Griffith Cash in the Attic


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Griffith

Antiques series. Warwickshire-based Rucky and her husband Mark want to raise a few extra pounds for a family holiday to Australia. They decide to sell off family heirlooms.


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Welcome to the show that finds all those antiques

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and collectables tucked away in people's homes.

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We then sell them at auction to raise money for a family project.

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You know what it's like when a family has

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moved around from one country to another.

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I'm always interested to know what sort of foreign artefacts

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they've picked up.

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Well, we'll find out more, later on, in Cash In The Attic.

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Coming up on Cash In The Attic... we learn about a Hungarian tradition

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for predicting a newborn's career...

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Whichever one the baby reaches out to,

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you're either going to be a businessman or a musician.

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Could expert, Jonty, have found a necklace

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with more to it than meets the eye?

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On the inside here is the minutest compact you'll ever see.

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At auction, could these early 20th century hat pins,

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be a cause for concern?

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I always think they look a bit like offensive weapons.

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In the wrong hands!

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Will they secure a good price when the hammer falls?

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Today I'm in Warwickshire to meet Rucky and Mark,

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who are hoping their antiques and collectables will fund

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a trip for their son, Griff, to the other side of the world.

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Rucky and Mark Griffith

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love to travel and will be going on that trip too.

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Rucky used to be an air hostess

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and Mark would often join her on some of the long-haul stopovers.

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But, since they had Griff, who's now 13,

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they've haven't been able to do as much travelling.

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They own a pub not far from their home near Rugby

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which Rucky helps to manage.

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Mark does all the maintenance

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when he's not tinkering around with his old car, that is.

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Rucky's from Holland and had a Hungarian father

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and a mother who was half German and half Dutch.

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She's inherited lots of their possessions and feels

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it's time to let them go. To help me look through them is Jonty Hearnden.

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His 30 years' experience in the antiques trade is going to be invaluable here.

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-Good morning.

-BOTH: Good morning.

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So, you're looking at your menus here.

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I really appreciate you taking time off running the pub.

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We thought we'd enjoy yourselves,

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have a day off and enjoy it with you.

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Right, OK. So what's the plan today? How much do you want to raise?

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-About £500.

-500 quid.

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-Is it all right if I get started?

-Absolutely.

-Good.

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I'm having that one.

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All right, then.

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So what made you decide, to call us in then, to raise money this way?

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-We want to go to Australia.

-Right.

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We'd like some help with getting the fare together,

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because it's not cheap for the three of us.

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It's the wedding of the daughter of some very good friends of ours

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and we've been honoured with an invitation,

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and nice hot weather, black tie!

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-Gosh, you'll need to take a fan with you or something, won't you?

-Yes.

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So the stuff we're going to be looking at then,

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where is that from, because I know you're both well travelled.

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Does it come from your trips round the world or is it inherited?

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Quite a bit of it is inherited. Rucky's parents were from Europe

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and they brought a lot of stuff in with them.

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Yeah, like you say, we've picked up a bit in our travels, as well.

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We need to raise £500 so the three of you, cos Griff, your son, wants to go as well?

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-Yeah.

-..can get on this trip to the wedding.

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-Shall we get started?

-Great!

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Both Rucky's parents were professional musicians

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and travelled around the world to play in concerts.

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They collected pieces from everywhere they went and apparently never threw anything away.

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Good news for us then!

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-Ah, Jonty...

-Ah-ha!

-Are you about to do a solo?

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Yes, just about to. Where's the bow?

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I have got the bow, I'm afraid.

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-Oh, you haven't?

-That went a long time ago.

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Right, it's a violin that really does seem to have seen better days.

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-Yes, it was my father's first violin.

-OK.

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Being that he was Hungarian,

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when babies were born in those days, when he was born,

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over the crib they get given a hand which has a coin in it

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and a hand that has a musical instrument in it.

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Whichever one the baby reaches out to, is you are either going to be a businessman or a musician.

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That's interesting.

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He reached out to the violin so that was his first violin

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when he started playing at the age of four or five.

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So did he follow that through, did he become a musician?

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-He did, he became a professor of music and he played the violin.

-Wow!

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It was rather nice but we did have another violin when he was alive.

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-It was a Guadagnini.

-That's a good name, isn't it?

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It is a very good name

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and I believe the same one was sold a couple of years ago

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-for about two million.

-What?

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-It's a shame I haven't got it any more.

-You haven't got it here?

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No, I'm sorry.

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It wasn't mine to sell, unfortunately.

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-So we were just left with this one.

-OK.

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-I'm afraid we're not looking at £2 million here.

-No.

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Not even one million. There's no makers label on here at all.

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I could imagine this has been passed down from a few generations.

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I would suspect this violin is well over 100 years old.

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Second-hand violins, in this sort of condition,

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the prices now seem to have fallen somewhat over recent years.

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It's not hundreds of thousands, not thousands, not hundreds... You know.

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-30 to 50.

-Oh, that's more than I would have thought. No, fab.

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-So you're quite happy for that to go?

-Absolutely.

-OK, that's great.

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But we need to raise £500, shall we see what else we can find?

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Wow, what a fascinating story about that violin.

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Rucky's father's music was to end up possibly saving his life

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as he ended up in a German prisoner of war camp. We'll hear more about that later.

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In their chalet room, Jonty's noticed a large collection of cutlery

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which belonged to Rucky's parents.

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In the 1960s and '70s they performed at concerts in the former East Germany, Poland and Russia.

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At the time they weren't allowed to take any money out of the country so they bought cutlery instead.

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All these are made of stainless steel and the estimate for auction

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is £70-£100.

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It looks like Rucky has struck gold.

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-Wow! What, three rings?

-Three rings.

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I forgot I had those.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

-Do they have stories, history?

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That one Mark bought for me when we were in Chichester.

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-I think it was just before I had Griff.

-What a romantic?

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Very romantic, don't tell him that, though!

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-Very modern in style as well, isn't it?

-It is, it reminded me of a belt.

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Yes, I see where you're coming from.

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So these sapphires are cut in lozenge form and then,

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of course, around the edge of I suppose the buckle,

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-you have these tiny little diamonds and they are quite dinky.

-Yes.

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Having a closer look, this is 18 carat gold band

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so that's very good news. What else have we got?

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-We've got this one which was bought in South Africa.

-OK.

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That was on one of my trips.

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-Again, this has a modern feel to it, doesn't it?

-Mmm.

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A solid gold band and then inset, right at the top,

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we've got a platinum or white gold

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and then you've got a pair of baguettes of diamonds

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and then we have a single diamond at the top there.

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We have an 18 carat gold band as well.

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I'd suspect we've just under a carat's worth of diamonds there.

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-Right.

-Which is good news.

-Yes.

-What else have they got?

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This last one, it was my father's.

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His name was Nicholas.

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-He used to wear it on his little finger.

-A little signet ring.

-Yes.

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Whenever I used to go home, I used to pretend I'd forgotten my ring so I could wear it.

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I preferred it to mine at the time. I haven't worn that for a long time now.

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Again, this is an 18 carat gold band and then, of course,

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the ends are studded with two rows of tiny, little diamonds.

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Definitely worth putting it into the auction sale.

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I mean, you're easily looking at £300-£500 here. Very easily.

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-Fantastic.

-That's good news.

-Yes.

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-Shall we put that back.

-Lovely.

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When the strings get to the saleroom,

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will they excite the bidders?

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I can start this in at 200.

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Yes! Excellent.

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At 250, at 260...

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We'll have to wait a little longer to find out how much they like what they see.

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As the search here in Warwickshire continues,

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going by Jonty's lowest estimate so far,

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we stand to make £400 when we take the things we found to the saleroom.

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We've almost reached their target already

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but I'll keep that to myself for now.

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In the dining room, Mark finds a small, wooden frame

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which doesn't seem to have a very clear picture inside.

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There's a set of five.

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They belonged to Rucky's Dutch grandfather

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and it turns out the images inside are negatives of her grandparents.

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They're not in very good condition so she's happy for these to go to auction.

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There's an estimate of £20-£40.

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Rucky gives no trace of her European background

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with her perfect English accent, but I'm intrigued to know more about her background.

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So tell me how long you've been in this country

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and what made you come here in the first place?

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I came here when I was 16 on a holiday and, erm,

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decided I liked the country and decided to stay.

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Did your parents come with you though?

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They came over here after a couple of years

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because they've already worked here at Trinity College

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and they also travelled the world with their concerts.

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It didn't matter where they lived so they followed me.

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Tell me a little bit about your parents,

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as musicians abroad because they were really at the top of their tree, weren't?

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They were, yes. My father was born in Hungary

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but he trained in England as a violinist.

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He was a professor of music and worked at Trinity College

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and did a lot of concerts.

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He had the London Soloists Ensemble and the Budapest Trio.

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He also did some conducting with the Bournemouth Sinfonietta.

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Whereas, my mother was from Holland and she was a musician,

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a pianist, also a professor of music

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and worked at Trinity College, as well.

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It all sounds very glamorous but your father had quite a hard time, especially during the war?

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He did. He was living in Holland, so he spoke good Dutch

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but he had lived in England and so he had been recruited by the British intelligence.

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Unfortunately, he got caught and spent four years

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in a Polish camp of war,

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which was quite horrific with some of the stories I'd heard.

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He didn't talk too much but when he did, it was really interesting.

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One of the stories he did tell us, the commandant of the camp felt

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that he would like a bit of class in his camp and wanted an orchestra.

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My father said he needed 140 people for his orchestra

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and those people would get extra rations

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and, in fact, there was only 40 people who could play

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but he made it look as if all 140 were playing in the orchestra

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so that he could get the extra food for the extra people.

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-So really he was responsible for saving a lot of people's lives, wasn't he?

-I believe he did, yes.

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He told me some stories about it and he was quite pleased

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and proud that he managed to do that.

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Now Rucky is quite an unusual name.

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Apparently her mother had the same name

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and it was completely invented by her mother.

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Rucky's found something that belonged to her grandmother.

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It's a cushion filled with a collection of hat pins from the early 20th century.

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Rucky remembers this always being close to the front door,

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ready for securing the hat before heading outside.

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Hat pins can be collectable and their estimate for auction is £20-£40.

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Meanwhile, Mark's invited Jonty out to the workshop

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to look at something from his side of the family.

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These are pub signs manufactured by my family

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in the middle '80s, '85, '86 on the Isle of Wight.

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Are they hand made?

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Yes, all hand made by a chap called Jim West

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who was based in Whitstable.

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These would be used as the originals,

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copies would be made of these

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and then sold to the pub business.

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They were in our pub for a while but are no longer in vogue.

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Yet, it's interesting, pub signs have been around for centuries.

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It was in the 12th century that the king at the time

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decreed that all alehouses,

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all alehouses that produced beer had some form of sign on the outside.

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I suppose it was a form of quality control because in the 12th century

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the best job in the world has to have been an ale taster.

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In fact, Shakespeare's father was an ale taster.

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Which signs do you want to sell now?

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Probably sell the ones that went on to be mass produced.

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These three, these four really.

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So three here and the Whitbread one down the bottom? OK.

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We'll send those into auction.

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In the 1980s, all pubs were decorated in this way.

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There was a big market for it then.

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That's really interesting because the market has obviously changed.

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I think, individually, you're looking at between 40 and £80...

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-That's fair enough.

-All right?

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As a group, I would put £150-£250 on them.

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OK, that's fine.

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-Are you happy about that?

-Yes, let's get them gone.

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Rucky's giving the bedroom a good going over

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and I'm doing the same downstairs where I've spotted some tankards.

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One of them is actually a Toby jug made by Royal Doulton

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in the form of Winston Churchill.

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I come across another three tankards

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that have all been passed down from Mark's grandfather.

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The estimate for this little lot is £40-£60.

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-Oh, you've found the apple.

-Yes, isn't it beautiful?

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A little necklace here and down below, of course as you say,

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-a little apple.

-Yes.

-Which is wonderful. Where is this from?

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It's from Germany, it was my grandmother's.

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From what I was told, she used to wear it around her neck when she went out

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and, of course, when it's opened it was a little powder-puff.

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Yes, because it's not just an apple as well you know.

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On the inside here is the minutest compact you'll ever see.

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-I know, it's fascinating, isn't it?

-Look at that.

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With a little handle here on the puff itself. Isn't that so dinky?

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It absolutely super with a little mirror so you can just do your nose.

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Yes, oh yes, and it's a shaped mirror insofar

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you can see your whole face and not just the end of your nose.

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-Yes, I know it's been in the family for years.

-Right.

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So it must be very precious to you. What about selling?

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I don't wear it, it's a shame.

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It'd be nice if somebody else could possibly wear it

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but I'm quite happy to sell that one.

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Right, I think this is great fun. The market loves unusual things just like this.

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I've been looking for a hallmark on there.

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Well a mark to say it's silver because this is not British.

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I do believe this to be silver,

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even though it doesn't have any markings on there at all.

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The other giveaway that it's not British is the actual design, the linkage of the chain.

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This is not necessarily what we produced.

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I suppose this would be dated, the early part of the 20th century.

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I think it's well worth putting it into the auction sale.

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I would imagine we're looking at £40-£60, that sort of ballpark.

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-OK.

-That sort of region.

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Who knows, somebody might love it as much as I do

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and want to pay more for it. I think this is absolutely fabulous.

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I've noticed some old pistols which I need to look at in more detail.

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Mark's come across a set of three late Victorian encyclopaedias.

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The subject matter is Amateur Gardening For The Town And City.

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They belonged to a tenant of theirs who left in a hurry.

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He never came back so they've had the books ever since

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and they're happy for them to go and hopefully to raise £30-£50.

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Now I found these. There's yours, Jonty. There you are, Mark.

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-Where were they from?

-They are from my grandfather.

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-Please don't point it at me.

-I'm sorry.

-Yes.

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He's had done, well, he bought them as pure decoration

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with a friend in the mid-50s.

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As a child, my brother and I would always play with them,

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when we were allowed, and then when my grandmother passed away,

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I inherited them.

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Are you fond of them?

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Yes, they are. A lot of memories, good memories.

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The pistols are roughly the same sort of age.

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They are percussion, hand pistols.

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Percussion pistols were invented really in the 1830s.

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Percussion is how the gun is fired

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because before that it would be flintlock.

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The flintlock had a spark that went into a pan which was external

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and the spark had to jump into the base of the barrel.

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You can imagine that would not be very efficient in damp conditions.

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That's the reason why a percussion pistol was invented

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so it allowed a weapon like this to be fired in damp conditions.

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Have you been able to spot any signs of a manufacturer at all?

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I've got a maker's name here, Murray Stonehaven.

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What have you got there?

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Wold is the last five letters but whatever that is at the beginning.

0:16:380:16:42

It's a bit difficult... I've not recognise these names

0:16:420:16:45

but there were a lot of gunsmiths up and down the country.

0:16:450:16:47

What about value?

0:16:470:16:49

I think these are worth between £400 and £600 each.

0:16:490:16:52

An estimate for auction, £800-£1,200.

0:16:530:16:57

-What do you think, boss?

-It's very good.

0:16:570:16:59

I had no idea they would be worth that sort of money.

0:16:590:17:02

They've got a lot of memories,

0:17:020:17:05

we would have to give it considerable thought.

0:17:050:17:07

There are strict laws governing ownership of such weapons

0:17:070:17:10

and Mark would need to make sure he has a deactivation licence

0:17:100:17:13

before they can be sold.

0:17:130:17:15

It goes without saying that such items should always be kept out of the reach of children.

0:17:150:17:19

How long have you two been together?

0:17:190:17:23

Erm, 28 years, isn't it?

0:17:230:17:26

-Yes, dear.

-Yes.

0:17:260:17:28

That's a long time. How did you meet?

0:17:280:17:30

We met at work with the airport.

0:17:300:17:34

It was just at a party and we started talking.

0:17:340:17:36

-You went looking for the best looking bloke there.

-Oh, well never mind.

0:17:360:17:39

He was a very...

0:17:390:17:41

-You set yourself up for that one, didn't you?

-It was my line.

0:17:430:17:46

I was going to come back with that.

0:17:460:17:48

No, we met through friends and started talking

0:17:480:17:52

and it just went on from there. We found out that we liked the same things

0:17:520:17:57

and we kept bumping into each other and the relationship went on from there.

0:17:570:18:00

For many years, it wasn't a daily thing

0:18:000:18:03

because I think we worked it out once

0:18:030:18:06

for the first six years that we were married we saw each other for about two.

0:18:060:18:10

-That could explain the longevity of the relationship!

-Absolutely!

0:18:100:18:14

Rucky would be away on three-week trips and then when she came home, I'd be away.

0:18:140:18:18

We understood that each other, with shift work and with me

0:18:180:18:21

flying away, that you weren't always there.

0:18:210:18:24

What made you decide to settle down back here?

0:18:240:18:28

We thought we'd just retire. We'd done a lot.

0:18:280:18:31

We hadn't spent a huge amount of time together,

0:18:310:18:34

although a lot of time had gone past.

0:18:340:18:36

We quite naively retired and bought a pub.

0:18:360:18:40

Right, which bit was naive, the retirement bit or buying a pub?

0:18:400:18:44

-The fact that we thought we'd retired.

-Both, yes.

0:18:440:18:48

You want to raise the money to go to this wedding in Australia

0:18:480:18:50

and you've already been to Australia once.

0:18:500:18:52

Is this the start of a bigger, travelling bug for you again

0:18:520:18:57

or have you really put those days behind you?

0:18:570:18:59

No, I think, we still like to travel.

0:18:590:19:02

We still want to see lots of new places

0:19:020:19:04

and especially with Griff having got to the age where he can appreciate it.

0:19:040:19:07

Now that you're thinking of taking Griff along,

0:19:070:19:10

is that a bit of a change?

0:19:100:19:11

-You weren't really expecting Griff at all, at one point?

-No.

0:19:110:19:15

We'd been told that it was really unlikely that we would ever have children.

0:19:150:19:18

Especially with her being in the Seychelles and me being...

0:19:180:19:22

I was thinking, I could have told you that!

0:19:220:19:24

Yes, that was the difficult part.

0:19:260:19:29

Never mind, we did try.

0:19:290:19:32

So we forged out a life for ourselves without, which we were quite happy about.

0:19:320:19:35

When Griff did come along, it was the icing on the cake.

0:19:350:19:38

It was a real surprise but it was a fantastic surprise.

0:19:380:19:42

Well if we're to help this family satisfy their travel bug and get to Australia,

0:19:420:19:46

we need to find a few more things before we finish here.

0:19:460:19:49

Jonty's come across an intriguing little envelope which contains

0:19:490:19:53

a large set of Japanese, silk prints.

0:19:530:19:55

It was given to Rucky's father from a Japanese student

0:19:550:19:58

when he taught a masterclass at Trinity College of Music.

0:19:580:20:02

They're very delicately painted masks

0:20:020:20:04

but our expert recognises they were made for the export market

0:20:040:20:07

and gives them a valuation of £30-£50.

0:20:070:20:10

These are some pictures my father had and they were done

0:20:120:20:16

by a friend of my father's in the actual concentration camp.

0:20:160:20:20

Which, you can see by the subject, they are very macabre, very eerie.

0:20:200:20:28

To be honest, I don't really look at them.

0:20:280:20:31

OK, I think the best thing to do is see what Jonty thinks.

0:20:310:20:33

Jonty, Mark, are you there? We've got some pictures to show you.

0:20:330:20:38

These are from the time that Rucky's father

0:20:380:20:42

spent in the concentration camps.

0:20:420:20:45

So, they're clearly quite disturbing images.

0:20:450:20:48

But, by someone very talented.

0:20:480:20:50

Oh, yes, I see what you mean.

0:20:500:20:52

Look at that.

0:20:520:20:54

Real sort of the grim reaper-esque.

0:20:550:20:58

Initially, this would have been done by probably a heavy leaded pencil.

0:20:580:21:03

I don't think it's charcoal.

0:21:030:21:05

We are looking at prints, rather than original art forms.

0:21:050:21:09

This one here, for instance,

0:21:090:21:11

the artist has originally signed it in the charcoal/dark lead

0:21:110:21:16

and then signed it again underneath in pencil.

0:21:160:21:19

Another indication to say they're prints rather than originals.

0:21:190:21:23

Which is a pity, really, because everyone wants to get

0:21:230:21:26

their hands on original art form rather than prints.

0:21:260:21:29

When it comes to valuing objects like this,

0:21:290:21:31

you want to put a very high figure on them somehow.

0:21:310:21:34

There's an awful lot of emotion that runs through all of these pictures.

0:21:340:21:37

My hunch is that we're looking at £30-£50.

0:21:370:21:40

It will be very interesting to see

0:21:400:21:43

what happens in the auction room

0:21:430:21:44

because I don't believe they are to everyone's taste.

0:21:440:21:47

I can see clearly that you would want to get rid of them.

0:21:470:21:50

Maybe getting rid of them this way into turning them

0:21:500:21:54

into something so positive is a positive thing to do itself.

0:21:540:21:58

-OK.

-Are you happy to put them in the auction sale?

-Oh, definitely.

0:21:580:22:02

Yes, that's fine. I just want them sold, to be honest.

0:22:020:22:06

Well the value of everything going to auction, excluding the guns,

0:22:060:22:09

-comes to £760.

-Wow!

0:22:090:22:12

That's amazing!

0:22:120:22:14

But, of course, if you did put the guns into the auction

0:22:140:22:18

that would take it to £1,560.

0:22:180:22:21

-Wow!

-Which would be a big dent in your fund, wouldn't it?

0:22:210:22:24

It would. Definitely.

0:22:240:22:25

What a fascinating day we've had here and I'm really keen

0:22:250:22:29

to see how well all Rucky and Mark's possessions do,

0:22:290:22:32

including that early 20th century silver necklace

0:22:320:22:35

with the apple shaped pendant, which is a very discreet compact,

0:22:350:22:38

complete with powder-puff. We hope it exceeds Jonty's £40 estimate.

0:22:380:22:43

There's the three gold rings, two are Rucky's and one, her father's.

0:22:440:22:48

They're all 18 carat gold and their estimate is £300-£500.

0:22:480:22:54

And, will they be taking those two early 19th century

0:22:540:22:56

percussion pistols, which were given to Mark's grandfather in the 1950s?

0:22:560:23:00

If they do, they could easily break through their target,

0:23:000:23:03

even if they only achieve their lower estimate of £800.

0:23:030:23:07

Still to come on Cash In The Attic,

0:23:090:23:11

what on earth is Jonty talking about here?

0:23:110:23:14

I really like it, I wanted to do the end of my nose.

0:23:140:23:16

That's just about the right size.

0:23:160:23:18

I don't know either! And Mark's keen to keep us all in good spirits.

0:23:200:23:24

It's got the ashes of mother-in-law's favourite budgie in there.

0:23:240:23:26

Has it, I don't care! I still think it's lovely.

0:23:260:23:30

Let's hope we can keep these spirits up.

0:23:300:23:33

Well, we had a lovely time with Mark and Rucky at their gorgeous house

0:23:390:23:42

and we found plenty of antiques and collectables

0:23:420:23:45

which we've brought here to Cuttlestones auction rooms.

0:23:450:23:48

Now remember they're looking to raise £500 towards a trip to Australia to a friend's wedding.

0:23:480:23:52

Let's just hope their antiques and collectables that

0:23:520:23:56

go under the hammer here today get them to the church on time.

0:23:560:23:59

Based in the historic Staffordshire market town of Penkridge,

0:23:590:24:04

Cuttlestones attracts individuals and dealers from right across the county and beyond,

0:24:040:24:08

all looking for a bargain. Let's hope the market's buoyant today

0:24:080:24:11

for Rucky and Mark's vintage signs.

0:24:110:24:13

-Good morning.

-Morning.

-Good morning.

0:24:140:24:17

Your pub memorabilia, how is the pub?

0:24:170:24:19

It's busy, good. Yes, very good.

0:24:190:24:22

You've got someone looking after it today, have you?

0:24:220:24:24

-Yes.

-Absolutely.

-What does it feel like now seeing your stuff here?

0:24:240:24:27

Completely different. It's nice, it's different than at home.

0:24:270:24:31

-Is this a positive experience, letting everything go?

-Very positive.

0:24:310:24:35

And you're quite pleased about everything that's in,

0:24:350:24:38

there's nothing you've had second thoughts about at all?

0:24:380:24:40

I've let everything go, other than the pistols.

0:24:400:24:43

The pistols hold too many memories, they'll stay at home with us.

0:24:430:24:46

-I think you're quite pleased with the valuation?

-Very pleased.

0:24:460:24:49

Very, very pleased.

0:24:490:24:51

-So are they just go to be handed down in years to come?

-Yes.

0:24:510:24:54

-Just kept for a little longer.

-They'll be handed down, I think.

-All right then.

0:24:540:24:58

Now, you want to make this money for Australia and you are staying with friends out there.

0:24:580:25:02

We are, yes, most of the time.

0:25:020:25:04

I knew they were handy for something!

0:25:040:25:06

-OK, shall we go and sell some stuff then?

-Yes.

0:25:060:25:09

-Come on, let's get you to Australia.

-OK.

0:25:090:25:11

The first of their lots to come up is the set of early 20th-century framed negatives

0:25:110:25:16

with images of Rucky's grandparents.

0:25:160:25:20

-Where were they from?

-They were from a house in Holland that my grandparents used to live in

0:25:200:25:24

and somebody moved in and found the door behind some wallpaper

0:25:240:25:27

and inside there were all the bits from belonging to my grandparents.

0:25:270:25:30

-I love stories like that, it's great, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:25:300:25:33

I think they're great fun and really quite old, too.

0:25:330:25:37

Are they going to get a bid, I'm not sure. I put £20-£40 as a speculative bid

0:25:370:25:41

-but I'm not quite sure where they're going to go with this.

-Let's find out.

0:25:410:25:45

At 12, 14, 16,

0:25:450:25:46

-£18 with me.

-Come on.

0:25:460:25:49

20, sir. 22? Says, "no".

0:25:490:25:52

22 with me.

0:25:520:25:53

At 22, any advance on £22.

0:25:530:25:55

-I'm more positive than negative.

-Yes.

0:25:550:25:57

34. The bidding's out off the book, £24 right-hand side. At 24.

0:25:570:26:01

Selling then for £24.

0:26:010:26:05

£24, that's basically a fiver each. Are you pleased with that?

0:26:050:26:09

-Yeah, I am actually.

-Are you happy?

-Yes, very happy.

0:26:090:26:11

Not bad for something found behind a bit of wallpaper, behind a door.

0:26:110:26:14

No, I think that's very good.

0:26:140:26:16

It's a great start for us

0:26:160:26:17

and maybe a sign that the bidders here are interested

0:26:170:26:20

in Rucky's European family heirlooms.

0:26:200:26:22

Right now our next lot is the continental violin,

0:26:220:26:26

not a Stradivarius, unfortunately.

0:26:260:26:28

-No.

-Which I guess is why it's only £30-£50.

0:26:280:26:31

-It's also in such poor condition, really.

-It is.

-Jonty!

0:26:310:26:34

-Overloved and overplayed, really, isn't it?

-And very old, yes.

0:26:340:26:38

There's always a market for violin,

0:26:380:26:39

that's a reason why put £30-£50 on it.

0:26:390:26:42

£10 in on the violin, at 10.

0:26:420:26:43

At £10. 10, 12, 14, 16,

0:26:430:26:48

18, 20, 22, 24, 26.

0:26:480:26:51

Keep going, keep going.

0:26:510:26:52

£26. 28, 30, 32,

0:26:520:26:56

34, 36, 38, 40.

0:26:560:27:00

Keep going.

0:27:000:27:02

46, 48, 50,

0:27:020:27:05

-Yes!

-That's good.

0:27:050:27:06

55, 60. At five, says "no".

0:27:060:27:08

65, on my right-hand side.

0:27:080:27:10

-That's really good.

-It's brilliant.

0:27:100:27:12

At £65, then.

0:27:120:27:15

-Oh, yes!

-65, I'm sure it wasn't a Stradivarius.

0:27:150:27:18

-Add a few noughts behind it.

-Absolutely!

0:27:180:27:20

-That's good.

-It is really good. Someone's got to do quite a lot of work on that.

0:27:200:27:23

-Yes, I know.

-Fantastic.

-I'm pleased with that, very pleased.

0:27:230:27:27

And who knows, maybe it will be going to another young,

0:27:270:27:30

Vanessa Mae or Nigel Kennedy in the making.

0:27:300:27:34

Next up it's the early 20th century hat pins and cushion

0:27:340:27:37

which belonged to Rucky's grandmother.

0:27:370:27:38

How much do we want for this, Jonty?

0:27:380:27:40

I put £20-£40 on it

0:27:400:27:42

because there's always collectors for these really stylish hat pins.

0:27:420:27:45

-I mean, they're all so different, really?

-Yes, they are lovely.

0:27:450:27:49

I was think they look like offensive weapons! In the wrong hands!

0:27:490:27:53

Pin cushion, and a small collection of hat pins, always popular.

0:27:530:27:58

£10 in on that.

0:27:580:28:00

At 10, 12, 14, 16, 18.

0:28:000:28:02

With me? Says "no". £18. At 18.

0:28:020:28:05

Any advance on £18?

0:28:050:28:08

I shall sell then for £18.

0:28:080:28:11

-JONTY: 18...

-That's a shame.

0:28:120:28:14

-Yeah, disappointing, really.

-It is.

0:28:140:28:18

That's all it boils down to, there's not enough interest in the room.

0:28:180:28:21

If there had been two people bidding for them,

0:28:210:28:23

I'm sure the price would have gone up. I think there was only one bidder in the room.

0:28:230:28:28

What a shame, still we've got lots of lots to go.

0:28:280:28:31

Our next lot is that amazing artwork which you had to admire

0:28:340:28:38

in artistic terms but, of course, the subject matter was quite dark

0:28:380:28:43

because of the artist's experience in the concentration camp.

0:28:430:28:46

Yes, I think, that they are interesting documents.

0:28:460:28:50

I believe them to be historical documents

0:28:500:28:52

-but I still fear they're going to struggle at auction.

-Mmm.

0:28:520:28:56

-This is... It's the awful...

-Limited market, I think.

-It's a dreadfully limited market.

0:28:560:29:01

-So your estimate on these was?

-I put £30-£50 on them.

-Right.

0:29:010:29:06

Where they go, I don't know.

0:29:060:29:09

AUCTIONEER: I can start this in at a tenner, at £10.

0:29:090:29:11

Oh, come on.

0:29:110:29:13

At ten, at 12, 14, 16, 18.

0:29:130:29:16

Says, "no". £18 with me.

0:29:160:29:20

At £18, any advance on £18?

0:29:200:29:22

And selling for £18.

0:29:220:29:25

Oh, well, crikey that is really low, isn't it?

0:29:260:29:30

It's hardly any money.

0:29:300:29:31

I think, unfortunately, it's just indicative of the sort of things people are looking for.

0:29:310:29:37

Well it's disappointing but we all knew the artwork

0:29:370:29:40

might be difficult to sell given the subject matter.

0:29:400:29:43

Our next lot, the three late Victorian Britannica books,

0:29:430:29:45

Gardens, volumes 9 to 11 from 1893.

0:29:450:29:49

There's a bit of a story to this, isn't there, Mark?

0:29:490:29:51

Yes, inasmuch as

0:29:510:29:52

we rent out a house

0:29:520:29:53

and the tenant disappeared.

0:29:530:29:55

After being missing for 12 months, we were lawfully allowed

0:29:550:30:00

to empty the house and everything was in the house.

0:30:000:30:03

He had literally just walked away.

0:30:030:30:05

He's never been seen again.

0:30:050:30:08

Volumes 9 to 11, Lot 101C and I can start this straight in at £22.

0:30:080:30:12

At £22 on the books, at 22. At 22, any advance on 22?

0:30:120:30:16

At £22 then on commission bid. 24, sir, takes the bidding out.

0:30:160:30:21

£24, right-hand side. At £24. Any advance then on £24?

0:30:210:30:26

I shall sell for 24.

0:30:260:30:29

-JONTY: Just one bidder again.

-£24. Mind you, they didn't cost you anything.

-No.

0:30:290:30:34

-Happy?

-Yes, they're gone.

-Good.

0:30:340:30:38

Quite a lot of commission bids seem to have been left

0:30:380:30:40

but with little competition from the room,

0:30:400:30:42

it means Rucky and Mark's items are still struggling here.

0:30:420:30:46

Will their luck change with the silver?

0:30:460:30:48

I have to say the next lot is my favourite out of all your items

0:30:480:30:53

-because that lovely, little, silver apple.

-It's beautiful.

0:30:530:30:57

Which, of course, opens up to reveal that lovely little mirror and puff.

0:30:570:31:01

-They just don't make things like that any more.

-No. No, they don't.

0:31:010:31:05

-It's so miniature. It's still got the powder on it.

-I know!

0:31:050:31:08

Maybe it's a bit of a girly thing. Do you like it?

0:31:080:31:11

I do, really, because I wanted to do the end of my nose.

0:31:110:31:14

It's just about the right size.

0:31:140:31:17

I put £40-£60 on it.

0:31:170:31:19

-I hope it does very well for you.

-OK.

0:31:190:31:22

I can start this in at £20. At £20...

0:31:220:31:26

We want more than that.

0:31:260:31:27

At 22, 24, 26, 28, 30,

0:31:270:31:32

£32 with me. At £32, at 32.

0:31:320:31:36

I shall sell for £32 on the commission. £32.

0:31:360:31:42

-That is...

-A real shame.

-Sorry about that.

-No, it's not your fault.

0:31:420:31:47

Do you know what, what annoys me about it, apart from anything else,

0:31:470:31:51

is if you went to a high street jeweller you wouldn't be able to buy

0:31:510:31:53

that amount of silver for £32 because the price of silver is so high!

0:31:530:31:57

-Yes.

-Let alone the fact that it's a lovely piece.

0:31:570:32:00

That is a shame.

0:32:000:32:01

It's got the ashes of mother-in-law's favourite budgie in there.

0:32:010:32:04

I don't care! I still think it's lovely.

0:32:040:32:07

I'm really disappointed with that result

0:32:070:32:09

but Rucky and Mark seem to be taking it on the chin.

0:32:090:32:12

Let's see how much we've made for them so far.

0:32:120:32:15

OK, now it's been a bit of a rollercoaster ride that.

0:32:150:32:18

We've got a bit of a break until your next lots come up,

0:32:180:32:20

which includes the pub signs amongst other things.

0:32:200:32:23

-Now, so far, we've made £181.

-Right, OK.

0:32:230:32:28

Are there any items that you're really pleased to see go,

0:32:280:32:31

any disappointments?

0:32:310:32:33

-The paintings, drawings, I'm pleased they've gone.

-Right.

0:32:330:32:36

I was very happy with how much the violin got.

0:32:360:32:40

-I'm a bit disappointed about the necklace.

-I think we all are!

0:32:400:32:43

That's the way auctions go, sometimes you win,

0:32:430:32:45

sometimes you lose.

0:32:450:32:47

-Let's make sure we win by the end of the day. Come on!

-Absolutely!

0:32:470:32:50

If you'd like to have a go selling at auction yourself, do bear in mind

0:32:520:32:55

that fees, such as commission, will be added to your bill.

0:32:550:32:57

This charge varies from one saleroom to another so it's always worth enquiring in advance.

0:32:570:33:03

Auction houses are ideal places to find a variety of remarkable antiques at very reasonable prices.

0:33:030:33:10

Our expert likes to keep his eye on the selling trends

0:33:100:33:13

and he's spotted one or two pieces that are well worth a punt.

0:33:130:33:16

Not that he's buying, of course!

0:33:160:33:18

-Hi, Jonty.

-Hello.

-They're a bit modern for you, aren't they?

0:33:180:33:22

It just reminded me of Mark and all his fabulous pub signs

0:33:220:33:26

that were made by his family.

0:33:260:33:28

Here we've got something else that's related to pubs, Breweriana, they call it. Very collectable.

0:33:280:33:33

People trade with these, they put them on their walls.

0:33:330:33:35

It's all part of that pub scene, really.

0:33:350:33:38

-Presumably in pubs rather than in their houses?

-Yes.

0:33:380:33:41

-We've got a collection of water jugs.

-Right.

0:33:410:33:43

A lot of them are whiskey-based, which all makes sense.

0:33:430:33:47

What happened was that the breweries, the distilleries,

0:33:470:33:49

they produced their own jugs to actually place these on the bar

0:33:490:33:54

so that people could see the advertising.

0:33:540:33:57

Are any of them made by Wade, because that can help, can't it?

0:33:570:34:00

No, these aren't made by Wade.

0:34:000:34:01

There is no makers stamps on most of these, actually.

0:34:010:34:04

-Does that make a difference?

-Sometimes it does, yes.

0:34:040:34:07

It's quite interesting really.

0:34:070:34:09

These will always sell within the parameters of £5-£10 a pop.

0:34:090:34:13

If you've got a water jug that is of a local distillery

0:34:130:34:17

to sometimes an auction house like this,

0:34:170:34:19

all of a sudden, boom, that won't sell for five or 10 quid,

0:34:190:34:22

that might be £40-£60, just like that.

0:34:220:34:24

-I suppose it's great if you fancy a tipple.

-Absolutely.

0:34:240:34:28

Which we haven't got time for! Come on.

0:34:280:34:30

That little lot went for the absolute bargain price of just £5,

0:34:310:34:35

so it's not only Rucky and Mark's collectables that are struggling to raise top prices here today.

0:34:350:34:40

We all gather together in time to see the next of their lots come up.

0:34:400:34:44

Our next lot is the set of Japanese hand coloured

0:34:440:34:47

and cut paper images of Japanese characters, a bit of a mouthful!

0:34:470:34:51

-I was going to say, a bit difficult, isn't it?

-It is, isn't it?

0:34:510:34:54

The history of these?

0:34:540:34:55

They were given to my father by one of his Japanese students as a thank you.

0:34:550:34:59

That's sweet, isn't it? What do we want for these, Jonty?

0:34:590:35:02

I think they're really decorative, unusual. The big question mark is what do you do with them?

0:35:020:35:06

I think there's enough art in there to put £30-£50 on them.

0:35:060:35:10

AUCTIONEER: Start these in at £10, 126C. At £10.

0:35:100:35:14

At £10, any interest at £10?

0:35:140:35:18

No? No interest there.

0:35:180:35:21

-No, move on, then.

-Oh dear.

-Unsold.

0:35:210:35:24

At least he didn't sell them for £10.

0:35:240:35:26

No, he didn't, we'll just take them home.

0:35:260:35:29

Not a good start to the second half

0:35:290:35:30

and with just four lots left, we really need these to do well

0:35:300:35:34

if they are going to reach their target.

0:35:340:35:37

Obviously, you run the pub, it's good to see pub memorabilia in here.

0:35:370:35:41

The next lot is five tankards, including a Royal Doulton,

0:35:410:35:43

in the form of Winston Churchill.

0:35:430:35:45

They'll came from my grandfather, he had them in his bar.

0:35:450:35:48

-And you're not tempted to put them in your bar?

-No.

0:35:480:35:52

I put £40-£60 on these. The big star is Winston Churchill.

0:35:520:35:57

He alone is worth that sort of money

0:35:570:35:59

so I hope we should be there or thereabouts.

0:35:590:36:01

AUCTIONEER: I can start this in at 20.

0:36:010:36:03

Oh, come on.

0:36:030:36:05

22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32,

0:36:050:36:09

34, 36, 38, 40,

0:36:090:36:13

42, 44?

0:36:130:36:14

Says, "no". £44 with me then.

0:36:140:36:17

At 44, any advance on £44?

0:36:170:36:21

I shall sell for £44.

0:36:210:36:23

Sold.

0:36:230:36:25

-44.

-It's what you got.

0:36:250:36:26

-I said 40 to 60, the low-end of the estimate.

-OK.

0:36:260:36:30

That's more like it, could this be the turning point for us today?

0:36:310:36:35

Now the four reproduction painted pub signs.

0:36:350:36:37

Have you literally lifted these off the wall of the pub?

0:36:370:36:40

Yes, we had them in our pub in the Isle of Wight.

0:36:400:36:43

They were actually produced by family members. That used to be their business.

0:36:430:36:47

Oh! Nothing like keeping it all in the family!

0:36:470:36:50

-I hope you got a good discount when you bought them.

-No.

0:36:500:36:54

Oh dear, right, OK.

0:36:540:36:56

I think, really given that trend is dying out a bit

0:36:560:36:59

for these reproduction signs, we've got quite a good estimate on there of £150.

0:36:590:37:03

It's because they're all hand made.

0:37:030:37:05

There's a lot of work gone into these I hope the auctioneer sells that fact.

0:37:050:37:08

AUCTIONEER: Lot 146, we've got the four pub signs.

0:37:080:37:12

I'll start these in at £50 on 146.

0:37:120:37:14

At £50, at 50, 50.

0:37:140:37:17

Any interest at £50?

0:37:170:37:19

-Oh, my God.

-Come on.

-Oh, no, no, no.

0:37:190:37:21

50 with you, 55?

0:37:210:37:22

Says, "no". £55 then at 55.

0:37:220:37:28

No interest at 55.

0:37:280:37:31

No, not sold then.

0:37:310:37:32

-Right, I think that answers that question, doesn't it, really?

-Just a bit.

0:37:320:37:35

-They're coming home with you.

-They are, absolutely.

0:37:350:37:38

-No place in the pub for them?

-No.

-Back to the garage.

0:37:380:37:41

-Back to the garage.

-Yes.

0:37:410:37:43

Well at least the auctioneer didn't let them go for a silly price

0:37:430:37:46

and Mark and Rucky can always try and sell them another day.

0:37:460:37:50

Hiding in a cabinet I discovered a bag full of flatware cutlery.

0:37:500:37:56

Where is it from?

0:37:560:37:58

When my parents used to play a concert in Eastern Europe,

0:37:580:38:01

you weren't allowed to bring the money out with you

0:38:010:38:04

so they used to buy bits of silver can bring that out.

0:38:040:38:07

-So it's all Continental silver?

-It's all Continental, yes.

-Yes, interesting.

0:38:070:38:10

In the catalogue it says stainless steel.

0:38:100:38:12

So is there any silver in amongst this flatware?

0:38:120:38:15

-No, I couldn't see any silver in there at all.

-OK.

0:38:150:38:18

What do we want for it?

0:38:180:38:19

I put £70-£100 but at this rate, I'm not quite sure.

0:38:190:38:23

AUCTIONEER: I can start this at £25.

0:38:230:38:27

-Whey! £25!

-Gosh.

0:38:270:38:29

30, 32, 35,

0:38:290:38:31

38, 40...

0:38:310:38:33

Keep going.

0:38:330:38:35

45, 48, 50 and five.

0:38:350:38:37

60, and five.

0:38:370:38:39

At £65 then.

0:38:390:38:40

Go on...

0:38:400:38:42

70, new money.

0:38:420:38:44

At 70. 75, 80.

0:38:440:38:47

-Yes.

-That's good.

-Yes.

0:38:470:38:49

85, 90.

0:38:490:38:53

At 90, at £90, says "no".

0:38:530:38:55

£90 and I shall sell for 90. 90.

0:38:550:38:59

-That was a lot for stainless steel, wasn't it?

-That's really good.

0:38:590:39:03

-It's funny how something you weren't expecting to make that money has gone for it.

-Yeah.

0:39:030:39:08

How fascinating that there should be such interest

0:39:080:39:10

in a mixed collection of cutlery from Eastern European countries.

0:39:100:39:15

Now next lot is a fantastic combination.

0:39:150:39:18

We got the 18 carat gold sapphire and diamond dress ring,

0:39:180:39:21

a South African 18 carat ring, with two baguette-shaped diamonds,

0:39:210:39:24

a continental dress ring...

0:39:240:39:27

It's just an amazing collection and 18 carat as well,

0:39:270:39:30

which is selling very well just in terms of scrap value.

0:39:300:39:35

-Jonty, what sort of valuation have we on this?

-This lot I am confident with.

0:39:350:39:38

£300-£500, should be a lot of interest.

0:39:380:39:42

-Have we protected it with reserves at all?

-The auctioneer will use his discretion.

0:39:420:39:46

-Yes, he's done that before.

-I think we should be OK.

-OK.

0:39:460:39:49

-I can start this in at £250.

-Yes, excellent.

0:39:490:39:54

At 250, 260, 270,

0:39:540:39:55

280, 290,

0:39:550:39:57

300, 310.

0:39:570:39:59

Much better.

0:39:590:40:01

320, 330, with me. Says, "no", 330.

0:40:010:40:03

Any advance on £330, then?

0:40:030:40:07

At 330.

0:40:070:40:09

With me, and selling for £330.

0:40:090:40:12

330, are you OK with that?

0:40:140:40:17

Yes, that was the bottom end but at least it did hit there.

0:40:170:40:20

We got there.

0:40:200:40:21

Absolutely. Well, that's all our lots now.

0:40:210:40:25

We've sold everything that we can sell today.

0:40:250:40:27

-So what's been the highlights for you?

-Erm...

0:40:270:40:30

Presumably not taking the pub signs back!

0:40:300:40:33

THEY LAUGH

0:40:330:40:35

I think, to be honest, the violin and also the pin cushion.

0:40:350:40:37

-I wasn't expecting that to sell.

-Right.

0:40:370:40:40

-To me, they've done really well.

-What about you, Mark?

0:40:400:40:43

A bit disappointed I'm taking the pub signs home.

0:40:430:40:46

Right, obviously, you wanted £500 towards your trip to Australia, didn't you?

0:40:460:40:50

How do you think you've done today? Do think we've made that amount?

0:40:500:40:53

With the rings, I think we might just have hit the 500.

0:40:530:40:56

Right, Mark?

0:40:560:40:58

With the sale of the rings, the last lot, I should think.

0:40:580:41:01

Who does your adding up at the pub?

0:41:010:41:03

THEY LAUGH

0:41:030:41:04

-Oh, dearie me.

-I haven't been adding up today!

0:41:040:41:07

OK, well that's probably a good thing because I have good news.

0:41:070:41:10

You've made £645.

0:41:100:41:13

-Oh, fantastic.

-Well done, guys.

-Oh, wow, that's really good. Thank you ever so much.

-Not at all.

0:41:130:41:17

-That's super.

-Have you enjoyed the journey?

-Very much.

0:41:170:41:20

Not as much as we're going to enjoy the journey home, all down the pub, I think!

0:41:200:41:24

Good idea!

0:41:240:41:25

Well Mark and Rucky will be putting the money they raised

0:41:290:41:31

towards that family holiday, down under later in the year

0:41:310:41:34

but, in the meantime, they've brought their son, Griff,

0:41:340:41:37

to an Australian restaurant to get themselves in the mood.

0:41:370:41:40

-We loved the food in Australia, didn't we?

-Yeah.

0:41:400:41:44

We really like nice, fresh food and out there it's nothing but fresh.

0:41:440:41:49

-It's beautiful.

-And a tremendous amount of choice, not just for us but also for Griff.

0:41:490:41:54

It looks fantastic.

0:41:540:41:55

You would love it, if you tried it. You would.

0:41:580:42:00

It's the outside life, the weather means you can spend a lot

0:42:000:42:05

more time outside, eating outside and family time as well.

0:42:050:42:11

Do you think you prefer to do knee-boarding or jet ski-ing?

0:42:110:42:15

Knee-boarding.

0:42:150:42:18

We've had an absolutely fabulous time. We've thoroughly enjoyed it.

0:42:180:42:21

Erm, the money has been extremely helpful

0:42:210:42:25

but it was just the whole experience was fantastic.

0:42:250:42:29

It was good fun, good fun.

0:42:290:42:30

Well Rucky and Mark certainly made enough money

0:42:350:42:38

to make a contribution to that fantastic trip to Australia.

0:42:380:42:41

Now, if you've got a project in mind that you'd like to raise the money for

0:42:410:42:45

by selling antiques and collectables at auction, then why not get in touch with Cash In The Attic.

0:42:450:42:49

You'll find more details at our website.

0:42:490:42:51

I'll see you again next time!

0:42:530:42:55

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:170:43:20

Warwickshire-based Rucky Griffith and her husband Mark want to raise a few extra pounds for a family holiday to Australia. They decide to sell off family heirlooms, some of which came from Rucky's musical parents. Lorne Spicer and expert Jonty Hearnden are on hand to advise.