Tedstone Cash in the Attic


Tedstone

Pauline Tedstone would like to raise some money for her grandchildren's futures. Lorne Spicer and Paul Hayes help her to look through the family heirlooms around her home.


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Transcript


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Welcome to the show that loves to help

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other people help themselves, friends or relatives,

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by going through all the items they no longer want,

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getting them valued and selling them at auction.

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If you've inherited a lot of items and want to leave a legacy for the next generation,

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often, the question is, how much?

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You can find out later in today's Cash in the Attic.

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Coming up on Cash in the Attic:

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one valuation gives this lady the giggles.

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Would I surprise you if I said around 100, maybe £120?

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Yes!

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And this discovery really does cap it all!

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-I've found some interesting items!

-You've found my crowns!

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Later, we have to face the stark reality of the auction room.

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Oh, dear, £20! What do you think of that?

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Not a lot.

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Find out what happens when the hammer falls.

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Pauline Tedstone is quite the globe-trotter.

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At the age of 20, she married Mike

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and they travelled across North America, living in Canada,

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and then the United States, for several years.

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All this while raising their two children, Steve and Jonelle.

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They returned to England,

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but still enjoyed life on the road whenever they could.

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Sadly, after 52 years of marriage,

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Mike passed away after a long battle with cancer.

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But now Pauline has decided, with her grandchildren living in America,

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that she wants to give them something for their future.

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So she's opted to use some of Mike's collections to do just that,

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knowing he would approve of her idea.

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Today, I've brought our expert, Paul Hayes,

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who will spot promising items for auction.

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-Hi, Pauline!

-Hello!

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-How are you today?

-I'm fine.

-Good. This is Paul,

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who's our expert today.

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-Hello, Paul.

-Nice to meet you.

-Thank you.

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-You're happy for Paul to look around?

-Absolutely.

-Good luck!

-Bye!

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You've called in Cash in the Attic. So what's your plan?

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Well, I have two children.

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They have both been invited to... please take, just take,

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whatever you feel you would like.

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But then I'm still left with things.

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I thought that the grandchildren have had nothing.

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It would be a good idea to try and sell the rest of this for the grandchildren.

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Do they live nearby?

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No, no. They live in Florida.

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So what do you want to do for them?

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I thought however much money we can make,

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I would like to split it equally and buy some sort of bond,

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but I would prefer they didn't get it until they were 18,

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and in memory of their granddad.

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What figure have you got in mind?

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I thought about 700 would be a nice figure.

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So that would be £350 each.

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-That's right. That would be good. Yes.

-OK,

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that sounds reasonable. You've got quite a big bungalow here.

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-Yes, it's lovely.

-Right.

-I like the space.

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-I hope there's a lot of cluttered things we can find.

-I hope so.

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Paul will do a good job. Let's see if he's got anything yet.

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-A-ha!

-Ah.

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What are you doing? You can come out of the closet now!

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How are you, Pauline?

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-I've found a fantastic collection of stamps.

-Yes.

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-These are amazing, aren't they?

-Were these your husband's?

-Yes.

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The section I'm really interested in is the older examples. We've got a penny black.

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-Is that a proper one?

-That's the real McCoy!

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-It just looks a bit like it's been photocopied.

-He cut them up.

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-OK.

-They had a problem when these were introduced.

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It's the first stamp ever made.

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When it had been posted, they stamped it with red ink.

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See it there?

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Because that wasn't distinct, people were re-using the stamp.

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-Naughty!

-So what they did,

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they changed it to the penny red.

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Black ink on the red. That's why the penny red is so prominent.

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So the penny black is the first one, that's most collectable.

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So what sort of value could we be talking about here?

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Because the stamp market is so complex.

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That's right. People do get heavily engrossed in stamps.

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It takes forever to catalogue each one.

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But a trained eye can quickly look out for the key ones which are rare.

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So if we put this one in as a job lot, as a collectors' lot,

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if I said a minimum of, say, £100, just to get them into the auction,

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and on the day, if you get two collectors who really like them,

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-I think you could do quite well. How does that sound?

-Yes, that sounds good.

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It's the safest way to get rid of them.

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Great. That's going to help towards the target.

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Let's see what else we can find.

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I'll go this way. You go down there.

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Yeah, of course. Right.

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Stamp collecting is still one of the most popular areas

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of all collectables.

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Let's hope there are plenty of fans there on auction day.

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Meanwhile, Paul's found another of Mike's collections.

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This time, it's a box of cigarette cards.

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These particular cards date back to the 1930s,

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when collecting and trading was a popular pastime for boys.

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Hundreds of designs were made,

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but they also served a purpose.

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They were used to stiffen the packs,

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to prevent the cigarettes being crushed.

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Paul values them at £50 to £70.

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We know Mike was a keen collector and, like most men,

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he had a penchant for boys' toys. As Pauline discovers,

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when she unearths this box of children's toy cars.

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Paul, can you come and look at these?

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Let's have a look. Ah. Whose are all these?

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They were Mike's, when he was...

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He had more than this.

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But this is what he's left, because they look so awful!

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Do you know what,

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you do hear of collectors

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going for toy cars that are mint and in the box.

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But they've missed out. I remember as a child, playing with items.

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-Not quite as old as these, but you'd throw them down the stairs...

-Yes.

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There's such a big collectors' market for these,

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the pre-war examples. After the war, they became mass-produced items,

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but it's so rare to find these things now.

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That's interesting.

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I'm going to stick my neck out here.

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Would I surprise you if I said around 100, maybe £120?

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Yes!

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-You sound surprised!

-That would be brilliant.

-OK.

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The golden age of racing. They're reminiscent of Stirling Moss

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and the whole 1950s era.

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-But I think they're smashing, all right?

-Yes.

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-So let's get them to auction.

-Thank you very much.

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What else can we find? Got another box there, by any chance?

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No, just pyjamas!

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Pauline was delighted with the valuation of the toy cars.

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That's a great boost for our target.

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I hope we find more, as our search continues.

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In a cupboard, Pauline finds a set of three 1950s vases.

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She bought these when she was living in the United States.

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They're made by the Italian company

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Capo di Monte. Paul thinks

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they'll earn £15 to £30.

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So far, we've managed to find £265-worth of items.

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But we're still a long way from our £700 target.

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There you are. I've found this really nice clock.

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OK, we've prepared one over here already.

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There's two clocks, a very similar style.

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So where's that from?

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Well, Mike's Aunt Jessie, his mother's sister,

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knew how much I loved clocks.

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I was quite surprised, but delighted,

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she left these two clocks for me.

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This is a beautiful design.

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-It's very traditional Celtic.

-Exactly. It's extremely Art Deco.

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The height of Art Deco, 1930s.

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It was a time when materials were quite expensive.

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So they used to make these utility clocks.

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If you feel the width of this wood, it's plywood. Feel the top.

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-Feel how thin that is?

-Yes.

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They were an affordable clock for everybody, for the masses.

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It's very deceiving.

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But what was wonderful about them

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is that they had the whole Art Deco look going on.

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The use of geometry here, it's a perfect square.

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This Celtic design, which you find on architecture.

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I never noticed, till you mentioned it.

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-Looks like it belongs in the Empire State Building.

-Yes!

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Or on the set of Poirot, or something!

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What sort of value do you think these might have?

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They're good examples. They'll never be as collectable

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as a Thomas Tompion or an 18th-century clock.

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These are good useable clocks.

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So I think value-wise, if I was being realistic here,

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sort of £50 to £80.

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On the day, if we get two collectors

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who want them, a bit more than that. How's that?

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That's really good.

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There's no time to waste and lots more rummaging to do.

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On the wall, Paul spots three watercolours of coastal scenes.

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They belonged to one of Mike's relatives.

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Paul believes they date from the 1920s,

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valuing them at £30 to £50.

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In the corner of the room,

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Paul notices a 1950s display cabinet.

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Made of oak, it's a modern reproduction

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of an earlier 16th-century design.

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Though this style of furniture is somewhat old-fashioned today,

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Paul still gives it an acceptable estimate of £40 to £60.

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While Paul keeps up the work, I take a moment

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to hear about Pauline and Mike's long, happy marriage

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while adventuring abroad.

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These are some of your holiday photographs!

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This is when we lived in the States.

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What made you first decide to live somewhere else?

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Well, like all our friends,

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we saved and saved and finally got a deposit.

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And then we thought, is this all there is to life, paying a mortgage?

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We thought, "Not for our life."

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So we took the plunge and chose Canada,

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and decided it would be a better life.

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What was it like when you got to Canada?

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Times were pretty hard there, actually.

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Mike walked the streets.

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With his skills, he'd never had to do that before.

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He did, eventually, get a job, for which we were very grateful.

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I understand that Mike had some very innovative ways

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of keeping the family provided for.

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He was the most amazing dart thrower!

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So he joined the Legion...

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and we had to make sure on Wednesdays, enough was left

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for him to buy two drinks and pay his subs at the Legion.

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They'd play for money, you see. Of course, he never lost!

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And the money he brought back

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bought our groceries for Thursday and Friday, until we were paid!

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I suppose we wouldn't have starved. We could manage to live with bread.

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Then some friends moved to the States and said,

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"Come down, it's wonderful."

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So we thought, "Why not?"

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And life was much easier, to be honest. Jobs were easier to get.

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It was easier to buy a home. We just loved living down there.

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We had an absolutely wonderful time.

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I really want you to make the money

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for the grandchildren. Let's find Paul.

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Hope he hasn't had too much of a break

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-and found something else to sell.

-That would be good.

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While we've been chatting, Paul's been busy.

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He's come across these two 19th-century milk stools.

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Made of elm, they have a great patina that reflects their age.

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Pauline's happy to send them to greener pastures.

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Paul hopes they'll earn £50 to £60.

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He doesn't stop there. This little box is home to our next surprise.

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All that glitters may not be gold,

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but in this case, it is, and a bit more.

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-Ah, now, Pauline, how are you? All right?

-Yes, thank you.

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-I've found some interesting items!

-You've found one of my crowns!

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-Obviously, you no longer need these any more.

-No!

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-They are discarded, yes.

-Right.

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Scrap gold, basically, is a broken earring, a bit of chain.

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A ring without a stone.

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A lot of people don't realise there is money there.

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There's intrinsic value, there's bullion value.

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So all these bits and pieces now will add up.

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People melt them down and make new jewellery from them.

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It's good to keep them in a bag like that.

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Dental gold is usually 22 carat. It's a high carat gold.

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So by the time you take your tooth out of there,

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I think you'd have quite a lot of value there.

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So if I said as a lot, as an auction estimate,

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if I said 80 to 120, I think

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that little lot could do quite well.

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-How does that sound?

-Very good.

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-I'd be very pleased with that.

-Excellent.

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I'll look after them now. Let's keep looking.

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There's not much time left for rummaging.

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So far, we've raised £515, but we need more to get to our £700 target.

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Pauline's found three woodworking planes

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that belonged to Mike's granddad.

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There's a whole market for woodworking tools

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and many of today's craftsmen

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prefer using antique tools to new ones.

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Paul estimates this lot at £30 to £50.

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And Pauline's still going strong.

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-Hello, Pauline!

-Ah!

-How are you?

-Found you.

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-Look at this.

-Ooh!

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That's good. Look at that. A signed cricket bat.

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-Uh-huh.

-What's the story about this bat? How come you've got it?

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I actually won it in a raffle.

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When I won it, I thought,

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"Oh, I've won a cricket bat." That was my reaction.

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And the men were furious!

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It was signed by England and Australia and it was Packer.

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At the beginning of the Packer days.

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So it made it sort of special.

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But there were some very avid cricket supporters,

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-and they weren't very pleased!

-That you'd won it!

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Goodness. This is 1977, Paul, the year of the Queen's Silver Jubilee.

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Exactly. What a rare thing to have!

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You see lots of cricket bats that were done for county level.

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Lincolnshire versus Lancashire, that sort of thing.

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But to have England versus Australia,

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-that's the Ashes, as we know it.

-Yes.

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'77 was a massive year. We won the Ashes that year.

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But after the game, it would have got signed by all the players.

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There'd only be a few of these bats

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that were given to charities,

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or special occasions, or people involved in hosting the event.

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It's very rare that they come onto the market.

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So you were very lucky indeed. No wonder those guys were mad!

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They were seriously not happy with me. And I couldn't understand why!

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-Is it something you do want to sell now?

-Yes.

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-Yes, I do. I've had it an awfully long time.

-'77 is a while ago, now.

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Paul, what sort of value might we be talking?

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I've never handled an international bat before.

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I've only ever had the regional ones.

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If I said £150 to £200?

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It sounds a good thing for six pence, doesn't it?

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I'd be very happy with that amount because I have no idea.

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It's a fascinating thing. I think it'll create a lot of interest.

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It's going to help us when it comes to batting our innings!

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You wanted £700, didn't you?

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-That will be good.

-To split between the grandchildren.

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-Well, the value of everything going to auction comes to £695.

-Well done.

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-Just about.

-Yes.

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So if the bidders are feeling generous on the day,

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we should top that up. I'm not sure

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we want to start splitting the odd fiver between them!

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-Are you happy with that figure?

-Very, yes.

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Everything has to be packed up for the auction house,

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and we'll see you there!

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Right. Thank you.

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It's been a lovely day

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and we've uncovered some great collections and memorabilia

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at Pauline's home, all of which we're hoping will help us make our £700 target at auction.

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Off to the sale goes... our collection of vintage toy cars.

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Valued at £100 to £120,

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they're sure to race ahead on the day.

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Mike's collection of stamps.

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There's something for every enthusiast with this lot

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and it's valued at £100 to £200.

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And our 1977 signed cricket bat.

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At £150 to £200,

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let's hope this item bowls the bidders over!

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Find out how much money these and Pauline's other items will raise

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on auction day.

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Coming up on Cash in the Attic, we get off to a flying start.

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Fantastic. Let's hope we can repeat that again.

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But before long,

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the bidding grinds to a halt.

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No, not sold.

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Find out what happens when the hammer falls.

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Now, it's been a few weeks since we visited Pauline in Worcester.

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She had a dilemma on her hands.

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Since losing her husband, she wanted to clear out a lot of stuff she had around.

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She didn't know what to do with it.

0:17:170:17:19

So we brought it to the Cotswold Auction Company here in Gloucester.

0:17:190:17:23

The Cotswold Auction Company

0:17:250:17:27

has been in business since the late 1800s

0:17:270:17:29

and it's still thriving today.

0:17:290:17:32

We're hoping Pauline's items raise £700

0:17:320:17:34

so she can invest in her grandchildren's future,

0:17:340:17:37

in memory of her husband, their grandfather.

0:17:370:17:41

Paul's already spotted one of our lots,

0:17:410:17:43

the stamps, which he's very optimistic about.

0:17:430:17:46

-Morning, Paul.

-Good morning, Lorne.

0:17:470:17:49

-How are you?

-Fine. You managed to find the stamps.

0:17:490:17:51

-I've been looking, but there's so much stuff here.

-Amazing.

0:17:510:17:54

There's loads of good stuff.

0:17:540:17:56

Fantastic collection of stamps.

0:17:560:17:58

-I think it'll do well.

-Pauline's got something for everyone.

0:17:580:18:02

Precious metal, with gold,

0:18:020:18:03

the watercolours, the Corgi toys,

0:18:030:18:05

cigarette cards.

0:18:050:18:08

-The cricket bat, some sports memorabilia.

-Yes.

0:18:080:18:10

-It would be great if we could help her make the money. She wants the money for the grandchildren.

-Yes.

0:18:100:18:16

I'm hoping everyone around this area is feeling generous.

0:18:160:18:19

Since we last saw Pauline,

0:18:190:18:22

she's had second thoughts about

0:18:220:18:24

the 1950s display cabinet.

0:18:240:18:25

She's decided to leave it at home.

0:18:250:18:28

Valued at £40 to £60,

0:18:280:18:29

let's hope we make up the difference with the other sales.

0:18:290:18:32

Pauline's arrived and has brought a friend to share in the excitement.

0:18:320:18:36

-Good morning!

-Hello!

-Who are you?

0:18:380:18:40

-I'm Margaret.

-You're accompanying Pauline.

-I've come with Pauline, yes.

0:18:400:18:45

-Ever been at an auction before?

-No, never.

0:18:450:18:47

-That'll be a first, then.

-Don't scratch your nose. You might buy something!

-Right!

0:18:470:18:52

Obviously, we've got the cricket bat. Have you put a reserve on it?

0:18:520:18:56

-Yes, I thought I should.

-OK.

-It's rather special.

0:18:560:18:59

-How much for?

-£100.

0:18:590:19:02

The auction's already started. Plenty of people here.

0:19:020:19:05

So put that down. You never know,

0:19:050:19:08

it might be going home with somebody else! Come on.

0:19:080:19:11

Today's bidders, as always, will be seeking out the best bargains.

0:19:130:19:17

Let's hope Pauline's items

0:19:170:19:19

catch their eye and sell for over Paul's estimates.

0:19:190:19:22

As the auction gets under way,

0:19:220:19:24

our first lot is the two wooden milk stools.

0:19:240:19:27

Paul valued these at £50 to £60 the pair.

0:19:270:19:29

First bid here at 30. Commission bid at 30.

0:19:290:19:32

30 in the book.

0:19:320:19:34

30. Five. 40. Five. 50.

0:19:340:19:37

At 50 with me. Bid's with me at 50.

0:19:370:19:41

50. Looking for five now. Take two. At two, thank you.

0:19:410:19:44

-55 here.

-55. There you go.

0:19:440:19:47

Commission bid at 55.

0:19:470:19:49

Are we all done at 55? 60, anywhere?

0:19:490:19:52

-55.

-There you go.

0:19:520:19:54

Fantastic. OK, let's hope we can repeat that again.

0:19:540:19:57

An impressive start to the day. Let's hope we can keep it going.

0:19:580:20:02

Up next, the two mantel clocks,

0:20:020:20:04

valued at £50 to £80.

0:20:040:20:06

-How do you think it'll go?

-I'm not sure about the clocks.

0:20:070:20:10

-Not sure. OK.

-Every bit helps.

0:20:100:20:13

-True.

-Fingers crossed.

0:20:130:20:15

30? £30? 20, then? £20.

0:20:150:20:18

Start me off for the two clocks.

0:20:180:20:20

£20. Must be worth that.

0:20:200:20:22

At ten. Going on at ten. 12. 15.

0:20:220:20:25

18. At 18. Who's going on now at £18?

0:20:250:20:29

At £18. 20 anywhere? 20.

0:20:290:20:32

At 20. Bid seated now at 20.

0:20:320:20:34

Two, anywhere? At £20. Lady's with you at 20.

0:20:340:20:37

Somebody's got a bargain!

0:20:370:20:39

At £20, and I'm selling.

0:20:390:20:42

Oh, dear. £20. What do you think of that?

0:20:420:20:45

-Not a lot!

-No. I'm not surprised.

-Disappointing.

0:20:450:20:48

So, good news comes in threes.

0:20:480:20:51

The three-piece set of Italian Capo di Monte pottery sold for £15.

0:20:510:20:56

At 15, then, I'm selling...

0:20:560:20:59

695.

0:20:590:21:00

-And the three 1920s woodworking planes made £22.

-22.

0:21:000:21:07

Gentleman standing...

0:21:070:21:08

Next up, our collection of three coastal watercolours.

0:21:080:21:12

-We're selling things in threes, Paul.

-Yes.

-Here we go again.

0:21:120:21:16

-What do we want for these, Paul?

-About £30 for the set.

0:21:160:21:19

30 to 50, hopefully. Let's see.

0:21:190:21:21

£10 to start. At ten. Who's going on? 12.

0:21:210:21:24

15. 18. 20.

0:21:240:21:26

-Two.

-There you are. Going up again.

0:21:260:21:29

At 22. Where's the five now?

0:21:290:21:31

22. At 25.

0:21:310:21:33

At 25. A new bidder at 25. At 25.

0:21:330:21:37

Lady's bid seated at 25. Eight, anywhere?

0:21:370:21:40

At 25. A nice little lot. I'm selling.

0:21:400:21:43

695.

0:21:430:21:45

£25. Nearly got there. Not quite,

0:21:450:21:47

-but is that good enough?

-It's a bit more.

-Good.

-It's OK.

0:21:470:21:51

Not bad, but let's hope the tide turns for our next lot.

0:21:510:21:55

It's Mike's stamp collection,

0:21:550:21:57

which we really need to make top money.

0:21:570:22:00

-Unusual little lot, this. We've put a £100 reserve on this.

-Yes.

0:22:030:22:07

-Good.

-Is that all right with you?

0:22:070:22:08

Good.

0:22:080:22:10

-It has your stamp of approval?

-It does!

0:22:100:22:12

What shall we say? £100 to start?

0:22:140:22:16

£100? 80, put them in?

0:22:160:22:19

50, then. Start me off, someone. £50 to start?

0:22:190:22:22

-£50. Start me off, someone.

-No interest, by the looks of it.

0:22:220:22:26

Anyone interested? 50, anywhere?

0:22:260:22:28

If not, we'll move on.

0:22:280:22:31

-Ah.

-Unsold.

-You get to keep them.

0:22:310:22:33

We may not have had the right bidder in the sale room today,

0:22:330:22:37

but with a collection of this nature,

0:22:370:22:39

I've no doubt it will generate interest at a specialist auction.

0:22:390:22:43

If you'd like to raise money by selling at auction,

0:22:430:22:46

do take note that sale rooms usually charge a commission fee.

0:22:460:22:49

These vary from sale room to sale room, so best to enquire in advance.

0:22:490:22:53

Next up, an item

0:22:530:22:55

we've all been talking about.

0:22:550:22:57

-The signed cricket bat.

-I think this is nice,

0:22:570:22:59

being the international sides, England versus Australia, the Ashes.

0:22:590:23:03

Wonderful. It's 1977, 28 signatures.

0:23:030:23:06

-We've got a reserve on this, haven't we?

-Absolutely.

0:23:060:23:09

-£100, yes?

-About that, yes.

-About 100.

-Yes.

0:23:090:23:12

OK. We want at least 100, then.

0:23:120:23:14

See how it goes. OK. Good luck.

0:23:140:23:17

Very unusual lot. What shall we say? Collector's item. £100 for it?

0:23:170:23:21

£100? 80, then. Start me.

0:23:210:23:23

£60 to start?

0:23:230:23:26

At 60. Who's going on at 60?

0:23:260:23:28

At £60. At £60.

0:23:280:23:30

-Five. 70. And 70.

-70.

0:23:300:23:33

At 70. At 70. Looking for five. At £70.

0:23:330:23:37

At £70. It isn't enough.

0:23:370:23:39

At £70.

0:23:390:23:41

-No.

-No, not sold.

0:23:410:23:43

It got up to £70, but that's not enough, obviously.

0:23:440:23:47

-You've got a £100 reserve on it. Are you OK about that?

-Yes.

0:23:470:23:51

It's such a shame we fell shy of the reserve,

0:23:510:23:54

but it's better to hold on to such a special piece

0:23:540:23:57

than to let it go for less than it's worth.

0:23:570:24:00

For the next two lots,

0:24:000:24:01

we experienced a similar struggle.

0:24:010:24:04

The jewellery and Dinky toys, despite being terrific items,

0:24:040:24:07

do not generate enough interest to sell.

0:24:070:24:10

Not sold, that one.

0:24:100:24:12

-Disappointing.

-Oh, I'm sorry. Yes, it is.

0:24:120:24:15

Well, we're coming to the end of our list.

0:24:150:24:18

I think Pauline's hoping for a bit of luck with this lot.

0:24:180:24:21

There's a nice range of topics in this, Paul.

0:24:210:24:24

I really like these. They were designed as an educational tool.

0:24:240:24:28

They were put in cigarette packets

0:24:280:24:30

and you'd get knowledge of different subjects.

0:24:300:24:33

We've got railway equipment,

0:24:330:24:34

we've got the saga of ships, and air raid precautions!

0:24:340:24:37

-Jolly handy!

-What do we do?

0:24:370:24:40

We're looking for about £50 for the lot. All right?

0:24:400:24:42

£20. I've 20 bid. At 20 with me. Commission bid at 20.

0:24:420:24:46

22. 25. 28. 30.

0:24:460:24:48

Two. 35. 38.

0:24:480:24:50

40. Five.

0:24:500:24:53

-45.

-45.

-I'm out at 45.

0:24:530:24:55

£45.

0:24:550:24:57

At 45, then. All done.

0:24:570:25:00

-OK, that's near enough.

-£45.

0:25:000:25:02

-Happy with that?

-What was it?

0:25:020:25:04

-We wanted 50 to 70 on the cigarette cards.

-Cigarette cards. Thank you.

0:25:040:25:08

-That's right.

-But we've got £45. Is that OK?

-Yes.

-Good.

0:25:080:25:12

That's more like it.

0:25:120:25:13

I'm glad we were able to rally the bidders with a sale.

0:25:130:25:18

It's been a day of surprises and upsets,

0:25:180:25:20

which has made for a rough journey.

0:25:200:25:22

Although we haven't reached Pauline's target,

0:25:220:25:25

I hope she'll be happy with what we have raised.

0:25:250:25:28

-How much do you think you've made today?

-Not a lot!

0:25:280:25:31

Well, I think everything's proportional.

0:25:310:25:34

-You've actually made £182.

-Right.

0:25:340:25:37

-Is that better than you thought?

-Yes, I think possibly, yes. Yes.

0:25:370:25:42

-I think it's a very...

-It'll be a start for them.

0:25:420:25:45

It's a very generous way to start.

0:25:450:25:47

-Not many grandchildren get started off like that.

-I'm pleased to do it.

0:25:470:25:51

It's clear Pauline's grandchildren are very important to her.

0:25:570:26:01

Even though James and Eleanor live in the United States,

0:26:010:26:05

Pauline keeps in close contact

0:26:050:26:07

and makes sure her next visit is never far away.

0:26:070:26:09

That's why she wants to make sure the money she's raised

0:26:090:26:12

will be secure when it comes to contributing to their future.

0:26:120:26:17

I'm going to see a financial advisor. I've a small amount of money for each of the grandchildren

0:26:170:26:22

and I need to feel ensured that it's going in the right place.

0:26:220:26:27

And with the independent financial advisor's help,

0:26:270:26:31

Pauline's sure to set her grandchildren off on the right foot in the years to come.

0:26:310:26:36

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