Guest Cash in the Attic


Guest

Antiques series. Chris Hollins and expert Paul Hayes help travel enthusiast Shirley Guest, who is on a quest to visit Britain's most beautiful buildings.


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Transcript


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We help you to sell something dear to your heart for something special.

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We're about to meet a lady who's willing to part with family history

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to see some other countries.

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'Today our expert, Paul, struggles to contain his excitement

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'over a delightful relic.'

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You're salivating, Paul. You're very excited. We're getting excited, now.

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'Our ears prick up at the sound of our favourite word.'

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-Did we hear...

-Money?

-There's some money involved.

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'Come auction day, our expert's love of puns reaches new heights.'

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That's the spirit.

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You don't know about him yet, do you?

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-Not yet, no. We'll find out.

-Sorry about that.

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'We'll be wincing and cheering when the final hammer falls.'

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Today we are in West London to meet a mother and son

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who are clearing out their cupboards to have a bit of a busman's holiday.

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'Home may now be a riverside apartment in West London,

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'but Shirley Guest has been quite a globetrotter.

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'She's lived in places like Trinidad,

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'Mauritius and Hong Kong.

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'Twice married, she has three sons.

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'Her youngest, Phillip, is a photographer.

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'Shirley's inspiration was her father, Percy,

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'a doctor with a love of art and history.

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'Our search, through many family heirlooms and souvenirs,

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'will enable Shirley to indulge her passion for history further.

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'Paul Hayes is our expert today, with more than 20 years experience.'

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-I'm going this way. You go that way.

-OK, mate.

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There they are! You must be Shirley and this is Phillip.

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-Nice to see you.

-Wonderful to see you, too.

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-What a lovely part of the world.

-It's very pleasant here, I must say.

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Who called the Cash in the Attic team?

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-I did.

-You called us in. Why did you call us in?

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I was hoping to raise a little money

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cos I love visiting stately homes.

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Stately homes. We'll hear a bit more about that later on.

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Own up, what sort of things are we going to find here, Phillip?

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I think we're going to find loads of things. Antiques from way back.

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Some interesting things. How much money would you like to raise?

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I was hoping to raise about £400.

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About £400. I'm feeling outnumbered by you two. Let's find Paul.

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He's the man who knows what he's talking about. Let's find him.

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'True to form, Paul has already made a fine discovery.'

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-Hello Shirley, how are you?

-Are you beavering away?

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Yeah. I've made a start already.

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Do you know what? I think I've found one of the nicest things

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I've seen for a long time.

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This is Chinese mythology. Do you know where this came from?

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I think it was Great Uncle Alfred got it from Tibet.

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It wouldn't surprise me. It's top quality.

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It goes back to Buddhist culture.

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All of the Buddhist temples are protected

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by these four characters, here.

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They represented the four points of the compass.

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They are hand-painted characters. The quality of paint is fantastic.

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You're looking at sometime in the 19th Century.

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The box itself is lacquer.

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It's made with like a papier mache,

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and then the sap from the lacquer tree is placed in layer after layer,

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to give this wonderful finish.

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And then using powdered gold, they get this wonderful effect.

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This is top quality, it really is.

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What I love about this, why I know this is a quality item,

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is that this isn't glass, this is crystal.

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-Is it?

-It's carved crystal.

-Goodness.

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And the way I can tell is that there's no air bubbles or anything.

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And the actual bottle here has been used for perfume or ointment.

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You're salivating, Paul. You're very excited.

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We're getting excited, now.

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-How much?

-The big question.

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I think I'd like to have a closer look at this,

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before we get to the auction,

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to try and find out some more, exactly, about it.

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But I think for now, if we put this in, maybe £70-£100.

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But I expect it to go for a lot more.

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Wonderful!

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'Yes, wonderful. A superb start.

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'Phillip has also been busy, turning out his grandfather's hipflask.

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'This was a souvenir of Percy's appointment to India in the 1920s.

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'It's silver-plated and clad in crocodile leather.

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'It could be worth £20-£30.'

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Paul, look what I've found here.

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Do you think that might be interesting?

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That's a beauty, isn't it? Where has this come from?

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I'm sure my father brought it back from Persia,

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but it could be India, as was there in the First World War.

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-Right. How long was your father...

-Right through the First World War,

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and then he went on to India and he worked as a Civil Doctor

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out there for the Indians for a while.

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I suspect this is actually where it's come from.

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-It's more Indian?

-Maybe 1920s, 1930s.

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If you are lucky enough to be out in the days of the Raj, out in India,

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these are the sorts of things they used to sell in bazaars.

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The whole thing is made from a local wood.

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In this case it looks like rosewood on the interior.

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Can you see that? And it's veneered with tortoiseshell and ivory.

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What I love about this type of work is the pierced decoration.

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That takes hours and hours to do. It's very, very elaborate.

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It's decorated here in black decoration. Can you see that?

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Does it have any sentimental value to you?

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Not really. I've got lots of other memories.

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We do have to be careful with ivory and tortoiseshell.

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They both come under CITES,

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the Convention for the International Trade of Endangered Species.

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An item from ivory has to be pre-1947.

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We know that this came from India.

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We know it's pre-war. We're looking 1920s, 1930s, so we're safe.

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What I like about this one, it's not damaged.

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The little feet are still on there. It's got the original key.

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-If we said, sort of, £80-£120.

-Wonderful, Paul.

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Very happy with that.

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'Isn't that lovely? I wonder what trinkets this box contained.

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'Doctor's orders, perhaps.

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'Phillip is intrigued by this pair of framed prints in Turner's style.

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'They're the work of an artist who lived until the 1920s.

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'William Tatton Winter was well-liked by royalty,

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'and is believed to have settled in Ryegate, which may be shown here.

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'The other picture is a shipwreck by John Cother Webb,

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'a student of Landseer, famous for creating mezzotints,

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'an early printing process. Paul values this pair at £40-£60.'

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There's a sense of travel in this family.

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Tell me about your side of the family.

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Your uncle and father.

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It sounds as if your family has travelled everywhere.

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Well, I mean, Great Uncle Alfred, obviously.

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Then my grandfather on my mother's side fought in the Boer War.

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My father was in Persia during the First World War.

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And then he was also in India.

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He joined the Indian Civil Service as a doctor.

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And then when I was 15 we went out to Trinidad.

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And then in 1954, I married somebody from Mauritius. Went to live there.

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We went to the Seychelles, where you were born.

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From there we went to Hong Kong.

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We went to what was the Gilbert Islands, now it's Kiribati.

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It's been quite a lot of travelling.

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I moan when I have to go around London!

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Is that sense of travel in your blood, as well?

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It is. I love travelling, always have.

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We were blessed to travel at such an early age,

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and live in these countries at such an early age.

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In those days, travel was more of an expedition.

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When you first went to the Seychelles, you went by boat.

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You love to travel around the world and now you want to travel the UK.

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What do you want to do?

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What I'd like to do is visit lots of stately homes.

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There's Petworth, which belonged to the Northumberland family,

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and lots of National Trust places.

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All the wonderful history and art, beautiful things to see.

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Shirley, I could talk to you all day. Brilliant stories about travel.

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But do you know who would get really upset? Paul.

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He's out on his own, working. Let's go an help him.

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Off we go.

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'We needn't have been too worried about him.

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'He's happily checking out a glazed porcelain cigarette box,

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'once owned by Shirley's Great Uncle Alfred.

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'It was made between the Wars by Carlton Ware,

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'and it could fetch up to £25-£40.

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'But another of Great Uncle Alfred's mementos

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'may do even better.'

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Have you any idea what this teapot - is it a teapot or a coffee pot?

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I can't make my mind up. Do you know where it came from?

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The Orient, I believe.

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Great Uncle Alfred had this on his travels as Sea Captain.

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That's as far as I know, I'm afraid.

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You're looking late 19th Century. The golden age of tea drinking.

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We had lots and lots of products coming in from Japan,

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which is where this teapot comes from.

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This is a very nice example of Japanese silverwork.

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I can tell you it's silver because there's no sign of wear.

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If this was silver plated, if I breathed on the surface,

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you'd get a yellow tinge coming through. This is perfect.

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It's not British silver, because it's too hard.

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They call this a low-grade silver,

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it tends to be what's made, at least into Europe if not into Asia.

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It doesn't dint with your fingers. The workmanship is fantastic.

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The enamel top is lovely as well.

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You've got the green and yellow in the shape of the chrysanthemum.

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The chrysanthemum is Japan's national flower.

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It symbolises peace and harmony, so it's quite an elegant teapot.

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If you wanted to auction, I'd say a minimum of £40-£70.

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-I think if someone takes a shine to it, it could go for more.

-Great.

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'I love your enthusiasm, Paul, but I wonder if bidders will share it.'

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Hundred pounds for it. There we go. Hundred pound. 110.

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120. 130?

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140? 150? 160. 170?

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-180? 190.

-180.

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'Oh! This could prove a very exciting sale.

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'Our search appears to be going well.

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'I've found a perfume bottle which belonged to Shirley's grandmother.

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'The silver cap is a little tarnished,

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'but the hallmarks suggest it was made in Chester in 1914.

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'Paul's estimate is £20-£30.

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Shirley, these are beautiful.

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Look at these. Almost see-through.

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-They're Japanese porcelain.

-Are they really? I like these.

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-Paul.

-Uhuh.

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I've got something very nice and something close to your heart.

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You like a cup of tea. Look at these.

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Those are lovely. It's known as Japanese export porcelain,

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or eggshell china.

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If I hold it up to the light, you can see through it.

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That's part of its mystery. They called it white gold.

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-Would you drink tea from it?

-I wouldn't.

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These usually are made for decoration.

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If you poured boiling water into that, chances are it will crack.

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These are purely ornamental. That's the idea. They go in a cabinet.

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-What are these flowers?

-Cherry blossom.

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Oh, lovely.

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What I love about Japanese items is they always put things to one side.

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Can you see that? This is on the left-hand side of the plate.

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You can see that all the decoration is to one side,

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whereas in Europe, we tend to do things down the middle.

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it's asymmetrical, to one side.

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-Who brought these back?

-Great Uncle Alfred again!

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He's done very well, Uncle Alfred, for us.

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Originally this would've been 12 cups and saucers,

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teapot, a sugar basin, cream jug, side plates.

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More often than not, they were brought back in the 1920s.

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You're looking at a 20th century item.

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I think what's happened here is that over the years they've been damaged.

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This one has been damaged and glued.

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I think, for decorative value,

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£30-£50. How does that sound?

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That's more than I expected. Very pleased.

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-Is that your cup of tea?

-Please.

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'Oh dear. The Japanese tea set brings another country

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'into our worldwide souvenirs.

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'Shirley's next find comes from somewhere a little closer to home.

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'These decorated seashells are from Cornwall,

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'one shows a carved terracotta woman with a basket.

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'Highly unusual. They may fetch £30-£50 in the auction.

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'Paul seems to have found something much more impressive.'

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Look at this. Do you know what, these are fantastic.

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Look at the size of the one you've got.

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-Who's collected these shells?

-That was my uncle in Cairo.

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-That would've been in the '20s.

-Right. OK.

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That's from the Gilbert Islands, Kiribati.

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I used to go snorkel diving and found that.

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That is amazing, isn't it? Look at that.

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This is typically what you'll find. This is an oyster shell.

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This is a form of mother of pearl.

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The way the oyster shell works is that

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when a bit of mineral or piece of dirt gets inside the oyster,

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to protect itself, it secretes a substance called nacre.

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That nacre covers the bit of muck and that becomes the pearl.

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What happens is this interior becomes a milky petrol finish,

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this mother of pearl.

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What they've done is polished and carved it in a fantastic way.

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Look at the detail, there.

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Look at all this floral decoration.

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That looks like one of the mosques in Cairo.

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-What's that one there?

-Bit crude, that one, isn't it?

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It is the quality of the carving but you can see the difference.

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-That's more a religious scene.

-You can see vestiges of paint there.

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I think these are beautiful quality.

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I think they are prized for the quality of the carving,

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not so much the actual shell.

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The shapes on those two are particularly nice.

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-What do you think, then?

-Around £50 each.

-Wow!

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You're looking £150-£200 as an auction estimate.

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-I never expected as much as that.

-Let's ask Phillip and Chris.

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Guys. Phillip, Chris. Some good news.

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-We're sprinting over.

-Did we hear...

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-Money?

-There's money involved.

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-If I said at least £150 for these?

-Actually, Chris was offering more.

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I don't think you've got the right idea about this programme.

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They are beautiful, aren't they? A great way of finishing our day.

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-You know you wanted to raise around £400 today, didn't you?

-Yes.

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The grand total is £505.

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-Wonderful.

-How do you feel about that?

-Wonderful.

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You see, he's not easily pleased!

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-LAUGHTER

-That's great.

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He's a tough customer.

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'I think Phillip may not be jumping for joy just yet,

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'but deep down he's as pleased as the rest of us

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'that we found so many treasures to sell.

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'Shirley's father brought this tortoiseshell box from India.

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'We think it dates from the 1920s, but it could be older.

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'We hope it'll fetch £80-£120.

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'The lacquer cabinet with bottle is guarded by mystical Chinese figures.

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'Worth at least £70-£100, we think.

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'And the Japanese white metal teapot should make £40-£70,

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'but if it turns out to be solid silver, as we suspect,

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'it could bring us more. Cor!

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'Still to come, our expert can't tell his ammonite from his elbow.'

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-Ammonite or nautilus.

-Nautilus. Ammonites are fossils.

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Oh right. Nautilus. There we go. Sorry.

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-'There are surprises in store, too.'

-Lovely!

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I thought your hat was going to blow off, then!

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Vanished!

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'Hold on to yours until the final crack of the gavel.'

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We had a fascinating day with Shirley and Phillip

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at Shirley's London flat. I can't wait to find out what happens today.

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Why? Because we found weird and wonderful things

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from her family's travels around the world.

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Will we make a fortune? We'll find out when the final hammer falls.

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'Shirley has sent her collectibles to Cheswick auction rooms

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'in plenty of time for dealers to view them.

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'I can't wait to catch up with Shirley and Phillip,

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'but someone seems to be missing.'

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Hello, Shirley. Nice to see you.

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This isn't your strapping son.

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He has a photoshoot in Regent's Park.

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-And so you are?

-Sheila. A great friend of Shirley's.

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We've known each other for donkey's years.

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Literally years.

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Not quite dinosaur years, more donkey years.

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-Donkey, I should say.

-Are we in for some trouble?

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-I hope we're in for trouble.

-I sensed that!

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You've got interesting items. The white metal coffee pot.

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They're keen on that here, so you've put a reserve of £50 on that.

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My ultimate favourite has to be the lovely Chinese casket.

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The guys here think it's late 19th Century, early 20th.

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We've put a reserve of £70 on that one.

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-Alright with you?

-Wonderful.

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'It's not too long before the auction gets underway.

0:17:190:17:22

'Shirley's first lot is the hipflask,

0:17:220:17:24

'silver-plated and wrapped in crocodile leather.

0:17:240:17:27

'It could be worth £20-£30.'

0:17:270:17:29

£20 for it. £20 for it. £10 for it.

0:17:310:17:34

15? 15. 18?

0:17:360:17:38

18. 20. 22.

0:17:380:17:41

25. 28. 30.

0:17:410:17:43

-32. 35. 38. 40. 45.

-Keep going. Oh!

0:17:430:17:47

At £42. Bid at £42. £45? £42 I'm bid.

0:17:470:17:51

At £42, are we done? I think we are, at £42.

0:17:510:17:54

That's the spirit!

0:17:550:17:57

-You don't know about him, do you?

-Not yet. I shall find out.

0:17:580:18:02

LAUGHTER

0:18:020:18:04

'Hm. Puns aside, that is a good start.

0:18:040:18:07

'Next this tortoiseshell and silver trinket box.

0:18:070:18:10

'It has been paired with the glass scent bottle.

0:18:100:18:13

'We're hoping for £20-£30, despite the slight tarnish on the lid.'

0:18:130:18:17

-I should've polished that silver.

-That's outrageous.

0:18:180:18:22

To be honest, it's better to leave the silver unpolished,

0:18:220:18:25

and not to polish it often.

0:18:250:18:27

Every time you polish it, you take a layer of silver off.

0:18:270:18:30

-It eventually gets thin.

-How much are we hoping for?

0:18:300:18:33

£20-£30 for this one.

0:18:330:18:35

£20 the lot. A bid at £20.

0:18:350:18:37

22. 25. 28.

0:18:370:18:39

30. 32. 35. 38. 40.

0:18:390:18:42

42. 45.

0:18:420:18:44

-48. 50.

-Oh come on!

0:18:440:18:46

Nobody else wants it at £48? Take £50. At £48.

0:18:460:18:49

At £48. Are we done? £48. You've got it. £48.

0:18:490:18:53

'Good. That's two lots punching well above their weight.

0:18:530:18:56

'Shirley's Great Uncle Alfred brought back many souvenirs

0:18:560:18:58

'from the far east, including this Japanese Satsuma tea set.

0:18:580:19:03

'Paul's estimate was £30-£50.'

0:19:030:19:05

£30 for it.

0:19:050:19:08

-Thank you, a bid at £30.

-£30. That's alright.

0:19:080:19:11

32. 35.

0:19:110:19:13

38. 40.

0:19:130:19:15

42. A bidder at £40. At £42.

0:19:150:19:18

-Come on.

-At £40, at £40. Sold at £40 and gone.

0:19:180:19:21

-There we go. That's alright.

-In the middle.

0:19:210:19:24

'Not bad. A reasonable result, considering the set was incomplete.

0:19:240:19:28

'Our fourth lot consists of two shells from Cornwall.

0:19:280:19:32

'One shows a carving of a fisherwoman.

0:19:320:19:34

'There are two more that Shirley found in Mauritius.

0:19:340:19:38

I think that's really nice. Such a delicate shape. Nice condition.

0:19:380:19:42

-Are they an ammonite or a nautilus?

-Nautilus. Ammonites are fossils.

0:19:420:19:47

-OK. Nautilus. There we go. Sorry.

-Got it wrong.

0:19:470:19:51

-You do have to work at it.

-Exactly.

0:19:510:19:53

Do I hear £20?

0:19:530:19:56

About four hands going up. I'm bid £20. 22. 25.

0:19:560:19:59

-25. 28. 30.

-That's more like it.

0:19:590:20:01

35? 35. 38. 40.

0:20:010:20:04

I'm bid. 42.

0:20:040:20:05

42, there. 45. 45. 48.

0:20:060:20:09

48. 50? At £48. Bid at £48.

0:20:090:20:12

At 50, there. 55.

0:20:120:20:14

65.

0:20:150:20:17

At £60 right there. £60.

0:20:170:20:20

Sure we'll have a bit more.

0:20:200:20:22

-Are we done? We are.

-You got £60. That's great.

0:20:220:20:25

-Ooh!

-Wonderful.

0:20:250:20:27

'And that's Paul's natural history lesson over.

0:20:280:20:32

'We can move on to the curious box Great Uncle Alfred found in Tibet.

0:20:320:20:35

'Will the four characters guarding the bottle bring us good luck?'

0:20:350:20:39

Out of all your items, this is probably the most unusual.

0:20:390:20:43

It's one I really like. The auctioneers like this one as well.

0:20:430:20:46

I know we have a reserve of £70 on this.

0:20:460:20:49

Let's hope somebody likes it.

0:20:490:20:51

Call me £100 for it. Thank you.

0:20:510:20:54

Straight in.

0:20:540:20:56

£100. 110, I'm bid.

0:20:560:20:57

At 110. 120. 130.

0:20:570:20:59

140. 150.

0:20:590:21:00

170. 180. 190.

0:21:020:21:05

190. 200. 210.

0:21:050:21:07

£210.

0:21:070:21:09

I see £210. Do you want 220? 230.

0:21:090:21:12

240. 250.

0:21:120:21:14

240 we're bid. 250? We're at 240.

0:21:140:21:17

240. 240. Are we all done at 240? Going. Last chance.

0:21:170:21:22

-Ooh!

-Genuinely excited.

0:21:220:21:24

-That's good, isn't it?

-I thought your hat would blow off.

0:21:240:21:28

-It vanished!

-LAUGHTER

0:21:280:21:31

'Wow! Over three times the lower estimate.

0:21:310:21:34

'That's brilliant! It must have made a huge difference to the target.

0:21:340:21:38

'Speaking of which...'

0:21:380:21:40

You wanted to raise £400 today.

0:21:400:21:42

At the halfway stage, you've raised £430.

0:21:430:21:47

-What? Wow!

-That's fantastic, Shirley!

0:21:470:21:51

-That's only half way!

-That's really good.

0:21:510:21:54

'Yes it is, Sheila. Very good indeed.

0:21:540:21:56

'If you'd like to sell your items in this way,

0:21:560:21:59

'bear in mind that auction houses charge fees, such as commission.

0:21:590:22:03

'Your local sale room will advise you on these extra costs.

0:22:030:22:06

'Shirley has delightful items still to come.

0:22:060:22:08

'Where better to start than with this Indian trinket box,

0:22:080:22:12

'made of rosewood and decorated with a veneer of tortoiseshell and ivory.

0:22:120:22:17

'It's late 19th Century and we're looking for between £80-£100.'

0:22:170:22:21

Bid at £50. At £50. 55.

0:22:210:22:24

Up five there, 60. 70.

0:22:240:22:26

85. 95.

0:22:270:22:30

100. 110. 120.

0:22:300:22:32

-Super. Keep going.

-120. £110.

0:22:330:22:35

Here at 120. 110. At 110.

0:22:350:22:38

At 110, we're at 110. Last chance, going at 110.

0:22:390:22:42

-Ooh!

-How's that?

0:22:420:22:43

-Wow!

-That's great, isn't it?

0:22:430:22:46

Fantastic. I'm a happy bunny.

0:22:460:22:48

'Good. That's another chunk of cash towards Shirley's grand tour.

0:22:500:22:54

'But how high can we go?'

0:22:540:22:58

Up next we've got this Japanese white metal teapot

0:22:580:23:01

with a floral decoration.

0:23:010:23:02

The catalogues have described it as white metal.

0:23:020:23:06

I'm 99% certain this is solid silver.

0:23:060:23:09

Because it doesn't have the same hallmark system we have in the UK,

0:23:090:23:13

it can only really be classed as white metal.

0:23:130:23:16

We have a £50 reserve on this. Let's hope it goes for at least that.

0:23:160:23:20

Quite a nice thing. Number 238. £50 for it.

0:23:200:23:22

About 15 hands going up here. Start again.

0:23:220:23:25

£80 for it. CHUCKLING

0:23:250:23:28

£100 for it. There we go. Telephone at £100. 110.

0:23:290:23:32

110. 120. 130?

0:23:320:23:34

140. 150. 160. 170.

0:23:340:23:37

-180. 190. 200.

-180, there.

0:23:370:23:39

210, 220.

0:23:390:23:41

230.

0:23:410:23:43

240. 250.

0:23:430:23:44

260.

0:23:440:23:45

At 250 bid. At 250. Want 260.

0:23:460:23:48

At 250 wanting.

0:23:480:23:50

At 250. We're going once at 250. Are we done? Twice at 250.

0:23:500:23:53

And gone. Your last chance.

0:23:530:23:55

-Oh!

-Wonderful!

0:23:550:23:58

-That's brilliant, isn't it?

-Isn't it! That's superb!

0:23:580:24:01

I've never seen that before.

0:24:010:24:03

The auctioneer says, "Who wants to come in?" and eight people bid!

0:24:030:24:07

-Fantastic!

-Yes! Wonderful!

0:24:070:24:09

'Wasn't that exciting!

0:24:090:24:11

'Our total has gone through the roof.

0:24:110:24:14

'Now the pair of the early 20th Century engravings,

0:24:140:24:16

'valued at £40-£60.

0:24:160:24:18

'Shirley's changed her mind and brought along a second seascape

0:24:180:24:23

'instead of the Victorian street.'

0:24:230:24:25

I'm going to start at £25. Done at 25 and going.

0:24:270:24:29

-That's a bit less.

-Never mind.

0:24:290:24:32

'Never mind. You're doing well. It's a shame they sold under estimate.

0:24:320:24:37

'How about some Carlton Ware?

0:24:390:24:41

'Let's see if this mid-20th century porcelain cigarette box

0:24:410:24:44

'performs a little better.'

0:24:440:24:46

-£20, going to sell. £20, it's gone.

-Only £20.

-It doesn't matter.

-There you go.

0:24:460:24:52

'Next up, more sea shells from the sea shore.

0:24:520:24:56

'These two mother of pearl examples have delicate carvings

0:24:560:24:59

'and are valued at £150-£200.'

0:24:590:25:02

For the two, start me at £100, please. £100.

0:25:020:25:07

Thank you. 110? 110. 120. 130?

0:25:070:25:09

140. 150.

0:25:090:25:11

-160.

-160! Yes, yes, yes!

0:25:120:25:15

At 150. 160.

0:25:150:25:16

170. 180?

0:25:160:25:18

190? 200?

0:25:180:25:20

-210. 220.

-Oh!

0:25:200:25:23

230. Back with the 220 value. Give me 230.

0:25:230:25:27

Yes!

0:25:270:25:29

Who else wants it? We come in at 220. Going at 220.

0:25:290:25:33

-Amazing. Absolutely amazing.

-So pretty.

0:25:330:25:35

I'm knocked out!

0:25:350:25:38

'Well, £220 is a fantastic final sale.

0:25:380:25:43

'It's now time to reveal the grand total.'

0:25:430:25:45

For someone that was chasing £400, you have raised...

0:25:450:25:49

£1,055!

0:25:510:25:55

£1,055!

0:25:560:25:59

-Unbelievable.

-That's incredible.

0:25:590:26:01

I should give some to charity. I'd have to after that.

0:26:010:26:04

That's typically you. You have to make that decision.

0:26:040:26:08

Listen, Chris and Paul, thank you so much. And everybody.

0:26:080:26:11

It's been a wonderful day.

0:26:110:26:12

'Ham House in Richmond-upon-Thames

0:26:160:26:18

'is first on Shirley's long list of stately homes to visit.

0:26:180:26:22

'All thanks to her auction success.'

0:26:220:26:24

I couldn't be more pleased. I never thought I'd raise as much.

0:26:250:26:28

To visit wonderful places is a great joy. I love visiting stately homes.

0:26:280:26:32

I've always loved history. That's really why.

0:26:320:26:36

I love anything that's historical, really.

0:26:360:26:38

Beautiful paintings. Lovely possessions, all round.

0:26:380:26:42

It's been a wonderful visit. I've had a wonderful time.

0:26:420:26:45

'Let's hope this is the first of many successful visits for Shirley.'

0:26:450:26:50

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:020:27:06

Travel enthusiast Shirley Guest is on a quest to visit Britain's most beautiful buildings. She needs around £400 to fund her journey of architectural appreciation. Chris Hollins and expert Paul Hayes help her find Indian boxes, Mauritian sea-shells and a mysterious Chinese casket to sell at auction.


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