Arley Hall 2 Antiques Roadshow


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Arley Hall 2

A return visit to the gardens of Arley Hall in Cheshire with Fiona Bruce and the experts. Finds include a portrait of a visitor's mother painted in India in the 1950s.


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Today we're back at Arley Hall and Gardens in Cheshire,

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and if you're a garden lover, prepare to be very excited,

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because this is one of the oldest country gardens in existence.

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And it's believed this double herbaceous border

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is one of the oldest in the country.

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Look at it - isn't it glorious?

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This has been home to the Warburton family since the 15th century,

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and it seems that successive generations have viewed the garden

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as being at the heart of this home.

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With records going back more than 250 years,

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it's such an important part of horticultural history

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that it is Grade II listed.

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The garden is best known for its fabulous herbaceous border.

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There's even a plan of it dating back to 1846 -

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the earliest plan for a herbaceous border ever found.

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This was a breakaway from the more formal gardens,

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pioneering the idea of mixing lots of plants and colours together

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in one space.

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And it must have caught the eye of artist George Elgood,

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who painted these watercolours in the 1880s and '90s.

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The plants were also much admired by

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the acclaimed garden designer Gertrude Jekyll,

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who wrote in this book, Some English Gardens,

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about one of the paintings done by George Elgood,

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and she said, "Throughout the length and breadth of England

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"it would be hard to find borders of hardy flowers handsomer,

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"or in any way better done than those at Arley in Cheshire.

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"It's easy to see in the picture

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"how happily mated are formality and freedom."

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What a gorgeous backdrop to see what stories will blossom

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on this week's Antiques Roadshow.

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We don't get many nuns brought into the Roadshow, funnily enough.

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No? Probably not.

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And here she is, a beautiful porcelain nun.

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I bought her a few years ago in Braderie de Lille, in France.

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I just loved her when I bought her, so I've had her ever since.

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What appeals to me about it is the really crisp modelling,

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it's like a piece of sculpture.

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A piece of sculpture in porcelain, and it's beautifully painted.

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When you look at this little border around the edge of her habit there,

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that's actually hand-painted. These tiny little scrolls.

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-Oh, right.

-Isn't that gorgeous?

-Yes, yeah.

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And the Bible that she's reading, when we look there,

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it's difficult to show it, but can you see there?

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-I can, I can.

-There's an inscription in the Bible.

-Yeah, Omnia.

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Exactly, it says Omnia Vanitas,

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which is from the Latin version of the King James Bible.

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-Right.

-So she's a nun and she's reading the Bible.

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The irritating thing about this nun, the only irritating thing about her,

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there's no "Made in France" or factory mark or anything.

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-No, no.

-So how on earth would you know what she was?

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Well, yeah, I don't.

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-I'm hoping you do!

-I do, that's the good news!

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I do, because I recognise the kind of porcelain that she's made from.

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-Right.

-I recognise the colour of the gilding here,

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it's a particular tone of colour, of gilding.

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I even recognise this blue that her Bible is bound with.

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-Yeah?

-These are all features of one factory,

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and that factory is not in France.

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-Is it not?

-It's in the East End of London.

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-No!

-It's in Bow.

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-Really?

-So she's a Cockney nun.

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Would you believe it?

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Can you believe that?

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-She's a Cockney nun.

-Wow.

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And even more amazingly, from the way that she's decorated,

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she was made, and this is almost unbelievable,

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-she was made 1758, 1760.

-No! Oh, my goodness.

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-250 years old.

-Oh, my goodness.

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-Wow.

-And a really early piece...

-I'm astounded.

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..of English porcelain by one of the best makers there is.

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-How much did she cost you?

-10 euros.

-10 euros?

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So maybe £8.

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This nun, made in London at Bow,

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cost you 10 euros.

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It's worth a minimum of 350 to 400.

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-Really?

-450...something like that.

-Wow!

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Wow. That's amazing.

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These very sombre portraits are the kind of thing you might have seen

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in any Victorian parlour, aren't they?

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But the eyes rather follow you around the room.

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Who are they?

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This is my lovely great-grandfather, James Davies Taylor,

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and my great-grandmother.

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And really unusually, these are paintings over photographs,

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-did you know that?

-Yes, I did.

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You can sort of tell once you know that they are.

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As a result, the eyes have been done in

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with this kind of very blue colour

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that perhaps wasn't really there. I don't know...

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-Your eyes are blue, though.

-My family do have very blue eyes.

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That will be, they've brought them out.

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But incredibly, you've actually got the original photographs which were

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blown up and then painted over to make these.

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If you compare them, first of all your very pretty great-grandmother,

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you can see it's exactly the same pose, can't you?

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All they've done is added a great deal of colour,

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and made her look as though she's living and breathing, haven't they?

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And the same with him.

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All the props have been coloured in, that basket of flowers,

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and then he himself has been spruced up no end.

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His moustache looks rather splendid.

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Tell me, why did they bother to have these rather grand portraits made?

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We're not sure why they had them made, but he did die the year after.

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We believe he was instrumental in bringing about legislation

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to force the pit owners to insulate the wiring systems.

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-So this is down the mines?

-Yes.

-And the wires were uninsulated?

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Initially they were uninsulated, and people were dying because of it.

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I can imagine, actually. I mean, you're down the mine,

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you're very sweaty because it's incredibly hot,

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you're probably not wearing a shirt and it's pitch dark.

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You bump into something and give yourself 240 volts.

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No wonder it was dangerous!

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It's insane. It's absolutely unbelievable,

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and I once asked my grandfather why they didn't insulate,

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because I couldn't believe it,

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and he said the pit owners said it was too expensive.

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Well, there you go - money, money, money.

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And so how did he manage to get that done?

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Well, he supported a lady who had lost her husband to electrocution,

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and he supported her in a legal case,

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because although he wasn't a lawyer, he was well-versed in law.

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And he provided the funds for her to bring the case.

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They won the case. She wasn't compensated,

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but as a consequence of that,

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they had to insulate the wires, and that was passed throughout England.

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-What, nationwide?

-We believe so.

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So where did he get the resources and funds

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to be able to represent this widow?

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We believe the funds came from the Foresters,

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which was almost like an early welfare system

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prior to the welfare state.

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-So everyone would put the dividends in...

-The workers?

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The workers would put their dividends in and when they were

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in dire need, they were supported from the fund.

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From the fund, I see.

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And this medal.

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Yes.

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-What does it mean?

-Well, it says on the back...

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-You've got the medal with you.

-Yes, I have got the medal with me.

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It says "with thanks for services rendered" on the back.

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-And it's from the Foresters?

-It's from the Foresters.

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So the community must have absolutely adored him

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-for this kind of work.

-They did,

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and when he died the whole of Barnsley turned out,

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and apparently my grandad said he remembered the streets

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being completely blocked with the whole of the community,

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who were mourning his loss.

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Isn't it extraordinary, the depth of stories that lie behind images

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that you might just skip over occasionally?

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Yes, and I'm so proud of him,

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because he did so much for the community.

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So, they're not worth very much,

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-and I don't suppose you expected them to be, did you?

-No.

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I would have thought, even so,

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he seems to me a very important man in the early trade union movement.

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Before it all began, almost,

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and so that makes it important, in that sense.

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I'm going to put £500 on the pair.

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And the medal, which has got to have an interest in value,

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perhaps the same again.

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-So a total of £1,000.

-That does surprise me.

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They're very precious, we'd never, ever sell them.

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I wouldn't either, if they were mine.

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Cockerels. You see them in nearly every continent in the world.

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Where do you think this cockerel was made?

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Well, I don't know, but I come from The Potteries

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and I wondered whether he came from there or from Ironbridge,

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somewhere like that, because I think he is bronze

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and he is extremely heavy.

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So, you're thinking Ironbridge

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-and all that cast metal, all the foundries?

-Yes.

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Well, certainly from a foundry, but not in Britain.

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-In fact, he is absolutely, definitely Austrian.

-Oh!

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Cast in a bronze factory in Vienna,

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and the most well-known is the Bergman bronze foundry.

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-Right.

-So, absolutely, he weighs...

-A tonne.

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..a tonne, doesn't he?

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The foundry was first started in 1860

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by a man called Franz Bergman

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and he then handed on the factory to his son,

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who was another Franz, around 1900.

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And I think that he was made in the early part, then,

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of the 20th century. But the problem is, the mouldings,

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the castings remained the same.

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They were handed down from father to son,

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so it's quite difficult to tell exactly when he was made.

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He has a slightly indistinct stamp underneath

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that has been painted over. It's a two-handled urn with a capital B.

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That confirms what I already feel about it. Who did he belong to?

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He belonged to my uncle Harry, who was 20 years older than my father.

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And so did you know this as a child?

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No, I didn't meet him until my uncle Harry had died

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and then he came to live with my father and then eventually,

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he's died and he's come down to the rest of the family.

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He just keeps on moving on, don't you?

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The paintwork is in such good order and that is a really nice thing

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because a lot of these bronzes get very scratched over the years.

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The glass eyes are perfectly intact and he's very colourful, isn't he?

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Yes, he's very smart, isn't he?

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I've seen a lot of cockerels

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and they fetch around £300

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-but that's when they are this size.

-Oh, right.

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This is...not quite life-size, but he really weighs a tonbe,

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-and on a great scale.

-He's a big boy!

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And he's worth £3,000.

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Ooh, that's nice. That's a surprise.

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Oh, well, you were worth lugging around!

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Jewellery. It's about love, it's about power,

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but it can also be a little bit about scandal.

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Who would have thought it with a beautiful bracelet like this?

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Tell me about the history.

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Yes, well, it's supposed to have been given by the Prince of Wales

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to his wife, although at the time,

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she wasn't held to be his wife.

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It was a secret marriage.

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This was when he was trying to persuade her to come back to him.

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We're talking George IV here, aren't we?

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-He eventually became George IV.

-Yes.

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He married, in secret, Mrs Fitzherbert in 1795

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and this is when he was trying to persuade her

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to come back to him in about 1799.

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So how did the bracelet come into your family?

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It was passed down through my immediate family

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and probably was given to my great-great-great-grandmother.

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Of course, it's all around the time of George IV,

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who of course was Prince Regent to start with.

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He had quite a complicated love life, really, didn't he?

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-I think that's the best way of putting it!

-Yes.

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Very much in love with Mrs Fitzherbert, the love of his life,

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but of course, he had quite a reputation for gambling

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and building up debts and it was correct that

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the government said they would pay off all his debts

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if he married Caroline of Brunswick,

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so she comes over and they get married,

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but it doesn't quite work out. Well, I think when you're in love

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with somebody as much as he obviously was with Mrs Fitzherbert,

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it was never going to be, was it? It's such a shame.

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The bracelet itself is made of gold.

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We have this lovely, delicate chainwork around here

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and then the detailing across the top

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which has got an inscription on it in French, which is...

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"Rejoindre ou Mourir."

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That is supposedly a clue to its provenance.

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"Let's get back together," "Let's get reunited or I'll die."

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-So tragic!

-The point being that when he tried to woo Mrs Fitzherbert

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in the first place, there was a mock stabbing.

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He supposedly tried to kill himself

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to try and persuade her to marry him.

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So this is possibly a link back to that first occasion.

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It just shows the passion that you can have for somebody.

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It's extraordinary, isn't it?

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So, that's the inscription there.

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We also have a lovely bit of agate in the centre

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and then a little turquoise in the middle there.

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Turquoise in the language of lapidary and stone and love

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means, basically, forget-me-not,

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because it's supposed to be the true colour of the forget-me-not flower.

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What we have here is a slightly

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green colour which is its original colour.

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Then when it's polished, it goes to that lovely forget-me-not blue

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and then reverts back over time to the green.

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If we carefully turn it over,

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there is a little locket on the back.

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If we open it up, we have inside

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a very, very daintily painted little eye.

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That's always been said to be George IV or the Prince of Wales' eye

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but I suspect it may be a bit too feminine

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and I wonder whether it's actually the adopted daughter,

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so that might tally.

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It's also got an inscription on the inside of the locket as well.

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That says "mirror of my heart".

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Oh, it just gets so fabulous, doesn't it, as we go through?

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So, all in all, I just think

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it's an absolutely gorgeous piece of jewellery.

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I think with the Royal provenance that we have with it,

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which hopefully we can secure, in an auction environment,

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you would be looking at an estimate of £2,500 to £3,000.

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It's got the possibility to fly, though,

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because everybody does really love a little bit of scandal.

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Your plate?

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It's funny - I've done vases

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and decanters and windows

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on the Antiques Roadshow,

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but this is the first time ever

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-I've done eye baths.

-Is it?

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It is. and so when you came in this morning, I thought,

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that is such an interesting collecting area,

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and you've made it your own.

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-Yes, I have.

-So, tell us about it in your life.

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One of the schools around here, the local school

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was having its 200th anniversary

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and we started getting out the stuff

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that had been in the school for a long time.

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One of the things was a first aid kit, and that was in it.

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And I loved it.

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It's lovely, isn't it? A lovely colour.

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So I said to the headteacher, can I give you my plastic one

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that I've got at home and can I have that?

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And he said yes.

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So I had it and then I've just collected them ever since, really.

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-How long ago is that?

-Oh, 20 years, a bit more.

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-Do we have your entire collection here?

-You do, yes.

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OK. They were in everybody's home, weren't they?

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We all had one when we were kids.

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You'd get something in your eye,

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-your mum would get some warm water with salt...

-Yes.

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And you'd put it there and then she would tell you to blink.

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-Yes.

-And it worked!

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-It was warm water, you didn't have to buy some product or anything.

-No.

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-A bit of salt.

-Bit of salt in there. Warm water and salt.

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So, where do you find them?

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I go round antique fairs, and it gives you an excuse.

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You don't have to spend a lot of money

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but you can be in an antique fair and get something.

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Or the children buy them for me. They see them somewhere

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in a junk shop or something and I sort of acquire them, really.

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They are, funnily enough, an extremely collected area.

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Don't feel as if you are alone in the world of this bonkers mission.

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You're not. The people who collect them most are ophthalmic surgeons,

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-eye doctors.

-Really?

-Most of these,

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it's fairly easy to guess where they are from

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because it says "British made,"

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which I find is a bit of a giveaway -

0:17:540:17:56

I think they're probably Polish!

0:17:560:17:58

They were made largely in Yorkshire for at least 300 years,

0:17:590:18:03

but you haven't got any that are very much more old than 100 years,

0:18:030:18:08

and they really are... I've kind of grouped them.

0:18:080:18:10

Your best ones are here and some of these are approaching 100 years old.

0:18:100:18:18

So, I think that you were paying about three quid for these.

0:18:180:18:22

I mean, that's fine.

0:18:220:18:24

They sell for that kind of money and maybe a little bit more,

0:18:240:18:28

but where you are spending a tenner, for instance,

0:18:280:18:31

on things that are about a hundred years old,

0:18:310:18:34

then I think that you're buying quite well

0:18:340:18:36

because I think these are sort of 20 quid each.

0:18:360:18:39

20 to 30.

0:18:390:18:40

One like that has got to be 30 or 40 quid.

0:18:400:18:44

Isn't it funny? Look at that, the way it is all falling over

0:18:440:18:47

and being badly made. It's brilliant, I love it.

0:18:470:18:51

I love badly made stuff.

0:18:510:18:53

So, here you've got thruppence each, as it were,

0:18:530:18:56

and here you've got the cream.

0:18:560:18:57

What you need to aspire to is that level there.

0:18:570:19:00

OK.

0:19:000:19:01

And it's fun doing this, isn't it?

0:19:010:19:04

It is. My family buy them for me so I'll tell them now,

0:19:040:19:07

they have to buy me more expensive ones!

0:19:070:19:09

You can't walk down the high street these days without tripping over

0:19:130:19:16

mobile phone shops, estate agents and tanning shops.

0:19:160:19:21

But what happens if you're in the 1930s and you wanted to tan at home?

0:19:210:19:25

You get, of course, the Vi-Tan home tanning machine.

0:19:250:19:31

Why on earth do you have this rather scary-looking device?

0:19:310:19:35

It is quite terrifying, isn't it?

0:19:350:19:38

This belonged to my grandfather and when he passed away,

0:19:380:19:42

it was one of the things I inherited from him.

0:19:420:19:45

So, this was a chap, who, in the 1930s or 40s,

0:19:450:19:47

had a home tanning machine.

0:19:470:19:49

Was he some kind of bronzed Adonis therefore?

0:19:490:19:53

He was a man of means, I think.

0:19:530:19:55

He had his own aeroplane. He had a Sopwith Pup.

0:19:550:19:59

A guy used to fly with him and he was the writer

0:19:590:20:02

of the Broons cartoon in the Sunday Post.

0:20:020:20:04

They're the Scottish cartoon characters?

0:20:040:20:07

There the Scottish cartoon characters, that's right.

0:20:070:20:09

My grandfather, whose name was Robert Buchanan Henderson,

0:20:090:20:12

was actually the inspiration for Hen Broon and if you look

0:20:120:20:15

at the character in the cartoon, it's very much like Grandad.

0:20:150:20:18

Very tall, upright, long, angular face,

0:20:180:20:20

little bristle moustache and quite the man of the house.

0:20:200:20:23

So from Broon to brown if he stood in front of this thing for a very,

0:20:230:20:27

very long time and got a good tan!

0:20:270:20:29

As you can see from the label here,

0:20:290:20:30

it was made by the Thermal Syndicate Limited.

0:20:300:20:32

In the late 1930s,

0:20:320:20:34

they released the Vi-Tan which was a home tanning machine,

0:20:340:20:38

something you plugged into the electrical socket and you stood in front of it.

0:20:380:20:42

I just love the label on the back here.

0:20:420:20:44

"Always wear the goggles provided when near the lamp.

0:20:440:20:46

"Normal initial exposure, three minutes at three feet.

0:20:460:20:51

"No effect will be felt for three or four hours.

0:20:510:20:54

"Under exposure is better than over exposure."

0:20:540:20:57

I mean, it's kind of terrifying, isn't it?

0:20:580:21:01

-It is.

-It's not exactly the most valuable piece in the world but in its day,

0:21:010:21:05

you mentioned he was a man of means and he would have had to have been.

0:21:050:21:09

They cost about £15 so when you think the average weekly wage

0:21:090:21:13

at that time in 1930s and '40s was around £6 a week,

0:21:130:21:18

you have two weeks just to afford this,

0:21:180:21:21

so it's very much a wealthy person's piece but today,

0:21:210:21:25

I think somewhere in the region of £30 to £50 as a curiosity.

0:21:250:21:29

Yes, well, it certainly is very curious.

0:21:290:21:32

-You wouldn't want to plug it in, would you?

-Please don't do that.

0:21:320:21:35

Please get it looked at before.

0:21:350:21:37

You know what? I don't think I would want to stand in front of it either.

0:21:370:21:39

I think, basically, would you prefer to stand in front of that

0:21:390:21:42

or a nice holiday in the Costa Del Sol?

0:21:420:21:44

Come on! We know the answer, don't we? Fantastic, thank you very much.

0:21:440:21:47

Thank you very much.

0:21:470:21:48

So, on the table, we have a set of miniature World War II medals

0:21:540:21:57

showing that a man was in Burma.

0:21:570:22:01

We have an Indian army ordnance corps cap badge,

0:22:010:22:04

we have the prisoner of war postcards sent back from Japanese prison of war camps

0:22:040:22:10

and then we have this.

0:22:100:22:11

-What is this?

-This is a diary kept by my father, who was taken prisoner

0:22:110:22:17

in Singapore on the 15th of February 1942 and the diary is written virtually

0:22:170:22:23

daily from the 15th of February until September 1945 when he was released.

0:22:230:22:30

In that time, he was in Changi jail

0:22:300:22:33

and seven months on the Thai Burma railway...

0:22:330:22:37

including the River Kwai

0:22:370:22:39

and the stories that we all know from that magnificent film.

0:22:390:22:44

Included in it is the emphasis on the malnutrition, the cruelty,

0:22:440:22:52

the lack of any hope, virtually,

0:22:520:22:55

of knowing when it was going to be over,

0:22:550:22:59

and then the comments where somebody has died,

0:22:590:23:01

and it's not quite matter of fact, but

0:23:010:23:05

there were 130,000 working on this railway

0:23:050:23:10

and 67,000 or 70,000 died.

0:23:100:23:13

I think at night, he would sit down literally and fill in,

0:23:130:23:18

just saying it was a good day or a bad day.

0:23:180:23:21

There's no drama in it, it's not dramatic.

0:23:210:23:23

Like these terrible people and these terrible tortures.

0:23:230:23:26

It does mention it and they were terrible,

0:23:260:23:28

like growing bamboo through you and leaving you out for 24 hours with a

0:23:280:23:33

bowl of water you can't reach and things like that.

0:23:330:23:36

In the end, it was survival and

0:23:360:23:38

the camaraderie to help each other through.

0:23:380:23:40

Did he ever tell you how he kept it?

0:23:400:23:42

-How did he keep it?

-He buried it.

0:23:420:23:44

-He buried it?

-Yes.

-Where did he get the ink from?

0:23:440:23:46

They made the ink from...

0:23:460:23:48

..fruit, from spices, from...

0:23:490:23:52

from anything they could lay their hands on that they couldn't eat but

0:23:520:23:56

they could use for other purposes.

0:23:560:23:58

There is this moment here where the ink probably ran out and they moved to a pencil.

0:23:580:24:04

What is the significance of this moment?

0:24:040:24:07

There was a five-day train journey in metal, er...

0:24:070:24:11

..carriages which were rice carriers

0:24:120:24:15

with 28 or 30 people per carriage.

0:24:150:24:18

They were unable to sit down.

0:24:180:24:20

There was no food, no sanitation and it was a five-day journey from

0:24:200:24:24

Singapore to Ban Pong which was west of Bangkok and the beginning of the railway.

0:24:240:24:29

How long did he work on the railway for?

0:24:290:24:32

Seven months. The railway only took one year to build.

0:24:320:24:36

They say a person died per railway sleeper and it was 215km long.

0:24:370:24:44

When he came home?

0:24:440:24:46

He was repatriated back to the UK,

0:24:460:24:49

kept in the Army because they were in such a miserable state, and posted to Germany

0:24:490:24:55

as part of the Army of Occupation, but probably a more gentle job

0:24:550:24:59

to get back to normal health.

0:24:590:25:02

It is such a unique record.

0:25:020:25:05

I don't think...

0:25:050:25:07

I've really ever seen a diary written like this.

0:25:070:25:10

You can't imagine in any way what these people went through and yet,

0:25:100:25:16

your father sat there and kept a record

0:25:160:25:19

in this tiny, tiny writing

0:25:190:25:21

of every day and as his friends died

0:25:210:25:25

he wrote their names, and because I've seen some of them written in and I know you've told me

0:25:250:25:31

that you've been out to Thailand and Burma to see where they are buried now.

0:25:310:25:35

It's almost impossible to put a price on this.

0:25:350:25:38

I mean, how can you put a price on five and a half years in a prison camp, when,

0:25:380:25:43

bless him, he probably had nothing?

0:25:430:25:45

A bowl of rice to him was worth the earth.

0:25:470:25:49

I would imagine if something like this came up

0:25:500:25:52

for auction and was sold,

0:25:520:25:55

it would actually really wouldn't realise what it would be worth.

0:25:550:25:58

It would probably be £600 or £700.

0:25:580:26:02

But to what he went through,

0:26:030:26:06

there is no price that you could put on this.

0:26:060:26:10

Because of this one man,

0:26:100:26:11

we at least have the story of a lot of people who were in those camps and

0:26:110:26:16

who didn't come home, but at least the amount of effort they put in

0:26:160:26:20

to staying alive is recorded here.

0:26:200:26:22

Well, here we are, poised in front of three copies of the most iconic

0:26:250:26:30

children's book of the 20th century,

0:26:300:26:33

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak,

0:26:330:26:35

and here are you and I am wondering why you collected three copies.

0:26:350:26:41

Well, about ten years ago we were on holiday in California in Laguna Beach

0:26:410:26:47

and in most of those small American towns,

0:26:470:26:50

there are always fundraising things going on.

0:26:500:26:55

-Yes.

-Fundraising for the local library and Brenda came to me and said,

0:26:550:27:01

"I've bought a copy of Where the Wild Things Are,"

0:27:010:27:03

which she was very pleased about.

0:27:030:27:05

She said, "and it's a first edition."

0:27:050:27:08

I said, "Let's have a look."

0:27:080:27:10

I turned the page over and said, "Do you know it's signed?"

0:27:100:27:13

-I didn't.

-She didn't!

0:27:130:27:15

So, how much did you pay for it?

0:27:170:27:18

25 cents.

0:27:180:27:20

Let's just have a look at this.

0:27:200:27:22

25 cents and you say it's a first edition.

0:27:220:27:25

-Yes.

-Well, let's just look inside.

0:27:250:27:29

Here is the first page and it's copyright 1963, first edition,

0:27:290:27:35

Where the Wild Things Are, Maurice Sendak.

0:27:350:27:37

Yes. And this is the signature here.

0:27:370:27:41

Maurice Sendak. To Jeffrey and Emily.

0:27:410:27:43

Boo!

0:27:430:27:45

Well, that's wonderful. So,

0:27:450:27:47

you bought this first edition and what I would say is wrong with it

0:27:470:27:50

-is it's lacking a dust wrapper.

-Yes.

0:27:500:27:52

Which is a great shame, yes.

0:27:520:27:54

But about these other two? You've got one here in Welsh?

0:27:540:27:57

Well, buying the first one set us off to look at every copy

0:27:570:28:01

of Where the Wild Things Are that came along.

0:28:010:28:05

In the local flea market, that's where the Welsh edition turned up.

0:28:050:28:09

-And the third one?

-The third one was a car-boot sale.

0:28:090:28:13

It's the 25th anniversary edition.

0:28:130:28:16

What are you going to do with these?

0:28:160:28:18

I think it's been published in very nearly every language in the world,

0:28:180:28:22

so we've got a lot to go at if we can get a first edition of every one?

0:28:220:28:26

-Have you got children?

-We've got grandchildren, yes.

0:28:260:28:28

We've got four grandchildren so we definitely need another one.

0:28:280:28:32

So you're going to give one to one, one to another, one to another?

0:28:320:28:35

It would be a lucky dip, I think!

0:28:350:28:38

Right, let's start off with prices, shall be?

0:28:380:28:41

The three you've got.

0:28:410:28:43

The 25 years edition,

0:28:430:28:45

it's not going to be terribly valuable but I imagine £20 or £30.

0:28:450:28:49

The first Welsh edition, probably a similar amount of money.

0:28:490:28:53

It does have a dust wrapper but the condition is not terribly good.

0:28:530:28:56

But this one is going to be worth...

0:28:560:28:58

-..£3,000.

-Oh, my goodness!

0:28:590:29:02

Now, you're going to break up the family if you start distributing that, aren't you?

0:29:020:29:06

What are you going to do?

0:29:060:29:08

The best thing about it is,

0:29:080:29:10

it's an absolutely wonderful story to read to the grandchildren.

0:29:100:29:14

I couldn't help noticing your potty, sir.

0:29:180:29:20

Are you worried about the length of the queue?

0:29:200:29:23

-I am, yes.

-In case you get caught short?

0:29:230:29:26

Where did you come by this marvellous potty?

0:29:260:29:30

My dad knew some friends,

0:29:300:29:32

an old couple of men that never got married and they were moving into town

0:29:320:29:37

where they could walk to the shops so he thought,

0:29:370:29:40

I will go and see them off before they go.

0:29:400:29:44

They said to him, "Do you want this pot?"

0:29:440:29:47

He said, "Yes, I'll have that, that's lovely."

0:29:470:29:49

Playing music.

0:29:490:29:51

And that's how I've come to get it.

0:29:510:29:54

So, it plays music. It says, "Ooh landlord,

0:29:540:29:56

"fill the flowing bowl" which is a drinking song, isn't it?

0:29:560:29:59

I think it is, yes, but it's changed, hasn't it, to fill this.

0:29:590:30:04

Clearly. Oh, look, it's got "patent non-splash thunder bowl".

0:30:040:30:09

Well, sir, I shall leave you with your potty and hopefully

0:30:090:30:12

you won't be waiting so long you'll find yourself in need of using it!

0:30:120:30:15

Well, you don't have to be too keen on clocks to think that this is

0:30:260:30:28

actually rather nice.

0:30:280:30:30

-Do you like it?

-I love it.

0:30:300:30:32

-It is beautiful.

-Is it yours or a family thing?

0:30:320:30:35

It was my father's.

0:30:350:30:36

My father passed away a few years ago and I found a whole collection

0:30:360:30:39

of clocks and watches that he had accumulated.

0:30:390:30:42

He was one of these people that could repair anything and understood

0:30:420:30:45

everything from first principles,

0:30:450:30:47

but he always said this was his favourite clock.

0:30:470:30:50

The story is that it was either the clock or a family holiday and he went for the clock!

0:30:500:30:55

Wow!

0:30:550:30:56

Where was the holiday to?

0:30:560:30:59

I imagine it would have been somewhere like Frinton-on-Sea

0:30:590:31:03

and I know for a fact that my sister was scared of going on the beach

0:31:030:31:06

and screamed so it was probably a wise choice.

0:31:060:31:10

Well, we'll see later,

0:31:100:31:11

but let me just tell you that it's English through and through.

0:31:110:31:14

Mid-19th century, sort of 1850, possibly 1855.

0:31:150:31:20

It's everything that the English clock collectors want.

0:31:200:31:24

The wood is satin wood.

0:31:240:31:26

Two winding squares, one for going, one for striking.

0:31:260:31:29

You've got this fantastic...

0:31:290:31:31

subsidiary seconds at the 12 o'clock position.

0:31:310:31:34

The size is lovely and you associate most clocks with a pendulum,

0:31:340:31:39

don't you? This doesn't have a pendulum.

0:31:390:31:42

It has the most fantastic giant platform.

0:31:420:31:46

Lovely. Let's look at this dial.

0:31:460:31:49

Beautifully engraved, lovely fleur-de-lis hands.

0:31:490:31:53

It is a really nice dial.

0:31:530:31:55

The only thing I can fault on it, there's no signature.

0:31:550:31:58

Looking at the side,

0:31:580:32:01

twin fuses, the original chains,

0:32:010:32:03

maintaining power for the going train,

0:32:030:32:06

which is what you would expect, and then on the back,

0:32:060:32:09

you've got this large coiled gong

0:32:090:32:12

and you've got the most fantastic regulation scale there

0:32:120:32:16

for the back of the platform.

0:32:160:32:18

Size is not too big.

0:32:180:32:20

It is top-of-the-range.

0:32:200:32:22

I don't know why it is not signed.

0:32:220:32:24

We will never know, but it is anonymous.

0:32:240:32:26

I suppose that holds it back a bit.

0:32:260:32:29

So, what would be your chosen holiday now?

0:32:290:32:31

I think I'd go for Honolulu.

0:32:340:32:38

-OK.

-I've never been to the South Seas.

0:32:380:32:40

So, what's that going to be for two of you?

0:32:400:32:44

I suspect about £10,000.

0:32:440:32:46

-About ten grand?

-Yes.

-So, Frinton or this?

0:32:460:32:50

Or Honolulu or this?

0:32:520:32:54

How do you think it equates?

0:32:550:32:58

Well, I think I'd rather keep the clock than go to Honolulu.

0:32:580:33:03

Well, I certainly would, particularly as the clock,

0:33:030:33:06

if you were to sell it at auction, would make a minimum of £15,000.

0:33:060:33:11

-Wow!

-So, I would put it to you...

0:33:110:33:14

..that it was a very good decision to have made initially by your father.

0:33:160:33:20

He made a lot of good decisions, so, he's done it again.

0:33:200:33:24

It's not every day that I get to record with a piece of glass that is

0:33:270:33:31

larger than my mouth!

0:33:310:33:33

But that is the case today.

0:33:340:33:36

You've brought this along on your barrow.

0:33:360:33:39

This is a beautifully made piece of stained glass, I really must say.

0:33:390:33:43

Tell us how it fits in your life.

0:33:430:33:45

I was working next-door to a property which was being refurbished and

0:33:450:33:50

there was a stone facade on the side of the house that my son wanted a

0:33:500:33:55

stone facade for his cottage, but behind the stone facade was this window,

0:33:550:34:01

so I took the stone facade down and took the window down,

0:34:010:34:05

paid the man, and I have had it for 13 years.

0:34:050:34:08

It is beautifully made.

0:34:080:34:11

Looking at the joinery around here,

0:34:110:34:13

this is all oak and the skill that went into making this

0:34:130:34:18

is extraordinary, really, and around the other side, of course,

0:34:180:34:23

you have wrought iron straps on it to protect it, because we are on the

0:34:230:34:27

inside here, aren't we?

0:34:270:34:29

This is the inside and this is the outside.

0:34:290:34:32

This is where the oak is.

0:34:320:34:34

I would think it's somewhere about 1880.

0:34:340:34:38

Its value rests on who is going to buy it, of course,

0:34:380:34:41

and what you're going to use it for.

0:34:410:34:43

You've got to have a very specific place for it.

0:34:430:34:45

I notice you haven't done anything with it.

0:34:450:34:47

It's just sat in your garage for the last 13 years, hasn't it?

0:34:470:34:50

Well, I've been waiting for planning permission for my extension!

0:34:500:34:53

-To do what?

-To do an extension to our house.

0:34:530:34:56

-Oh, you're going to use it?

-Yes.

0:34:560:34:58

Oh, brilliant. Look, I tell you.

0:34:580:35:00

It's English, 1880s.

0:35:000:35:02

-How much did you pay for it?

-£150.

0:35:020:35:04

13 years ago?

0:35:040:35:06

-13 years ago.

-Well, I think that if you went into a reclamation yard

0:35:060:35:10

and wanted to buy this today, I don't think you'd get any change from 500 quid

0:35:100:35:15

and then I reckon that this barrow is worth another hundred quid,

0:35:150:35:20

so I reckon the lot is 600 quid, so I reckon 150 quid,

0:35:200:35:24

-you've done all right, mate!

-Very good.

0:35:240:35:26

Thanks for bringing it in.

0:35:260:35:28

Thanks very much.

0:35:280:35:30

You might think you're looking at a portrait by a European artist of the 1930s.

0:35:320:35:37

In actual fact, this painting

0:35:370:35:39

was done by an Indian artist in the 1950s.

0:35:390:35:43

It's obviously a portrait.

0:35:430:35:44

Can you tell me something about the sitter?

0:35:440:35:46

Yes, the sitter is my mother.

0:35:460:35:48

It was painted in India and...

0:35:490:35:53

..the artist worked for Grindlays Bank,

0:35:540:35:58

which was where my father worked, and that's how we got to know...

0:35:580:36:02

That's how he came to paint your mother?

0:36:020:36:05

-Yes.

-Well, the artist has actually signed his name.

0:36:050:36:07

A very well-known artist in India today, Krishen Khanna.

0:36:070:36:11

So, obviously, you have a family relationship with him

0:36:110:36:13

-or you had a family relationship with him?

-Yes, my mother did.

0:36:130:36:16

I was too young at the time but my mother knew him and I believe has kept

0:36:160:36:20

in touch occasionally.

0:36:200:36:22

The story of Grindlays bank is fascinating because Krishen Khanna,

0:36:220:36:26

his family originally came from Lahore and with the separation of India

0:36:260:36:30

and Pakistan, they moved to Shimla, where he worked in Grindlays Bank.

0:36:300:36:35

Absolutely. The artist gives up banking in 1960

0:36:350:36:39

and he becomes a professional painter.

0:36:390:36:42

He takes the leap although he had very little money,

0:36:420:36:44

he took that big step to become a professional artist and of course,

0:36:440:36:48

most of the works we know of his date from that later period,

0:36:480:36:52

from the '60s, '70s, '80s etc.

0:36:520:36:54

It's extremely rare to find a picture by Krishen Khanna from 1954.

0:36:540:36:58

From this experimental phase,

0:36:580:37:00

he had just taken a few evening classes in painting and was practising and

0:37:000:37:05

he went on to become a really important figure,

0:37:050:37:08

one of the great modern painters of India, along with MF Husain, Raza,

0:37:080:37:13

Souza, Gaitonde,

0:37:130:37:15

all of these names that have now really achieved celebrity globally.

0:37:150:37:19

It's a fascinating picture.

0:37:210:37:23

It's very, very much rooted in the European painting of the 1930s.

0:37:230:37:28

It has a very, very luminous effect with a nice impasto,

0:37:280:37:33

this very thick painting.

0:37:330:37:36

Krishen Khanna has become a big name and what has happened is,

0:37:360:37:38

the whole market for modern Indian painting has gone through the roof,

0:37:380:37:41

partly with the birth of private museums in India,

0:37:410:37:45

with the Indian diaspora, Indians in Britain, in America,

0:37:450:37:49

in south-east Asia,

0:37:490:37:51

who want to reclaim some of this modern heritage and who have started to collect.

0:37:510:37:56

Do you have any idea of the value of a 1954 Krishen Khanna painting?

0:37:560:38:01

None, none whatsoever.

0:38:010:38:02

It has never been valued.

0:38:020:38:04

I mentioned to my mother that I might bring it here today and she said,

0:38:050:38:09

"Go ahead, see what happens."

0:38:090:38:11

But no idea whatsoever.

0:38:110:38:13

Well, I think she would be happy to know that were it to be offered at

0:38:130:38:17

auction, it would probably be with an estimate of something like

0:38:170:38:20

£30,000 to £50,000 today.

0:38:200:38:22

-Crikey!

-Are you shocked, or am I?

0:38:260:38:29

I think you're going to make her a very happy lady today.

0:38:300:38:32

Thank you very much indeed.

0:38:340:38:36

She will be.

0:38:360:38:37

Well, I'm mindful that these days,

0:38:420:38:43

ladies don't do so much lunch as they are doing afternoon tea.

0:38:430:38:48

Absolutely. I'm having afternoon tea on Sunday.

0:38:480:38:51

Oh, are you? Are you using your best china, that's what I want to know?

0:38:510:38:56

-Afraid not.

-I'll tell you what,

0:38:560:38:58

if I was to produce this china for anybody, they would have to be very,

0:38:580:39:03

very good friends.

0:39:030:39:04

-Where has it all come from?

-It comes down on my mother's side and was

0:39:040:39:09

given to her by my grandmother

0:39:090:39:11

and I believe it was her great-grandmother's wedding set.

0:39:110:39:16

When did she get married?

0:39:160:39:18

It must have been around about 1830 something like that.

0:39:180:39:22

Right, OK. You know full well who made this?

0:39:220:39:25

-Yes.

-Because on the base of this saucer, we have a mark.

0:39:250:39:32

That is a mark of the Rockingham porcelain factory.

0:39:320:39:36

The mark there is the puce mark, and that mark was used from 1830 to 1832.

0:39:360:39:44

-Oh, right.

-So that would tally in absolutely perfect.

0:39:440:39:47

-Yes, yes.

-What strikes me is the quality of the flower painting.

0:39:470:39:53

It's absolutely beautiful.

0:39:530:39:55

It is, it's exuberant.

0:39:550:39:56

I mean, let's just take this one cup.

0:39:560:39:58

Everything you see on there has been painted by hand.

0:39:580:40:02

But what an expert hand.

0:40:020:40:04

Now, this is just a selection of about how many pieces?

0:40:040:40:08

-About 50, I think.

-About 50.

0:40:080:40:10

What was left after my father tended to break it...

0:40:100:40:13

-When washing up.

-Well, it's a high-risk area.

0:40:140:40:18

Rockingham porcelain has been a victim of trends

0:40:180:40:21

and it's been a bit of a downward trend when it comes to price.

0:40:210:40:24

So I think it's fair to say that what was worth, let's say,

0:40:240:40:31

£3,000 25 years ago is probably

0:40:310:40:35

nearer £1,500 - £2,000 today.

0:40:350:40:39

-But does it matter?

-No. Not at all.

0:40:390:40:41

Course it doesn't matter because this is the best of

0:40:410:40:45

Yorkshire porcelain and let me tell you, coming from a Lancastrian,

0:40:450:40:49

that is the ultimate tribute.

0:40:490:40:52

MUSIC: Everything Stops For Tea

0:40:550:40:59

HENRY SANDON SPEAKS

0:41:050:41:10

in a Stoke-On-Trent museum.

0:41:100:41:13

So, tell me, how did a piece of modernist Americana get here

0:41:150:41:19

-in leafy Cheshire?

-Well, I was

0:41:190:41:21

living in America and a friend of mine's aunt passed away and I helped clear out her estate.

0:41:210:41:28

And this was one of the things that we found and

0:41:290:41:32

I was given it as a gift for helping

0:41:330:41:36

do the bull work of clearing everything out.

0:41:360:41:39

So you obviously love it as much as I do.

0:41:390:41:41

I do indeed.

0:41:410:41:43

It's made and designed by Homer Gunn, who is a recognised artist in America.

0:41:430:41:48

He did a lot of monuments.

0:41:480:41:50

He studied in the Rhode Island School of design and art, 1938 - 41.

0:41:500:41:56

And the origins of this are in the Art Deco period, the interwar period,

0:41:560:42:00

which is when he would have been getting his act together

0:42:000:42:03

to become the sculptor that he actually was.

0:42:030:42:05

Some people say his work is brutalist, but it's very simplistic,

0:42:050:42:09

in my mind.

0:42:090:42:11

I love horses, as you can tell,

0:42:110:42:13

and I love the way he's just made this move

0:42:140:42:17

as if it is jumped together almost out of a tube into life.

0:42:170:42:23

You must have loved it to bring it back from America.

0:42:230:42:26

I do, I love the fluidity of movement in it.

0:42:260:42:28

The simple construction but it really gives the shape of the horse

0:42:280:42:32

-and the movement.

-Just two lines of brass.

0:42:320:42:35

-Yes.

-And a little bronze mop on it.

0:42:350:42:38

To give the symbolism of its eye and its ears and its mane,

0:42:380:42:42

and it's even got a bit of movement in the curve of its spine.

0:42:420:42:45

And when we look at it around here, its body is just two circles.

0:42:450:42:49

And its tail is even floating away this way.

0:42:490:42:52

It looks as if it's going to just jump over a fence and float away.

0:42:520:42:56

He was an important designer in several art circles in America.

0:42:570:43:00

The Boettcher six were one that springs to mind.

0:43:000:43:03

And he actually did several big monuments.

0:43:030:43:07

Symphony Orchestra monument, big gallery monuments,

0:43:070:43:10

but this works in a small and simple and acute style.

0:43:100:43:16

-How long have you had it?

-Since 1994.

0:43:160:43:19

Well, it's made in 1965 and on the base,

0:43:190:43:23

we can see it's signed, or inscribed, Homer Gunn '65.

0:43:230:43:29

And it is very typical of the period of the brutalist modernist period.

0:43:290:43:34

These are the antiques of the future.

0:43:340:43:36

These are the things which are making the money now.

0:43:360:43:39

There's not lots of his work available,

0:43:390:43:42

but those that do command some good prices.

0:43:420:43:44

Really?

0:43:440:43:45

And this simple set of circles probably out of a couple of pounds' worth

0:43:450:43:51

of material, a couple of circular pieces cut into sections,

0:43:510:43:55

is now going to be worth £1,500.

0:43:550:43:59

-Very good.

-Thanks for bringing it to England because I love it.

0:43:590:44:02

This is what's called a duck's foot pistol because it looks

0:44:060:44:11

like a duck's foot. Sort of.

0:44:110:44:13

And it was made in about 1770.

0:44:130:44:16

And it was designed purely for law and order,

0:44:160:44:19

to intimidate large groups of people.

0:44:190:44:22

They are rare, rare things.

0:44:220:44:24

There's huge amounts of fakes.

0:44:240:44:26

And I'm pleased to say I've had a really good look at this and I am

0:44:260:44:30

certain that this is not one of them.

0:44:300:44:32

Oh, well that's very nice to know. Very nice to know.

0:44:320:44:36

-Where did you get it?

-I bought it in a shop in Pudsey.

0:44:360:44:42

-Oh, yes?

-Where they sold not only at the time current firearms but also

0:44:420:44:47

they had an antique section.

0:44:470:44:49

And I popped in one day.

0:44:490:44:51

He brought one out, he brought that out, and I said, I'll have it!

0:44:510:44:55

So it was a bit of an impulse buy then.

0:44:550:44:57

-Yes.

-Well, I think it was a very good impulse.

0:44:570:45:00

It's a lovely, lovely thing.

0:45:000:45:02

And, if we just look at it, you can see on the side, the maker's name.

0:45:020:45:07

-Laugher.

-Right. Yep.

0:45:070:45:09

He was the man who made it in the 1770s.

0:45:090:45:12

If you imagine that you were the captain of a merchant ship

0:45:120:45:15

and you had a couple of these, you had a mutinous crew,

0:45:150:45:17

you stood on the quarterdeck...

0:45:170:45:19

If you had two of these, the crew is not going to try and storm you.

0:45:190:45:22

You can say, "Right, you lot, back below decks."

0:45:220:45:25

And really this...

0:45:250:45:26

This predates the 19th century perfection of the revolver,

0:45:260:45:31

which gave you five or six shots.

0:45:310:45:33

That gave you four automatically.

0:45:330:45:35

Over a spread, and certainly,

0:45:350:45:38

no crowd would want to have a go at anybody armed with that.

0:45:380:45:42

If you had to go and buy that today, in a buoyant market, at auction,

0:45:420:45:46

you'd be paying something like £3,500 for it.

0:45:460:45:50

So, quite a lot of money.

0:45:500:45:51

And it's a fantastically good thing.

0:45:510:45:53

It's been just great to see it here today.

0:45:530:45:56

-That's good. That's good.

-Nobody will argue with that, will they?

0:45:560:45:59

Thank you very much. No, they won't.

0:45:590:46:00

I like to think this is the young Mary Berry.

0:46:040:46:07

THEY LAUGH

0:46:070:46:08

Could be.

0:46:080:46:10

Actually, the date is 1942.

0:46:100:46:12

Now, how do I know that?

0:46:120:46:14

Luckily for me, there's a label on the back.

0:46:140:46:16

Telling me that the painting is by Doris Zinkeisen

0:46:160:46:19

and, on the label, it says "ICI".

0:46:190:46:21

Very strange idea...

0:46:210:46:24

for a chemicals company to have a label on the back of a painting.

0:46:240:46:28

Now, the reason for that is because during the war -

0:46:280:46:32

don't forget, these were the darkest days of the war, 1942 -

0:46:320:46:34

ICI, in order to encourage the Home Front,

0:46:340:46:37

commissioned a series of paintings from different artists,

0:46:370:46:40

but particularly from Doris Zinkeisen, who painted this,

0:46:400:46:45

of women working on the Home Front. This is called The Kitchen Front.

0:46:450:46:48

It's on the label. So, it's a wartime propaganda poster, really.

0:46:480:46:52

It was made as a poster, and this is the original painting.

0:46:520:46:55

Because you didn't know who it was by when you brought it in,

0:46:560:46:58

you hadn't looked at the label, had you?

0:46:580:47:00

I'd seen the ICI part and I wondered what the connection was with ICI.

0:47:000:47:04

-That's always interested me.

-That's the connection.

0:47:040:47:07

So, you didn't know who she was, Doris Zinkeiser?

0:47:070:47:10

She was one of two sisters. Doris and Anna.

0:47:100:47:12

They lived together, shared a studio,

0:47:120:47:14

and they both painted quite similarly.

0:47:140:47:16

But Doris, in my opinion, is the better painter.

0:47:160:47:19

In those days, you might have said

0:47:190:47:22

that she was "only" a poster artist,

0:47:220:47:24

but then her society portraits and, also,

0:47:240:47:27

she worked for the London Theatre doing set design and costume design.

0:47:270:47:31

Raised her up to a much higher level than just that.

0:47:310:47:35

In latter years, we have come

0:47:350:47:36

to really appreciate those very things you like about it -

0:47:360:47:39

its simplicity and the stylised forms.

0:47:390:47:42

-Yes.

-And it's modernity, for 1942.

0:47:420:47:45

So, you didn't know who it was by,

0:47:450:47:47

you didn't know what it was really about, you didn't know its date -

0:47:470:47:50

why did you buy it at all?

0:47:500:47:51

I bought it at an auction, and I bought it simply because I liked it,

0:47:510:47:56

and I still do. I bought it about 20 years ago

0:47:560:47:59

and I just love the simplicity.

0:47:590:48:02

I like the lines of it and the naivety, really.

0:48:020:48:05

It's got a wonderful light to it, and an innocence as well.

0:48:050:48:08

-Yeah, very stylised.

-Very stylised.

0:48:080:48:11

-I like it.

-It is, I think, a really sunny, lovely picture.

0:48:110:48:15

Now, what did you pay for it in that auction 20 years ago?

0:48:150:48:19

It was a few hundred.

0:48:190:48:20

I honestly can't remember, but it was a few hundred.

0:48:200:48:24

That's all right. Well, you know,

0:48:240:48:26

her fashionable portraits from the '20s and '30s,

0:48:260:48:29

which are often of very glamorous society women,

0:48:290:48:32

are quite valuable things.

0:48:320:48:34

In fact, they are very valuable things.

0:48:340:48:36

This is much more interesting than them, to me,

0:48:360:48:38

because it's a wartime thing and it means something.

0:48:380:48:41

She's trying to put a message across.

0:48:410:48:44

But, nonetheless, I can't put it at the 20-30,000 that they are.

0:48:440:48:47

I'm going to put £2-3,00 on this one.

0:48:470:48:50

Oh, wow. Thank you.

0:48:500:48:52

Yeah. I honestly didn't expect that, no.

0:48:520:48:55

Regular viewers of the Roadshow may remember me at Walmer Castle

0:48:570:49:00

last year when I found the most fantastic collection

0:49:000:49:03

of Martin Brothers pottery. And here we are,

0:49:030:49:06

before Arley Hall and you've turned up with this monumental piece

0:49:060:49:10

of Martin Brothers for me. But how's it come in to your possession?

0:49:100:49:14

Well, my grandfather had a collection of Martinware,

0:49:140:49:19

which has just always been in the family.

0:49:190:49:22

And he lived in Battersea,

0:49:220:49:24

and I think he probably collected it around

0:49:240:49:28

about the time it was made and produced.

0:49:280:49:32

So, we're talking about the beginning of the 20th century, are we?

0:49:320:49:35

-Yes.

-So was he a man of means?

0:49:350:49:38

I wouldn't like to say. He died before I was born,

0:49:380:49:41

but I think he must have had some money

0:49:410:49:44

to be able to buy such things.

0:49:440:49:47

Well, it would suggest, at that time, if he was a businessman,

0:49:470:49:50

if he was a professional man,

0:49:500:49:52

he would have probably been going up to Holborn,

0:49:520:49:54

to the premises where they used to retail the wares.

0:49:540:49:57

But look at it, What a fantastic piece of work for them.

0:49:570:50:00

Beautifully pottered. This is all characteristic.

0:50:000:50:03

You know, the carving, the scrolls, the faces, these grotesques...

0:50:030:50:07

We do have one slight issue, do we not?

0:50:070:50:10

We certainly do. Yes. Yes.

0:50:100:50:11

Let's just have a quick look round the other side,

0:50:110:50:14

and what was once a fairly stunning and spectacular, perfect vase

0:50:140:50:18

is now a rather stunning and spectacular...damaged vase.

0:50:180:50:23

What happened here?

0:50:230:50:25

The Martinware pottery was packed up during the war,

0:50:250:50:28

and they had a cellar,

0:50:280:50:30

and I was told that it was damaged by a bomb.

0:50:300:50:33

Was this the only one that met with damage?

0:50:330:50:36

That's the only one that was damaged.

0:50:360:50:38

Well, out of a collection,

0:50:380:50:40

to have only one and the rest survive is no bad thing.

0:50:400:50:44

But it is a shame, and obviously, it IS going to impact on it.

0:50:440:50:48

Had the Luftwaffe not dropped a bomb so perfectly placed

0:50:480:50:51

to take away the foot on your vase,

0:50:510:50:53

you would have been looking in its perfect order

0:50:530:50:56

somewhere in the region of £8,000-10,000.

0:50:560:50:58

Oh, good heavens.

0:50:580:51:00

Oh, wow! That is just amazing.

0:51:000:51:04

But what did they cost you?

0:51:040:51:06

Where is that value now?

0:51:060:51:08

Well, it's not so bad.

0:51:090:51:11

Because Martin Brothers collectors are tolerant and I still think,

0:51:110:51:15

despite all of this, despite that loss, despite that damage,

0:51:150:51:20

it's worth about £3,000 in today's market.

0:51:200:51:22

My goodness. But all the damage?

0:51:220:51:25

-With all the damage.

-That's just amazing.

0:51:250:51:27

Whenever I think of images of Victorian streets, shops,

0:51:290:51:34

I think of very visual and colourful enamel signs like this.

0:51:340:51:40

So where did you get this sign?

0:51:400:51:42

This sign was bought while on holiday in Cornwall with my parents,

0:51:420:51:46

-when I was a child.

-You bought a few, did you, as a family?

0:51:460:51:49

Yes, it's been in a collection over the years.

0:51:490:51:51

-Right.

-There was about four that we bought while we were on holiday.

0:51:510:51:54

Has the collection grown?

0:51:540:51:56

Yeah. There's about 35, 40 that we've got now.

0:51:560:51:59

Fantastic. And of course they were originally made for use outside.

0:51:590:52:03

And I think we can see that there's rusting,

0:52:030:52:06

there's wear where somebody has obviously hammered them

0:52:060:52:09

onto a wall, and, I mean, they do fake them now.

0:52:090:52:12

So, as far as an old one's concerned,

0:52:120:52:14

you should be looking for this dark rust staining

0:52:140:52:17

and lots of wear and tear.

0:52:170:52:18

What caught my eye with this one is, obviously,

0:52:180:52:21

the central beautiful Greek maiden.

0:52:210:52:25

And, of course, she's chiselling the title of the sign -

0:52:250:52:28

"There's No Tea like Phillips's" -

0:52:280:52:30

with a mallet, but what the enamel designers have done,

0:52:300:52:35

they've taken an image, really, from a Victorian painting.

0:52:350:52:39

These do evoke a past age like nothing else.

0:52:390:52:43

Their heyday was 1870 through to the 1950s,

0:52:430:52:48

and, of course, with modern advertising,

0:52:480:52:51

the life of these very expensive signs was soon over.

0:52:510:52:56

The market for these has really grown.

0:52:560:52:58

This is a very good example. Super state.

0:52:580:53:02

I would suspect at auction it's going to make around £2,500.

0:53:020:53:06

Really?

0:53:060:53:08

Thank you.

0:53:100:53:11

Now, you know, for those people who watch this programme regularly,

0:53:130:53:17

and I am told that there ARE people

0:53:170:53:19

-who watch this programme fairly regularly...

-Yes.

0:53:190:53:21

..they will know that when they look at a brooch like that,

0:53:210:53:26

that it's Art Deco.

0:53:260:53:28

Which would mean it was probably made in the 1920s or '30s.

0:53:280:53:33

Now, have you had this brooch in your family since the 1920s or '30s?

0:53:330:53:38

No, I've had it since the '50s.

0:53:380:53:41

I inherited it from my mother-in-law.

0:53:410:53:44

-Right.

-And she bought it from Robb's the jewellers in Pitlochry.

0:53:440:53:48

-Right.

-And Mr Robb told her...

0:53:480:53:52

that the emeralds with the diamonds round it

0:53:520:53:56

was originally drop earrings for the Seventh Duchess of Atholl.

0:53:560:54:00

And that, of course, is a tremendous provenance

0:54:020:54:06

-and pedigree, because that's Blair Castle...

-Blair Castle.

0:54:060:54:09

..in Perthshire, which is located

0:54:090:54:11

what, seven, eight miles away from Pitlochry?

0:54:110:54:13

-Yes.

-For the benefit of everybody watching,

0:54:130:54:16

let me show you, YOU know this, but in classic Deco fashion,

0:54:160:54:21

it's not just one component, it's two,

0:54:210:54:25

and if you turn it over, there are a pair of clips at the back.

0:54:250:54:30

So, what you do, you pull back the prong fitting like that...

0:54:300:54:35

you pull out the clip like that...

0:54:350:54:38

..and then you can wear one...

0:54:400:54:43

-As a clip.

-..as a clip on each side of your little jacket.

0:54:430:54:46

-I've worn it once like that.

-Have you?

0:54:460:54:48

If I just put that back into place again, and close it up,

0:54:480:54:53

let's talk about what it's set in.

0:54:530:54:55

-White metal. Platinum.

-Yes.

-You know that.

-Yes.

0:54:550:54:59

Look at those stones! What fantastic colour they are.

0:54:590:55:05

-What you know about those?

-I know they're emeralds.

0:55:060:55:09

-They are.

-But I don't know much more.

0:55:090:55:12

-All right, well, shall I tell you something about them?

-Yes.

0:55:120:55:14

The best ones in the world come from Colombia.

0:55:140:55:17

-Yes.

-They are of that genre.

0:55:170:55:21

-Yes.

-They are set in borders of diamonds

0:55:210:55:25

in pear-shaped frames and larger diamonds

0:55:250:55:29

going round the outside.

0:55:290:55:31

Each of the stones weighs over - in my assessment - two carats.

0:55:310:55:39

So there's probably two carats, two carats...four carats.

0:55:390:55:45

-Might be a bit more than that, but I'm being a bit careful here.

-Yes.

0:55:450:55:48

And the diamond frames.

0:55:480:55:50

-Oh, that's good.

-Everybody likes things like this.

0:55:500:55:54

And everybody likes a bit of colour like that,

0:55:540:55:57

because they are really, really super-duper,

0:55:570:56:01

top-of-the-range stones.

0:56:010:56:03

What do I think they're worth?

0:56:040:56:06

Well, I think your brooch

0:56:060:56:09

is probably worth something in the region...

0:56:090:56:13

of £40,000 today.

0:56:130:56:16

That's nice.

0:56:160:56:18

What are you going to do with it, now?

0:56:180:56:20

I'm going to do exactly what I've done with it the past few years.

0:56:200:56:23

Keep it, wear it when I go to something nice,

0:56:230:56:26

and eventually, my daughter behind me will inherit it.

0:56:260:56:30

It really is a truly splendid Deco brooch,

0:56:300:56:36

of high quality,

0:56:360:56:38

-it's a classy piece and I congratulate you.

-Thank you.

0:56:380:56:41

What a gorgeous brooch.

0:56:440:56:46

I wouldn't mind being that daughter who is going to inherit it.

0:56:460:56:49

Walking around with a £40,000 brooch? Lucky girl!

0:56:490:56:53

Our day here is drawing to a close. Our crowds are leaving.

0:56:530:56:56

We've been very glad to have them. And from the whole Roadshow team

0:56:560:56:59

here at Arley Hall, until next time, bye-bye.

0:56:590:57:01

A return visit to the enchanting gardens of Arley Hall in Cheshire finds Fiona Bruce and the team of experts hard at work. It's a rich day of finds as family treasures come under scrutiny. Amongst the objects featured are a portrait of a visitor's mother which was painted in India in the 1950s and identified by Asian art specialist Amin Jaffer as a superb example of a now highly collected artist whose work commands high prices today.

There's a poignant diary hidden from Japanese guards by a prisoner of war whilst building the bridge over the River Kwai. And diamonds and emeralds once worn by a duchess deliver a final flourish as expert John Benjamin gets excited by their quality and sparkle.