

we've got a very early Hornby train here. Lovely box - look at this.

0:26:140:26:20

Mm, that's right.

0:26:200:26:22

I mean, sort of fake leather box

0:26:220:26:23

with this lovely embossed writing on it.

0:26:230:26:26

I mean, as a kid, can you imagine getting that and then the excitement

0:26:260:26:29

of lifting the lid and seeing that? I mean, it's just fabulous.

0:26:290:26:36

It's a clockwork loco, obviously,

0:26:360:26:38

and it's got the ML Ltd, Meccano Limited,

0:26:380:26:44

on the front there.

0:26:440:26:46

It has to be from those first years in the 1920s - 1921, 1922 perhaps,

0:26:460:26:51

so right at the start of Frank Hornby's reign

0:26:510:26:55

as the king of British toy trains.

0:26:550:27:00

When it comes to value, obviously, I can see these,

0:27:000:27:03

and I'm calculating what these might be.

0:27:030:27:05

I have glimpsed, without unpacking, I've glimpsed

0:27:050:27:08

what the other boxes contain.

0:27:080:27:10

And I wouldn't hesitate to say that it would fetch, as a collection...

0:27:110:27:16

-..£10,000.

-Would it? Mm!

0:27:170:27:21

And, I mean, I may be a tad conservative on that.

0:27:210:27:25

Mm!

0:27:250:27:27

That's a lot of money.

0:27:270:27:28

You know, the Chinese call jade the stone of heaven.

0:27:330:27:39

How have you come by these things?

0:27:390:27:41

Well, I was in Hong Kong in the RAF in the '50s

0:27:410:27:44

and as we came to leave, after two and half years there,

0:27:440:27:47

we had some spare cash

0:27:470:27:49

and so we decided to invest them in some Chinese jade

0:27:490:27:53

and so we bought these three pieces

0:27:530:27:56

-just before we left Hong Kong in 1958.

-So 1958. Wow, what's that?

0:27:560:28:01

-56 years ago?

-I guess. Yes.

0:28:010:28:05

The monkey together with the peach

0:28:050:28:08

-is a symbol in Chinese for longevity.

-Right.

0:28:080:28:13

-Oh, well...

-You've had them 56 years.

0:28:130:28:15

That's right, yes. I'm no spring chicken now!

0:28:150:28:18

This one is a wonderful combination of wrapped lotus leaves

0:28:180:28:22

and there's a little flower, lotus flower on the side,

0:28:220:28:24

and, of course, lotuses grow up through thick, oozy, black mud

0:28:240:28:28

-and out comes a perfect white and pink flower.

-Ah.

0:28:280:28:31

So they represent purity, and so you see

0:28:310:28:34

the goddess Guanyin sitting on a lotus throne,

0:28:340:28:38

you see carvings of Buddha on a lotus throne.

0:28:380:28:42

This third one here, the shape is taken actually from the Tang dynasty,

0:28:420:28:46

which was 618 to 907 AD,

0:28:460:28:49

so back in the classical period of Chinese history,

0:28:490:28:53

and the shape is supposed to represent a mallow flower.

0:28:530:28:57

Right. This one, we're told, probably would be used

0:28:570:29:03

to go to the temple and make a libation to the gods.

0:29:030:29:07

I think you're quite right with this one.

0:29:070:29:09

-It should be... It's a libation cup.

-Mm.

0:29:090:29:11

These two, actually, I think, are objects off a scholar's table.

0:29:110:29:15

They're water pots for washing brushes.

0:29:150:29:18

Right, right. Not to hold the ink?

0:29:180:29:21

-Not to hold the ink. The ink is a solid block.

-Of course.

0:29:210:29:24

And you grind it up but you need to add water in order to make the ink,

0:29:240:29:28

in order to practise your calligraphy,

0:29:280:29:30

so they're wonderful scholar's objects.

0:29:300:29:32

I think it's a very nice choice of things to bring back from Hong Kong.

0:29:320:29:36

Yes, well, we like them very much and my daughter says,

0:29:360:29:38

"If you leave me anything, Dad, leave me these three pieces."

0:29:380:29:42

Oh, fantastic.

0:29:420:29:43

-One thing we didn't talk about is the date of them.

-Yes.

0:29:430:29:47

Um... Dating jade is never an easy thing to do, but it's based on

0:29:470:29:52

the type of stone that's used and also on the style of the carving.

0:29:520:29:57

The quality of the carving of all of these is good.

0:29:570:30:01

The type of stone used suggests that these date from

0:30:020:30:05

some time at the end of the 18th century or just...

0:30:050:30:08

Or into the middle of the 19th century,

0:30:080:30:10

so they're late Qianlong period or early Jiaqing.

0:30:100:30:13

Did they cost much then?

0:30:130:30:15

-Um, I think it was £20.

-£20?

-Mm.

0:30:150:30:19

Well, when it comes to the value,

0:30:190:30:20

I think this one here - the libation cup -

0:30:200:30:24

would be 2,000.

0:30:240:30:26

The peach and the monkey,

0:30:260:30:27

4,000.

0:30:270:30:28

This one - because of the colour of the stone - I think probably

0:30:280:30:32

£8,000.

0:30:320:30:34

Good heavens!

0:30:340:30:36

HE LAUGHS

0:30:360:30:38

Well, that's a lot more than I was expecting, I must say.

0:30:380:30:41

Collectively, round about £14,000.

0:30:410:30:45

My word!

0:30:450:30:46

So here we have an album of costume sketches,

0:30:490:30:53

and the album is for a very well-known designer,

0:30:530:30:58

-William Ivor Beddoes.

-Yes.

0:30:580:31:01

I see they're inscribed here, to, "Dear Gwen."

0:31:010:31:03

That was his mother, who, um, was really interested in Red Shoes

0:31:030:31:08

because she used to be a ballet dancer, so he put all these together

0:31:080:31:11

in a book and gave it to her for her birthday in 1952.

0:31:110:31:15

And what, what's Gwen's relation to yourself?

0:31:150:31:17

-My mother-in-law.

-She was your mother-in-law.

-Mm.

0:31:170:31:21

OK, well, let's say a little bit about the artist.

0:31:210:31:23

He's a very interesting character.

0:31:230:31:25

-He was what you might call a Renaissance man.

-Yes.

0:31:250:31:28

He was completely self-taught. He was a poet, a designer, an artist.

0:31:280:31:33

Yes, yes.

0:31:330:31:34

-A self-taught musician.

-Yes.

0:31:340:31:36

I believe he was a drummer in a lot of the silent films.

0:31:360:31:40

Yes. And then my father-in-law, who was a sound man at Shepperton,

0:31:400:31:46

got him a job at Shepperton and this is how he ended up doing all this.

0:31:460:31:51

The Red Shoes, that iconic film of 1948 with Moira Shearer,

0:31:510:31:55

-where... This is his most famous film, I understand?

-Yes.

0:31:550:32:00

And these are his original sketches.

0:32:000:32:03

-Yes.

-For the film. Do you have a favourite?

0:32:030:32:07

I think he's my favourite.

0:32:070:32:08

That's... Obviously, The Red Shoes

0:32:080:32:11

was loosely based on a Hans Christian Andersen tale about the...

0:32:110:32:15

-That's right.

-..ballet dancer who saw the red shoes in a shop window,

0:32:150:32:19

-tried them on.

-Yeah.

-And then basically she couldn't stop dancing,

0:32:190:32:22

she danced herself to death.

0:32:220:32:24

-He went on to make other films, obviously.

-Yes.

0:32:240:32:27

Another major one was Tales Of Hoffman in the early 1950s.

0:32:270:32:29

Yes, and then he did the Space Odyssey and...

0:32:290:32:32

Exactly, you know, his career spanned decades.

0:32:320:32:35

I think he worked right up until the 1970s on films like Star Wars.

0:32:350:32:38

Yes, he did Star Wars, yes.

0:32:380:32:40

So would you be surprised to know that one watercolour design

0:32:400:32:45

from the Red Shoes sold at auction just a few years ago?

0:32:450:32:49

Oh, did it?

0:32:490:32:50

It did. They rarely... There's only two that have ever come up for sale.

0:32:500:32:54

-And it was far more detailed than this.

-Yes.

0:32:540:32:57

However, it sold for £1,800.

0:32:570:33:01

My goodness, yes.

0:33:010:33:02

I think, given that these are not quite as detailed as that,

0:33:030:33:06

but there are so many of them, you know, they've got to be worth

0:33:060:33:09

£200 to £400 each.

0:33:090:33:11

You know, we're probably looking at a collective value of

0:33:110:33:14

£4,000 to £5,000 on the album.

0:33:140:33:16

Well, we're never going to get rid of it, so...

0:33:160:33:19

We'll keep it in the family, definitely.

0:33:190:33:21

We see quite a few letters written during the First World War

0:33:380:33:42

to be opened in the event of the writer's death,

0:33:420:33:46

but when I saw this,

0:33:460:33:47

I thought it was the most moving letter I had ever seen.

0:33:470:33:52

-This was written to your grandmother.

-Yes.

0:33:520:33:54

I can't actually get through it, so I'm going to ask you to read it out.

0:33:540:33:57

I don't know if I can.

0:33:570:33:59

OK. Well, it was sent from the First Hampshire Regiment

0:33:590:34:02

on October the 4th, 1916.

0:34:020:34:04

And he says, "My darling Vera,

0:34:040:34:07

"by this you will know that I have been killed.

0:34:070:34:11

"I meant to ask you to be engaged to me,

0:34:110:34:13

"but when I was on leave, I was too frightened to say anything.

0:34:130:34:17

"I loved you very, very much and would have done anything for you.

0:34:170:34:21

"However, we may meet in another life.

0:34:210:34:24

"With best love, ever your own loving boy, Harry."

0:34:240:34:28

-I know.

-I've read it so many times.

0:34:310:34:33

Oh, my goodness, it's just...

0:34:330:34:35

And also it just talks of...

0:34:360:34:38

..a love lost, hopes dashed,

0:34:390:34:42

a life that could have been lived and never was.

0:34:420:34:45

Yes, and, of course, if he had lived, I wouldn't be here,

0:34:450:34:47

because she wouldn't have married someone else afterwards.

0:34:470:34:50

How did you know about this letter?

0:34:500:34:52

Did your grandmother talk to you about it?

0:34:520:34:54

I had a suitcase of old memorabilia from my grandmother's after she died,

0:34:540:34:57

and when I went through it, with all the other rather mundane things,

0:34:570:35:01

there was this letter.

0:35:010:35:03

I remembered seeing a photograph and I was sure it said "Harry"

0:35:030:35:06

but the album, I have no longer got it, it's with another relative,

0:35:060:35:09

and so I e-mailed them and said,

0:35:090:35:11

"I'm sure there's a picture, 1916, of someone called Harry."

0:35:110:35:14

And there was, and she e-mailed that and then she e-mailed someone,

0:35:140:35:18

another cousin in Australia,

0:35:180:35:20

who said, "I don't believe it.

0:35:200:35:22

"On Gran's deathbed, she gave me this locket

0:35:220:35:24

"and she said it was of someone who she was engaged to."

0:35:240:35:28

-Well, she wasn't quite engaged...

-He was too frightened to ask.

0:35:280:35:31

But he wanted to be, and she got a picture of that locket,

0:35:310:35:34

which she sent to me, and this was him, and this was her.

0:35:340:35:37

And how old was he when he died? Did you manage to work that out?

0:35:370:35:40

-20.

-20.

-Yes.

0:35:400:35:42

And what might have been and the fact that she had this locket

0:35:420:35:45

on her death bed with his photograph in.

0:35:450:35:48

-Yes, because she'd harboured that desire for ever.

-All her life.

0:35:480:35:51

All her life, yes, and she was 91 or 92 when she died.

0:35:510:35:54

Well, she obviously loved him just as much

0:35:540:35:56

-if she kept this locket all her life.

-Yes.

0:35:560:36:00

This is one of my great aunts, Elizabeth Leather,

0:36:020:36:06

who, when she separated from her husband,

0:36:060:36:09

had to find a means of existence

0:36:090:36:12

and she joined the American White Star Line

0:36:120:36:15

and served on many of their ships,

0:36:150:36:18

the Olympic, the Britannic and so on and so forth, but more interestingly,

0:36:180:36:21

she was on the Titanic on its maiden voyage.

0:36:210:36:26

She survived.

0:36:260:36:27

She escaped in Boat 16, was picked up by the Carpathia

0:36:270:36:33

and returned with 21 of the 23 female crew, two of whom were lost.

0:36:330:36:41

I suppose the female crew were all first-class stewardesses.

0:36:410:36:45

Yes, they were first-class stewardesses.

0:36:450:36:47

-So that made it easier for them to escape.

-Yes.

0:36:470:36:50

And I gather she rowed for hours.

0:36:500:36:52

She rowed for two hours...

0:36:520:36:53

She insisted on rowing in the boat for two hours.

0:36:530:36:57

-And she was in her 50s by this point.

-She was 51.

0:36:570:36:59

And they were not short oars. It's not like a skiff on the Thames.

0:36:590:37:02

No. Well, she said that she wanted to do her bit,

0:37:020:37:06

and also to try and keep warm.

0:37:060:37:08

Well, I think that's very sensible, yes, yes.

0:37:080:37:11

She wouldn't have been particularly well-to-do, I mean, she wouldn't...

0:37:110:37:15

-No.

-She had to go out and work.

0:37:150:37:17

Particularly after the Titanic,

0:37:170:37:18

because the White Star Line cancelled everybody's employment...

0:37:180:37:21

-Yes.

-..the following day.

0:37:210:37:23

She didn't have a family.

0:37:230:37:25

When she died in 1937,

0:37:250:37:27

she bequeathed the two items to my mother.

0:37:270:37:30

I've been struggling for about ten years now to find out a bit more

0:37:300:37:35

about the medal, which is in memory of Titanic.

0:37:350:37:40

And we've got a little locket here which has got her initials, EML.

0:37:400:37:44

That's right, she was wearing that on the night of the disaster.

0:37:440:37:47

The interesting thing is that this memorial medal is nine-carat gold.

0:37:470:37:53

It is indeed, with a pearl in the middle.

0:37:530:37:55

And if I just turn it round,

0:37:550:37:57

-we can see there that it's made by Vaughtons of Birmingham.

-Yes.

0:37:570:38:01

And it's inscribed, "April 15th, 1912",

0:38:010:38:04

so it's been produced by somebody

0:38:040:38:09

to give to these people.

0:38:090:38:12

I can't help thinking that she would never have commissioned it.

0:38:120:38:15

She wouldn't have been able to commission it, or purchase it.

0:38:150:38:18

Obviously, the first thing I did was to go back to Vaughtons,

0:38:180:38:21

who produced it, and find out, if I could, how many they made

0:38:210:38:25

and who it was made for, and by, and so on.

0:38:250:38:28

And tragically, they informed me that just before the Second World War,

0:38:280:38:32

they'd run out of storage space for their office material

0:38:320:38:35

and they'd destroyed everything.

0:38:350:38:36

Gosh.

0:38:360:38:37

One hopes that perhaps it was made by a grateful passenger

0:38:370:38:42

who gave them to the staff who were survivors as a memento,

0:38:420:38:48

-and as a thank you.

-It's a possibility.

0:38:480:38:50

Well, it would be nice to think that.

0:38:500:38:52

Titanic is the most extraordinary sort of maritime story, really.

0:38:520:38:58

The locket, with the evidence that it was on board the Titanic

0:38:580:39:02

on that night, it's going to be worth several thousand pounds.

0:39:020:39:05

-Oh!

-The memorial pendant... They have turned up,

0:39:060:39:11

-but we know whose this one was and that always makes a difference.

-Yes.

0:39:110:39:15

It's worth about 2,000, £2,500.

0:39:150:39:18

So, in all, there's about

0:39:200:39:22

-£4,000 or £5,000 worth.

-Mm.

0:39:220:39:25

Amazing.

0:39:250:39:26

This is the finest small English mantle clock that I've ever seen

0:39:290:39:34

on the Roadshow.

0:39:340:39:35

Good Lord.

0:39:350:39:37

It's an exceptional thing

0:39:370:39:39

and it must have fairly exceptional provenance, so how did you get it?

0:39:390:39:43

Well, it was evidently given by Queen Victoria

0:39:430:39:47

to a lady-in-waiting, and when she was a very old lady,

0:39:470:39:50

she gave it to my next-door neighbour,

0:39:500:39:53

who happened to be a deputy director of the Bank of Scotland,

0:39:530:39:56

and it came down, through his family, to me.

0:39:560:39:59

Right, well, it makes absolute sense.

0:39:590:40:01

This is just the sort of thing that the Queen would have ordered

0:40:010:40:07

-and given as presents to those very close to her.

-Good Lord.

0:40:070:40:12

The thing is signed by Charles Frodsham

0:40:120:40:15

-with their Strand address...

-Mm-hm.

0:40:150:40:18

..and I'm very much hoping

0:40:180:40:20

that it will be fully signed on the back plate.

0:40:200:40:22

-Do you ever open this?

-No.

0:40:220:40:24

So you don't really look at it too frequently?

0:40:240:40:26

Er, no. SHE LAUGHS

0:40:260:40:27

OK. Well, there it is, the full signature,

0:40:270:40:32

Arnold... Charles Frodsham, 84 Strand

0:40:320:40:36

and then the number down there.

0:40:360:40:37

Right. Well, it's always been referred to as "the Frodsham clock".

0:40:370:40:41

Right, well, Frodsham in 1843 took over the business premises

0:40:410:40:48

and the good name of John Roger Arnold, and for 15 years,

0:40:480:40:52

the company was referred to as Arnold and Frodsham.

0:40:520:40:54

And then Charles Frodsham started really on his own,

0:40:540:40:58

but only made the finest things.

0:40:580:41:00

And this is so exceptional because of the size,

0:41:000:41:05

and just look at the quality of it.

0:41:050:41:09

It's sensational.

0:41:090:41:11

The dial is as perfect as you'd get.

0:41:110:41:16

-Gosh.

-Beautifully engraved, signed on that lovely annular chapter ring,

0:41:160:41:21

and the hands are cut-out spade hands.

0:41:210:41:25

The finest English clock work.

0:41:250:41:27

Now, I'm here to tell you the price.

0:41:270:41:30

You must have a thing like this insured.

0:41:300:41:33

Roughly what's it insured for?

0:41:330:41:34

I don't think it is.

0:41:340:41:36

-Seriously?

-No, it lives in a cupboard.

0:41:360:41:39

RICHARD LAUGHS

0:41:390:41:40

I honestly don't know what to say.

0:41:400:41:43

Um... All I can tell you is that the last one of these...

0:41:430:41:47

Yes.

0:41:470:41:49

..which had a number just two removed in sequence from yours -

0:41:490:41:53

-and we're talking round about 1845 here...

-Right.

0:41:530:41:56

..not a lot either side of that -

0:41:560:41:59

was sold at auction

0:41:590:42:01

for £42,000.

0:42:010:42:03

You are joking?!

0:42:030:42:05

Now I'm not saying that yours is going to do quite that,

0:42:050:42:07

but it's going to do

0:42:070:42:09

at least 30,000 to 35,000.

0:42:090:42:10

Good grief!

0:42:100:42:12

With that Royal provenance, the finest,

0:42:120:42:15

by one of the finest makers of the early Victorian era.

0:42:150:42:18

Good Lord!

0:42:180:42:20

So, please, get it insured.

0:42:200:42:22

LAUGHTER

0:42:220:42:24

But much more important than getting insured,

0:42:240:42:26

get it out of that cupboard and let it be seen!

0:42:260:42:29

Thank you very much. I'm totally astounded.

0:42:290:42:32

Oh, I think I need a gin.

0:42:320:42:34

LAUGHTER

0:42:340:42:37

We're just coming to the end of our day here at Chenies Manor

0:42:400:42:43

and I thought I'd slip into something comfortable.

0:42:430:42:45

Japanese silk wedding kimono, circa 1980s,

0:42:450:42:48

brought along by one of our visitors.

0:42:480:42:50

Look at this. Look at the sleeves.

0:42:500:42:52

The front...

0:42:530:42:54

The back...

0:42:570:42:58

And look at the gold interior...

0:43:010:43:03

Fabulous.

0:43:050:43:06

From Antiques Roadshow, until next time,

0:43:060:43:08

sayonara!

0:43:080:43:10

The Antiques Roadshow returns to Chenies Manor near Amersham in Buckinghamshire, where they discover a forgotten train set, a dazzling piece of Whitefriars glass and a 19th-century plant stand that provides one of the biggest surprises of the series.

The team unwrap a train set that hasn't been out of its box in over 70 years, and the family of a glassblower pay a moving tribute to their father's work for the Whitefriars company. A beautiful Italian figurine of a flower seller catches the eye of ceramics specialist Eric Knowles, while Fiona Bruce reads a tragic letter from a soldier to be opened in the event of his death.

There's also an extraordinary update about an ornate French plant stand, known as a jardiniere, that was last seen on the Roadshow in 1991 - an event that changed the life of its owner 20 years later.