Janice Long v Mike Read Bargain Hunt Famous Finds


Janice Long v Mike Read

Radio 2 presenter Janice Long competes against perennial broadcaster and writer Mike Read to see who can find the best buys at an antique centre in London.


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Transcript


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MUSIC: "Video Killed The Radio Star" by Buggles

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So, video killed the radio star, did it? Well, not on this programme.

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Because our two famous faces today are equally famed for their fabulous voices

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and they're being welcomed with open arms, as we go Bargain Hunting.

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Hello, and welcome to Bargain Hunt Famous Finds.

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Ha! That's enough of him.

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It's all about radio today

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at Alfie's Antiques Market, in jolly old London

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as our disc jockey famous finders go head-to-head.

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Or should I say, mike-to-mike?

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We're used to their confident, dulcet tones on the airways.

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But have they got what it takes to bargain and spin a profit?

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Of course, they do have the advantage of their very own hand-picked expert

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and £300 to go and find their three items.

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And the team that makes the most profit, gets Top Of The Pops.

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For the Red team, we have the multi award-winning DJ, Mike Read.

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He's been in the business for over 30 years, going professional when he started at Reading's Radio 210.

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Radio One beckoned a few years later

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and Mike soon became a household name, both on radio and as a TV presenter.

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A whole generation of young people woke up to watch Mike on Saturday Superstore.

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If you want to avert your eyes, you can.

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We have a selection of highlights from this series coming up.

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If you want to run screaming into the other room, going, "Aaah!

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"I can't bear to see them again." Here they come.

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He was also a regular on Top Of The Pops.

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Here's a guy who doesn't need loads of money.

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At number nine this week, Prince, with Alphabet Street.

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He's an author, painter and songwriter.

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So, obviously, a man of many talents.

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But, will those hold him in good stead, today?

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So, Mike, you've been in the public eye now for a long time.

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How did you first start in radio?

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Well, I got into local radio, it was run by a guy called Neil.

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He called me over and said, "Look, I want you on my radio station for three reasons."

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He said, "You're very English, you're mildly eccentric and you're a good opening bowler."

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-Ha!

-He was starting a cricket team, as well.

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I was a fast bowler at the time. 'Course, I got progressively slower over the years

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until I didn't bowl at all. But at the time, it was being a fast bowler, I rather suspect, that got me in.

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What sort of things do you collect?

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I'm an unwitting collector. I never mean to collect things.

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-But I have about a million tracks in my record collection. A big photo library.

-How many tracks?

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-A million tracks.

-A million tracks?!

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-Yes.

-But you also have literary interests, don't you?

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Yes. My first stage musical was on Rupert Brooke. I've always written poetry.

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And then we founded the Rupert Brooke Society, at Grantchester, in 1999.

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I edited the magazine for many years, and was chairman.

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And I've got a lot of Brooke memorabilia.

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We're going to find out more, about one of those collections, later on in the programme.

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But who have you brought with you, today, to help with the Red team?

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I've brought the masterful and knowledgeable Ken Wharf here, who's an expert.

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-How do you do, Ken?

-Thank you. Thanks for that, Mike.

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And what walk of life have you come from, Ken?

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Well, when I first met Mike, in the late '80s,

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I was at that time working for the late Diana, Princess of Wales.

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-Were you?

-I was doing what they call a reconnaissance, in Austria.

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I was a lone figure, in a luxurious five-star hotel.

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And I was very envious of this group of drinkers to my right.

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One of them was the celebrated Mike Read and Sir Cliff.

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I think Mike felt sorry for me, this guy on his own

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and said, come over for a drink. Which I did.

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-Were you a Royal Protection Officer, then, officially?

-Yeah, yeah.

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I joined the Royal Protection Squad, at Scotland Yard, in 1986. Great, great period of time.

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So, Mike, how are you going to fare today, as a bargain hunter?

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I think we're on fire. I think we're at match fitness now.

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We're just ready to peak and ready to go. I'm, I'm...

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-Bring it on, now, is the...

-That's brave fighting stuff.

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I think you're going to make an excellent team.

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We're looking forward to this. Let's see who the Reds are up against.

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It's BBC2 DJ Janice Long.

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BBC Radio Merseyside, in Liverpool, was the first stop for Janice's presenting career.

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She became known for the live Streetlife sessions.

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She then moved on to Radio 1.

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Where she became the first female DJ to present Top Of The Pops.

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-This is Janice's mum's all-time favourite singer.

-Hi, Mum.

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Tonight you've come as a wing half.

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-And I've come as a Picasso painting.

-Thanks(!)

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Janice has always been a champion of new music.

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She now presents the midnight to 3AM slot on Radio 2.

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But has she had enough sleep today to give Mike a run for his money?

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So, Janice, welcome to Bargain Hunt.

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-Thank you for having me. Hello.

-Hello.

-Hello.

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How did your big break come about, then?

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I applied to the BBC. Didn't get the job. They said I wasn't very worldly.

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So, I applied and got a job to be an air stewardess.

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Cos I speak a couple of languages and I thought, I can use them.

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After being an air stewardess, I went off and tried to hitch to Greece.

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Ran out of money in Amsterdam, and ended up living in a tent for nearly a year.

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Went off grape picking after that. Came back to the UK

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and a letter from the Beeb had followed me around, sort of saying, yes, now you're worldly.

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-Ah!

-Then I got offered a job at Radio 1.

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Now I'm at Radio 2, and still, you know, searching for new bands

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and having bands in session, and stuff, which I love.

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Well, in this programme, we recently had your brother, Keith Chegwin.

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-Has he been giving you any tips?

-No, he's tight-lipped.

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-What, Keith Chegwin?

-Wouldn't give me one hint.

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All he said was, "You'll have a lovely time.

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"Lovely people." "What goes on?" "I'm not telling you."

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Really?! Now, who have you brought along with you?

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Well, I asked my son, Fred...

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-Fred... if he would like to do it.

-Yes.

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Expecting him to go, "Not doing that."

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-And he went, "Yeah. Be happy to come along." So, here he is.

-Very nice to meet you, Fred.

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-Nice to meet you, too.

-So, what do you get up to? What are your ambitions?

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Videos, films, music videos.

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At the moment, I'm making music videos.

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Hopefully with a view to going into films. I'm writing a film at the moment, too.

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-And do you mind my asking, how old are you, Fred?

-20.

-20 years of age.

-Yup.

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Well, we're going to have youthful enthusiasm.

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You do go back together professionally, for a long time.

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Yeah, when I joined Radio 1, Mike was doing The Breakfast Show.

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And when you go somewhere, and they're all famous...

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-Yes.

-..you don't know what's going on.

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-He was nice to you.

-He's an absolutely lovely, lovely man.

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Why are you laughing when I said he was lovely man?! INDISTINCT REPLY

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They meet... they meet in Austrian bars, you see.

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When they're rubbing shoulders with European royalty.

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Now, the money moment.

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£300 a piece. You know the rules. Your experts await, and off you go! And very, very, very good luck.

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Do you know something? All of this is music to my ears.

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They might be experts in the world of radio

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but they're going to get a bit of help from our experts in the field of antiques.

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Tuning in for the Reds is Kate Bliss.

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And not singing but looking after the Blues is David Barby. Oh, dear!

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-Oh, what do you think about this?

-Visually, that's fantastic.

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I like that.

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It's like going to a great aunt's for tea, when you're a kid, isn't it?

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-It just wants sandwiches placed on it. Cucumber sandwiches, Mike, doesn't it?

-No crusts.

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-No crusts.

-And a few iced fancies.

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Oh, yes. Exceedingly good. Well, let's have a look at the plates.

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It's really nice to have three tiers on a cake stand. Rather than just two.

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Little bit more unusual.

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-I love the, sort of, primitive design of it.

-Fantastic colours.

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They're really vibrant.

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Now, this is... Here we go, we've got factory mark on the back here.

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Minton's - a great British porcelain and pottery factory.

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But if we look closely, you can see the name is impressed there -

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in the pottery - and you've got some numbers underneath.

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So, ten for October and 29, for 1929.

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-So, this is right at the height of Art Deco.

-What is unusual, though...

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it's George V, it's British,

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and yet these pictures, to me, don't say British at all.

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-It's almost got a, sort of, Austrian...mountain appearance to it.

-It has, yes.

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But I love the colour scheme on it. I love the oranges with the pinks.

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And that sort of cream. Visually, I think it's a great piece.

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This particular design is by a lady called Joan Shorter.

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Now, she was actually the adopted daughter of Clarice Cliff.

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-Oh!

-So, there is a Clarice Cliff connection there.

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But pieces, perhaps a little more affordable, are, sort of, gaining momentum, I think.

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But I rather like it for it's naivety.

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They're almost, sort of, nursery images of the cow, there.

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There's no real theme to it. But the colours, when you consider...what 1929?

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-Are these enamel painted on?

-Yes. It's transfer printed.

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And then hand-painted over the top, with these bright colours.

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That's a great thing to eat your sandwiches and your cakes off.

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-Cucumber sandwich.

-I can see that going quite well at our auction cos it's got Art Deco appeal.

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-So, I think we ought to find out what price it is, and what we can negotiate.

-I think it's good.

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I see on here that famous old bread, the boy going up the hill with a bike.

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I think so.

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THEY HUM HOVIS ADVERT TUNE

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Ha, ha, ha! I don't know, those boys!

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They think they've got something unique at £45.

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-But the Blue team seem to have similar tastes.

-Well, Janice,

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this is the sort of thing that I did not expect you to pick up.

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I'm thinking that, that is the sort of thing that's collectable.

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It looks as though it would be sought after.

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-That kind of Clarence, what's his name?

-Cliff?

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-Cliff. Him? Her?

-Her.

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And...so, you know, it's the sort of thing people are always on the look out for.

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And maybe it's part of an era. Who is it?

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Well, that's a little pixie.

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And this was designed... There's the name there. What's it say?

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< Mabel.

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-Lucie Attwell.

-That's right. Mabel Lucie Attwell.

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She worked for Shelley between 1928 and 1936.

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This one dates from probably around about 1928 period,

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because it's got this yellow lid. And that dates from that period.

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-The teapot's shaped like a little toadstool.

-It is.

-It's so beautiful.

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It's echoes from the past, you know, the things that we might have seen in 1930 movies.

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This is quite delightful.

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I love this type of ware.

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It's pottery. And it's very collectable.

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You can get complete sets.

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We're missing the milk jug, sugar basin, little plates and little cups and saucers.

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-But collectors will probably have those.

-So, they just add?

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Yes, they'll just add to these.

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You imagine a mass of them, on a wall, on a stand.

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They'd look superb.

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I think this is absolutely super. Fred, do you like it?

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I wouldn't particularly have it in my room, or anything.

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-It's not you, is it?

-It's a quirky little piece. I quite like the pixie on it.

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Yes, I think it is quirky. That's a good interpretation of it.

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Let's have a look at the mark.

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Shelley. She fell out with Shelley in 1936.

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So this had a limited run. Between 1928 and 1936.

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OK. So, that makes it even more collectable?

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Yes. Because how many of these have survived? There's no chips.

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Spout's all right. Let's have a look at the lid.

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It's one of those difficult lids, that you can rarely open easily.

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There's no damage there. In fact, there's no staining inside. I wonder if it was ever used.

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-No tanning. No.

-I've just seen the price. Look, £145.

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-Oh, Lord!

-Not paying that.

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That's half our budget, isn't it?

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Right. Fred, are you forceful?

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-Yeah, when I want to be.

-God, you see how he said that?

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That's my boy.

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-Right, try and get the price...

-Will do.

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..at a more reasonable figure.

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Fred used his forceful charm and got the Shelley teapot for £85

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leaving the Blues a healthy £215 for their next two items.

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Mike, you brought some things to show us.

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-Yes.

-That relate to Rupert Brooke.

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Just tell us, what is it about Rupert Brooke

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-that really gets you going?

-He looked modern.

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Amongst all his contemporaries, he almost looked as if he belonged to

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a different era, considering he died at the age of 27.

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Sort of, optimum age for a rock artist to die.

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And I think, had it been that era, his face would have been the badge, the T-shirt, etc. He was an icon.

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He was referred to as, you know, the most handsome man in England.

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He charmed people at Rugby, at Cambridge.

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He was the epitome of the young, blond hero that went to war.

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He was a tremendous poser in a way.

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He'd write five letters from one place in a day...

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one to his mother, one to a girlfriend,

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one to a friend, one to somebody else, one to an old lecturer.

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And they'd all portray a totally different man.

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-Now, you bought some pieces. Have these come from the museum?

-Yeah.

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We set up the Rupert Brooke Society at The Orchard, at Grantchester. Where Brooke lived.

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This is Brooke's diary, when he was at The Orchard from 1908.

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There he is having breakfast with Geoffrey Keynes, Maynard Keynes' brother.

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He was an eminent surgeon. Maynard Keynes, famous economist.

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They were all part of the same circle. And there is the Fabian Society.

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He became a leading Fabian, but...

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-This is an incredibly personal document, then.

-It's a very personal document.

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-Mike, tell us about these? Sunglasses, I suppose they are, aren't they?

-Yeah.

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They're Brooke's sunglasses, that he took around with him.

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-These were with him, quite a lot.

-They're rather nice.

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Because you can sometimes get these sunglasses and spectacles with silver frames.

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But these are in steel.

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And what I think is really nice are these hinged sections filled with gauze.

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So, that if Brooke was wearing these in an open vehicle, in some way,

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you'd keep the muck out, from the corners of your eyes.

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-And, they work.

-We accept sunglasses now.

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-But I'm guessing then, they would have been a little unusual.

-Definitely.

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You'd have to have money, before you went and bought a pair like this.

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-Well, congratulations on your passion.

-Thank you.

-And for sharing it with us.

-Pleasure.

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# ..We're having fun sitting in the back seat

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# Kissing and a-hugging with Fred...# Oi, what you doing? >

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Fred, what are you doing? Phoning seven little girls? Ha!

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I was just looking at this phone. It's quite...retro.

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-I like the look of it. I'd have that in my room.

-You can't text on it.

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I think that's absolutely fabulous.

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It's the sort of thing I would imagine you going for.

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-Do you like looking through the workings of things?

-Yeah. It's quite... Ah, it's quite interesting.

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Look, Janice, you can even see the bells inside. Can you see that?

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That is brilliant. And all the wires and connections.

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-I think this is called a skeleton phone.

-Oh, right.

-Cos you can see all the way through it.

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Date wise, I think it's 1970s?

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1970s, 1980s. That sort of period.

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-These were produced by other companies, than the GPO.

-Ah.

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Because they had the monopoly on phones, up until a certain time

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which I think was the late '60s, early '70s.

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And then everybody started producing phones, in plastic mediums. Think of the Mickey Mouse ones.

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-Oh, exactly.

-They were superb.

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And then you had a huge variety of colours. This is offbeat, cos you can see right through it.

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And I notice, whilst you're holding this, Fred, is that...

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that's a modern connection.

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So, you just plug it in and use it immediately.

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-Would that sell?

-Depends on the price. What's the price?

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-£25.

-£25. That sounds cheap, really. You know, we've seen other ones -

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those coloured ones - pink ones, and goodness knows what...£80.

0:15:420:15:46

25 is remarkably good because I think this is a little bit more clever.

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-But if he can get it for less?

-If he can, brilliant.

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-Go on, then. Work your charms.

-All right, yeah.

-OK.

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At least he's found something that HE really likes.

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-Can identify with, yeah. That's very good.

-Exactly.

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So, what can identify with you?

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I've no idea. Can we keep looking?

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Right, said Fred as he rang up £10 for the phone.

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Ah, I've found you.

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Hi. Oh, that's nice.

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-But look what I've got.

-Uh-huh.

0:16:160:16:19

Now, dare I say it, I think this might be a bit of winner.

0:16:190:16:21

-What is it?

-Do you know what it is?

-No.

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Well, it's basically called a cabaret tray.

0:16:230:16:26

-Cabaret?

-Cabaret, yeah.

0:16:260:16:27

-As in cabaret tea set. Now, this...

-Fantastic colours.

-It is, isn't it?

0:16:270:16:32

-It's typical Crown Derby.

-Oh, right.

0:16:320:16:34

A factory in Staffordshire, in the 19th century. But then progressed into the 20th century.

0:16:340:16:39

And this is known as the Imari pattern.

0:16:390:16:41

It's what they call this iron red, vibrant blue and gilt.

0:16:410:16:47

Started in Imari, in Japan, where ancient pottery really was produced.

0:16:470:16:52

And they developed glazes in this palette.

0:16:520:16:55

And the Victorians loved this kind of Japanese look.

0:16:550:16:58

And Crown Derby really picked it up and ran with it

0:16:580:17:03

and developed a whole range of tea and coffee wares, in this vibrant pattern.

0:17:030:17:08

-Would there be, somewhere, a tea service that went with this?

-There would, yes.

0:17:080:17:11

And if you look very closely here, you've a little impressed square.

0:17:110:17:16

-Can you see that?

-Yup.

-And that is the date code for 1889.

0:17:160:17:19

-Oh, right.

-It's in very good condition.

0:17:190:17:21

Exactly, Ken. That's exactly what I was going to say.

0:17:210:17:24

The best thing about it, is the condition.

0:17:240:17:26

This gilt wears actually really quite easily.

0:17:260:17:29

You know, just a bit of wear, a bit of rubbing from the teapot and cups,

0:17:290:17:33

and that will start to be scratched and marked.

0:17:330:17:36

And really, it's in incredible condition. It's lovely.

0:17:360:17:39

-Another winner here, by the look of it.

-I think we're on a winner.

0:17:390:17:42

What what would this... you think, we could we get this for?

0:17:420:17:46

I think, this might make 200, maybe even £250.

0:17:460:17:51

But, I think, with a bit of careful negotiation from yourselves,

0:17:510:17:55

we might be able to get it around the £150 mark.

0:17:550:17:57

OK. So, we could, we get £100 mark up on it, possibly.

0:17:570:18:01

Possibly. OK. Let's go and do a deal.

0:18:010:18:03

The deal was done at £150.

0:18:030:18:05

They better get a move on with their remaining £105. Because time is ticking away.

0:18:050:18:10

Janice has brought along a couple of interesting items that she really loves.

0:18:100:18:15

So, Janice, you brought something precious, did you, to show me?

0:18:150:18:19

We lived in Newbury, in a cottage.

0:18:190:18:21

And we used to go to the boot sale on Sunday.

0:18:210:18:24

And then we'd go off to Marlborough, or Hungerford. And we were always rooting, and finding bits and pieces.

0:18:240:18:29

And I think I've kept them, basically, because it reminds me of a great time - Fred was born.

0:18:290:18:34

We really enjoyed living there.

0:18:340:18:36

And I haven't got the heart to part with them. We don't show them at home, now.

0:18:360:18:40

I look at them and I just appreciate...

0:18:400:18:42

because all of this is hand done, apparently. I think they're French.

0:18:420:18:46

And I just think the soul that's gone into making something like that.

0:18:460:18:49

I love this, the pansy here.

0:18:490:18:52

And the lilac over there.

0:18:520:18:53

-They're sort of a reminder of those happy days in the cottage.

-Yeah, Fred being born.

0:18:530:18:57

And knowing that you're interested in this sort of thing,

0:18:570:19:01

we've had a little scout around Alfie's.

0:19:010:19:03

And have got a selection of these wall vases, or pockets, which they're sometimes called.

0:19:030:19:07

And it is an incredible variety of shapes and forms, that you can have, for a little wall vase. Isn't it?

0:19:070:19:14

I mean, they're really quite kitsch. This, I think, I've never seen before. A pair of wall pockets.

0:19:140:19:19

But it looks like a plated teapot.

0:19:190:19:22

And you've got the reservoir again.

0:19:220:19:24

-Yeah.

-So, two halves of a teapot, effectively.

0:19:240:19:27

I think they're seriously oddball.

0:19:270:19:29

-Would be great in a cafe or something.

-Yeah, in a cafe. Absolutely. Cheers!

0:19:290:19:33

-Earl Grey? No.

-No.

0:19:330:19:34

Half an Earl Grey. Thanks very much. Half a pint.

0:19:340:19:37

And the most valuable one, is this fellow.

0:19:370:19:39

It's got the Shelley mark on it.

0:19:390:19:42

A collectable factory, with this pink and green drizzle.

0:19:420:19:46

And that would cost you £235. Can you believe that?

0:19:460:19:50

This detail here.

0:19:500:19:53

It's almost fantasy. It's like out of a fantasy novel, isn't it?

0:19:530:19:56

It looks like some weird land you're going off into.

0:19:560:19:59

What they've done is when the glaze is still wet

0:19:590:20:01

-they've just let it drizzle, like that.

-Oh, right. And that's the dearest?

0:20:010:20:05

That's by far the dearest.

0:20:050:20:07

But, just as a little example of how these collectables sometimes catch on.

0:20:070:20:12

And what a serious collector of Shelley will pay for a good one.

0:20:120:20:16

It's amazing, isn't it?

0:20:160:20:17

-Bit like you, really.

-Ha!

0:20:170:20:19

As Janice rejoins her team to get their final item,

0:20:190:20:23

Ken's found something that brings back fond memories.

0:20:230:20:27

I remember this year, 1990,

0:20:270:20:29

because The Prince Of Wales had broken his shoulder... or dislocated his shoulder...

0:20:290:20:34

in a polo accident, in Cirencester

0:20:340:20:36

and actually went to Nottingham University, for it to be reset.

0:20:360:20:40

Diana went to visit him on a number of occasions.

0:20:400:20:43

And I think this was a postcard to a very attentive porter,

0:20:430:20:47

that assisted us, in and out of Nottingham Hospital.

0:20:470:20:51

And ironically, after the death of Diana, there's still a huge market for Diana memorabilia,

0:20:510:20:56

and sort of, you know, Christmas cards, particularly.

0:20:560:21:00

I'm told this is actually for sale at £750.

0:21:000:21:03

-There's no way we're going to beat anybody down to £300.

-So, everybody must ask you, Ken.

0:21:030:21:08

I mean, you spent so much time with Diana. And you must have been great friends.

0:21:080:21:12

I wouldn't say I was a great friend. There was a real professional friendship there.

0:21:120:21:16

I spent eight years working with her, someone that would have enjoyed a bargain hunt.

0:21:160:21:20

And would have been an ideal candidate.

0:21:200:21:22

Well, chaps, we better get back to our shopping. Time's running out.

0:21:220:21:26

Come on, you lot! You've still got one item to buy, and not much time to do it in.

0:21:260:21:31

Beatles memorabilia always sells. I've actually found some Beatlemania stuff here,

0:21:310:21:36

that is certainly circa 1963. Maybe just end of '64.

0:21:360:21:41

But these are obviously, cake decorations.

0:21:410:21:44

There's a brown Ringo, a green John, a yellow George and a blue Paul.

0:21:440:21:48

It's in its original package here, unopened, for all that time.

0:21:480:21:53

I think this is, this is maybe not a bad thing. People are always advertising for Beatles memorabilia.

0:21:530:21:58

If we can get it around the, you know, 50 or less,

0:21:580:22:00

maybe we might make 100, might make 80. It's difficult to say, in the current climate.

0:22:000:22:05

-Or, indeed, if two or three people go for it, you might make more.

-Yeah, exactly, great.

-Brilliant.

0:22:050:22:10

As well as the Beatles figures,

0:22:100:22:12

a bonus Twist And Shout single was thrown in,

0:22:120:22:16

all for a total of £35.

0:22:160:22:18

Mike and Janice are rather more accustomed to doing the talking, then perhaps the listening.

0:22:180:22:24

And are they going to listen today, when it comes to their expert and the bonus buy?

0:22:240:22:28

That's the moment when any left over lolly, not used in the shopping

0:22:280:22:32

is taken by the expert, to find that special item that may boost their profits later, at auction.

0:22:320:22:38

Are they going to listen? And will they take the chance? I don't know.

0:22:380:22:42

-Oh, what have you found there?

-That. I want that.

0:22:450:22:48

What is it, a perfume bottle?

0:22:480:22:50

Yeah, perfume spray. Now, why did you like that?

0:22:500:22:53

-I think I was attracted by the design. I like the colour.

-Yes.

-And I like all of this.

0:22:530:22:59

Jazzy, cubey...jaggedy stuff that's going on.

0:22:590:23:03

Fred, have a look at this. Can you see all those designs?

0:23:030:23:07

They're awfully sharp and jagged. That's typical cubist.

0:23:070:23:10

Very nice indeed. I like this.

0:23:100:23:11

You associate the, sort of, jazz age, with that period.

0:23:110:23:14

The music, the syncopated rhythms.

0:23:140:23:16

-All that jazz.

-Yes, all that jazz.

0:23:160:23:18

What's this thing, though? The puffer.

0:23:180:23:21

Well, that's...that's 70 years old.

0:23:210:23:24

Now, you would wilt, 70 years old, wouldn't you?

0:23:240:23:26

-Can I just have a quick look at it?

-Yes.

0:23:260:23:28

-Do you like it?

-Yeah.

0:23:280:23:30

Most importantly, this is named.

0:23:300:23:32

And it's got Daum, Nancy, France.

0:23:320:23:36

-Famous?

-Well-known. Well-known glass manufacturers.

0:23:360:23:41

-Round about the same time as Lalique and Galle.

-OK.

0:23:410:23:44

Probably not as valuable as Lalique.

0:23:440:23:47

But producing excellent work.

0:23:470:23:49

And what I like about this, is that sort of rough, rusticated-type engraving into the glass.

0:23:490:23:55

And then these elements highlighted by polishing.

0:23:550:23:59

That really is quite stunning.

0:23:590:24:00

But when I turned it upside down, I saw the price.

0:24:000:24:04

£150. Now, have we got enough money? I don't think we have.

0:24:040:24:09

Well, we definitely want to keep a bit back for, for our expert to...

0:24:090:24:12

-To spend.

-Use his expertise.

-Oh, £5 is sufficient.

0:24:120:24:15

-Yeah?

-And I can see that on your dressing table?

0:24:150:24:19

-Can we try and get it down?

-Yes, it's up to you.

0:24:190:24:21

-All right.

-Fred's been so good in getting prices. Negotiate it.

0:24:210:24:25

-It's up to you on this occasion. Come on, Fred.

-Oh, thanks, boys(!)

-See you later.

0:24:250:24:30

Excuse me...

0:24:300:24:31

Janice has discovered what she hopes will be a bargain.

0:24:310:24:34

Paying a sweet smelling £65.

0:24:340:24:37

That's the end of the shopping.

0:24:400:24:42

Let's recap on what the Reds bought.

0:24:420:24:44

Well, they're hoping that this Minton cake stand

0:24:440:24:47

will pull in a profit at £45.

0:24:470:24:50

For me, of the three, that's the favourite. That could make us the money.

0:24:500:24:54

Everyone loved the Crown Derby tray.

0:24:540:24:57

I reckon this could be a winner at £150.

0:24:570:25:00

It was a really solid piece.

0:25:000:25:02

And we're going to carry off the laurels with that one, we think.

0:25:020:25:05

Will the Reds twist and shout

0:25:050:25:08

with the £35 Beatles figurines and record?

0:25:080:25:11

Little bit of Beatlemania, coupled with our cake stand, and tray.

0:25:110:25:16

I think we're in for a... I think we're in for a good one here.

0:25:160:25:19

So, did you have a great time shopping, boys?

0:25:190:25:21

-Yeah. I normally don't enjoy shopping. But it was a fun day.

-Well, it is different.

0:25:210:25:26

I think it was a great day. We've had some to fun, thanks to Kate.

0:25:260:25:29

-No, we've had some good times.

-Shopping, shopping, shopping!

0:25:290:25:32

Guiding you lot around.

0:25:320:25:33

You spent a magnificent £230.

0:25:330:25:35

I can't tell you how proud I am of you.

0:25:350:25:38

Give me 70. Oh, wow, man!

0:25:380:25:42

-Kate.

-Thank you.

-Have you had any trouble today, with this lot?

0:25:420:25:45

I have had to keep them on a very tight rein.

0:25:450:25:47

-I can tell. They're quite naughty too, aren't they?

-Very naughty.

0:25:470:25:51

-We were a little bit naughty.

-Naughty on the frisky end of naughty.

0:25:510:25:55

What are you going to do with that 70 smackers?

0:25:550:25:57

Well, we've got Art Deco. We've got pop memorabilia.

0:25:570:25:59

So, I'm going to go for something really traditional.

0:25:590:26:02

-Like you?

-Absolutely.

-Brilliant. Good luck.

0:26:020:26:05

Let's remind ourselves what the Blues bought.

0:26:050:26:08

Will this £85 Shelley teapot pour a profit.

0:26:080:26:12

I think it's '80s. It's old to you.

0:26:120:26:16

Fred found the telephone and negotiated a successful sale,

0:26:160:26:20

paying just...

0:26:200:26:21

-Not something

-I

-would necessarily buy, for myself.

0:26:210:26:25

But, it's going to make a shed full.

0:26:250:26:26

The perfume bottle caught Janice's eye.

0:26:280:26:30

And, at £65, she's hoping it will appeal to some like-minded buyers.

0:26:300:26:34

The perfume, yeah. It was Art Deco, 19...?

0:26:340:26:38

But it's got a failed puffer!

0:26:380:26:39

-IN PSEUDO FRENCH ACCENTS

-Now, Janice, Fred.

-Yes.

0:26:390:26:41

-Did you have a good shopping?

-It was marvellous.

-Was it?

0:26:410:26:44

-IN NORMAL VOICES It was great.

-We're talking about shopping here!

0:26:440:26:47

-It was good, it was good. I enjoyed it. Did you?

-Yeah. I did.

0:26:470:26:49

-You spent a pretty paltry £160. I don't understand that.

-That's all right.

0:26:490:26:53

-It's all right. I'd like £140 of left over lolly, please, Frido.

-There you go.

0:26:530:26:57

Thank you very much. £140 goes to David Barby.

0:26:570:27:00

-That's a nice sum, isn't it?

-It is a nice sum.

0:27:000:27:02

It's a satisfactory amount, I have to say.

0:27:020:27:04

I've got to find something that reflects their interests.

0:27:040:27:07

-Not going to be easy.

-Well, I don't know, I've seen one or two things.

0:27:070:27:11

-Ah, you cunning monkey, you.

-Yes.

-Off you go, David.

0:27:110:27:13

For us, it's time to head off to the auction and find out who's number one in the charts.

0:27:130:27:19

We're staying in London for our auction today.

0:27:210:27:24

And our Red team is off to a slow start. I don't believe it!

0:27:240:27:28

Oh, no, £25, minus £10.

0:27:280:27:32

While the Blues are finding it hard to make a decision.

0:27:320:27:35

You're sure you're sure? You going to go with it, or not?

0:27:350:27:38

-Quickly.

-No.

-Yes. No, no.

-No?

-No.

-No.

0:27:380:27:41

All that coming up in a minute.

0:27:410:27:43

But, before we get underway, I'm going to have a quick chat with the auction valuer.

0:27:430:27:47

Well, we sloped across town, to Criterion Auctions in Wandsworth

0:27:490:27:53

-with Addison Gelpey, our valuer. Addison, how are you?

-Good. Lovely to see you again, Tim.

0:27:530:27:58

Very nice to see you, too. And first up, for Mike and Ken then, is this three-tier cake stand. Any good?

0:27:580:28:03

It's not that fantastic. I mean, people don't really have cake stands nowadays, in the 21st century.

0:28:030:28:09

-On the whole.

-No.

-And it's a Minton cake stand, silver-plated.

0:28:090:28:13

-I've sort of valued it at about £30-£50.

-Well, that's fine.

0:28:130:28:16

-£45 is what they paid. At least they're in the frame.

-They're in the frame, yes.

0:28:160:28:20

I was frightened that you might have said, £10 to £20. But...

0:28:200:28:24

No, it's, it's got a chance.

0:28:240:28:26

It's a bit tired. But it's got a chance.

0:28:260:28:28

Talking about pretty and decorative. How do you rate this Crown Derby tray?

0:28:280:28:31

Well, it quite a smacker.

0:28:310:28:33

It's very in your face.

0:28:330:28:35

It's clean as a whistle. Late 19th century. Imari with a flower pattern.

0:28:350:28:39

But it is print, not hand-painted.

0:28:390:28:41

We valued it at sort of 80-120.

0:28:410:28:43

Is that all? £150 they went for.

0:28:430:28:47

-Oh.

-Kate's very, very keen on this. Think it's too much? £150.

0:28:470:28:51

I think it will struggle to get to £150.

0:28:510:28:54

But 80-120, it's got a good chance.

0:28:540:28:56

Something completely different. Beatlemania.

0:28:560:28:59

The little 45 and the plastic figures.

0:28:590:29:02

Well, everyone loves The Beatles.

0:29:020:29:03

It will appeal to quite a few people. So, we'll see how it goes. But I've put an estimate of...

0:29:030:29:08

-sort of, 20-50, hopeful.

-Yes.

0:29:080:29:11

-Good broad spread that, isn't it?

-Well, yeah.

0:29:110:29:14

20-50. £35 they paid, you see.

0:29:140:29:17

So that is looking a bit tight on the edge.

0:29:170:29:19

-We'll see.

-It's all going to hang on this big tray.

0:29:190:29:23

But, just in case, perhaps we ought to have a look at the bonus buy. And here it is.

0:29:230:29:27

Now, Ken and Mike, you spent £230.

0:29:270:29:30

-You gave £70 of leftover lolly to our Kate.

-A foolish move.

0:29:300:29:33

A foolish move.

0:29:330:29:35

But strictly necessary. What did she buy?

0:29:350:29:38

Well, it was rather foolish. Because I bought a bit of a lady's piece.

0:29:380:29:42

But it was a bargain.

0:29:420:29:43

Which is why I have purchased it, for you good sirs.

0:29:430:29:47

It's a rather beautiful silver and tortoiseshell little, trinket box.

0:29:470:29:51

With what's known as piquet work in the top.

0:29:510:29:53

Inlaid silver in the tortoiseshell, which does look a little bit dirty

0:29:530:29:57

but would clean up beautifully.

0:29:570:29:59

Inside...now, this is the hitch...

0:29:590:30:02

it is a wee bit shabby, as you can see.

0:30:020:30:05

It needs some restoration.

0:30:050:30:06

But, if that was in really good nick, that's a couple of £100's worth.

0:30:060:30:10

-Is it?

-I paid £70, which I think was pretty good.

0:30:100:30:13

For a hallmarked bit of silver and tortoiseshell.

0:30:130:30:16

-Very pretty for your lady's dressing table.

-Well, I haven't got a clue.

0:30:160:30:19

We're taking you at your word here. I wouldn't have a clue what it was.

0:30:190:30:22

-Kate's advice has always been good.

-It's been jolly good.

0:30:220:30:25

-Jolly good.

-Good hinge, Mike.

0:30:250:30:27

A good hinge is always important, Ken. Without the hinge,

0:30:270:30:31

-it's just a two pieces.

-It's bad luck being unhinged, isn't it?

0:30:310:30:34

-You'd be happy with this as a gift, wouldn't you, Kate?

-Delighted.

0:30:340:30:37

Mark you, Kate's very happy with any gift that comes her way. Right?

0:30:370:30:41

-I'm not a fussy girl.

-No, no, no, quite.

0:30:410:30:44

We trust her. The tortoiseshell looks magnificent, the silver looks wonderful. The legs...

0:30:440:30:49

the legs look terrific. I like, I quite like the little legs there.

0:30:490:30:53

And is there another question that you need to ask Kate?

0:30:530:30:56

Kate, how much did you pay for this?

0:30:560:30:57

-That was £70.

-£70. With your expertise, Kate, could we turn the magic 100 on this, do you think?

0:30:570:31:03

-I would hope that should make £100.

-Really?

-Yes, I would hope so.

-OK.

0:31:030:31:06

You don't decide right now. You decide after the sale of the first three items.

0:31:060:31:10

But, for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Kate's sweet little box.

0:31:100:31:16

-That's a nice, genuine, real little object.

-Yeah.

0:31:160:31:20

I mean, it's sort of silver inlay.

0:31:200:31:22

It's got... it's tortoiseshell, as well. Which gives it a nice look.

0:31:220:31:26

It's a little bit tired on the inside.

0:31:260:31:28

But it's a pretty thing and it's got, it's got a good chance.

0:31:280:31:32

We've put, I think, 60-100 on it.

0:31:320:31:34

Kate paid £70. 60-100, should be a profit in there.

0:31:340:31:38

That's if they go with the bonus buy.

0:31:380:31:40

Anyway, that's it for the Reds.

0:31:400:31:42

Now for the Blues. Janice and Fred, they've gone with the Shelley teapot.

0:31:420:31:47

Now, this again, is very mass produced.

0:31:470:31:50

It's got that Clarice Cliff look about it

0:31:500:31:52

so people are drawn to it. We've put an estimate at sort of 20-30 on it.

0:31:520:31:57

-How much?

-20 to 30.

-They paid £85 for that!

0:31:570:32:00

Oh, my goodness me! OK, well, they'll be very, very lucky indeed if they get close to that.

0:32:000:32:06

But I've been wrong before. Let's hope it does well for them.

0:32:060:32:10

-So, we live in hope?

-We do, definitely.

0:32:100:32:12

Brilliant. What about the plastic telephone?

0:32:120:32:15

I mean, it's a retro thing.

0:32:150:32:16

It's not a genuine phone

0:32:160:32:18

but I guess it would work?

0:32:180:32:20

Yeah, it would work.

0:32:200:32:22

I like the look of it. It's definite retro.

0:32:220:32:24

We sell retro quite well here.

0:32:240:32:26

-Not high value.

-Got the look, though, hasn't it?

0:32:260:32:28

There'll be lights going on in there.

0:32:280:32:31

And somebody may get it. But we've only put a 20-30 estimate on it.

0:32:310:32:34

That's fine. They paid £10.

0:32:340:32:35

-Well, they've got a good chance.

-That's a good buy, at £10?

-I think so.

0:32:350:32:39

How do you rate this deco glass atomiser?

0:32:390:32:42

Well, French Daum is the maker.

0:32:420:32:44

Sometimes they go for up to, sort of, £5,000 - £10,000 on the really special stuff.

0:32:440:32:48

-But this is not as special as we'd like.

-No.

0:32:480:32:51

-It's a little bit tired on the pump. And there's a bit of damage over here on the...

-Metal work.

0:32:510:32:56

-But most important part's the glass, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:32:560:32:59

The glass is perfect. Needs a clean, but it's perfect.

0:32:590:33:02

We've got a lot of hope on this. I mean, Barby is passionate about it.

0:33:020:33:06

It's quite a good find. We've put 80-150 on it.

0:33:060:33:09

-Hopefully we'll get a bit of interest in it.

-He'll be delighted. £65 paid, you see.

0:33:090:33:12

There's a real chance that's going to do OK.

0:33:120:33:15

-Yes.

-Personally, I think the teapot should take off.

0:33:150:33:18

But we shall see. And just in case, let's have a look at the bonus buy.

0:33:180:33:22

Now, Janice and Frido.

0:33:220:33:25

-You spent £160.

-Gosh, that much?

0:33:250:33:27

And you gave David Barby £140. Now, David, what did you buy?

0:33:270:33:31

-Well, something rather exciting. Shall I reveal it, now?

-It's going to be a rabbit.

0:33:310:33:36

-Oh.

-Oh. That wasn't, that wasn't the reaction I was expecting, Janice.

0:33:360:33:41

-Um, a mirror.

-Isn't it devastating?

0:33:410:33:45

-It's very striking.

-It is.

0:33:450:33:47

This is what we term as Arts and Crafts movement.

0:33:470:33:49

Late 19th, beginning of the 20th century.

0:33:490:33:52

And what is so clever about this, is the objects were designed

0:33:520:33:55

to make them look at though they'd been hand crafted.

0:33:550:33:59

I love these bosses here, that are smoothed out on this sort of hammered background.

0:33:590:34:05

And then almost crunched up, we have these close mounted turquoise stones.

0:34:050:34:10

It's rather nice.

0:34:100:34:12

-I'm going to pass it over.

-How much did you spend on that, then?

-£140.

0:34:120:34:15

-Oh, lovely.

-Wasn't that a bargain?

0:34:150:34:17

-Yes.

-Yes.

-It's heavy.

0:34:170:34:19

Feel the weight. But is it sought after?

0:34:190:34:22

Oh, yes. Arts and Crafts, very, very in.

0:34:220:34:24

It's minimalistic in design.

0:34:240:34:26

-There's no fuss.

-Because you're not going to decide until the sale of the first three items.

-OK.

0:34:260:34:31

All right? But any other questions you want to ask David about it?

0:34:310:34:35

-Like, how much profit's it going to bring?

-Yeah. How much are we likely to...?

0:34:350:34:39

140 - are we going to rake in another couple of 100?

0:34:390:34:42

I have seen similar mirrors go for close on 200.

0:34:420:34:46

Were they like that at the back?

0:34:460:34:48

No, they had their original back.

0:34:480:34:50

The original mirror would have been bevelled. But that's easily remedied.

0:34:500:34:54

Or, what about a nice portrait in there?

0:34:540:34:56

Meanwhile, for the viewers at home, let's find out what the valuer thinks about David Barby's mirror.

0:34:560:35:01

So, Addison, do you fancy a bit of Arts and Crafts then, Addison?

0:35:010:35:06

Well, I really like this. I think it's got a good look about it.

0:35:060:35:09

It's got the four turquoise inlays on each quarter.

0:35:090:35:12

-I think it's got a good chance of selling.

-Yes. Well, it'll sell.

0:35:120:35:15

Because there's no reserve, I guess.

0:35:150:35:17

But is it going to sell for £20 or for £200?

0:35:170:35:20

Well, we've put, sort of, 60-100 on it.

0:35:200:35:22

-I'm hoping it'll make top end of the estimate.

-Yeah, well, it needs to. Cos David paid £140 for that.

0:35:220:35:27

That could be really risky, couldn't it?

0:35:270:35:29

Well, if the right people are in the room, it's got a good chance of selling.

0:35:290:35:33

If somebody wants this, they'll buy it.

0:35:330:35:36

You never know, Janice and Fred may simply ignore it when it gets to the auction.

0:35:360:35:40

-Who's the auctioneer today?

-Daniel.

0:35:400:35:42

-Daniel Webster's doing the auction today.

-Can't wait.

0:35:420:35:44

-So, guys, this the moment of truth.

-It is.

0:35:470:35:50

You're on the edge of the precipice. You feeling nervous, at all?

0:35:500:35:53

Not at all, no, no.

0:35:530:35:55

I think it's just going to be riotous fun. I notice that things are not

0:35:550:35:58

-going for too high a price. They're not going at the top end, they're going nearer the bottom end.

-Right.

0:35:580:36:04

-But if all else fails, you've always got the bonus buy to fall back on.

-We have.

-Kate's little box.

0:36:040:36:08

Anyway, first lot up is going to be the cake stand. And here it comes.

0:36:080:36:11

Art Deco silver-plated cake stand.

0:36:110:36:14

At 20. Ten if you like? Ten's bid.

0:36:140:36:17

15, 20, at £20. 25, new place.

0:36:170:36:22

At 25, are we all sure and done? At £25.

0:36:220:36:26

Oh, dear. £25.

0:36:260:36:28

You're minus £20 on that. But don't despair.

0:36:280:36:31

Victorian Crown Derby Imari palate twin-handled tray.

0:36:310:36:34

And £50 for it? 50, I have.

0:36:340:36:37

At 55, 60, five, 70, five,

0:36:370:36:40

80. Five yours, sir.

0:36:400:36:42

85, 90, five, 100, ten, 20...

0:36:420:36:46

-Come on!

-30, 40, 50, 60...

0:36:460:36:51

-Yes!

-We're in profit.

0:36:510:36:52

70, 80, 180 away left.

0:36:520:36:56

180.

0:36:560:36:58

-Yes!

-That's brilliant. £180. You're plus 30 on that.

0:36:580:37:01

Plus £10, overall. Stand by.

0:37:010:37:03

Four Beatlemania plastic figures.

0:37:030:37:06

Twist And Shout record and all sorts.

0:37:060:37:09

At £10, the money's here with me at ten. Are we all done?

0:37:090:37:11

15, 18, 20...

0:37:110:37:16

22,

0:37:160:37:17

25...

0:37:170:37:20

-£25, are we there? At 25, then.

-Come on, come on.

0:37:200:37:24

Oh, no. £25, minus £10.

0:37:240:37:28

You've wiped your face. No profit. No loss.

0:37:280:37:30

-Absolute....

-Anyway, there you go. No profit, no loss. What are you going to do about the bonus buy?

0:37:300:37:36

-Are you going to go with the trinket box, or not?

-What do you think, in the current scenario?

0:37:360:37:40

We've had one good hit. I think we should go with the trinket box.

0:37:400:37:43

-Let's do it.

-I will buy you a beer, if we make a loss.

-That's a sign.

0:37:430:37:48

-Are you going to go with the jewellery box, then?

-We'll go with it.

0:37:480:37:51

We're going with the bonus buy. And here it comes.

0:37:510:37:53

A silver and tortoiseshell inlaid trinket box.

0:37:530:37:56

Neat little thing.

0:37:560:37:57

Interest at 55, 60 got.

0:37:570:37:59

At £60, the money's here at 60.

0:37:590:38:02

-Five, 70, five, 80...

-Well, done, Kate.

0:38:020:38:06

85 I'm out, you're in. At £85, are we all done?

0:38:060:38:11

-£85!

-Well, done, Kate.

0:38:110:38:13

Plus £15. You have made £15 profit.

0:38:130:38:16

-Well, done, chaps.

-That's good.

0:38:160:38:18

She doesn't have to buy you a beer.

0:38:180:38:20

-I will anyway.

-I don't know whether it's a winning score or not.

0:38:200:38:24

-But the important thing is, don't tell the Blues a thing. OK?

-We are buoyant.

0:38:240:38:27

-So, team, do you know how the Reds got on?

-I heard they were awful.

0:38:330:38:36

-No.

-Who told you that?

0:38:360:38:38

-Mike Read.

-Did he?

-Tactics, isn't it?

0:38:380:38:40

-It's all strategy with that man.

-I'll get him.

0:38:400:38:43

So, how you feeling? You feeling nervous?

0:38:430:38:45

I'm just worried about that perfume bottle. What about you and your phone?

0:38:450:38:50

Are you nervous, at all, Fred?

0:38:500:38:53

-Not really. Just anxious to see how it all goes.

-We're all anxious.

0:38:530:38:56

And, if all else fails, you've got the mirror to fall back on.

0:38:560:38:59

Now, first up, is the teapot and here it comes.

0:38:590:39:01

A Shelley porcelain nursery teapot.

0:39:010:39:04

Designed by Mabel Lucie Attwell.

0:39:040:39:06

And 45? 50 is bid.

0:39:060:39:08

At £50, the money's here with me at 50, five, 60, five, yours.

0:39:080:39:13

65 we're in the room now. 65, 70...

0:39:130:39:16

Yes!

0:39:160:39:18

Five. At £75 then.

0:39:180:39:22

-Oh!

-Well, that's much better than estimated. Only minus £10.

0:39:230:39:28

Now, Frido, your telephone.

0:39:280:39:30

Bygone plastic telephone.

0:39:300:39:32

Bit of fun for a tenner.

0:39:320:39:34

At £10 somewhere? Ten's bid.

0:39:340:39:36

15, 18, 20.

0:39:360:39:39

20 away left. At £20 then.

0:39:390:39:43

£20. Well, done, that's a profit, at £10.

0:39:430:39:47

You had a loss of £10. You've got a profit of £10.

0:39:470:39:50

It's wiped its face.

0:39:500:39:51

A Daum perfume bottle.

0:39:510:39:53

And £50 for it? And 50's bid.

0:39:530:39:55

55, 60, five, 70...

0:39:550:39:59

-Come on, come on.

-You're in profit.

-Am I?

0:39:590:40:01

At £70 are we all done and sure?

0:40:010:40:03

No, no. Keep going, man. Come on!

0:40:030:40:06

No! £70. But that's OK. You made a £5 profit.

0:40:070:40:10

-You are plus £5.

-Oh, brilliant. Where are we going?

0:40:100:40:13

Overall, you are plus £5.

0:40:130:40:15

Now listen, £5 could be a winning score.

0:40:150:40:17

-Yeah.

-It could be a winning score, all right? Or.

-We go for...

0:40:170:40:21

You can risk it and go for his mirror. What you going to do?

0:40:210:40:24

-Go on. What do you say?

-What you doing to do? You paid £140.

0:40:240:40:27

I paid £140 for it, all right?

0:40:270:40:29

-What are you going to do?

-Are you saying don't?

-No.

-Let me look into your eyes.

0:40:290:40:33

-Would you lie to me?

-It's coming up. Quick, what are you going to do?

0:40:330:40:36

-It's your choice, your choice.

-Yes.

-Oh, my God!

0:40:360:40:39

-Are you sure you want to do that?

-No...

0:40:390:40:41

Are you sure you're sure? Are you going to go with it, or not?

0:40:410:40:44

-Quickly.

-No.

-Yes... No! No, no.

-No?

0:40:440:40:46

-No.

-No. You're not going to go with it.

0:40:460:40:48

An early 20th century Guild School copper-framed mirror.

0:40:480:40:51

And 40 I have. At 40, five, 50...

0:40:510:40:55

Five, yours, sir.

0:40:550:40:57

At £55, are we all sure?

0:40:570:41:00

That is minus £85. I bet you're glad you didn't go with the bonus buy?

0:41:000:41:04

-Too right!

-Delighted.

-Thank you, son.

0:41:040:41:06

Anyway, so, there we have it.

0:41:060:41:08

You have ring-fenced your profit at £5.

0:41:080:41:11

-You will go home with £5 profit. Which is unusual enough on Bargain Hunt. I have to tell you.

-Fantastic.

0:41:110:41:16

Don't tell the Reds a thing, all right?

0:41:160:41:17

-I can't wait. I'm going to hit the town.

-Don't tell.

0:41:170:41:20

-Point me in the right direction.

-Don't tell the Reds a thing, OK?

0:41:200:41:23

-No, lips are sealed.

-Well, done.

0:41:230:41:26

Gosh, what fun we've had today. And so incredibly close, this contest.

0:41:340:41:38

How lovely to have, today, two teams of winners.

0:41:380:41:42

-Now, have you been talking to one another?

-We have. We haven't discussed the price.

0:41:420:41:46

-No.

-Ah, well, that's absolutely brilliant. Two teams of winners.

0:41:460:41:50

Two teams that have made profits.

0:41:500:41:52

Which is unbelievable on Bargain Hunt. It's just a question of scale.

0:41:520:41:56

And I have to reveal that the runner's up today are, the Blues.

0:41:560:42:00

-Yes!

-It was that cake stand, I bet?

0:42:000:42:04

It wasn't the cake stand, actually.

0:42:040:42:06

-Anyway, plus £5.

-OK.

-Which is very good, isn't it?

0:42:060:42:09

-Now, you didn't go with the bonus buy.

-No.

-Your wisest move.

-That was Fred's wisest move.

0:42:090:42:14

-That was Fred's wisest move. And here is your £5 note.

-Why, thank you.

0:42:140:42:18

-I have to say, Janice...

-One beer, two straws.

0:42:180:42:21

-Is that what you're going to spend it on?

-Charity.

-Who's going to get the cash?

0:42:210:42:25

-The NSPCC.

-NSPCC. Well, that's very good.

0:42:250:42:27

-We've thoroughly enjoyed having you on the programme.

-It's been fab.

0:42:270:42:31

But the victors today, who actually hadn't made an awful lot of money

0:42:310:42:36

up to the moment of the bonus buy.

0:42:360:42:39

-And that bonus buy saved your bacon, right?

-Right.

0:42:390:42:41

-And made you £15.

-Ah, fantastic.

0:42:410:42:43

-Here's your £15, Mike.

-Fantastic, fantastic.

0:42:430:42:46

-Well, done, indeed. Well, done, Ken.

-Thank you.

0:42:460:42:49

-What are you going to do with the £15?

-We're donating it to the people that came second.

0:42:490:42:54

-Cos it's a worthy charity.

-Isn't that nice?

0:42:540:42:56

-That is the sweetest way.

-I didn't mean it!

0:42:560:42:59

-Anyway, you've had a good time?

-We've had a great time.

0:42:590:43:02

-Join us soon, for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:43:020:43:05

For more information about Bargain Hunt,

0:43:090:43:12

including how the programme was made,

0:43:120:43:14

visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:43:140:43:16

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:200:43:23

Email [email protected]

0:43:230:43:26

Two familiar voices of the airwaves compete to see if they can cause a bit of a noise at auction.

Radio 2 presenter Janice Long competes against perennial broadcaster and writer Mike Read to see who can find the best buys at an antique centre in London and then sell them for the most profit.

Janice is accompanied by her son, Fred, while Mike is partnered with Ken Wharf, former bodyguard to Princess Diana.

During their time shopping for bargains, presenter Tim Wonnacott takes time out to discuss Janice's interest in wall vases with her and discovers Mike's fascination with the poet Rupert Brooke. Among the items Mike brings along to show Tim are Brooke's reading glasses and diary.

There is great excitement for both teams when their items come up for sale at auction.


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