Roach Cash in the Attic


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Roach

Series looking at the value of household junk. Angela Rippon and Paul Hayes visit Linda and Paul Roach who hope to raise some cash to help their son when he starts at university.


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Welcome to the programme that looks for antiques in your home and sells them at auction.

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I'm sure we've all got things which, when we look at them, bring great pleasure

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and great memories of those people who gave them to us or from whom we inherited them.

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But what happens if you redecorate and then find there just isn't room for them any more?

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That's a dilemma facing the couple that we're about to meet.

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I rather hope we're going to help to be able to turn their family treasures into real money

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on today's edition of Cash In The Attic.

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Coming up on today's Cash In The Attic, we learn to play a Chinese board game from the 1930s.

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Are you a mahjong player?

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Regular. On Saturdays and Bank Holidays, yes!

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-I take that as a no then.

-I've never played in my life.

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We have a lesson in mathematics from the days before calculators.

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-What have we got here then?

-It's a maths book.

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Well, that's appropriate for a teacher, isn't it?

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But how will our cash add up come auction day?

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Five over your top estimate.

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-Fabulous. That's more like it, isn't it?

-Terrific.

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Find out when the final hammer falls.

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Today I'm in Sutton in Ashfield,

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which is just off the M1 in Nottinghamshire.

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I'm about to meet Linda and Paul Roach,

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who called in Cash In The Attic because they'd like to

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give their son a bit of a helping hand on his way to university.

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It was second time around when Paul and Linda married 20 years ago.

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They already had two children each and then had their son Kieran who is studying for his A-levels.

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Paul's a teacher and Linda a family support worker.

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They love spending time in Spain where they have their own casa, a great holiday home.

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But their family home has recently been redecorated because it was severely water damaged.

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Lots of their ornaments no longer fit into their new modern decor.

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They've decided to have a good sort out.

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Hi, Linda and Paul. Well, I can see somebody has been busy with the paintbrush.

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-Yes!

-This is part of all the redecoration of the house, is it?

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Yes, it is. We've had a bit of water damage to the roof

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and it's meant redecorating several of the rooms inside and this is one of them.

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And in fact the redecoration is one of the reasons why you've called us in, isn't it?

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Yes, we've had to get rid of some of the furniture

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and the display cases and some of the stuff that was in have had to go.

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-But where did it come from originally?

-Paul's parents. Yes.

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When they died, we inherited it We've looked after it and cared for it and now it's time for it to go.

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So, what are we actually raising money for today?

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My son's going to university, which we hope will happen next September

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and it's to help to support him through the start of that.

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It's an expensive business, isn't it?

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-And how!

-Yes. Very.

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So, how much do we think we might want to raise?

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About £700, I'd like to be able to get if we can.

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-And that'll go into the university fund?

-Yes.

-Absolutely, yes.

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Well, I can see from the house that you've done a great job.

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So I'm expecting there's quite a lot of stuff you want to get rid of.

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And I've got just the man who can put a value on it - Paul Hayes, let's go and meet him.

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-Come on.

-That's great.

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-Ah, hello. Hi.

-There's Paul. Paul, meet Paul.

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-Hello. How are you?

-Pleased to meet you.

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Paul, you look like a cinema usherette with that. What have you got there?

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Certainly not popcorn and hot dogs, is it?

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-What is it?

-It's a fantastic Noritake coffee set.

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-How lovely!

-Wonderful, isn't it?

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-It is nice, yes.

-Where did this come from, Paul?

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I think it was a wedding present to my parents just at the beginning of the war.

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Right. OK, well, that fits in.

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Noritake, a massive, massive factory.

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If you look underneath, you have the blue stamp. That actually was discontinued in about 1939.

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You're looking just before the war.

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-Is this painted with gold leaf or what?

-These are all hand-painted with gold leaf.

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There can be hidden symbols there too.

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I'm not sure what the swan means, but the butterfly is the symbol of the soul. You live for ever.

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It's a wonderful thing to have.

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It's eggshell, it's very delicate.

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They haven't survived in large numbers and it is nice to find them in this condition.

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Perfect condition. Lovely story to go with it.

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-What's the price tag?

-Well, I think, if I was being conservative, if I said around the £100 mark.

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-Oh, wow!

-If I said 60-100 to give it a chance at auction.

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I'd be delighted. Great.

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Well that should see Kieran through, what, probably his first week at university?

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-Let's go and see what else we can put in the pot.

-OK.

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'Well, that's a great start to our day.'

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In the spare bedroom, I come across a box of British Royal Mint coins

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that Paul's dad started to collect in 1972

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and continued until he died in 1990.

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Each set has its own certificate

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and Paul says we can BANK on them getting £150-£200 at auction.

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Our expert also makes a discovery in the bedroom.

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It's a hallmarked, silver cigarette box which Paul's father picked up at an antique fair.

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Our Paul values it at a far from sterling £30-£45.

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What have you got there?

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Something you might like to have a look at. It's a mahjong set.

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Mahjong? Ah! Do you play mahjong?

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We used to with my parents when I was a child.

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But that was a long, long time ago.

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How about you, Paul? Are you a mahjong player?

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-Regular. On Saturdays and Bank Holidays, yes.

-I take that as a no, then!

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I've never played in my life. It's too complicated. How do you play?

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It's a bit like...

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collecting tiles of sets.

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You try to collect as many as you can.

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They go on a stand, so you can keep them secret from your opponents

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and then when you get a set, you put them on the top of the stands so you can see whether you've got a set.

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Well, again it's in wonderful condition, Paul.

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It looks complete. I love the fact that you have the original instructions -

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very important for somebody who's starting out and wanted to buy this.

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What are these made of?

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It looks like Bakelite, actually.

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Originally these were made from bone and ivory.

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By the 1920s and 1930s, this new material was out and this is imitation bamboo, isn't it?

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That's the idea. This sort of colour.

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But whether it's a Chinese invention...

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Legend has it that Confucius himself actually invented this game about 500 BC.

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But how true it is, we don't know.

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-I think it's a good bit of PR for Confucius.

-It probably is, yes.

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What sort of age would we put on this?

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We're looking at 1920s-1930s. The golden age of Bakelite. That's what you're looking for.

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What sort of price if we took it to auction?

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I could see... It's a travelling set, sometimes you get them in mahogany boxes.

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It's a nice, usable example.

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If I said around the 70 to 100 for an auction estimate, how does that sound?

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-I'd be pleased.

-OK.

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Linda has unearthed eight sets of cutlery, seven of which are hallmarked.

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They're in excellent condition, though some of the boxes are a bit bashed.

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And our expert suggests a £100-£150 valuation.

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Also winging its way to auction

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is this black slate mantel clock, inlaid with green malachite.

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It used to belong to Paul's mother,

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and the couple had it restored after she died.

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We're hoping it's going to make £60 to £100.

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What do you think about these? Do you think they could go to auction?

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These are nice, aren't they? Is this your collection of snuff boxes?

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No, it's my parents again.

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When my father retired, they pottered round the antique shops.

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I think these are a couple of things they picked up that took their fancy.

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-Do you know who that is there? ABD?

-No, I don't at all, no.

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Somebody's initials there, whatever that means.

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This one means something to all of us - "For Auld Lang Syne".

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-Yes. New Year.

-That's great.

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The collectability is endless.

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I've seen all different shapes and sizes and materials. Snuff was THE pastime really of the gentry.

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When you go back to the 18th century, every gentleman had a snuff box.

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Basically it's compacted tobacco, which you would partake.

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But the idea is you would share it,

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so if you could pull out a nice silver snuff box

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and share it with your business partner or with your friend,

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-you were accepted into the circle. That was the idea.

-Right.

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-I can open this one. How do you open that one?

-It took me ages to figure it out.

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-What you actually have to do is give it a squeeze at the end and it pops open like that.

-Engineering.

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-Isn't that brilliant?

-Amazing.

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If I said 60-100 for the pair?

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Better than I thought. That's great.

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But will we even get a sniff when they go to auction?

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£50. 20. £20. Bid at £20.

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'Let's hope the bidders don't turn up their noses.'

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He starts low but he manages to get them up, doesn't he?

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'Find out what happens on auction day.'

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Continuing the silver theme, Linda has brought out the silver tea set,

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which again belonged to Paul's parents.

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At £200-£250,

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I reckon we might be getting pretty close to their £700 target.

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So I find Linda and Paul to ask them about something that I spotted earlier.

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Linda and Paul, when I was rummaging around in your kitchen earlier,

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I found this rather lovely orange tree.

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Not everybody has got an orange tree in their kitchen. Very Spanish.

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But there are strong associations for you with Spain, isn't there?

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We've got a house in Spain that's amongst the orange groves.

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Do you both speak Spanish?

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-(No.)

-THEY LAUGH

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So presumably Kieran, who speaks Spanish and wants to study it at university, is a great help to you?

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-Oh, gosh, yes.

-Yes.

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It's fantastic. I don't go anywhere without him.

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THEY LAUGH

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But I gather, Paul, that you've got a bit of a hobby that's got quite a strong Spanish link?

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Yes, that's right. Ever since I was a teenager I've been playing the guitar,

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but I just about managed three chords I could strum,

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but I'd like to play properly and I'm hoping to find some time in my retirement to do that.

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-And do you think you might retire to Spain to do it?

-I'm sure we will, yes.

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-So you could play the guitar and Linda, you could do the flamenco.

-Well, yes. Who knows?

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-The perfect combination.

-Absolutely.

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And your son could sell tickets to come and watch you in Spanish. No, we're going too far.

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-But it's a thought. But in the meantime, we've got to get him through university.

-We have.

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So shall we leave the oranges to the English sunshine

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-and see what else we can find in the house?

-Yes.

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Paul is back upstairs and has found this Victorian wooden writing box

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that's been in the Roach family for generations.

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The writing box was a staple piece of furniture for the wealthy in Georgian and Victorian Britain.

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At £45-£60,

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a bidder wouldn't need to be too well off to afford this one.

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I wanted to show you this. I don't know whether this would be good for auction?

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Wow, that's a beauty, isn't it? Look at that. This is fantastic!

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Is this something you've bought, or inherited?

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No, it was part of the furniture in my parents' home. Ever since I've been around.

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What do they use it for?

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It was just in the lounge, covered with a tablecloth and with ornaments on it, a jar of flowers.

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I was going to say, because it is in fantastic condition.

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The fact that your mum's covered it with a cloth has made all the difference.

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This is a walnut table.

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And you can tell that... The base here is a very dark colour.

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The top has been inlaid with burr walnut, but it only ever grows in small sections.

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So what they have to do, for an area this size, is use it in the veneer form,

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obviously very thin, but they repeat the design.

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The piece of veneer they've used

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is actually that big, there. Just that corner.

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And they've used a process called quatro veneering,

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where they've taken this piece, in slices, they've turned it that way,

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turned it that way, then turned it that way.

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You end up with almost like a herringbone effect,

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like a butterfly. Isn't that beautiful?

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It's really nice, yes.

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It's probably not the most fashionable item today, probably fair to say,

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but if I said at least £200 up to maybe £400?

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-Fantastic!

-Sound all right?

-That sounds brilliant to me.

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'That's a cracking valuation, so we must be close to our £700 target with that.

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'But before I get a chance to work out the total,

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'Paul comes up with something that just might help me with the maths.'

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-I wondered if you'd like to have a look at this.

-Let's have a look.

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What have you found, Paul?

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-It's an old book.

-Oh, right. Now then, you two.

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What have we got here?

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It's a maths book.

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Well, that's appropriate, for a teacher.

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Is this something you've picked up at a junk shop?

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No, this was in a box of books that I brought back from my parents' house.

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-I think it's really quite old.

-Is it old, Paul?

-It certainly is.

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It's fantastic, actually. 1710.

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What a fascinating thing. So you've the Marrow Of Mathematicks,

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and it's everything you'd understand about mathematics at that time.

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I love the fact that "mathematicks" is spelt with a K.

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-Can I see?

-Yes.

-It's not in the best of conditions and, as you always tell us, condition is everything.

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You can get things like bindings replaced,

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and that can be done sympathetically, and it doesn't really harm the value as such.

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What I am worried about with this one is pages missing.

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If you've got any content missing, that's irreplaceable, and the book

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then is just a fun item to have rather than an investment piece.

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-Can I read you something?

-Go on.

-Look at this.

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Who on earth would want to multiply by 23...

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463,298,765?!

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-That's your mileage, Paul, isn't it?

-Yes, I think you're right!

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What a fascinating book! It's just extraordinary.

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So we could take...could we take this to auction?

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-Yes, certainly.

-How much do you think it might make?

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The meanest price that I could give is probably at least £20, £30,

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but if two people really take a shine

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to it, I think it could take off, and fetch a realistic price.

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-How does that sound?

-That sounds good.

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-That sound all right to you?

-It certainly does.

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Well, I'm going to do some maths now.

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Not with the aid of this book, because it's much too complicated for me.

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I'm just going to do a quick bit of mental arithmetic and tot up

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the lowest prices that Paul's given us on everything we've seen today,

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Even on Paul's lowest estimate, we should be able to make...

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£995!

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-That sounds fantastic! Really good.

-Brilliant.

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-But don't tell Kieran just yet!

-No.

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-Let's wait until after the auction.

-He'll start to spend it now!

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'In just a few weeks, we'll find out if that old book does summon up a bidding war.'

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So here's a reminder of some of the other items that Paul and Linda will be selling.

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The 1920s or '30s Bakelite mahjong set -

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hopefully the bidders will play the game and offer £70-£100.

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The pre-war Noritake coffee set that was given to Paul's parents

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as a wedding present, that should add another £60-£100.

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And what about that table that Paul's mum kept

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in pristine condition?

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That's one of OUR Paul's highest valuations today, at £200-£400.

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Still to come on Cash In The Attic...

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Paul feels tea should be taken in style.

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As you may have noticed, they are selling bacon sandwiches and mugs of tea down there.

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I think what they do need is a solid silver tea service.

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I hope this old book reveals a fantastic secret.

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-Maybe there was something hidden in it like a map that Indiana Jones might find.

-Yeah!

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If it was Harrison Ford's pay cheque, we'd be laughing.

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Find out on auction day.

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Oh, didn't we have fun when we were rummaging around Paul and Linda's house?

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Finding things mainly that had come from Paul's side of the family,

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including that very delicate Noritake tea service and the fun mahjong set.

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Remember, they're hoping to raise £700 towards their son's university fees.

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So we've bought all of those items and more here to Brettells Auction Room

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in Shropshire. And let's hope there are lots of eager bidders then, when their items go under the hammer.

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There are 377 lots in this auction today, so the potential bidders have

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much to examine if they arrive nice and early for the viewing.

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We soon find Linda and Paul right in the midst of things.

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No time for a last cup tea, I'm afraid.

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-No.

-But it looks rather good.

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It looks amazing. It's a perfect present. Thank you very much(!)

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-Have you been to auctions before?

-Yes, we have. Locally, but nothing quite like this.

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So today's going to be quite exciting?

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-Yes.

-It is. Quite an event.

-Looking forward to it.

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-Shall we go and take our places?

-Let's go.

-The auction's about to start.

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'The countdown begins for the first of Paul and Linda's 11 separate lots.'

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Will the bidders be tempted to tick off £60-£100

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for the Belgian slate mantel clock?

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Who'll start me, then?

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30 or 40? 20 will do.

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-£20, I'm bid, at 20.

-20, we're in.

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-At £20, I'm bid. At £20.

-At 20?

-Come on!

-Goodness.

0:16:540:16:59

-At 25.

-25.

0:16:590:17:00

£25 only bid. 25.

0:17:000:17:03

25 is disappointing.

0:17:030:17:05

-It definitely is.

-Very disappointing.

0:17:050:17:07

Oh, dear. Well, that timepiece obviously looked too heavy

0:17:070:17:10

for most bidders' mantelpieces.

0:17:100:17:12

Will we have more success when the Victorian writing slip goes under the hammer?

0:17:120:17:16

At 55. Anybody left of me now?

0:17:160:17:19

-At 55 and going to be sold.

-That's great.

-At 55...

0:17:190:17:23

-That's good. Yeah.

-Hammer down at 55.

-Definitely good, yes.

-Better.

0:17:230:17:28

Selling for a healthy £55, that's much more like it.

0:17:280:17:32

I wonder if the pre-war Noritake coffee set,

0:17:320:17:35

still in its presentation case, will be just as lucky for us.

0:17:350:17:39

As Paul said, it made a lovely present - originally, of course, when it was given to your family.

0:17:390:17:43

So maybe that's what someone will buy it for now. Let's see.

0:17:430:17:46

We'll start at 20.

0:17:460:17:48

At £20 I'm bid. At £20.

0:17:480:17:49

-£20 I have for the Noritake.

-No, come on!

0:17:490:17:53

£20 bid, £20. 5 anywhere?

0:17:530:17:55

5, 30, £30... One more, Debbie, please, and help me.

0:17:550:17:59

-35, he's trying.

-At £35.

0:17:590:18:03

Anybody else in this room? At 35 the bidding is right in front of me now.

0:18:030:18:07

-He's going to let it go.

-Last chance.

-Yeah.

0:18:070:18:09

-35.

-So that's gone for 35.

0:18:090:18:12

-35.

-What a shame.

0:18:120:18:14

Indeed. Sadly no Noritake collectors here today.

0:18:140:18:17

Let's hope the smokers aren't outside.

0:18:170:18:20

They might be the only ones who fancy the silver cigarette box.

0:18:200:18:23

We'll start where? Who'll start me, then, at £20?

0:18:230:18:27

-£20 bid. At 20, 30...

-Ooh.

0:18:270:18:30

£30. 5?

0:18:300:18:32

-35, 40.

-40, there you go.

0:18:320:18:35

-It's moving around the room.

-£50 with me.

-£50!

0:18:350:18:40

-Good.

-Excellent!

0:18:400:18:42

£50, last time for everybody.

0:18:420:18:44

At £50, all done, then. We're going to be sold at 50.

0:18:440:18:47

That's more like it! Our first item to sell over its top valuation.

0:18:480:18:52

'Now, our next item is one that I think deserves to do really well.'

0:18:520:18:57

Now, I love books and I particularly love your book of mathematics.

0:18:570:19:01

-Not in excellent condition, Paul.

-No.

0:19:010:19:05

-You've put quite a low price on it.

-You'd have thought it would

0:19:050:19:07

be worth more, but this is the going rate for these books.

0:19:070:19:10

I must say, Paul and I did start to fantasise a bit about it

0:19:100:19:14

and say maybe there was something hidden in it, like a map

0:19:140:19:17

-that Indiana Jones might find.

-Yes.

0:19:170:19:20

If it was Harrison Ford's pay cheque, we'd be laughing!

0:19:200:19:23

18th-century bound volume.

0:19:230:19:25

The Marrow Of Mathematicks. And this one's dated 1710.

0:19:250:19:30

Who'll start me, at...30?

0:19:300:19:35

Interesting... Educate yourselves with the wonders of mathematics! £20.

0:19:350:19:40

10, then? Surely?

0:19:400:19:42

It's 1710, for goodness' sake!

0:19:420:19:44

-£10 and start me off.

-Can't believe that.

0:19:440:19:46

Oh, £10. There you are. There's a tenner over there.

0:19:460:19:49

10, 15... I have £15. You'd better bid again now, Ian!

0:19:490:19:53

-At £15, 20.

-Great!

-£20 I have. At £20.

0:19:530:19:57

Interesting book. £20. 5, 25.

0:19:570:20:01

25 right in front of me.

0:20:010:20:02

Anybody else in the room?

0:20:020:20:04

Sold at 25.

0:20:040:20:06

-There you go.

-What an education for £25! Yes.

0:20:060:20:10

Maybe the crowd just don't like maths.

0:20:100:20:12

Perhaps they'll prefer games. We're looking for £70 for the mahjong set.

0:20:120:20:17

£25 all done, Sarah, then.

0:20:170:20:19

At 25. Going to be sold. Right in front of me now.

0:20:190:20:22

£25 only bid.

0:20:220:20:24

-Oh, gosh.

-£25?

-Yes.

0:20:240:20:27

-That's a real disappointment.

-It is, I'm afraid.

0:20:270:20:30

Oh, dear. The mahjong went for a song.

0:20:300:20:35

We're halfway through the sale

0:20:350:20:37

and have made just £215 towards our £700 target.

0:20:370:20:42

There's plenty left to sell though, so it's onwards and upwards.

0:20:420:20:46

If you'd like to try to raise money at auction,

0:20:460:20:48

do bear in mind that there are charges to be paid,

0:20:480:20:50

such as commission.

0:20:500:20:53

These can vary from one saleroom to another, so it is always worth checking in advance.

0:20:530:20:57

Our next lot is those boxes of silverware.

0:20:570:21:00

There's a great collectors' market for these items.

0:21:000:21:02

And they are boxed and in nice condition.

0:21:020:21:04

Eight sets, I think we looked at, so £100 is great.

0:21:040:21:07

Just over a tenner each.

0:21:070:21:09

I'm bid. 50 for you? 50, thank you.

0:21:090:21:12

-50, we're in.

-It's a good start.

-60? 5.

0:21:120:21:17

70? 5. 80? 5. 90? 5.

0:21:170:21:22

-Wow!

-Yes, come on.

0:21:220:21:25

£100, lady on my left. £100 bid. 100 on my left. It will be sold.

0:21:250:21:29

Down this line, last chance.

0:21:290:21:31

At £100 on my left. 100.

0:21:310:21:35

-Mmm!

-Nice one!

-Good price.

0:21:350:21:38

That went down very well, thank you,

0:21:380:21:41

serving us up another £100 for our fund.

0:21:410:21:43

Will the snuff boxes have similar luck?

0:21:430:21:47

Start me at, what, £50? 20? £20 bid. At £20. The snuff box. 5?

0:21:470:21:53

30. 5. 40.

0:21:530:21:56

-He starts slow, but he manages to get them up.

-Yes.

0:21:560:21:59

Where are we going now for the silver? 50?

0:21:590:22:01

5! 60?

0:22:010:22:03

£60 at the far end of the room. 65?

0:22:030:22:06

-Yes.

-Another fiver...

0:22:060:22:09

£65. Will be sold this time round. 65.

0:22:090:22:13

-Nice little collection for £65.

-It is, yes.

0:22:150:22:18

Well, a little more would have been nice,

0:22:180:22:20

but it was still above Paul's lowest estimate.

0:22:200:22:24

Unfortunately the same can't be said for the coin collection...

0:22:240:22:28

At 70, 75...

0:22:280:22:31

..which sells for just half its estimate.

0:22:310:22:35

What a disappointment.

0:22:350:22:37

I hope this isn't a sign of things to come, as it's the turn of the

0:22:370:22:40

silver sea tea set next, and we've all got high hopes for this lot.

0:22:400:22:44

They're selling bacon sandwiches

0:22:440:22:46

and mugs of tea down there. What they do need

0:22:460:22:49

is a solid silver tea service.

0:22:490:22:51

-Raise the tone!

-Yes. You've brought one in today, haven't you?

0:22:510:22:54

They do make a perfect cup of tea, actually.

0:22:540:22:56

-Paul's an expert. He knows!

-Yes.

0:22:560:22:59

I've put this on at £200, but we have a reserve on this.

0:22:590:23:02

-Yes, we have.

-At 200?

0:23:020:23:05

Yes, we understand that's the scrap value of the silver.

0:23:050:23:08

-So anything else is a bonus?

-Absolutely.

0:23:080:23:11

200?

0:23:110:23:13

200?

0:23:130:23:15

Scrap's more, I'm sure. We'll start at 100. Bid 100, bid 100.

0:23:150:23:19

-100, the silver tea set. 120? 140? 160?

-That's better.

0:23:190:23:24

-£200.

-Good. Made your reserve already.

0:23:240:23:27

I'll take a tenner off you.

0:23:270:23:29

At £200, bottom right. At £200. Shout if I miss you now.

0:23:290:23:32

-200 is your reserve.

-It is, yes.

0:23:320:23:35

£200. Quickly, bottom right.

0:23:350:23:38

It will be sold this time round. At 200.

0:23:380:23:40

Yes!

0:23:400:23:42

-Made your reserve. Well done.

-That's great.

0:23:420:23:44

The silver polished up well, due to its beauty or its scrap value?

0:23:440:23:49

Now to the final lot of the day and our star item,

0:23:490:23:52

the walnut veneer table, also reserved at £200.

0:23:520:23:57

We have a phone bid on this and we have commission bids also.

0:23:570:24:03

Who'll start me for that? 200, 300?

0:24:030:24:05

£200? £100? 100 bid, 100, 100.

0:24:050:24:10

100, 100.

0:24:100:24:12

100. Anybody else now?

0:24:120:24:14

20. 120 left of me. 40? 140.

0:24:140:24:18

140. You're out on the phone.

0:24:180:24:20

140. 60. 160. 80?

0:24:200:24:24

180. You're out on the phone at 180.

0:24:240:24:28

200 on the phone.

0:24:280:24:30

-You've made your reserve.

-Yes.

-They're on the phone.

0:24:300:24:33

220. 220, I have. 220.

0:24:330:24:37

230? 230. Up to you now. 40?

0:24:370:24:42

240. Sat there. 240.

0:24:420:24:44

240. Up to you now...250.

0:24:440:24:47

-Wonderful!

-That's brilliant.

0:24:470:24:50

Shakes his head and says no. At 250 on the telephone.

0:24:500:24:52

At £250. Going to be sold, then.

0:24:520:24:54

-Last chance.

-It's great when it goes up like that!

-Yes! Exciting!

0:24:540:24:59

-260. 260.

-They're not out yet.

-It's in great condition.

0:24:590:25:05

260 I have. At £260, left, right and centre.

0:25:050:25:09

Last chance on the phone. At 260.

0:25:090:25:13

-Fantastic!

-Brilliant!

-It's really good, isn't it?

0:25:130:25:16

Someone laid out £260 for that well-preserved table.

0:25:160:25:21

What a thrilling end to the day!

0:25:210:25:23

But of course we're all dying to know the final total now.

0:25:230:25:27

But we are still reeling from the adrenaline rush of that last sale.

0:25:270:25:30

-Did you enjoy that?

-Yes, I did! It's exciting!

0:25:300:25:33

Good! I've got more exciting news for you!

0:25:330:25:36

£700 was your target.

0:25:360:25:38

We didn't make even the halfway point at the halfway stage, did we?

0:25:380:25:42

But you've ended up being able to take home with you,

0:25:420:25:45

towards your son's university education...

0:25:450:25:48

-£915.

-Oh, wow!

-That's better than I thought.

0:25:480:25:52

That's brilliant.

0:25:520:25:54

The money Paul and Linda raised will be going towards son Kieran's university fund.

0:25:580:26:03

So they've all come to Lancaster where he hopes to start later in the year.

0:26:030:26:08

We're really pleased with the amount we managed to make at auction

0:26:080:26:12

and hope it will go towards making life more comfortable for Kieran when he is here at university.

0:26:120:26:17

So does Kieran have a clear idea about what he's going to be doing once he gets here?

0:26:170:26:22

I've heard that in each college they've got a bar,

0:26:220:26:24

so I'd definitely like to have a look at the nine different bars

0:26:240:26:27

and check out what societies they've got here. It seems pretty good.

0:26:270:26:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:26:570:27:00

Angela Rippon and Paul Hayes visit Linda and Paul Roach in Nottinghamshire to search for collectables to sell at auction. The proud parents hope to raise some extra cash to help their son when he starts at university.