Sarah Cawood Cash in the Celebrity Attic


Sarah Cawood

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Welcome to Cash In The Celebrity Attic, the show that finds treasure in the homes of the well known

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then helps sell them at auction to raise money for good causes.

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Well, today, we're going to meet someone who's been a regular face on television for over a decade.

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Now, she grew up here in Lincolnshire and, at just 17, she left school

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to join the Royal Ballet School, but she only lasted a year.

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But from there, she was spotted on stage and a career in front of the cameras beckoned.

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And since then she's presented everything from kids' shows to the National Lottery.

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But she's probably best known for presenting

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Top Of The Pops, Live And Kicking and the Eurovision Song Contest.

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Do you know who it might be?

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Today, we are in Lincolnshire

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to meet the television presenter Sarah Cawood.

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Sarah is a regular on our screens and whether she's willing your numbers to come up on the National Lottery

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or bringing you the latest gossip and news from Comic Relief Does Fame Academy, her energy and enthusiasm

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always bring a sense of mischief and fun to the numerous TV shows she presents.

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Sarah lives and works in the hectic hustle and bustle of London, but

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today she's come back home to see her mum, Valerie, who in contrast enjoys the peace and quiet of rural life.

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Coming up on Cash In The Celebrity Attic, it's a mother and daughter's day.

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Sarah's back home raiding the family silver.

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Well, it's better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick.

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It certainly is. From experience.

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And they're an awesome double act when they quiz me about my love life.

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Would you marry her?

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-No.

-Chain-smoking, ankle-showing floozy.

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At the auction, I need to pull these girls into line.

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-Hands out. Let me have a look.

-We haven't got them.

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You haven't got the costume jewellery? You promise?

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-No, I promise.

-Does Sarah find the answer to eternal youth?

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I'm going to put it in the attic.

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Cheaper than Botox.

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And will we have reached our target when the final hammer falls?

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-Hey, Paul! Nice to see you. How are you?

-Good morning, Chris.

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-Are you well?

-I've very well. Looking forward to seeing Sarah.

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-You?

-I'm so excited actually.

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Live And Kicking, Fame Academy. Sarah, yes, great presenter.

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Yeah, but she's also very cool and I'm not from that school.

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-How about you?

-Oh, me and you are all right. We'll fit in here, won't we?

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I'm not sure about antiques, but I think we'll fit in.

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Well, the good news is, this is her mum's house.

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-So maybe Mum's got some decent stuff.

-Sounds great. Shall we have a look?

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Let's get going. I'll go and meet the girls...

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-Come on then.

-And you have a good rummage round.

-OK.

-Valerie and her partner designed and built

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this beautiful, large, four-bedroom house set in a superb location just a few years ago.

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She's obviously very house-proud, but my only concern is,

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are we going to discover any surplus or forgotten items available to sell

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in this impeccably tidy house?

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-Hello.

-Hello.

-I know you're Sarah.

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You must be Valerie, right?

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-That's right, yes.

-Do we need to do any rummaging? It's lovely, isn't it?

-It really is. It's lovely, isn't it?

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-Why are we not at your place, Sarah?

-Well, I've only got a little place in London.

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You know, shoeboxes in London. And also, I'm a terrible life launderer.

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I don't really have anything to rummage for really.

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The chances are I've already car-booted it or, you know, given to a charity shop or donated somewhere.

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-Mum's got loads of rubbish though, haven't you?

-I've got a lot of yours in the loft.

-I was about to say.

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So, basically, what we're saying is, that you've got rid

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of all your stuff, so she's trying to get rid of your stuff now?

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-Yes.

-Willingly?

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-Yes. Yes, pretty much.

-Oh, good.

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-Well, that sounds good.

-Yes.

-Well, I'm looking forward to it.

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Now, we obviously want to raise some money.

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-What are we raising money for?

-We're raising money for Cancer Research.

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And why that particular charity?

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I've just been a fervent supporter for a long time, so I think for them really. It's close to my heart.

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That will be great. It sounds like, obviously, a great cause.

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Today we are going to do a bit of rummaging. You look dressed for the occasion, Sarah.

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-Yeah.

-You're ready for a rummage. You look far too glamorous, Valerie, for this.

-No, it's just an old dress.

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And you're pretty smart as well.

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Yeah, but I don't do any work. I just watch you.

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-Not today!

-OK, not today. I promise I'll do some work.

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Come on, follow me and we'll go and find Paul.

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The amount that Sarah would like to raise for charity today is £300 and

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if anybody can turn up the goods, it's our expert Paul Hayes,

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who's got many years experience in the antique business and has done

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more Cash In The Attic rummages than I've read football scores.

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-What have you found, Paul?

-Ah, well, do you know what?

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I've had my eagle eye out.

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-I haven't warned you about him, have I, Sarah?

-There you are. But I found this French print.

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I quite like this actually. Is this like a family heirloom or something?

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-Is it?

-No, actually I won it in an auction...

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-Ah, right.

-Many years ago.

-How's your French, Chris?

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-Tres bien, monsieur.

-I've sort of worked it out.

-Is it a love letter?

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Yeah. I worked it out by the pictures. A love letter, exactly right. Une lettre d'amour.

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But what's really shocking about this, this would have been right at the turn of the century,

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the year 1900, and for the ladies

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to show their ankles and to be seen smoking, that was a real faux-pas.

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She's a floozy!

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Exactly. But if you look at the way the pictures tell the story,

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she's obviously getting her secretary to write her love letter for her, as you would do.

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And then she's spraying on some eau de cologne or some sort of perfume.

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Then she's putting a few teardrops from the water bottle.

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Obviously, they're fake.

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And then a little lock of hair. And this the poor gentleman here.

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This is the suitor and, of course, his heart's breaking now. And he sends her...

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The end shot here is a contract in the post, so he wants to marry her.

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That's her job done, basically, isn't it? Easy as that.

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-I've met this girl.

-Really?

-I've been out with her.

-Did you marry her?

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-No.

-Chain-smoking, ankle-showing floozy.

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She sounds like the perfect woman.

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But what a great bit of fun and I think the Edwardian period, when it

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comes to the saucy postcards, the photographs...

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The Parisians seem to have a knack of all that actually and it's very, very collectable.

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You said "collectable". That's good news, because that normally means there's a value there.

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Yeah. I mean, I really like that and there's a big market for these.

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I think you could be looking around the £50 mark. Sort of 30-50.

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I mean, how does that sound?

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-Very good.

-That sounds great.

-Tres bien?

-Yes.

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-Yeah.

-Very good.

-Tres bien.

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Well, it is a good start.

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I know I always say good start, because you know what that means?

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-We've got to get back to work.

-OK.

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-Follow me.

-OK.

-Ooh, la la! Tres bien indeed for a charming French lady

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and a step in the right direction, but only a small one.

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To make our £300 target,

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we need to find many more possessions around Valerie's magnificent home.

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Sarah's obviously got the same energy off-screen as she has on it,

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and she's all too eager to comb her mum's house for more items.

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She's turned up this Edwardian-style biscuit barrel, which could make £25-£30 at auction.

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Meanwhile, Paul's where he should be, up in the attic.

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Now then, look at this.

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What a fantastic painting. Now I found this in the attic.

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-Ah, yeah.

-Now you can tell me the secret now.

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Is this the one you keep in the attic so you stay forever young?

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It's my Dorian Gray, yes.

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I really like it though. So is this one you actually had done for yourself?

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Yeah, I did actually. I just got an email out of the blue about 2003...

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It's probably dated somewhere. ..From an artist that said he was going to do a series

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of portraits and would I be up for having my portrait done. And, you know, I had to sit for him.

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I just thought, "How often do you get somebody painting your portrait? What a lovely opportunity."

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-So I went for it.

-That's right. And it's so unusual actually to meet the sitter. You do find with portraits

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that people have gone long ago to have this done and, of course,

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to actually see you in the flesh here and on the canvas, it's quite strange, isn't it? Do you like it?

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-Actually do you like this one?

-I do actually.

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It sort of grows on you.

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When I first saw it, the colours were like, "Wow! Why aren't they sort of natural colours?"

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That's exactly the idea. He's gone for shocking colours.

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The nice thing is, on the back here, we do have the artist...

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-Vittorio Pelosi.

-Yeah, Vittorio.

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-Vittorio Pelosi. He's quite a young gentleman, isn't he?

-Yes, yeah.

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But he's actually making waves at the moment in the art world.

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He's going for the celebrity niche, if you like, and I think

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the 21st century, we're all obsessed with the whole celebrity culture. So I think he has found this market.

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He's done yourself and I know he's done Patrick Moore and he's done Dani Behr and a host of others.

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And he does lots of exhibitions. But I actually think, and I've seen lots of portraits,

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-I think he's caught your likeness very, very well.

-Really?

-Yeah. It's one of things.

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It's not an exact likeness, obviously, but he has captured you I think, which is very important.

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Well, I think lots of people will be interested in this. You've got someone interested in modern art.

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Is he a good investment for the future? Who knows? So that's what people will buy into.

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And, of course, any fans of yourself as well.

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If you've got a web forum or an internet site, we could get the word out that it's coming up to sale.

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-If we get two or three people who really take a shine to this at the auction, you could do well.

-OK.

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-Does that sound all right to you?

-Yeah.

-So if I said at least £50-£80,

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-to give it a chance and see what happens on the day?

-Absolutely.

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-Great! So let's keep looking.

-OK.

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Well, that's a terrific find, and in the attic!

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I don't think Sarah realised Pelosi was quite an established artist

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in the celebrity world nowadays,

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so let's hope it makes its target price or more at auction.

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The next find is a charming box-set of Beatrix Potter figures of Mrs Rabbit nursing her son Peter.

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These collections are timeless and continually popular.

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This box is in good condition,

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and Paul reckons it could fetch between £20 and £30.

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Ah, this is nice, to be sat down for a change.

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-It really is, isn't it?

-Is it good to be home?

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-Did you grow up here?

-I didn't grow up in this house.

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-Right.

-This house is quite new, but I grew up in the area.

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I went to school in Stamford, which isn't far from here, so I'm a Lincolnshire girl.

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-So this is your 'hood? You grew up here.

-This is my manor.

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But you left at about 17, I hear, to go off to the ballet school.

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-I went to the Royal Ballet School when I was 17.

-What was that like?

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It was really... Obviously, it was incredibly liberating.

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Unfortunately, I got turfed out at the end of my year, cos they do tend to weed the girls out.

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I'd like to say it was cos I was a rebel. It, basically, was because I wasn't good enough to stay.

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But then I went to another ballet school in London, so... It was fab!

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So where did the TV break, the big break, come about? Who saw you where?

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I had just left Phantom Of The Opera, finished doing a stint in the West End, and I went and auditioned

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for a dance agency, because I wanted to continue my dancing.

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And the woman that was filming it was married to the head of Nickelodeon's live sector

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at that time, when it was a tiny little fledgling channel.

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They liked me and they took me on. So I got to hone all my live presenting skills

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while no-one really was watching, which was brilliant.

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So after you did the kids' TV programmes...

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And I can't believe it, cos I look at you and you're quite an innocent,

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sweet-looking girl and then you have that laugh.

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Because you were the face of ladette television, weren't you?

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I know and I'm not a ladette. I look stupid drinking pints, cos they're almost as big as me.

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It was really... That was the biggest misnomer.

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I was really sort of playing at it, to a degree, and even now I look back and it so wasn't me, but...

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Look, your mum's not listening. You don't have to tell me lies.

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You are a bit of a rebel. You are a bit of a ladette, aren't you?

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I'm definitely a bit rock and roll, but I wasn't...

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You know, I've always thought it was quite "undecorous" to be

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really drunk in public, but it was my big break The Girlie Show.

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It was certainly a really interesting time, cos it was definitely... It was Cool Britannia.

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It was all part of that. It was part of Brit Pop.

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It was part of modern-day TV culture and, for that reason alone, I'm proud that I was a part of it.

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We've almost seen you grow up on television.

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You've done the kids' TV, ladette stuff and even the Lottery.

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Yeah! Oh, goodness. Giving all that cash away all the time.

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I don't know. But I was lucky enough to do that £100 million super-draw

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and as you're actually watching the numbers come down, you're thinking, "Someone's life is changing forever.

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-"And I love that."

-Well, you mentioned that word "Euro"

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-in Euro Millions and now I hear you've done the Eurovision Song Contest.

-Yes. I love the Eurovision.

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And actually when you go, when you actually go and cover it, the whole city wherever it's been shot...

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So I did it in Helsinki and I did it in Moscow.

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And wherever you go, the whole city goes Eurovision crazy.

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Helsinki and Moscow? It must have been brilliant.

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How come we don't get any further than Harrogate or Minehead? Oh, well.

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So far we've only accrued a potential £105, so it's all hands to the pump

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to find more collectables to sell and make that target of £300.

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Paul's first to come across our next discovery, a print of hare coursing

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and a framed collection of cigarette cards featuring greyhounds.

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Since 2005, hare coursing has been banned in the UK, but whatever you think about

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the sport, there's still a market

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for these prints and cards, which could fetch us between £20 and £30.

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Sarah's also on the case and has found this candlestick with snuffer, along with a quaich cup,

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which is a shallow drinking bowl usually used for whisky in Scotland.

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They're silver-plate and should bring in at least £25.

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And in her unrelenting quest to find more items, Sarah's moved her search upstairs.

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-Paul?

-A-ha.

-I've found some stuff in Mum's room.

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-Come and have a look at this.

-Where are you?

-I'm here.

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-It's like a scene from Dallas.

-Look at these. I know, it's like Southfork.

-It's great, isn't it?

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Oh, right. Some costume jewellery, is it?

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-Yeah.

-Oh, right.

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-Have you ever worn any of these?

-I haven't.

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That one's quite sweet though.

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All right. OK, a turquoise. A very 1960s colour, turquoise actually.

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Yeah, that'll be one of Mum's specials from the '60s then, I guess.

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Right. Well, the beautiful thing about costume jewellery is that it's really affordable.

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So the idea was, in the 1920s and '30s, if you bought these two-piece outfits...

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They may go out of fashion very quickly, so you'd buy these accessories that

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-went with that particular outfit and then they could be discarded or reused on another one.

-Right.

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But what's happened now is people are realising that the design is just as good.

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I mean, the amount of workmanship gone into that, even though it's

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not solid gold, it's still the same as you would have with a gold item.

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-And that's the exploding wall. Dead 1970s, that.

-Very nice!

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Very Kojak and The Professionals, that sort of thing, isn't it?

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But the origins of costume jewellery actually go back to the times of Dick Turpin, the 18th century.

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-Really?

-What would happen, you'd have a lady who would actually have a diamond like that.

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And, of course, if she was travelling around, she couldn't wear the real one.

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And if you happened to be apprehended, then you could lose your diamond.

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So what they did, they made copies or fakes, so if they happened to run

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into trouble, they could be given to the robber.

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The real ones would be hidden away. So that's where it started from.

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-Oh, fantastic.

-Very, very clever. It's the sort of thing...

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It's very affordable and people do love just the design and the workmanship that goes into them.

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But if I was say, what? A couple of pounds each.

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You're looking at least £20-£40, to give it a broad spectrum.

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I think if somebody really fancies one or two, you might do very well at the auction. How does that sound?

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-Well, it's better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick.

-It certainly is! From experience.

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Mum's brooches are lovely. The costume jewellery, really nice and I think they're really cool.

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She's got some groovy things hidden away that I had no idea about.

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Ah, you see, Sarah, never underestimate mums.

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They're a very special breed. Paul's now looking in every possible spot and in the airing cupboard,

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he comes across a pair of standard, gilt-edged mirrors.

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They're the type of mirrors that would fit in anywhere.

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New they'd cost around £100-£120, so at Paul's estimated price of £25-£30,

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they could be a real bargain for someone.

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-How are you doing?

-All right. Lots of nice decanters

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and bits and pieces. Nice little sideboard here. A tantalus there. I mean, can that go?

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-Ooh! I don't think so, cos it's on display. But you know what? I'm sure she's got one in here.

-Really?

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-Ah, here it is.

-All right.

-This is the fella. Look at this.

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-Have a look at that.

-Ah, right.

-What do you reckon?

-Chances are this has been a prize given away at an event.

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Something like a golf club. It's a spirit decanter and you have six tumblers, which is good.

0:16:180:16:24

And the important thing is with these, it's to look to see whether there is any damage.

0:16:240:16:29

Now, what tends to happen with the combination of glass and alcohol, you can force the lid in there.

0:16:290:16:34

You can crack this or this can chip or it falls over and so on. But this is beautiful.

0:16:340:16:38

-I can see straightaway, it's genuine lead crystal. Can you feel the weight of that?

-Is it really?

0:16:380:16:42

Yeah, it's very, very heavy. You can see that? It's a feel of quality.

0:16:420:16:46

The reason it's so heavy is that there is real lead oxide here, which gives it its sparkle and its sheen.

0:16:460:16:50

And if you read this here...

0:16:500:16:52

Here we are, it says, "Made in Poland. Hand cut.

0:16:520:16:54

-"24 lead crystal". It actually means it's 24% lead oxide.

-Crikey!

0:16:540:16:59

Yeah. And this is all in nice condition, the tumblers and so on.

0:16:590:17:03

Square decanters tend to be for spirits.

0:17:030:17:05

The rounder decanters tend to be for wine. But do you use a decanter?

0:17:050:17:09

I have a few at home, but I'm always scared to put anything in them in case it goes off.

0:17:090:17:13

As long as you keep them out of strong sunlight...

0:17:130:17:15

-That's the main thing.

-Right, OK.

-So keep them away in a cupboard.

0:17:150:17:18

That won't affect it at all. It's the sunlight that tends to evaporate them and so on.

0:17:180:17:22

But these were very necessary. Wine, before it was sold in bottles,

0:17:220:17:25

used to actually be sold in big vats or casks and they would be kept in the cellar.

0:17:250:17:29

And, of course, it was your servant's job to keep running, filling your vessels and so on.

0:17:290:17:33

So the idea of the decanter was, you could leave it on the sideboard

0:17:330:17:36

and be left alone to enjoy your wine or your spirits. So I think that's a great prize for somebody.

0:17:360:17:41

I think it would make a lovely present, wouldn't it?

0:17:410:17:44

It certainly would, yeah.

0:17:440:17:46

If I said around the £30 mark...

0:17:460:17:48

-Does that sound right to you?

-Yeah. It's all adding up, which is brilliant.

-Of course.

0:17:480:17:52

-That's what we're looking for. What's your tipple?

-I do like a white wine.

0:17:520:17:57

Ah, you see. Mine's a cuppa tea. Can we put the kettle on?

0:17:570:18:00

-Yeah, let's go and do it.

-Come on, then.

0:18:000:18:03

I don't think she'll miss that one, or certainly hasn't been missing it. So, again, what a nice find!

0:18:030:18:09

Who knew she was such a hoarder, my mother?

0:18:090:18:11

And she's a very generous mum to donate so many of her things to Sarah's charity.

0:18:110:18:16

And she's still searching for more stuff. Good on you, Valerie!

0:18:160:18:19

And Paul's also hoping to serve up a few more finds.

0:18:190:18:23

-I love my mum.

-Ah! But you're good mates?

-Yes.

0:18:250:18:28

-You seem to have similar tastes in what you want to do and have fun.

-We're very similar.

0:18:280:18:33

I think we look very similar and we're both very tidy and both have a certain way we like things done,

0:18:330:18:39

which occasionally can result in a bit of a clash, but, on the whole, we get on pretty well.

0:18:390:18:44

-Someone told me she's a dancer as well?

-An amateur ballroom champion.

0:18:440:18:50

She loves a bit of Strictly. But she didn't take it up professionally.

0:18:500:18:53

So that's where you got it from, do you reckon, your balletic skills?

0:18:530:18:57

Yeah, and sort of very petite as well. I've got good genes thanks to my mum. Thank you, Mummy.

0:18:570:19:03

-Well, done, Mum. And some good things to take to auction as well.

-Absolutely! Bless her.

0:19:030:19:08

-Talking of the auction, we are trying to raise some money.

-Yeah.

-Tell me a bit more about the charity.

0:19:080:19:14

Basically, it does what it says on the can.

0:19:140:19:17

They're researching cancer, and it's very expensive.

0:19:170:19:21

The equipment to research medicine generally and to research cancer...

0:19:210:19:23

The microscopes, even the gloves they use when they're dealing

0:19:230:19:26

with nitrogen, which is obviously -80C or something, these cost an absolute fortune.

0:19:260:19:31

So any money to put towards the equipment is well received.

0:19:310:19:35

And I chose it because I did lose an ex-boyfriend in my early twenties

0:19:350:19:40

to cancer and at his funeral, we were told not to send flowers,

0:19:400:19:45

but to donate to Cancer Research UK and the hospice where he was treated in the last weeks of his life.

0:19:450:19:50

So it's a cause close to my heart.

0:19:500:19:52

-And something obviously you must have been doing for quite some time now, contributing to it.

-Absolutely.

0:19:520:19:57

And I think most... You can ask anybody on the street and in some way almost every single person

0:19:570:20:02

you talk to will have had their lives touched by cancer on some level.

0:20:020:20:05

Either a friend or a relative that they know.

0:20:050:20:08

I think you're right and I think, as you say, a great cause.

0:20:080:20:11

So we'd better get back to some work, because I think Paul and your mum are flagging.

0:20:110:20:15

OK. Let's go and fetch 'em.

0:20:150:20:16

Mum's the word when Valerie discovers a silver shoehorn and button hook.

0:20:190:20:23

They date back to the Victorian period when no wardrobe was complete

0:20:230:20:27

without a pair of lace-up boots and needed the appropriate tools to do them up.

0:20:270:20:30

After all, it can't have been easy for ladies to bend

0:20:300:20:35

in those tight corsets. Today, they're worth around £25-£30.

0:20:350:20:39

Oh, this is where you've been hiding, in the annex.

0:20:390:20:42

-Yeah. You need a map for this place.

-I know, it's huge, isn't it? Cor, this is lovely, isn't it?

0:20:420:20:46

This is exactly what happens. People have these big houses.

0:20:460:20:49

Things go out of fashion. They get put into an outbuilding or so on.

0:20:490:20:51

What a fantastic find this is. It's the poshest hi-fi cabinet I've ever seen. Look at that.

0:20:510:20:56

-I want to know more about it, so I'd better get the girls. I think they're in the garage.

-Great.

-Sarah, Valerie.

0:20:560:21:03

-Oh, here they come. What's this we've got here?

-Oh, yeah.

0:21:030:21:06

This is great, isn't it?

0:21:060:21:08

Mum's dresser.

0:21:080:21:09

-Right.

-And the bane of her life.

0:21:090:21:11

-Really.

-It's huge!

-No, it's beautiful,

0:21:110:21:13

but it just doesn't go in the rest of the house, unfortunately.

0:21:130:21:17

And we'd furnished the rest of the house when I inherited this and this was the only room where...

0:21:170:21:23

-We call it a games room, but it's dump room really.

-It looks like it should be in a church.

0:21:230:21:27

Well, funnily enough, you mention church. Actually, it has a lot of architectural overtones, doesn't it?

0:21:270:21:31

These look like stained-glass windows. Ecclesiastical overtones there, especially with this archway.

0:21:310:21:36

Very architectural and that was part of the design. These are actually reminiscent of the War of the Roses.

0:21:360:21:41

You know, the red, and the white roses either side.

0:21:410:21:44

But the style is Jacobean and that goes back to the reign of James I,

0:21:440:21:47

but it was revived round about the year 1900.

0:21:470:21:51

And what they did, they added all sorts of elements of design into it.

0:21:510:21:54

So you've got the War of the Roses from the 15th century.

0:21:540:21:57

You've got this, which is more like the Georgian period.

0:21:570:22:00

And it has modern functions. In the bottom here, this is deliberately designed to keep your wine cool.

0:22:000:22:05

Sometimes you actually have a lead box in there as well, which kept it cool naturally.

0:22:050:22:09

But what I love about it, it's solid oak and it's really part of the Arts and Crafts movement.

0:22:090:22:14

It was a time where we're going against the mahoganies and imported fancy woods.

0:22:140:22:18

This is going back to basics. And nowadays when you buy things, it tends to be laminate.

0:22:180:22:22

Oak's quite expensive now. And this is a beautiful piece to have.

0:22:220:22:25

Valerie, would you be willing to let this wonderful piece of furniture go?

0:22:250:22:30

Yes. It's difficult because it has been around for such a long time,

0:22:300:22:34

but it just has nowhere to live and it's stuck out here.

0:22:340:22:39

-So it's got to go.

-Yes.

0:22:390:22:41

-Yes.

-I think for charity, yes.

0:22:410:22:44

That is good news as far as you're concerned. How much do you think we could get?

0:22:440:22:48

Well, I think this is such an unusual piece.

0:22:480:22:50

The ordinary, everyday furniture that you'll find from the Victorian times has took a

0:22:500:22:54

bit of a battering, but I can see this being used in a pub or a hotel.

0:22:540:22:58

You've got the ram's head and the red white roses.

0:22:580:23:00

There's all sorts of potential buyers for something like this.

0:23:000:23:03

I can see this in a hallway as an opening piece for somebody, an oaky beam sort of place.

0:23:030:23:07

-If I said between 300 and 500, how does that sound?

-Sounds great.

0:23:070:23:12

-It sounds amazing, yes.

-Excellent.

0:23:120:23:14

-Right, great.

-Well, that's not a bad day's work, is it?

0:23:140:23:16

-No.

-We've probably saved the best till last.

-Of course. Yeah.

0:23:160:23:20

We've had a little tally up. You say £300 at the very conservative?

0:23:200:23:24

Yeah, to give a chance.

0:23:240:23:26

-We've got a grand total.

-Which is?

0:23:260:23:27

Well, you wanted around £300, didn't you?

0:23:270:23:30

-I did, yeah.

-Well, you've done that, because, conservatively, we reckon we could get around £560.

-Wow!

0:23:300:23:37

-That's not bad.

-Amazing.

0:23:370:23:39

It's not bad at all.

0:23:390:23:41

So fingers crossed. Next time we meet will be at the auction rooms.

0:23:410:23:45

-Yes, and you'll be dressed up, won't you?

-All right, Mum(!)

0:23:450:23:48

'Ha, Sarah! Don't worry, all the mums all over the world are the same.

0:23:480:23:53

'Whatever age you are, they still tell you what to wear.

0:23:530:23:56

'I'm now really looking forward to seeing how the girls are dressed on auction day.

0:23:560:24:01

'And also looking their finest will be...

0:24:010:24:04

'The 19th-century print of the racy French lady

0:24:040:24:08

'and her elderly suitor, valued at £30-£50.

0:24:080:24:11

'That picture of Sarah painted by the artist Vittorio Pelosi.

0:24:110:24:15

'His work is becoming very sought after,

0:24:150:24:17

'and we're hoping we could get as much as £80.

0:24:170:24:20

'And our final find, the magnificent Arts and Crafts sideboard,

0:24:200:24:25

'which Paul's valued at £300-£500.

0:24:250:24:28

'Still to come on Cash In The Celebrity Attic,

0:24:290:24:32

'at the auction, what causes Sarah to go all embarrassed on me?'

0:24:320:24:37

What's that?

0:24:370:24:39

-Unsold.

-Aaagh!

0:24:390:24:42

-'And who is Sarah talking about?'

-Well, I did say she was cheap.

0:24:420:24:46

Eee!

0:24:460:24:49

'So will they make that £300 at the end of the day?'

0:24:490:24:53

Now, it's been a couple of weeks since we helped TV presenter Sarah Cawood and her mum, Valerie,

0:24:580:25:03

find hidden treasures and collectables in their home

0:25:030:25:06

to bring here to the Chiswick Auction Rooms in west London.

0:25:060:25:09

Now, Sarah wants to raise £300 for Cancer Research UK.

0:25:090:25:13

So let's hope there are some generous bidders when those items go under the hammer.

0:25:130:25:17

Fingers crossed. It's another busy day in the saleroom as the more bidders there are,

0:25:170:25:21

the more chances of our lots making sky-high prices.

0:25:210:25:25

But before the sale gets under way, I catch up with the auctioneer Tom Keane.'

0:25:250:25:30

-Hi, Tom. Nice to see you.

-Hi, Chris.

0:25:300:25:32

-All right?

-I'm nervous, because Paul couldn't make it.

0:25:320:25:35

He's gutted, so you're going to have to help me out today.

0:25:350:25:38

Number one is that wonderful piece of furniture there, but Paul was a bit concerned it was a bit big.

0:25:380:25:43

-What do you reckon?

-He's right. It is a bit big.

0:25:430:25:46

The quality's good. What lets it down is it's a 1920s copy of a 18th-century sideboard.

0:25:460:25:51

So we get a few Australian shippers come in.

0:25:510:25:53

If they turn up, they'll buy it. If they don't turn up, it won't go.

0:25:530:25:57

OK, so that one hangs in the balance. And the other nerve-wracking one was Sarah Cawood's portrait.

0:25:570:26:03

-What do we make of that?

-I saw it.

0:26:030:26:05

It's not a bad portrait. If her mum's coming, she might buy it, but it's going to be hard to sell.

0:26:050:26:10

-A hard one to sell?

-Hard to sell.

0:26:100:26:12

I'll leave you to it and I'll go and find the family. See you later.

0:26:120:26:15

-Work some magic.

-I'll try.

0:26:150:26:16

'Well, Tom doesn't sound too positive about the large sideboard or the painting.

0:26:160:26:20

'I hope we can prove him wrong.

0:26:200:26:23

'Both Sarah and her mum are keen to raise as much money as possible for the charity

0:26:230:26:27

'and those two items are our main players today, so they need to do well.

0:26:270:26:31

'And I'm pleased to say that the girls are already here.'

0:26:310:26:34

Sarah, Valerie... Oh!

0:26:340:26:36

-Are you putting that down or are you putting it on?

-I'm putting it down.

0:26:360:26:40

-Are you sure?

-I just put it on.

0:26:400:26:42

-Keep an eye on her.

-Yes.

-Nice to see you.

0:26:420:26:44

-It's sad when you've got to let things go though, isn't it?

-It is. It is, but you move on.

0:26:440:26:49

Fashions change and, you know, memories are there.

0:26:490:26:53

Now everyone's talking about a big piece of furniture around the corner, your bureau.

0:26:530:26:57

Are you going to be sad to see that go as well?

0:26:570:27:00

Again, mixed feelings really.

0:27:000:27:01

It was too big for the house, but...

0:27:010:27:04

It looks really good in there, doesn't it?

0:27:040:27:06

It looks brilliant. It needs the sunshine and a big room.

0:27:060:27:09

-It would look stunning.

-Anything else that you're worried about, Sarah?

0:27:090:27:13

I'm interested to see how much the sideboard will fetch, it's such a beautiful piece of furniture.

0:27:130:27:18

I'm concerned about the portrait. I think it might fetch 20p if I'm lucky.

0:27:180:27:22

I'm sure we'll get more than that. I forgot to say, you both look very glamorous.

0:27:220:27:25

-I said I'd dress up, didn't I?

-Yes. Is that your doing, Mum?

0:27:250:27:29

No, she did it by herself.

0:27:290:27:30

I think we actually said dress and they're shorts, but never mind.

0:27:300:27:33

You both look lovely, delightful. Let's get on with the auction.

0:27:330:27:36

Come on, follow me.

0:27:360:27:39

'I'm always stunned at how alike these two girls are.

0:27:390:27:42

'One thing they've decided not to bring is the biscuit barrel.

0:27:420:27:45

'It was Sarah's granny's and she could smell the ginger biscuits in it

0:27:450:27:48

'that her gran used to give her when she was little, so it held too strong a memory to part with.

0:27:480:27:53

'But we've still got ten good lots to sell.

0:27:530:27:56

'It's a hot day outside, but it doesn't seem to have kept the bidders

0:27:560:27:59

'in their gardens, so let's hope we have a successful day ahead of us.

0:27:590:28:02

'The auctioneer is preparing for the off and it's time for Sarah's first lot.'

0:28:020:28:09

Here we go, ladies. First up, six glass tumblers.

0:28:090:28:11

Now, Paul left me a note here saying they're in good condition,

0:28:110:28:15

stoppers there, so they are quite valuable.

0:28:150:28:17

-Are you quite glad to see them go?

-Yes.

0:28:170:28:20

-Oh, right.

-We've got tumblers and decanters coming out of our ears.

0:28:200:28:23

Yes. I've got loads of decanters.

0:28:230:28:25

-Wave goodbye.

-Wave goodbye.

0:28:250:28:28

And start me at £20. £20?

0:28:280:28:29

£10? I'm bid at ten. Who'll give me 12? At £10.

0:28:290:28:33

12. 12. 15. 18.

0:28:330:28:35

18. 20. 22.

0:28:350:28:37

Bid at £20. See you there at £20.

0:28:370:28:39

£20. Take two. At £20. At £20 only.

0:28:390:28:41

The first one goes at £20.

0:28:410:28:44

-It's gone! £20.

-That's all right.

0:28:440:28:47

-That's not too bad, is it?

-You were going to give those away!

0:28:470:28:50

-Yeah.

-Well, I think that's a pretty good start.

0:28:500:28:52

They had no sentimental attachment.

0:28:520:28:54

In fact, they were pleased to get rid of them and £20 is just what Paul expected.

0:28:540:29:00

The next lot is the mirrors. These should do well.

0:29:000:29:03

Mirrors are popular items at auction rooms and the pair would fit into most styles of rooms and houses.

0:29:030:29:09

We're hoping for £25-£30.

0:29:090:29:13

Now up next we've got the two rectangular, gilt-wood, wall mirrors.

0:29:130:29:17

I've seen them. I recognised one. I didn't realise they were in it!

0:29:170:29:20

What chance have we got today?

0:29:200:29:22

You might have bought them!

0:29:220:29:23

I did say, "Oh, they're just like Mum's, they are!" They are Mum's.

0:29:230:29:26

-I replaced them with Grandma's mirrors.

-OK!

0:29:260:29:28

Well, they're up for grabs now.

0:29:280:29:30

For the two mirrors, start me £20.

0:29:300:29:31

Start me £10. I'm bid at ten. Who'll give me 12? At ten. 12. 15.

0:29:310:29:35

18. 20. 22. 25. 28. Cheap at £25.

0:29:350:29:39

There's a £25 bid there. At £25. At 25 and gone. We're out at 25.

0:29:390:29:42

-Sold at £25.

-25 quid.

0:29:420:29:44

£25, that's solid, isn't it?

0:29:440:29:46

Yeah. I wouldn't buy 'em.

0:29:460:29:48

That's good.

0:29:480:29:50

I wasn't keen on them.

0:29:500:29:51

Good. They've gone.

0:29:510:29:54

'Sold. Paul's spot on again. He will be pleased.

0:29:540:29:57

'Another good step towards our target.

0:29:570:30:01

'Next up is the jewellery that Sarah and Valerie were saying goodbye to

0:30:010:30:05

'before the start of the auction.

0:30:050:30:07

'Now, as we know, all that glitters isn't gold,

0:30:070:30:10

'and this collection is only costume jewellery.

0:30:100:30:13

'There are several pieces in this lot,

0:30:130:30:15

'unless one or two have gone missing...'

0:30:150:30:17

OK, hands out. Let me have a look.

0:30:170:30:19

-We haven't got them.

-You haven't got the costume jewellery? You promise?

0:30:190:30:23

-No. Promise.

-No. Not wearing them.

-Cos it's up for grabs now.

0:30:230:30:26

Hands in your pockets, hands behind your back and behave. Here we go.

0:30:260:30:29

£20 for it? Where's the costume jewellery buyers? £10 for it?

0:30:290:30:32

A bid at ten. There at ten.

0:30:320:30:34

Who will give me 12? 12 there. 15 there. 18 there. 20 there.

0:30:340:30:37

22. Bid's at £20. I'll take 22.

0:30:370:30:39

At £20. I'll take 22. At £20.

0:30:390:30:42

Your bid so far, sir. At £20.

0:30:420:30:44

At £20 and gone. 156. £20.

0:30:440:30:46

£20, that's not too bad, is it?

0:30:460:30:48

-It's pretty good.

-Being the summer and not many sort of tourists

0:30:480:30:52

in buying things, the costume jewellery could have done better.

0:30:520:30:56

On a good, cold winter's day they could have made £50 or £80, but in the summer, 20 quid. That's it.

0:30:560:31:02

'All right. We'll have to settle for that.

0:31:020:31:04

'They could have gone for a little bit more, but we've got a hat-trick of successful sales and raised £65.

0:31:040:31:10

'So let's hope our luck continues.

0:31:100:31:12

'Next up is the charming Beatrix Potter set of Mrs Rabbit and her son Peter.

0:31:120:31:15

'It's never been used and comes with its original box,

0:31:150:31:19

'so it could make a perfect birth or christening present.'

0:31:190:31:22

Are they worth, er, £20?

0:31:220:31:25

Are they worth £10? Bid at ten. Who will give me 12? At £10.

0:31:250:31:28

Who will give me 12? 12. 15.

0:31:280:31:30

18. 20. 22.

0:31:300:31:32

Bid at £20. Looking down at £20.

0:31:320:31:34

All out at £20? That's it.

0:31:340:31:36

Going for £20. Are we done at £20 only? 319...

0:31:360:31:39

£20. We just scraped in there. That's not too bad though, is it?

0:31:390:31:43

It's not humiliating, is it, Chris?

0:31:430:31:45

Humiliating? You want to try humiliating when none of it sells.

0:31:450:31:48

-That's pretty bad.

-Has it happened?

0:31:480:31:50

It has happened before. You're going well.

0:31:500:31:52

You're purring along nicely. I like it. £20.

0:31:520:31:55

'I think Sarah and her mum are really quite nervous

0:31:550:31:58

'about how their items are going to fare.

0:31:580:32:01

'It is true, you never know at auctions and the bidders look

0:32:010:32:03

'a serious bunch today, but everything's sold so far.

0:32:030:32:06

'Next is the grouped lot of silver-plated candelabra,

0:32:060:32:10

'candlesnuffer and the Scottish drinking bowl or quaich.

0:32:100:32:13

'The good news is that the auction house

0:32:130:32:16

'upped Paul's estimate of £25-£50.

0:32:160:32:18

'So let's see if it makes the higher amount.'

0:32:180:32:20

A silver-plated candlestick.

0:32:230:32:25

Candlesnuffer as well. A few more bits in this lot. 180A.

0:32:250:32:29

Start me... What shall we say?

0:32:290:32:31

£50 for it? £20 for it?

0:32:310:32:34

A bid at £20. At 20. Take 22.

0:32:340:32:37

£20. That's the only bid. 22. 25.

0:32:370:32:40

28. 30. 32. A bid at £30.

0:32:400:32:42

I'll take 32. At £32.

0:32:420:32:44

Your bid at £30. Take two. At £30. All done at £30? Your last chance.

0:32:440:32:47

Going at £30. Gone at £30.

0:32:470:32:50

I thought we were going big there. Did you?

0:32:500:32:53

-Did you just get all excited?

-I did. Sorry.

0:32:530:32:55

'Well, it wasn't big, but it was respectable and another sale.

0:32:550:32:59

'So how healthy is our charity fund looking?'

0:32:590:33:02

-I don't know about you, it's hot in here, isn't it?

-It really is.

0:33:020:33:05

-Very.

-Hotter than Hades.

0:33:050:33:06

It's the hottest day of the year and we're in here.

0:33:060:33:09

And tension is building.

0:33:090:33:10

We've reached the halfway stage, so it could be time to have a little look around and have a relaxation.

0:33:100:33:15

-Right, OK.

-But if you remember, I think it was £300 you wanted to raise, wasn't it?

0:33:150:33:20

Yeah. I think 300-500 will be awesome, but that's...

0:33:200:33:23

-Is she getting greedy, Mum?

-I think she is. 300 would be great.

0:33:230:33:26

We're at the halfway stage and we've reached £115.

0:33:260:33:32

Oh, that's good. That's not bad.

0:33:320:33:34

-It's not bad, and we've got some big, big items to come, including, of course, the bureau.

-Yeah.

0:33:340:33:39

And we're expecting big things from that. So, fingers crossed, we should be OK.

0:33:390:33:43

-Come on, let's have a good look round.

-OK. After you, Mum.

0:33:430:33:46

'Well, the girls seem pleased with that result.

0:33:460:33:48

'We've made a good dent in our target and there are still more items to sell. Our day is far from over.

0:33:480:33:54

'Valerie's made a beeline for the jewellery counter.

0:33:540:33:57

'She must be keen to replace her donated lot.

0:33:570:34:00

'Whilst Sarah's found a souvenir from the Far East.'

0:34:000:34:03

This is my favourite piece out of everything I've seen at the auction rooms today.

0:34:030:34:07

I just think the attention to detail on her is amazing.

0:34:070:34:11

I've read Memoirs Of A Geisha and, from what I can remember of how

0:34:110:34:15

geishas are put together, this is perfectly done. Absolutely stunning.

0:34:150:34:19

And her face is so lifelike.

0:34:190:34:22

She's absolutely beautiful. I think if I were to buy her...

0:34:220:34:25

And actually I really would like to.

0:34:250:34:27

But if I were to buy her, I think you'd really want

0:34:270:34:29

some sort of corner unit, so she would be the focal point.

0:34:290:34:32

But really, a piece like this, you're going to decorate your entire room around it, aren't you?

0:34:320:34:38

So if I were to take her away, the front room's going Japanese.

0:34:380:34:41

'And that geisha girl sold later in the day for £60.'

0:34:410:34:46

'Now if you're planning to go to auction,

0:34:500:34:52

'then remember that charges such as commission apply whether you're buying or selling.

0:34:520:34:56

'Your local saleroom will be able to give you all the details.

0:34:560:35:00

'It's time for our next lots to go under the hammer,

0:35:000:35:02

'and it's the hare-coursing cigarette cards and print.

0:35:020:35:05

'Not everyone's taste and the cards aren't rare.

0:35:050:35:08

'So let's see how they do.'

0:35:080:35:10

At £10. All out at £10? 12 or not. At £10.

0:35:100:35:12

That's the bid. Sold at £10.

0:35:120:35:15

-It's better than nothing though. £10.

-Yep.

0:35:150:35:17

'But it's still £10 under Paul's estimate.

0:35:170:35:19

'Every bit raised will go towards Sarah's charity

0:35:190:35:22

'and it all helps, but we do need to start bringing in bigger amounts

0:35:220:35:27

'or else we're in danger of not reaching our £300 target.

0:35:270:35:30

'There are still a couple of larger items to sell,

0:35:300:35:33

'including this Vittorio Pelosi painting.'

0:35:330:35:36

Up next, on my booklet it says you're up for grabs here. Is this right?

0:35:360:35:40

It's that portrait of me, which is brilliant.

0:35:400:35:43

I love it, but I'm going to be so embarrassed.

0:35:430:35:45

I don't think it'll fetch anything.

0:35:450:35:47

How much are we looking for? Of course, it's about £50-£80.

0:35:470:35:50

-You reckon 50p, don't you?

-Yeah, 50p I reckon.

0:35:500:35:52

How about you, Mum?

0:35:520:35:54

I haven't got a clue.

0:35:540:35:55

-You like it or you loathe it.

-Fingers crossed, Valerie. Here we go.

0:35:550:35:59

-You're up for grabs, Sarah.

-Vittorio Pelosi.

0:35:590:36:01

The oil on canvas. Portrait of...

0:36:010:36:03

She's in the room. Sarah Cawood. It's unframed. Self-portrait there.

0:36:030:36:06

How much shall we start for it? £50 for it?

0:36:060:36:08

£30 for it?

0:36:080:36:09

Give me a bid at £30 or I'll pass on it.

0:36:090:36:12

£30 start me. £30 for it.

0:36:120:36:13

-No bid at £30?

-Come on, somebody. Take pity.

0:36:130:36:17

It's worth more than that. £30 or not? No bids?

0:36:170:36:20

If you change your mind, come and see the desk.

0:36:200:36:23

-What was that?

-Unsold.

0:36:230:36:24

Aaaagh!

0:36:240:36:26

I don't care. You know what I'm going to do?

0:36:260:36:29

I'm going to take it and put it in the attic. Cheaper than Botox.

0:36:290:36:32

Do you know what? I think they have no taste in here, Sarah Cawood.

0:36:320:36:37

I don't want a portrait of me. Why would they want a portrait of me?

0:36:370:36:40

It's completely valid.

0:36:400:36:43

Just think, if Oscar Wilde's story of Dorian Gray,

0:36:430:36:46

about a man who kept a picture up in the attic

0:36:460:36:49

to keep himself young, was true,

0:36:490:36:50

today's prolific, multi-million pound cosmetic industry would be defunct

0:36:500:36:54

and superstars would be even more wealthy than they are now.

0:36:540:36:58

You know, if it was a portrait of...

0:36:580:37:00

I don't know. Uma Thurman, it might go for a bob or two.

0:37:000:37:04

But, you know, I'm Sarah Cawood.

0:37:040:37:07

'I think Sarah's taken that very well. What a trooper.

0:37:070:37:09

'So we're behind on our target and it's all resting on the next lot.'

0:37:090:37:14

It's the big one, the shakedown, the one that we've all been looking for.

0:37:140:37:19

It's that big bureau.

0:37:190:37:20

How are you feeling? Confident?

0:37:200:37:22

-Hope so.

-Paul said it needs a little bit of work on it.

0:37:220:37:26

It needs a bit of care and attention.

0:37:260:37:28

-Yes.

-And the only thing he worried about, cos it's so dark and so huge,

0:37:280:37:32

it might restrict the sort of bidders that would go for it.

0:37:320:37:35

-But we're hoping what? Between £300 and £500.

-Oh, goodness!

0:37:350:37:39

-That would be marvellous.

-Wouldn't it just? Here we go.

0:37:390:37:42

What's it worth? Is it worth £300 for it?

0:37:420:37:44

Is it worth £200 for it? Would you pay £200 for it? £200 for it?

0:37:440:37:47

Somebody £200? £100 for it?

0:37:470:37:49

-Ah!

-Upsy-daisy, no-one likes it. £100 for it. No-one likes it.

0:37:490:37:52

£100 then. I'm going to pass this lot. No bidders for £100 then?

0:37:520:37:56

-I do apologise. No bids of £100. It's worth more.

-It didn't go.

0:37:560:38:00

Too niche. We thought that might happen.

0:38:000:38:02

Yes, it needs a big house.

0:38:020:38:04

It needs an enormous house, doesn't it? Paul did worry about that.

0:38:040:38:07

-A Georgian house.

-And the biggest worry, of course, is...

0:38:070:38:10

-Getting it home again.

-Well, it was officially the biggest piece and heaviest

0:38:100:38:14

piece of furniture we've ever had on Cash In The Celebrity Attic.

0:38:140:38:18

-Oops!

-We've lost a lot of money there though, Chris.

-Don't worry, don't worry.

0:38:180:38:23

Disappointed with the dresser not getting any bids on it, but, hopefully, perhaps on a rainy day,

0:38:230:38:29

we'll get more people looking for furniture coming into the auction and it will sell.

0:38:290:38:34

'Well, let's hope that it does better

0:38:340:38:36

'if they leave it here for another sale.

0:38:360:38:38

'It just needs the right buyer and one will come along.

0:38:380:38:40

'Just a shame it's not today.

0:38:400:38:42

'The end of our sale is getting ever closer, but there's still a chance to turn the tide and make some money.

0:38:420:38:47

'Next, it's the Victorian silver shoehorn and button hook.'

0:38:470:38:52

£10 for the lot?

0:38:520:38:53

It's got to be worth it.

0:38:530:38:55

-Oh, come on!

-Oh, come on!

-Bid at ten. Give me 12.

0:38:550:38:57

Do you want 12? No, ten. 12 there.

0:38:570:39:00

-15. 18?

-Yes, come on, keep going.

0:39:000:39:02

At £15. I'm taking £15. 15 and going. All done? 18 there.

0:39:020:39:06

20. A new bidder.

0:39:060:39:08

-£18.

-There's another one there.

0:39:080:39:10

-Going for £18!

-So it's just under.

0:39:100:39:13

That's all right though, isn't it?

0:39:130:39:15

-I thought you'd saved the best for last.

-I wish they'd fetched more.

0:39:150:39:18

We did in theory save the best till last, but they don't know about it.

0:39:180:39:21

'Oh, dear! The girls are disappointed and it's a shame.

0:39:210:39:24

'Maybe the hot weather is making the bidders tetchy.

0:39:240:39:27

'Perhaps a bit of French farce will cheer them up and put them in the mood for buying.'

0:39:270:39:32

OK, next up is one of my favourite items. Was it under the stairs?

0:39:320:39:36

The cartoon, the lettre d'amour.

0:39:360:39:37

Told a good story, didn't it?

0:39:370:39:39

-With the French floozy.

-Ooh, the French floozy, yes.

0:39:390:39:42

Smoking and showing an ankle.

0:39:420:39:43

Never in this auction room would we do that, would we?

0:39:430:39:46

No!

0:39:460:39:48

-No.

-And start me £20 for it. Start me £10 for it. I'm bid at ten.

0:39:480:39:50

Give me 12. At £10. 12.

0:39:500:39:52

-15. 18.

-Yes.

0:39:520:39:55

18. 20. 22.

0:39:550:39:57

22. 24. At £22. Bid at £22.

0:39:570:40:01

Take 24. At £22 and selling at £22.

0:40:010:40:03

Are we all done at £22? I think we are at 22.

0:40:030:40:06

You've got it, madam. £22...

0:40:060:40:08

Mum, we're rubbish at this.

0:40:080:40:10

The floozy has gone for £22.

0:40:100:40:13

Well, I did say she was cheap.

0:40:130:40:14

Eeee!

0:40:140:40:17

'Cheap? What a way to talk about our French floozy, Sarah.

0:40:170:40:21

'And I think she'd be quite happy with £22, especially given she's over 100 years old.

0:40:210:40:26

'We started off so well, but it's been a disappointing run of our final lots.

0:40:260:40:31

'So how have we got on today?'

0:40:310:40:33

That is just about it.

0:40:330:40:36

Remember I said we were going to save the best things till last?

0:40:360:40:40

Mm, we had a bit of a difficulty in the second half, didn't we?

0:40:400:40:43

-Yes.

-Did you sense that?

-Yes.

-I most certainly did, yes.

0:40:430:40:46

Now, you wanted to raise £300.

0:40:460:40:47

Yeah, I don't think we can have raised that.

0:40:470:40:50

OK. Well, the grand total was £165.

0:40:500:40:54

-Listen, like I said, it's better than nothing.

-It is better than...

0:40:550:40:59

I've got to say, you were really unlucky on the big items.

0:40:590:41:02

-I mean, when I tell Paul, he's going to be so disappointed about that piece of furniture.

-Yeah.

0:41:020:41:07

So £165. Did you enjoy it?

0:41:070:41:09

-That's the main thing.

-Yeah, it was really good fun.

-Yes.

0:41:090:41:11

-You guys are great.

-Oh, thank you.

0:41:110:41:13

You say all the right things. I think we deserve a cup of tea.

0:41:130:41:16

-Yes, please.

-I thing we do, as long as it's free!

0:41:160:41:19

'That was a disappointing result at auction, but the good news is

0:41:240:41:27

'that the sideboard did eventually sell a week later for £230.

0:41:270:41:32

'So altogether the amount raised was £395, £95 over the estimate.

0:41:320:41:38

'Sarah and Valerie were delighted and it meant a bigger total for the charity.'

0:41:380:41:43

Our income comes entirely from the generosity of the public

0:41:430:41:45

and it comes in through a whole number of activities and channels.

0:41:450:41:49

And that money goes towards the funding of the 4,500 scientists, doctors and nurses that we have

0:41:490:41:54

right across the UK, who between them are trying to understand the reasons for cancer,

0:41:540:41:59

but also to develop new treatments, new therapies, so that more and more people can survive cancer.

0:41:590:42:05

I know that every little helps,

0:42:050:42:07

and I know that the girls at Cancer Research UK feel exactly the same way.

0:42:070:42:11

So even the little bit that we made today is better than nothing at all.

0:42:110:42:15

Now if you want to be on the programme,

0:42:190:42:21

then why don't you apply to be on the show by going online?

0:42:210:42:24

Good luck and we'll see you next time on Cash In The Attic.

0:42:270:42:30

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:520:42:54

E-mail [email protected]

0:42:540:42:56

Chris Hollins and the team visit TV presenter Sarah Cawood and her mum Valerie in Lincolnshire. Their charity target is 300 pounds and all hopes are pinned on the sale of a Victorian sideboard. Will the auction bidders dig deep in support of Cancer Research?


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