Freeland Cash in the Attic


Freeland

Series looking at the value of household junk. Katie Freeland hopes to fund a family safari in Africa, and invites Chris Hollins and John Cameron to look over her London home.


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Transcript


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Welcome to Cash In The Attic, the show that finds hidden treasures

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in your home and helps to sell them at auction.

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Today I am in Chelsea in South West London

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and this is the beautiful Physics Gardens.

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I may not have green fingers, but I do like getting my hands dirty, which is great news because

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it's time to move on to our next location.

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Yes, it's time for a rummage.

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I do hope we find some interesting items to take to auction.

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On today's Cash In The Attic, our expert John

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finds Victorian buttons of surprising value.

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I think it's fabulous actually.

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They have been sitting in the drawer. Yes, it would be brilliant.

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And when it comes to valuations he finds there is no messing with the mother-in-law.

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-How much do you think they're worth?

-I'd like to think at auction today they'd make about £80-£120.

-Each?

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No, that's for the pair.

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On auction day, is our willpower enough to push the bids sky high?

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Come on, come on.

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Find out what happens when the final hammer falls.

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We've moved a couple of miles down the road.

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We're still in South London and we've reached Tooting.

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We're going to meet a lady

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who's called in the Cash In The Attic team

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because she wants to treat her family to a wild experience.

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Katie Freeland might look like any mum playing in the garden

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with her children, but she has a remarkable family history.

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Her great-grandfather exported tea from Burma

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and her great aunt was a governess to a princess in Romania.

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But if there's one thing she has in common with all her ancestors,

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they all love new and exciting experiences.

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Something tells me that's what we'll be in for today.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-What a beautiful home.

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-You must be Katie.

-Yes.

-Which makes you the mother-in-law, who's Kate.

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The big question then is, what do you want to raise the money for, and how much do you need?

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If I could get about £500.

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Ideally we'd all love to go to South Africa and do a safari.

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£500 to £600. Are you ready for this?

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-Are you sure?

-I think so.

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-She's not coming!

-I'm not coming, but I'm pleased to help.

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Katie was too polite to reveal that she and her family are going through tough times right now.

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Both her sisters have recently passed away and she also lost her mother a few months ago.

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She wants to travel to South Africa with her husband and three children

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to create happy memories and move on from these sad times.

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Looking around the house, I wonder if any of these

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interesting looking pieces are steeped in family history.

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I'd normally expect John Cameron to get us started with a fine piece of furniture,

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but something shiny has caught his eye.

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-He's there.

-Hi.

-Hi, John. What have you got for us?

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I have found some rather attractive silver buttons.

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They date from the turn of the last century.

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I reckon that's Granny or Granny's mum, yes.

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Around that time. They'd probably came back from Asia at that time.

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Interesting about the travelling, because these aren't English.

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They're Continental, certainly imported.

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We can tell that because they have "sterling" engraved on the back

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as opposed to a set of British hallmarks.

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The decoration on the front would support that. If you have

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a look at the beautiful lady there, very much in the art nouveau style.

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So buttons, are we talking about for a man's waistcoat, trousers?

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Well, I think the only man's costume this would have been on, Chris, is probably Oscar Wilde.

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-Oh no!

-And he's of that period.

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-They're quite large, aren't they?

-They are large.

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You can't imagine going to buy anything like this today.

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The Victorians certainly knew how to do things properly.

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Their accessories were superb.

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-I think there's another box somewhere.

-I'd like to see those, if they're of this quality.

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Some rummaging to come.

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Value wise I would suggest

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about £70 to £90 for them.

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-You don't seem that excited.

-I think it's fabulous.

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-They've been sitting in a drawer.

-I'd like to see the others.

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-OK, let's go and find them.

-That way, I think.

-OK.

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What a nice surprise to start us off.

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We're all straight down to work

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and there are plenty of nooks and crannies to search through today.

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I wonder if these are any good to go to auction?

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Well, they certainly look interesting.

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-Where do they come from?

-Burma. They were Katie's grandfather's.

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-OK, so they were well travelled?

-Very much so, yes.

-Interesting.

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They're called cloisonne. The first thing you do with cloisonne

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is have a look at it for damage because the surface of this

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is covered with enamel, which is literally vitrified glass.

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Once this gets damaged, it's very, very hard to repair.

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Right, OK. They look pretty good.

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-They're Japanese.

-Right.

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If we look at those birds amidst the branches there,

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these beautifully blossoming trees, the way it's quite asymmetric

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in its layout, that's typically Japanese,

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as opposed to Chinese which tend to formulate things in mirror image.

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Date-wise, I would say about the latter part of the 19th century.

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What we call the Meiji Period from the 1860s to about 1912.

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I thought they were older.

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-That's where I'd put them.

-How much are they worth?

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Well, they are in good condition

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-I'd like to think at auction today they would make about £80 to £120.

-Each?

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No, that's for the pair!

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But who knows? They are nice.

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If they made double that I would be absolutely delighted for you.

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Katie also has another pair of cloisonne vases, pink ones.

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They're going to auction with a pair of blue plates.

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John values the lot at...

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Upstairs Katie has found that other box of buttons.

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She thinks they were a present to her great grandfather

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who returned to the UK from Burma in the early 1900s.

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The thistle design is made from silver and blue enamel,

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and John values them at £30 to £50.

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It's amazing how many items

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have been passed down through Katie's family.

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I wondered where you'd got to. What have you got there?

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Family photos? I've noticed you've got a fascinating family history,

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You have loads of legal documents on the walls, great photographs of all the family members.

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Let's start with your father's side, your great-grandfather. They weren't based in the UK, were they?

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No, they were Scottish so they grew up in Scotland.

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The bit that starts to come in with the stuff that we've got is really when they were in Burma,

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Exporting tea.

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I think they must have made quite a lot of money out there actually.

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And it gets more fascinating.

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I don't know which side of the family this is, but I've seen letters from royalty.

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Actually that's mostly on my lovely great Aunt Ida's side.

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She actually taught as a governess and went out to Romania to the Princess Ileana of Romania.

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and actually through her entire life they remained firm friends.

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She had a zest for life and just had a sparkle in her eyes.

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I'm hoping actually, because I lost my mum earlier this year,

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I really hope that my children will remember my mum with the same fondness

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that I remember Aunt Ida and actually a lot of this is all due to her.

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I suppose if you've got all these lovely photographs and letters, as you have,

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getting rid of items or antiques is not so painful, or is it?

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There's always one or two things that are really difficult to part with.

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For some strange reason they just mean something more to you

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-And the antiques start to become easier to part with.

-I agree with you.

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The only problem is it could take us ages to look through all the letters and we haven't got any time.

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-John's going to get very angry if we don't get back.

-OK.

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Come on, let's go and find some antiques.

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While we've been chatting both John and Kate have left no corner unexplored.

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Kate's uncovered this Staffordshire tea set.

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Tea has clearly played a big part in the family life.

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Auntie Enid collected china sets including this one,

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valued by John at £30 to £50.

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Kate also digs out a pair of handmade lace bonnets

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which Katie inherited from her mum.

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They're in good condition

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and John hopes they'll net...

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Kate's stunning home has so many interesting family items.

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It's a pleasure to learn about them.

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Now, has she laid her hands on two more that could set John's heart a-flutter?

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-John, do you think these would be worth anything?

-Let's take a look at those.

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Where did you find those?

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It was my great-grandfather. They got married in Burma.

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He worked out there for quite a long time.

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They certainly look of that origin and they're made of silver.

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They're not hallmarked as British silver would be,

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and they still retain the original gilding on the inside.

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Interesting, the shape - they're totally export pieces.

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That scrollwork handle is very much a European thing.

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The work that's gone into them is absolutely remarkable.

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When you look on the inside

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you can see that these haven't been cast.

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Worked by hand by a silversmith

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punching all that detail out from reverse,

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before turning it around and then doing the same

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this side in finer detail to chase out the textures of the fur and the bodies and so on.

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There are some really little details in here as well.

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A lot of work has gone into them.

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It's part of a three piece tea set.

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We've got the sugar and cream jug. We're missing a teapot.

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-What happened to it?

-I haven't seen it actually.

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-I still think they're saleable.

-OK.

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They are good quality and there is a market for foreign silver.

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Even though we're lacking the teapot this should make at least £100 to £150 at auction.

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I think someone will really enjoy them.

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I'd love to see how they perform at auction. They're super quality.

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Well, John, you won't have to wait long to see what the bidders make of them.

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Come on. Come on...

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But will it make enough money to help Katie achieve her dream?

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Thank you very much.

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All that excitement is still to come, but as our rummage continues,

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John keeps up the good work in the attic, finding a tapestry.

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Katie thinks it was embroidered by someone in her family.

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It shows Bonnie Prince Charlie drinking from a spring.

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John values it at an impressive £100 to £200.

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We're bounding ever closer to that £500 target

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and I've found this standard lamp

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which was bought by Katie's great-grandmother around 1918.

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It's going to auction

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with a price tag of £20 to £40.

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Katie has such a huge variety of items hidden away

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and there's no prizes for guessing

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where this next little collection has come from.

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I've had these fans for quite a while actually.

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They're probably family - grand... great grandmother.

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These would date to the latter part of the 19th century, early 20th century. The use of fans

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goes back a lot further, several hundred years and certainly in the 18th century it was a necessity,

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especially in high society balls, where they were used as an object to communicate with.

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I'm not terrible voiced in the communication process...

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-Fan etiquette!

-No, exactly. But they're quite a nice collection.

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You've got some ivory here and these look ebonised.

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-Looking at the fans here I think these are European.

-OK.

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The decoration, although they're ivory, I think are Continental, probably French.

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This one's quite interesting. Looks Japanese to me.

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Ebonised sticks, nicely embroidered flower work here.

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Typically Japanese.

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Collectors are looking for several things - condition is very, very important.

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The quality of design, and the materials.

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You often see ivory, as we have here, tortoise shell,

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ebony and other timbers and sometimes beautifully inlaid.

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That's been painted, but you often see them

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inlaid with silver and gold wire so they can be really exquisite things.

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Works of art, aren't they?

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Absolutely, they were works of art made by craftsmen of their day.

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-I would suggest putting them together as one lot and I think we'd be looking at £100 to £150.

-OK.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-Methinks you have made a wise choice, madam.

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Well done. We will leave those there and see what else we can find.

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OK, let's go.

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Bear in mind that in the UK it's only legal to sell

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worked ivory made before 1947 and that is classed as antique.

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If in doubt, ask your auction house.

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Downstairs Kate has spotted this large Edwardian high backed chair.

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It's in need of new upholstery, but John's very keen on the carved frame.

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It adds another £50 to £80

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to our ever increasing total.

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The chair belonged to Katie's Great Aunt Ida. When she left the Romanian royal household

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to move back to England, she bought an old Tudor building called the Old House in Cambridgeshire

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and turned it into a tearoom.

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Remarkably, Katie has a fabulous set of china from that very tea room.

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-This is a really pretty set. It's a cake set.

-Let's have a look.

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Actually there's only two pieces here but there's a whole set of them.

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-How many have you got in the set?

-There's a few actually.

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-I think there's probably five cake stands and 14 plates.

-It's certainly a dessert set.

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You can just imagine a Victorian table laid out with these.

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When you see those old cookery books, the amount and variety of cakes and sweets...

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it makes you wish you were born in that period.

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Looking at the decoration, Kate, does that remind you

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-of those vases we looked at earlier?

-Yes.

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That's because the decoration was inspired by the Orient.

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This is exactly the period we were talking about with those vases, the Meiji Period,

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when Japanese artworks inspired a whole movement in this country called the Aesthetic Movement.

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But, if we turn them over and have a look on the back

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we can see a retailer's mark there - James Green & Nephew.

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I love that, not James Green & Son.

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I wonder if you ever see James Green & Second Cousin Twice Removed!

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-Exactly!

-That's the retailer, not the maker.

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If we look closely, it's a bit obscured

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-but there is a pressed mark. Can you see that?

-Mmm-hmm.

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That is Bodley. It's been obscured by the glaze.

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Bodley were an English company based in Burslem in Staffordshire.

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They were only around from the 1870s to the very early 1890s, and that ties in perfectly with this period.

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So they're in fact English, but the decoration is typically Japanese,

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It's been transfer printed on, this brown border, and the outline of the fruiting trees,

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and the fruit trees have been hand painted in afterwards, so a series of processes.

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I think the colours are lovely, and it's got a real feminine part to it.

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They do remind me of cakes, just that colour.

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-Everything reminds you of cakes!

-Besotted with cakes!

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This has a chip. What are they like for condition?

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Actually, all the cake stands are in very good condition,

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but there may be a couple of chips on a couple of the plates.

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OK, we'll take that into consideration, plus the fact that it's not a major maker.

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I would suggest an estimate of about £100 to £150.

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You don't seem very happy about that.

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Well, there's a sentimental bit here.

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I don't know whether it's enough to make me part with them.

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Right, so if we said £100, that is not good enough for you?

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-I'd really have to think about it.

-Right, we have something that hangs in the balance.

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I suppose we weren't going to have a trouble-free day, John?

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-Can't have your cake and eat it!

-Very good, very good.

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-The good news is that the rummaging is over. Are you pleased with that, Kate?

-Great!

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-It's time for a gin and tonic.

-Oh, yeah!

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Now, you wanted to raise £500 to £600 today, didn't you?

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That would be great.

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Now, with the plates and cake stands hanging in the balance, we reckon we can raise £780.

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That's quite good, and I would be quite pleased, but...

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Without the plates, of course, it's £680.

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I think that's all right for a good day's work.

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What a fascinating day we've had.

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I feel we've really got to know Katie's family through her items.

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Here's a quick reminder of the most interesting ones heading to auction.

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Two boxes of silver buttons,

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which once belonged to Katie's great-grandfather.

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We're hoping that these will make the combined total of £100 to £140.

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Worthy of £100 to £150, I wonder if Katie's great-grandmother

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attracted her great-grandad's attention with these lovely fans.

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Plus, of course, we've got those cake stands,

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which once had pride of place in Aunt Ida's tea room.

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If Katie can bring herself to let them go,

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with a bit of luck they'll bring in £100 to £150.

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Find out how they all get on when the final hammer falls.

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Hopefully it won't fall anywhere near Katie's fragile ceramics!

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Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

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we have our fair share of nail-biting moments.

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Fingers crossed, I think, on this one.

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But there's more than a glimmer of hope of hitting our £500 target.

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-Yes!

-We got those away.

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Thank you very much.

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It turned out to be a real trip down memory lane for Katie at her home in south-west London.

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She had a fascinating family history,

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and we found some wonderful items that we hope go really well here

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at Sworders auction house in Essex.

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Katie wants to raise around £500 to £600 for a family trip to go on safari,

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so let's hope everybody in there is in generous mood, as her items go under the hammer.

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It might be early in the day, but the auction room is already packed with prospective buyers

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sizing up today's lots, and there's plenty up for sale too.

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John and I find Katie in the midst of things.

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Hello, Katie, nice to see you.

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What have you done with the mother-in-law?

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I think we wore her out the other day!

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We've got one big question for you, and it is...

0:17:350:17:37

Have you brought your dessert service?

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No, I haven't, I'm afraid. I did think long and hard about it.

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I think if it had been worth a little bit more, I might have been tempted,

0:17:440:17:48

but it's got a bit of sentimental value attached to it.

0:17:480:17:50

So no, I've left it at home.

0:17:500:17:52

-Oops. That's hit us hard, a little bit, hasn't it?

-It takes at least £100 off our target, I think.

0:17:520:17:57

I think we're running out of time, let's get into the auction. Come on.

0:17:570:18:02

'Positive mental attitude. The room is full of people, and we have plenty of items to sell.

0:18:020:18:07

'We're ready to go, and so is our first lot.

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'That's the Staffordshire tea set that once was owned by Aunt Enid in the 1920s.

0:18:090:18:14

'We want £30 to £50.'

0:18:140:18:17

We're not asking for much, are we?

0:18:170:18:19

No, but they've described it as a part tea service, implying that it's not complete.

0:18:190:18:23

We have got odd numbers of cups and plates and so on, hence my £30 to £50 estimate.

0:18:230:18:29

I don't think I could have put a much lower estimate on it.

0:18:290:18:31

Good decorative lot, we'll start here at £10 to bid.

0:18:310:18:35

£10 I am bid. 12, 15, 18, 20.

0:18:350:18:38

At £20? £22,

0:18:380:18:40

£25. £25 here on my right.

0:18:400:18:43

It's in the room now, £25, I'm going to sell.

0:18:430:18:46

Thank you very much.

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You didn't want to take that home, did you? You weren't ever going to use it again.

0:18:480:18:53

It would've been nice to get more, but I'm pleased.

0:18:530:18:55

'We're straight out of the blocks with £25,

0:18:550:18:58

'just short of John's lower estimate, but we're on the move,

0:18:580:19:01

'and it looks like there are lots of keen buyers in the room.

0:19:010:19:04

'I wonder if there'll be any interest

0:19:040:19:06

'in the two late Victorian silver pieces from Burma.'

0:19:060:19:10

-I'm looking for five if you want. 55, 60...

-Come on.

0:19:100:19:14

85. £85 there.

0:19:140:19:17

Any advance at 85? I'm going to sell, make no mistake.

0:19:170:19:20

At £85.

0:19:200:19:22

Thank you very much.

0:19:220:19:24

-Not quite what we hoped, but they have sold. OK with that, Katie?

-Yes.

0:19:240:19:28

'£85 is just short of John's lower estimate of £100,

0:19:280:19:32

'but it's more cash towards the family trip to South Africa,

0:19:320:19:37

'Next, it's the fan collection from the turn of the 19th century, that's been handed down through the family.

0:19:370:19:42

'John fancied that they might make £100 to £150.'

0:19:420:19:47

-At £25 a fan, don't know, let's see. Here we go.

-Fingers crossed.

0:19:470:19:52

We'll start here at £40, it's a low start.

0:19:520:19:55

I'll take five if you wish. 45, 50, 55, 60.

0:19:550:19:59

At £60 here.

0:19:590:20:00

-Against the room at £60...

-It's not...

0:20:000:20:03

-Not sold.

-No fans for fans.

-Disappointing.

0:20:030:20:06

Disappointing, as you say, but it is a specific thing,

0:20:060:20:09

and there was nobody here today that wanted fans.

0:20:090:20:12

'It's so difficult to gauge today what's going to sell or not.

0:20:120:20:16

'Two separate cloisonne lots coming up,

0:20:160:20:18

'dating from the Meiji period in Japan. We want....'

0:20:180:20:21

At £60, with me now.

0:20:250:20:27

Still with me at £60.

0:20:270:20:31

Not sold.

0:20:310:20:33

-Their loss.

-Their loss completely.

0:20:330:20:36

'Now, don't be upset, Katie.

0:20:360:20:38

'At least the auctioneer didn't let them go for a silly price.

0:20:380:20:42

'We really need the room to love our items, but I'm not sure about what's next.

0:20:420:20:46

'Why? Well, it's our second of our cloisonne lots.

0:20:460:20:50

'£50 to £100 is the estimate on these.'

0:20:500:20:54

We've got more vases here, John, which I'm a bit concerned about. Just a different colour.

0:20:540:20:59

It's not looking great.

0:20:590:21:00

These are pink variety, slight damage, together with a pair of plates of mediocre quality,

0:21:000:21:05

hence my 50-100 estimate. Fingers crossed, I think, on this one.

0:21:050:21:10

All the same, some interest here. At £40.

0:21:100:21:14

Any advance on £40? 45, 50.

0:21:140:21:16

At £50. We're going to sell this time.

0:21:160:21:19

Against the room. 55, 60, 65.

0:21:190:21:23

£65 is bid.

0:21:230:21:25

-Yes!

-Well, we got those away.

0:21:250:21:27

I wonder which part they were after, the plates or the vases?

0:21:270:21:30

'Unbelievable! I really thought Katie would be taking them home.

0:21:300:21:35

It has been quite hard work, gang, hasn't it?

0:21:350:21:38

John, I don't know what to say to Katie. Her little face there, look. She's a bit disappointed.

0:21:380:21:42

I saw you having a chat to the auctioneer, have you got some good news for us?

0:21:420:21:46

We've had word from the auctioneer that the chap

0:21:460:21:49

who was bidding on the cloisonne vases has come back and offered £80, our lower estimate.

0:21:490:21:53

-Would you be happy with that, Katie?

-Yes. Yes.

0:21:530:21:56

OK, so we've got another £80.

0:21:560:21:58

£80 on top of that. We're at the halfway stage.

0:21:580:22:01

You wanted to raise about £500 - £600 for that safari.

0:22:010:22:04

I've got some good news, you're going to get the taxi to the airport anyway. So far we've raised £255.

0:22:040:22:11

OK, that's more than I thought.

0:22:110:22:13

Not too bad, is it? It's a lot better than I thought as well.

0:22:130:22:16

'So, halfway towards our £500 target, and we have everything to play for.

0:22:160:22:21

'If you've been inspired by Katie's progress to try your hand at the auction game, do bear in mind

0:22:210:22:27

'that there are various charges to be paid, such as commission.

0:22:270:22:30

'They vary from one sale room to another, so it's always worth checking in advance.

0:22:300:22:36

'Next, the standard lamp

0:22:360:22:37

'picked up by Katie's great-grandmother around 1918.

0:22:370:22:40

'John's valued it at, "at least £20".'

0:22:400:22:45

-You don't like this much, do you?

-I would rather not take it home.

0:22:450:22:49

-Right.

-Mainly because my husband doesn't like it. I grew up with it.

0:22:490:22:52

It's been in my house for years, but my husband's not very fond of it.

0:22:520:22:56

Can I have that? 12, 15, 18...

0:22:560:22:58

-Yes, we're off!

-..20, 22.

0:22:580:23:02

£22 on the pillar now. 25, 28?

0:23:020:23:06

25, close by. 28, fresh bidder.

0:23:060:23:08

30, 32, 35,

0:23:080:23:11

38, 40, 42....

0:23:110:23:14

At £42.

0:23:140:23:17

-There's no accounting for taste.

-What do men know?

0:23:170:23:20

'Smiles all round then, and another £42 in the kitty.

0:23:200:23:25

'The second half of our auction has got off to a great start, and we're all in good spirits.

0:23:250:23:30

'Let's hope the bidders are just as interested in our next lot,

0:23:300:23:34

'that Edwardian high backed chair.'

0:23:340:23:36

Good, comfortable lot there.

0:23:360:23:37

I bid £20.

0:23:370:23:39

-Any advance on 20?

-Oh, no.

0:23:390:23:41

22, 25, 28, 30.

0:23:410:23:44

At 30?

0:23:440:23:45

Any advance on £30? Any further interest?

0:23:450:23:48

'I can't believe no-one was interested in the chair.

0:23:490:23:52

'Chin up though, we've still got plenty of items to go.

0:23:520:23:55

'Next up, it's the Victorian tapestry, featuring Bonnie Prince Charlie.

0:23:550:24:00

'John found this, and he values it at £100 to £200.'

0:24:000:24:04

Any further interest at £40?

0:24:040:24:07

No, no interest. Not sold.

0:24:070:24:09

'Uh-oh, another unsold item, and things go from bad to worse

0:24:090:24:13

'when the Victorian hand-made lace bonnets go under the hammer.

0:24:130:24:17

'We wanted £50 to £80.'

0:24:170:24:20

No further interest at £20.

0:24:200:24:22

All done? £20. Not sold.

0:24:220:24:25

'They don't sell either. OK, everyone, take a deep breath.

0:24:250:24:29

'Two items to go, and we need £203 to hit our target.

0:24:290:24:33

'I really like this next lot from the Victorian times,

0:24:330:24:36

'and I've got everything crossed that the bidders in the room share my view.'

0:24:360:24:42

Up next we've got those art nouveau buttons.

0:24:420:24:44

They are nice, cased and silver, so I hope we've got some collectors here today.

0:24:440:24:50

65 at the back of the room. Any advance on £65?

0:24:500:24:54

£70 anywhere? Selling at £65.

0:24:540:24:58

We're limping towards those bottom estimates, but it sold. £65.

0:24:580:25:03

'Time now for our final item,

0:25:030:25:06

'and it's the second of our Victorian button lots.

0:25:060:25:08

These have a thistle design, and are made from silver and enamel.

0:25:080:25:12

Any advance on 32, madam?

0:25:120:25:15

38, 40. £40 there.

0:25:150:25:18

42, 45, takes it from commission.

0:25:180:25:21

It's in the room now. At £45, selling.

0:25:210:25:25

-Yes! £45. They did all right.

-We're in!

0:25:250:25:30

'Well, we've ended on a high, £45 more to add to our total.

0:25:300:25:35

'It's been a really tough day trying to hit our £500 target.

0:25:350:25:39

Well, that is it.

0:25:390:25:40

I've got to say, John, I know we didn't bring the cake stands, you couldn't part with them,

0:25:400:25:45

of all the auctions I've been to, I've never had such high hopes and been so disappointed.

0:25:450:25:49

The things I thought would do well didn't, and the things I thought wouldn't, did!

0:25:490:25:54

-In total today we've raised £407.

-OK.

0:25:540:25:58

-Not too bad.

-Not too bad.

0:25:580:26:00

We're all going to a fancy dress party in those bonnets.

0:26:000:26:03

-Yes, Victorian party invites in the post.

-Yes!

0:26:030:26:06

I'll take a rain check on that one!

0:26:060:26:07

Katie and her family won't be going on safari until next year.

0:26:130:26:16

But a few weeks after the auction, she's decided to test the water for what it might be like.

0:26:160:26:21

The whole family are ready to go. I wonder what's first for them to see.

0:26:210:26:26

-I can see one!

-Can you see one?

0:26:260:26:28

They're stunning, aren't they, these animals?

0:26:280:26:32

Well, you can't feed the lions, but someone else is hungry.

0:26:320:26:36

It's been brilliant, a fantastic day.

0:26:360:26:39

A really memorable day. Thank you, it's brilliant.

0:26:390:26:41

If you want to raise some money for something special,

0:26:440:26:47

and you think you might have some hidden treasures in your home,

0:26:470:26:51

Why don't you contact us to be on the programme?

0:26:510:26:53

All the details are online -

0:26:530:26:55

Good luck, and I'll see you next time on Cash In The Attic.

0:26:550:26:58

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:090:27:12

Series looking at whether household junk could be worth a small fortune.

Katie Freeland hopes to fund a family safari in Africa, and invites Chris Hollins and expert John Cameron to look over her London home. They discover many fascinating heirlooms from her adventurous forebears, including a tea set from her great aunt, once the governess of a royal household in Romania.


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