Episode 20 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Episode 20

Former Gold Medalists Robin Cousins and Tessa Sanderson hit the road with £400 to invest in antiques, alongside experts David Harper and David Barby.


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-Some of the nation's favourite celebrities.

-That's the pig for you.

-This is the pig for me.

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-One antiques expert each.

-Celebrities!

-Off and running, off and skating.

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And one big challenge -

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who can seek out and buy the best antiques at the very best prices...

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-No, we want things that are making money.

-..and auction for a big profit further down the road?

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We'll cut that bit.

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-Who will spot the good investments? Who will listen to advice?

-You like that?

-It goes with your eyes.

-Yeah?

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And who will be the first to say, "Don't you know who I am?"

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Time to put your pedal to the metal.

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This is Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Suffolk kicks off this celebrity buying frenzy

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for a retro Team GB -

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a pair of record-breaking gold medallists.

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Ah, a gentleman!

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In a gorgeous, golden-hued Triumph Stag,

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each with £400 to invest.

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Ooh!

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Seatbelt on.

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We're off. Bye!

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-I'm going to be watching you.

-I'm going to be watching you.

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I'll be more than happy if you win, but you won't.

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But I would be happy if you won.

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Oh, my God, that hurt! In that case, I'm gonna kick your butt! LAUGHTER

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He broke the world record with a stunning, 18-foot leap on ice.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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He's a British, European and World Champion figure-skater,

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winning the 1980 Olympic gold medal in Lake Placid, USA.

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He is now a top judge of Dancing On Ice.

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He's Robin Cousins.

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As sure as beauty follows age, ice is followed by fire.

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# Shoot that poison arrow through my heart... #

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She's an amazing, six times Olympic athlete.

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She's a record-breaking javelin thrower.

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She took 1984's Olympic gold in LA.

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It's been a long time coming and no-one can take it away from me now.

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She's a Commander of the Order of the British Empire. She's Tessa Sanderson.

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My dad always says something is only worth what somebody is willing to pay for it.

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I think I'll just go with the way I feel about something.

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Yeah, go with the gut, then have the expert tell us why it's a good choice or not.

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Indubitably, we move mountains to get the very best experts available

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and they don't come better than this pair, I tell you.

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-Shall I take the driving seat?

-Yes, please. As always, David.

-I've got one of these.

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-Would you move your leg?

-I'm right over into the corner.

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Have you ever been involved in competitive sports?

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I used to play rugby at school.

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I don't like all that contact with other men in the scrum.

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Do you understand what I'm trying...? David, stop it!

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Oh, Lordy!

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He's the dealer with the wheels, a collector of lovely motors.

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He began buying antiques aged five,

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graduating to his own business and his very own long trousers.

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He's the wise man of antiques. He's David Harper.

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Hey, fetching?

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And this man is known simply as the Master,

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a depth and breadth of antiques knowledge admired by all.

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He loves a snazzy jacket.

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# I want a dream lover so I don't have to dream alone... #

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He's irrepressible, he's unflappable, a prince amongst experts. He's David Barby.

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We've got a choice today between David and David, so who are you going to pick? Because I want David.

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-Do you think we should shop together?

-Shall we run away together in our little Morris Minor?

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-I think we'll just shop!

-LAUGHTER

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Shall I have the cuddly David,

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a little bit larger David?

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OK, I'm going to have the David.

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The David. And I'll have the other David.

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So let's find out who's zooming with whom.

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-Good morning.

-Good morning.

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- Hello. This is where you are! - Lovely to meet you.

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-Very pleased to meet you.

-A pleasure.

-Nice to meet you too.

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-What a gorgeous day!

-Nice to see you.

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Nice to meet you.

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We decided I want to work with David and Tessa wants to work with David.

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-Luckily for you...

-Luckily, we have two Davids. Tessa has already decided who goes where.

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Bye-bye.

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Well...

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-That's fine.

-I am pleased...

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I love you too!

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Because you kindly kept saying, "I want to go with..."

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I wanted the cuddly one.

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-Don't you say anything!

-I want the cuddly one!

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-It's the winning combination right here.

-Goodbye!

-Goodbye!

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Listen, you're all winners in our eyes.

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Robin and Tessa have a cross-country route ahead,

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taking in the delights of Suffolk, Cambridgeshire, Essex and Greater London.

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Today's first pin in the map, though, is Bury St Edmunds, ending up at auction in Greenwich.

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Bury St Edmunds bears a 13th century town motto,

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"Shrine of a king, cradle of the law,"

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dating from when barons met and swore to make King John sign the Magna Carta.

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Shopping kicks off in the neighbouring emporiums of Past & Present and Risby Barn.

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But are they big enough for our driven Olympians?

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Is it true that you're actually on stamps somewhere in the world?

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-Seven.

-Seven?

-Yeah, seven stamps, Turks and Caicos being one of them from Olympic days.

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I'm not on a stamp anywhere in the world at all. Can you believe that?

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Well, in a way, David, yes.

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Next door, beneath the canopy of Past & Present,

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the competition is already hard at it

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with Joe lending a helping hand.

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-Would you do toys?

-Yes.

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There was a special dinner party for collectors and they made the gold one

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and it's got its rockets, original box.

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-I think that's a possibility. I like it. What's the best on that?

-That's got 45 on it. That'd be 30 quid.

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-I think we're looking at 1965, 1970...

-Yeah.

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-That's before you were born.

-I'd love to say so, darling, but...

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I think this is quite good. It's gold-painted. What did you win at the Olympics?

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BOTH: Gold!

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It's gold all right, possibly made as a commemorative item for Dinky employees themselves

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back in the 20th century when some die-cast metal toys were actually, believe it or not,

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made in Britain!

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But what price can Tessa and David get it at?

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-I'm finished at £28.

-Oh, come on, 20 quid?

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-We're stuck at 28 at the moment.

-20?

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Tessa's not budging on the Dinky toy.

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So what items can Robin find to play with?

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# I'm stuck in the middle with you... #

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-That pewter's very stylish.

-Mm-hm.

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-Two pieces. If it's Liberty, it's worth looking at.

-It definitely is.

-Milk jug and sugar bowl.

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-Is there such a thing as Liberty style?

-Yes.

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If we look on the base there, it says "Tudric Pewter".

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Anything with "Tudric" on the base was made and retailed through Liberty of London.

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-But what they are is drop-dead gorgeous in their style.

-Hmm.

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Well, then, these seem to me... my first buy.

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OK, but hang on a moment

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because now we have to talk about the mercenary subject of money.

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We have to try and get some sort of discount.

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-Should we be having this conversation with...?

-Not really.

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-Look out!

-I'm very deaf.

-Where did Richard come from?

-Please, please be deaf.

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Richard has a ticket price of £50

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and very soft footsteps.

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Bartering is not... I give the man in the market exactly what he's asking for.

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You've never been in MY shop.

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I don't know what's fair.

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-OK, you are right.

-I don't want to take somebody for granted.

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No, no, no. Neither would I.

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Ha! Remember, David, you are not the cuddly David!

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-I'm looking at £40 on here.

-What would you say now?

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I'd normally say thank you, give him the money and leave, but I won't

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because from the look on your face, I should probably say, "How about I give you 35?"

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Then he comes back at 38 and we end up with 37?

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We started at £50, so it's heading in the right direction for Robin, but what about Richard?

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-We've still got to make a living. I've got 500 kids to look after!

-You've been a very busy man!

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Do them for 35.

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-37, 37.

-37?

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-37, it is, and then my question to you - good deal?

-It's a very good deal.

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Robin, first purchase.

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Good work, Robin, you and other David are off and skating,

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but we're still warming up with Tessa and cuddly David.

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-David?

-Oh, my God!

-What have you seen?

-Look at that lavatory seat!

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-Oh...

-Razor blades and barbed wire!

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-Oh!

-My God!

-Isn't that unusual?

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DAVID LAUGHS

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-That is fabulous.

-Oh, my...

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-Oh, my God! Isn't that fabulous? Do you like that?

-Yes, I do.

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What's the price on it? Oh, sugars!

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David looks flustered at the ticket price of £85.

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But this striking, punk toilet seat is a bit special,

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possibly from the 1980s and often referred to as "the dangerous toilet seat"

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or "the ghetto fabulous lid".

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Does that put you off going to the toilet with barbed wire on your bum?

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-It's a special breed of people.

-Quite quirky.

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I think it's quirky.

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-The only point is, Joe, it's scratched on the top.

-It's a toilet seat.

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Yes, scratching might not be the worst that happened to it.

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£45. That's half price.

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I really like that. I really like that.

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I think it's quirky, it's different. I think they'll look and think, "Oh!"

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-But I think £45 might be a bit high...

-You're buying outside my box and outside your box.

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I'll sell you that and the toy

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for £60.

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It looks like Tessa is stuck again...

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..whilst Robin is steaming ahead.

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-There's a jug in there that I want you to have a look at.

-The silver?

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-Yeah. What do you think about that?

-It's Christopher...Dresser.

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I think if we described it for the auction as a Christopher Dresser style, then it would have a chance.

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-I think it's beautiful and it needs to go back, but slightly further into a corner for now...

-OK.

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-Knowing that if we wanted to, we know where it is.

-All right, OK.

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-There's a big danger there.

-Your contemporary will probably rummage into the corners and find things.

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He's been known to rummage in corners.

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Let's just ask Richard while he's here, very nice Richard.

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Oh! I wish he'd stop doing that.

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So this 1900s hot-water jug is not designed by Dr Christopher Dresser,

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but it does have his aesthetic qualities.

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He actually manufactured personally nothing,

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but his designs sold to manufacturers are classics of their type.

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This lookie-likey has a ticket price of £32.

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What kind of money could we buy that for if we come back for it?

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Looking around about the £25 mark.

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OK. Now, for me, I'd pay £25 for that now and get out of here.

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-Personally.

-OK.

-But I want you to feel happy and comfortable.

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You went with me on purchase number one. I will go with you now on purchase number two.

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Respect!

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This is the dream working relationship.

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Now Tessa must decide if she wants the Starfighter toy at £20,

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the punk loo seat at £40, or both.

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So we're at 25 and 35. That's £60.

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50 and it's done. I swear!

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-I'll sell it to you for £50 under one condition.

-What?

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-You come and see us again.

-Of course I will, darling. Got a deal? Yeah, all right.

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-We've got a deal?

-Do you want a kiss from me, Joe?

-No, thanks.

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Well, how about a cuddle then?

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Tessa and David are finally off the starting blocks and into this race

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without their shopping going down the pan.

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I think this is fabulous.

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TESSA LAUGHS

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Bye!

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I can't believe it.

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Sorry, Joe. You can have some peace now.

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Though sadly, not for long, as our Olympians are swapping shops.

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-Is it jacket off territory?

-Jacket off territory.

-I think so, yeah.

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Robin has proved his eye, but will he be able to negotiate?

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Tell me why you like that.

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It's the shape again and the feel.

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I like the colour patterns, the fact that it's not just all one colour.

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That shape and form is '50s, '60s, '70s

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and it's screaming Murano.

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-And the colours are very...

-I think it's lovely.

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If you said, "It's lovely, but it's not for the auction," I will pay for that and have that at home.

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But this isn't your shopping trip, Robin. Tell him, David H!

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I would have it and take it home because I like it very much.

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OK, so we all like it.

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Amazingly, glass-making on the Italian island of Murano

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dates back to at least the 10th century

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and hit its commercial stride in the 15th and 16th centuries,

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although this piece is 20th century and priced at only £28.

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But you don't love negotiating, do you?

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It's not that I don't love it. I don't know enough about it to not be blagging.

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So, starting at 20, would that be too cheeky?

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No, I don't think so.

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I would like to take this piece of Murano glass off you.

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-Piece of Murano glass.

-As I'm sure you understand, I'm acting as an agent for this person.

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Once more, Robin has deftly avoided any actual haggling

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as Joe calls the dealer himself.

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The price on it is £28.

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He'd like to buy it for 20.

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Yes. Don't say anything rude when I'm selling.

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It is kind of jazzy.

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-Thanks very much. Bye-bye.

-So how did we do?

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She's trying as hard as she can, but she'd like to make £22 on it.

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-Then she can have £22.

-That's very good.

-Fair enough.

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-A medal-winning first outing for both our celebrity teams, eh?

-Thanks again.

-Pleasure.

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Time for the next heat and the next destination.

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But how do you handle all the adoration?

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Um, I think...

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I like people. What people have always said to me is, "How much is your medal worth?"

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I mean, in monetary terms, but you can't put a figure on it.

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That's right, that's right.

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-How can you put a value on, first of all, the emotion...

-Yeah, yeah.

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..and all the sheer effort you put into it to get that medal?

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Our gold medallists are pure national treasures,

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so let's send them further round this treasured nation.

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The road trip leaves Bury St Edmunds and Suffolk behind, sadly,

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but briskly travels 30 miles west to the most learned city of Cambridge.

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It is all very pleasant, isn't it?

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It's all quintessentially British.

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Handsome, cerebral Cambridge.

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A Roman settlement in the mid-1st century,

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a university town from the early 13th century,

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a recruiting ground for Cold War spies in the 1960s,

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and today, a haven for leisurely punters and competitive shoppers.

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-Oh, look at this!

-Oh!

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-What a little haven!

-This is very interesting.

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Lying in wait is the diminutive Gabor Cossa Antiques.

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-And with the delightful David Theobald to help.

-Very nice to meet you too.

-I try to be cheap.

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I hope so!

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We're looking for something really quirky and interesting.

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-This little silver figure...

-He's so expensive.

-Is he really?

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-I'm sorry. Some things just are.

-Right.

-Some things are not.

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What about that little taper stick?

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Well, it's silver.

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It's for sealing wax.

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These wonderful little jobbies date back to a time when a lady or gentleman would hand-write a letter,

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put it in an envelope and seal it with a wax stick and seal.

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Awfully stylish.

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But could a certain lady or gentleman part with any money for it?

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It's got to be 45. Can you make a profit on that? It's 1901.

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Is that the very best you can do?

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It kind of... I'm not being funny. It does owe me 40.

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I mean, I try, but, um...

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-But you can do better for us.

-Can I?

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-Yes.

-Should I take a loss?

-LAUGHTER

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-What is that?

-I'll show you, actually.

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Now, this is quite cheap, but it has got its spring, which is good.

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And you dig out the candle wax with that from your candlestick

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and you trim the wick in there.

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The snuffers allow one to extinguish the flame without burning one's fingers or blowing hard.

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It's 19th century, but will it catch fire at auction?

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I think the taper wax holder is unusual, it's quirky. I think it's good.

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-I'm taking your lead on this.

-I think that's quirky.

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-And I think the, um...

-The candle snuffer?

-It's the sort of thing you might get Greenwich ladies buying.

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Lovely ladies! But will Tessa buy the taper stick at £40 and the snuffers at £30, or both?

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How much did we say?

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-70.

-Seven zero?

-Yeah, I'm sorry.

-Are we sure?

-Yeah, I'm sorry.

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-Anything less is a loss.

-You're putting that face on.

-Have you thought of doing this for a living?

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Don't give her any ideas!

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For £70, Tessa and David B have bought a pair of bona-fide antiques

0:19:040:19:08

and put the loo seat behind them.

0:19:080:19:11

-Bye-bye.

-Bye-bye.

0:19:110:19:13

Just in time for the competition to arrive in town.

0:19:130:19:16

Cool, aren't they? Very cool.

0:19:160:19:18

-Are you parking in front?

-Can't you walk that far?

-No.

0:19:180:19:22

-Do you want me to drive a bit further forward?

-No, I'm absolutely fine.

0:19:220:19:27

Tell me about it! Robin and David H now find themselves in the charming environment of The Hive

0:19:270:19:33

with courteous Bill and delightful Brenda in attendance.

0:19:330:19:37

-We need a bit of steering in the right direction.

-Skating?

0:19:370:19:41

-Do you know any good skaters?

-No, but if there's something skating, it's definitely not going in the auction.

0:19:410:19:47

It's prints and things usually.

0:19:470:19:50

-Well, there's a tile down there.

-Show us the tile.

0:19:500:19:53

Sorry, Brenda. David means, "Show us the tile, PLEASE." Manners!

0:19:530:19:59

Look at the colours! Good colours.

0:19:590:20:01

I have skating memorabilia.

0:20:010:20:03

I've got a nice collection of pieces. It's porcelain, it's figurines or it's plates.

0:20:030:20:09

-Hmm.

-But not a tile.

0:20:090:20:12

-That's gorgeous.

-Now then... Made by Minton.

0:20:120:20:16

Now, Minton were incredibly good quality producers of porcelain

0:20:160:20:22

and known for making really good tiles.

0:20:220:20:26

But can our boys stretch to the £125 ticket price?

0:20:260:20:31

I'm going to be mercenary here because I'm thinking "profit".

0:20:320:20:36

I'm thinking about beating the others. Come on, I'm getting you excited here.

0:20:360:20:41

No, we are definitely taking it, but it depends where it's going

0:20:410:20:45

and whose pocket the money is coming out of to take it. What a predicament!

0:20:450:20:50

Oh, dear, Robin is getting confused about whose shopping trip this is...again!

0:20:500:20:56

I'm afraid we're only here to buy items for auction.

0:20:560:20:59

You've got the distinct tile collectors and they are worldwide

0:20:590:21:03

and you've got the people like you...

0:21:030:21:05

The more you talk about how unique and exclusive it is,

0:21:050:21:09

the more you're talking yourself out of getting it for the team.

0:21:090:21:13

Listen, the dream team are getting that tile!

0:21:130:21:16

Robin and David H have reached a stand-off,

0:21:160:21:19

whilst Tessa and David B harmoniously arrive and move in next door -

0:21:190:21:25

the Cambs Antiques Centre with haggling veteran Stephen just waiting to say "yes"!

0:21:250:21:30

Hello, Stephen.

0:21:300:21:33

-We're looking for something quirky, unusual.

-Some bits and bobs here.

0:21:330:21:37

-Right.

-Some very nice little posy vases.

0:21:370:21:41

-Very Art Nouveau. Have a look at them.

-That is nice.

0:21:410:21:45

And a square section which is unusual.

0:21:450:21:46

Birmingham. What sort of date?

0:21:480:21:50

1905, 1907.

0:21:500:21:53

-I like the top bit.

-They're stylised tulip heads or crocus heads.

-Very pretty.

0:21:530:21:58

Those are quite nice. What's the price of those?

0:21:580:22:01

I was looking for around £95 for the pair,

0:22:010:22:06

which I think is good value. Where would you like to be, David?

0:22:060:22:10

Goodness me! That's asking me to be both buyer and seller.

0:22:100:22:14

-I can always say "no".

-All right, £40.

0:22:140:22:17

Can you squeeze to 42?

0:22:200:22:22

That'll give me a working margin.

0:22:220:22:25

£42?

0:22:250:22:27

Shall we have a look... and then come back?

0:22:270:22:30

Oh, let's! So far, Cambridge has only achieved indecision for our teams

0:22:300:22:35

with Robin Cousins still hopelessly in love with that Minton skating tile.

0:22:350:22:40

OK, let me do the rough end of the business with Brenda.

0:22:400:22:44

I mean that in the nicest possible way, Brenda. Don't worry.

0:22:440:22:47

The money side. Brenda, what can be the best trade price on this one?

0:22:470:22:52

The death on that is 100.

0:22:520:22:54

Somehow we're going to have it. Someone's going to give you 100 quid.

0:22:540:22:58

-Put that aside, please.

-Right.

0:22:580:23:00

Another false start, sadly.

0:23:000:23:03

Who will be the first to go for gold and get their wallet out, dust off the cobwebs?

0:23:030:23:09

-Robin...

-Hmm.

0:23:090:23:11

What are we going to do?

0:23:120:23:15

-I like these.

-You like those.

-Yeah.

0:23:170:23:19

The single stem holders.

0:23:190:23:22

-That looks very chic. I love the design on the top.

-Right, OK.

0:23:220:23:25

But they're still £42.

0:23:250:23:28

-What did we say it was?

-35.

0:23:280:23:30

-Yes, let's go for that.

-OK.

-We'll have that.

-Well done. Decision made.

0:23:300:23:34

-Thank you very much indeed.

-I wish you good luck with them.

-Job done.

-Thank you very much indeed.

-Good.

0:23:340:23:41

-Get your cash out.

-Don't look at anything else.

-Well said!

0:23:410:23:46

Now, David H must help Robin buy that skating tile,

0:23:460:23:49

but not for his private collection.

0:23:490:23:52

-Can the dream team have...?

-Yes.

-Really?

-Yeah.

0:23:520:23:56

-Robin...

-Of course we can.

-Thank you.

0:23:560:23:58

OK...

0:23:580:24:00

You know, this antiques business is full of disappointment. You realise that, don't you?

0:24:000:24:06

Oh, I wouldn't say so.

0:24:060:24:07

Team Cousins gets the skating tile for £100,

0:24:070:24:10

whilst Team Sanderson wins the vases for just £35,

0:24:100:24:15

so cuddly David is taking Tessa somewhere special.

0:24:150:24:18

-This looks intriguing.

-Interesting building.

-"Laboratory of Physical Chemistry."

0:24:180:24:23

Hidden behind the hallowed walls of ancient Cambridge University

0:24:230:24:27

lie aged devices for studying both outer and inner space.

0:24:270:24:32

The development of the telescope and microscope are about to be brought into focus.

0:24:320:24:37

Ha! The Whipple Museum began with the much loved private collection

0:24:370:24:41

of the late Robert Stewart Whipple,

0:24:410:24:44

former managing director of the Cambridge Scientific Instrument Company.

0:24:440:24:49

Ruth Horry and Josh Nall are resident PhD students and here to explain all.

0:24:490:24:56

They look wonderfully young, don't they?

0:24:560:24:58

-Hello.

-Hello. Nice to meet you.

-Nice to meet you too.

-Hello. David Barby.

-Very pleased to meet you.

0:24:580:25:04

-What have you got to show us?

-Lots of fascinating objects.

0:25:040:25:07

Fascinating indeed!

0:25:070:25:09

Robert Whipple was an instrument maker by trade, but his passion was collecting artefacts

0:25:090:25:15

which tell the history of galactic and molecular exploration.

0:25:150:25:19

We've got in here telescopes, some microscopes,

0:25:190:25:23

but Whipple was interested in design, craftsmanship.

0:25:230:25:27

From my early days at school, I remember reading about the Culpeper microscope.

0:25:270:25:32

Lenses had existed since Roman times,

0:25:320:25:35

but it wasn't until the late 16th century

0:25:350:25:38

that Dutch spectacle maker Zacharias Jansen put multiple lenses

0:25:380:25:43

into a tube to increase magnification.

0:25:430:25:47

Edmund Culpeper's instrument from 1725

0:25:470:25:51

added a concave mirror to backlight specimens.

0:25:510:25:54

Microscopes became world-changing in the mid-19th century

0:25:540:25:59

after Charles Darwin's famous voyage of The Beagle, using his own state-of-the-art bespoke instrument.

0:25:590:26:05

We primarily know Darwin for two things.

0:26:060:26:09

In the late 1830s, he published his Voyage Of The Beagle

0:26:090:26:13

which made him incredibly famous principally as a travel writer and as a geologist,

0:26:130:26:18

then 20 years later, he publishes On The Origin Of Species.

0:26:180:26:22

And what's really interesting is this microscope shows us

0:26:220:26:25

what he was doing in the 20 years in between.

0:26:250:26:28

World-class instrument makers Smith and Beck of London created this microscope

0:26:280:26:34

for the vast 19th century sum of £36.

0:26:340:26:37

It was through this very lens that Darwin developed his theories of evolution

0:26:370:26:44

from which the origin of species were based.

0:26:440:26:47

How did you get this?

0:26:470:26:49

We got it because one of Darwin's sons, Francis Darwin,

0:26:490:26:53

became a Professor of Botany at Cambridge University,

0:26:530:26:56

and he brought it with him, he inherited it from his father,

0:26:560:27:00

and then he donated it to the university when he retired.

0:27:000:27:04

Thanks to the benevolent Darwins and Robert Whipple himself,

0:27:040:27:09

we now have this wonderful collection of instruments,

0:27:090:27:12

some to examine where we came from and others to look at where we're heading.

0:27:120:27:17

It's a huge telescope. Look at that!

0:27:170:27:21

Telescopes developed following astronomer Galileo's acclaimed model,

0:27:230:27:27

used to observe the solar system, though not all of it.

0:27:270:27:32

18th century composer William Herschel used mirrors in this telescope

0:27:320:27:37

to discover objects at great distance,

0:27:370:27:40

and with a similar model,

0:27:400:27:42

he spotted a strange moving disc beyond Saturn's orbit.

0:27:420:27:47

It was with a telescope only a little smaller than this that he was able to discover Uranus.

0:27:470:27:52

That made him one of the most famous people in Britain and he was made Astronomer to the King

0:27:520:27:58

and he was commissioned to make these telescopes for George III.

0:27:580:28:02

The fascinating thing about William Herschel is that he was a musician.

0:28:020:28:07

He played the organ and he made his own musical instruments.

0:28:070:28:10

It was through that skill that when he got into astronomy, he applied to making telescopes

0:28:100:28:16

and he soon became better than anyone else.

0:28:160:28:19

How fascinating! Tessa and David have looked down the lens of history

0:28:190:28:24

and witnessed a wonderful collection within these walls.

0:28:240:28:28

You've fired our enthusiasm. Thank you very much.

0:28:280:28:31

The Cambridge antiques shops are closing.

0:28:310:28:34

Our teams must look within

0:28:340:28:37

and to the stars for inspiration

0:28:370:28:40

as another day of action lies ahead.

0:28:400:28:43

Nighty-night, celebrity road trippers!

0:28:430:28:47

Next day, the sun shines upon our Olympian Goliaths and their chosen Davids.

0:28:480:28:54

This is good.

0:28:540:28:57

I feel competitive.

0:28:570:28:59

-Nervous?

-A little bit, yeah, to get it done.

-Oh, get out!

0:28:590:29:04

We're both quite competitive, aren't we?

0:29:040:29:08

-I'd never consider myself to be competitive.

-You liar!

0:29:090:29:12

There's a lot of world record holders, but not everybody is an Olympic champion.

0:29:120:29:17

Pressure under fire.

0:29:170:29:19

So far, Tessa Sanderson and David B shopped rather well,

0:29:190:29:22

spending £155 on 5 items.

0:29:220:29:25

The Dinky Starfighter.

0:29:260:29:30

The...barbed punk loo seat.

0:29:300:29:32

The plated snuffer and wick trimmer.

0:29:320:29:35

The Victorian taper stick.

0:29:350:29:37

And the Art Nouveau tulip vases.

0:29:370:29:40

There's £245 left in their kitty.

0:29:400:29:43

-Put your head through it.

-Hello! No! I'll sit on it!

0:29:430:29:48

-No, I want to see...

-Gold medallist with my head through the loo?!

0:29:480:29:52

Robin Cousins and David Harper tried their very best, spending just £184 on four items.

0:29:520:29:58

The Liberty pewter set.

0:30:000:30:02

The hot water jug with the look.

0:30:030:30:05

The '60s Murano art glass.

0:30:050:30:07

And the ice skating Minton tile, which is most definitely going to auction.

0:30:070:30:13

And their purse has £216 remaining.

0:30:140:30:17

Sounding like a bronze bell. It's vibrating in my hand.

0:30:180:30:22

Lord!

0:30:220:30:24

The day begins, still in handsome Cambridge, with Robin and the other David still hungry for more.

0:30:240:30:30

Two for one. Can I offer you two tiles so I can get my one back?

0:30:300:30:36

Let me just think about it. Em...

0:30:360:30:38

No! However, feel free to browse the many delights at Stantiques,

0:30:380:30:42

under the watchful eye of this man here. Amazingly, he's called Stan. The man.

0:30:420:30:48

Quite a nice tray.

0:30:500:30:52

-Very pretty.

-Drinks tray, butler's tray.

0:30:520:30:55

If someone sent me a picture of that tray, I would say, subject to viewing it,

0:30:550:31:00

it's an 18th-century tray. But when I get it I'd turn it over.

0:31:000:31:05

The colour doesn't seem quite right,

0:31:050:31:08

the cut and then, of course, we know it's had some sort of alterations.

0:31:080:31:13

-But, Robin, what do you feel? Are you getting anything from that?

-A nice, decorative tray.

0:31:130:31:18

-But it is, at the end of the day, just a...roughed-up, prettily-carved piece of wood.

-Really?

0:31:180:31:25

-Yeah.

-Is that how you'd describe it?

0:31:250:31:28

The price may sway you.

0:31:280:31:30

My best price...£10.

0:31:300:31:32

Giveaway.

0:31:320:31:34

If somebody was to believe that IS an 18th-century tray,

0:31:340:31:38

-it might make 100, 150 quid.

-And if they didn't...

0:31:380:31:43

Why are you looking at me like that?

0:31:440:31:47

Poor old Robin. He's not terribly excited by the tea tray, but at a delightful £10, does it matter?

0:31:470:31:54

-No.

-No?

-But I get it.

0:31:540:31:57

-That's it, yeah.

-I don't love it, but I get it.

-If it doesn't make profit,

0:31:570:32:02

I'll jump in the Thames and never come out.

0:32:020:32:05

Stan's offer is just too good to ignore, so Robin will have to wait if he wants to buy something

0:32:050:32:11

more up his street.

0:32:110:32:13

Speaking of which, it's time to get on that Road Trip again.

0:32:130:32:17

-Look at you! You think you're at Brands Hatch!

-Yeah!

0:32:170:32:22

-Panicking now.

-Are you panicking?

-We need to get there and have a look.

-I know.

-Time, time, time.

0:32:240:32:30

-I know, I know.

-Indeed. The last day of shopping will not last forever

0:32:300:32:35

and our teams need those money-spinning objects whether they like them or not.

0:32:350:32:41

Cambridge is finally departing as our Olympians and Davids head 18 miles south,

0:32:410:32:47

crossing into Essex and on towards Saffron Walden.

0:32:470:32:51

It looks expensive! It looks expensive!

0:32:520:32:55

-Oh, it looks expensive.

-Does it?

0:32:550:32:58

Well, look at these buildings. All well maintained.

0:32:580:33:02

David's right to worry. Saffron Walden is a well-heeled medieval town,

0:33:020:33:07

its early wealth coming from the growth in trade in saffron, funnily enough, that rare yellow spice

0:33:070:33:13

from the saffron crocus flower, used for dyeing medieval fabrics,

0:33:130:33:18

-now more commonly found in your evening curry.

-Do you think

0:33:180:33:23

-it's that one big ticket item?

-We could. There's a lump of money there to take a chance.

-Yeah.

0:33:230:33:29

If we find the chancey object.

0:33:290:33:32

Shout if there's anything that's going to take your eye, Tess.

0:33:320:33:36

Tessa and David have found their way to the rather fine Arts Decoratifs,

0:33:360:33:42

packed with some tiny treasures, possibly with eye-popping ticket prices. Let's hope Anne here

0:33:420:33:47

can be accommodating, especially as our teams have their eyes on the jewellery cabinets.

0:33:470:33:53

This one here is gold with black enamel.

0:33:540:33:58

And this has river pearls all the way round. Not oyster pearls.

0:33:580:34:03

And then you've got these rather shiny pearls here. But this has something interesting on the back.

0:34:030:34:09

And this says...

0:34:090:34:11

"Rebecca Inglis, 5th September, 1818.

0:34:110:34:15

"Age 49."

0:34:150:34:18

And that was worn either as a pendant or as a brooch.

0:34:180:34:23

It hasn't got a wow factor. I do like that one.

0:34:230:34:26

-Now, madam...

-Yes, sir.

0:34:260:34:29

-We're in a frightful hurry. We've got to make a decision quickly.

-OK.

0:34:290:34:33

-What's the best you can do on that?

-Tessa and David will need a bit of slack from the ticket price of £92

0:34:330:34:40

and someone will need to find out who Rebecca Inglis was.

0:34:400:34:46

For now, can Tessa get the very best price?

0:34:460:34:50

This lady is going to do us a great deal. I can feel it.

0:34:500:34:54

-One woman to another woman.

-You feel it in your bones.

-We're going to have a great deal. Hit me.

0:34:540:35:00

-30.

-Ooh!

0:35:000:35:03

-That's shocked you, hasn't it?

-And with a box.

-I don't know what to say.

0:35:030:35:07

-I like that because it's gold and it's dated. How often do you find jewellery that's dated?

-Georgian.

0:35:070:35:14

Hello. Oh, I can see people in there.

0:35:140:35:18

Oh, that's bad timing.

0:35:180:35:20

- Oh, no! - It's like a panto!

0:35:200:35:23

-And you are...?

-We know you guys!

0:35:230:35:26

-Not feeling grumpy, David, by any chance?

-No!

0:35:260:35:29

David Barby has just given me a hand sign and it wasn't waving.

0:35:290:35:34

Ah. I'm sure he just means give us two minutes here.

0:35:340:35:38

-My very best...

-Your very, very, very best.

-Yes. ..and the box thrown in - 25.

0:35:380:35:44

Can't do less.

0:35:440:35:46

-OK.

-Done.

-Thank you.

0:35:460:35:49

-Thank you very much indeed.

-He doesn't normally do that.

-Thank you.

0:35:490:35:54

More cuddly than kissy is David.

0:35:540:35:57

-Bye-bye!

-Now can Robin find that eye-catching big-ticket item he's been seeking.

0:35:580:36:05

The secret is the prices are hidden, therefore you don't know what a bargain you're getting.

0:36:050:36:10

-How much have we got exactly, Robin?

-206.

-£206.

0:36:100:36:14

And we're willing to blow every last penny if you can find us something.

0:36:140:36:19

-You want to make a huge profit.

-If you don't mind.

-You want my best ring.

-Yes.

0:36:190:36:24

-This is 18-carat diamond cluster.

-Diamond cluster.

0:36:240:36:28

-It's a lot of diamond.

-Very pretty.

0:36:280:36:30

It feels heavy.

0:36:300:36:32

-It's a tiny ring.

-A tiny ring.

-That means the bling looks great because of the size of the ring.

0:36:330:36:41

Bling bling! For real. Probably no great age here, sadly,

0:36:410:36:45

but we've got 18-carat gold, a cluster of seven diamonds, a London hallmark

0:36:450:36:50

and Robin likes it!

0:36:500:36:53

-Now we have to put our money where our mouth is.

-It's blingy.

0:36:540:36:58

It's in, I'm thinking, pristine and beautiful condition.

0:36:580:37:03

-How much is that to us, Anne?

-£206.

0:37:030:37:06

-£206?

-Yes. You're getting a bargain.

0:37:060:37:10

-Would you do this?

-Yeah.

-If it was you, not for us.

0:37:100:37:14

-The answer is absolutely yes.

-Then there's my answer.

0:37:140:37:18

-We have done our final...

-Thank you, Robin.

-..buy.

-David.

0:37:180:37:22

-It's beautiful.

-And we've spent everything. That is the way to do it.

0:37:220:37:28

Excellent work, gentlemen. And great to see full use of your £400 budget, too,

0:37:280:37:34

especially on such an eye-catching treasure.

0:37:340:37:37

What, if anything, do you really miss from the days of being on the road, competing and performing?

0:37:410:37:47

I suppose it's the one thing about the ice, my big white canvas as I called it, was the freedom to fly.

0:37:470:37:55

I get great joy from seeing somebody perform well something I may have helped create.

0:37:550:38:01

Robin has now earned his stripes in the arena of antiques negotiations,

0:38:010:38:06

so David's found a flamboyant indulgence for him.

0:38:060:38:11

Saffron Walden is in the past now as the Road Trip heads into the future,

0:38:110:38:17

52 miles south to the great city of London, landing in handsome maritime Greenwich.

0:38:170:38:23

As home to the British Navy, in the Thames Estuary and a historical centre of sea trade,

0:38:260:38:32

Greenwich has witnessed the ebbs and flows of imported fashions.

0:38:320:38:37

Here we are.

0:38:420:38:44

-The Fan Museum.

-Electrical or otherwise?

-Your fans, Robin.

0:38:440:38:48

We'll be out of here pretty smartish, then!

0:38:480:38:51

Men!

0:38:510:38:53

Fans clearly began as devices for cooling the face, but have been used for anything but.

0:38:530:38:59

From Ancient Egyptians, Chinese and Greeks, to modern Europe, fans have been status symbols,

0:38:590:39:07

objects of beauty and...well,

0:39:070:39:10

really quite sensuous.

0:39:100:39:13

-Deputy Curator Jacob Moss is here to reveal all.

-Hi, there.

-Hi.

0:39:130:39:18

-I'm David Harper.

-Robin.

-Hello. A big welcome to the Fan Museum.

0:39:180:39:23

The unique Fan Museum opened in 1991.

0:39:230:39:26

It started from the personal collection of Mrs Helene Alexander

0:39:260:39:30

and grew to over 3,500 beautiful artefacts.

0:39:300:39:35

The walls may not talk in here, but the fans have plenty to say for themselves.

0:39:350:39:40

There's a lot of mythology involved in the study of fans.

0:39:400:39:44

The language of the fan is one of those areas that is a mixture of factual and fictive.

0:39:440:39:50

We certainly know that women used their fans to communicate their emotions, their character

0:39:500:39:56

and there is even an early 18th-century fan called the Conversation Fan, a printed fan,

0:39:560:40:02

which gives instructions of how you might compose words and sentences

0:40:020:40:07

with flickers to the left and to the right.

0:40:070:40:10

Flicker to the right? How terribly rude! Fan etiquette developed from European royalty -

0:40:100:40:17

an essential accessory in Louis XIV's court, but strictly kept closed in the King's presence.

0:40:170:40:24

18th-century Britain saw the peak of fan manufacturing

0:40:240:40:28

with new designs gaining widespread popularity,

0:40:280:40:32

so ladies from all walks of life could hide behind these enticing panels and flirt.

0:40:320:40:38

This fan, more of a novelty, but interesting nonetheless.

0:40:380:40:43

Within the guard sticks, you've got some secret compartments.

0:40:430:40:47

You have everything you need to effect a quick and speedy repair, should your corset bust a seam.

0:40:470:40:53

It was quite cumbersome, so this was possibly a fan for the servant,

0:40:530:40:58

for the mistress's dress maid, shall we say.

0:40:580:41:02

It's a bit of a rollercoaster with the history of the fan. Popularity dips, it ebbs and it flows.

0:41:020:41:08

But then they have this sudden surge, a last hurrah, towards the end of the 19th century,

0:41:080:41:13

where really they become extremely opulent and some of the most exquisite work is created then.

0:41:130:41:20

Sadly, within 50 years, fans would almost completely fall out of fashion.

0:41:200:41:26

The First World War signalled the end of this refined opulence,

0:41:260:41:31

although they would remain an inspiration for artists and lovers.

0:41:310:41:36

This is one of a series of works by Sickert, the Old Bedford series.

0:41:360:41:41

This is the Old Bedford Theatre or music hall.

0:41:410:41:44

She's a character, this young lady.

0:41:440:41:47

She was a little-known music hall star. Little Dot Hetherington.

0:41:470:41:50

Her hand is out, she's pointing up to a floodlight in the gallery

0:41:500:41:54

and this is a take on the song The Boy I Love Is Up In The Gallery.

0:41:540:41:59

-Value?

-Oh! What a question!

-You taught me.

-I do apologise.

0:41:590:42:04

It's not... I feel we can safely say that this is a considerably valuable object.

0:42:040:42:10

These flamboyant designs have clearly struck a chord with that world-class performer, Robin.

0:42:100:42:17

It's been a fascinating encounter with refinement, beauty and, well, flirtation.

0:42:170:42:22

And now it's time to pull back the covers on everyone's shopping endeavours.

0:42:220:42:27

Stand by.

0:42:270:42:30

Slowly, slowly, slowly.

0:42:300:42:32

Wow!

0:42:330:42:35

Em, yes, we said we wanted something with a wow factor and that is a wow.

0:42:360:42:41

- Tessa, was this your choice? - Yes. - It's rock'n'roll!

0:42:410:42:45

Toys aren't necessarily my thing, but I know they are very popular. And very much the thing.

0:42:450:42:50

-It was gold and Tessa won gold.

-Yeah, it fires things.

-It's never been out of its box.

0:42:500:42:57

-And what's that worth, then?

-How much did we pay for that? £30?

0:42:570:43:01

-Yeah. This is a real eclectic mix of things.

-It is.

0:43:010:43:05

-Bonkers, proper antique, really sort of vintage and becoming the new thing.

-Yeah.

0:43:050:43:13

Yeah, it might well be the new thing, though just possibly a toy that's never been played with

0:43:130:43:19

-is a rather sad toy, isn't it?

-Oh, how wonderful!

-Look at you!

0:43:190:43:24

-How wonderful.

-We had a real tussle.

0:43:240:43:29

-And those are Tudric?

-Yes, they are.

0:43:290:43:31

-Liberty.

-Lovely handle, lovely shape.

0:43:310:43:34

-- How much did you pay? £37.

-That's good.

0:43:340:43:37

-For the Liberty pieces.

-Christopher Dresser lookalike.

-Yes, thank you.

0:43:370:43:43

-And these are also Dresser.

-After Christopher Dresser.

-Tactile.

0:43:430:43:47

Lovely, the shape and the feel. I'm very excited to see what you have

0:43:470:43:53

-and I think we will look forward to seeing each other at the auction.

-Me, too.

0:43:530:43:57

I think that they're great.

0:43:570:43:59

Ah, how lovely.

0:44:010:44:04

-Now what do you really think?

-What do you think of the toilet seat?

-Hideous.

0:44:040:44:09

-But hideously kitsch.

-Very kitsch.

-There are markets for that.

0:44:090:44:13

-I loved the tile.

-I loved it, particularly with the skates.

0:44:130:44:18

-Yeah.

-But £100? Are they going to make that in a general sale? I'm not certain.

0:44:180:44:24

-Would you swap any of theirs for any of ours?

-Oh...

0:44:240:44:28

-Can I predict? The tray for the candlesticks.

-Absolutely! In one. Not difficult.

0:44:280:44:35

Do you know what? It's been emotional working with you.

0:44:350:44:39

-I have loved it so much.

-So have I.

0:44:390:44:41

It's been quite a journey for everyone. We're still in London's handsome Greenwich,

0:44:410:44:47

but this Road Trip is nearly complete.

0:44:470:44:50

-How do you feel? Are you excited?

-Actually, you know what? I'm not sure how it will go now.

0:44:500:44:57

I hope we bought the right things.

0:44:570:44:59

Auction day has arrived wit nerves and expectations,

0:44:590:45:04

but sadly David Barby has been taken ill and can't rejoin this Road Trip.

0:45:040:45:09

Slightly sad today because I'm on my own. I'm not with my lovely old friend, David Barby.

0:45:090:45:15

He's poorly and just can't make it, so today it's kind of strange.

0:45:150:45:21

So the pressure's on David Harper to carry our Olympians' hopes and dreams,

0:45:210:45:25

but if any man can do it, then that man is David H.

0:45:250:45:30

-How are you, darling?

-Gorgeous to see you. Robin. Are you well?

-Very, thank you.

0:45:300:45:36

I'm afraid I'm on my own today, so you two - disaster - are going to have to share me.

0:45:360:45:44

Tessa, I'm on your team AND Robin's. We'll do it for David.

0:45:440:45:48

Greenwich Auctions first opened their doors in 1999, specialising in fine art and collectables,

0:45:480:45:55

as well as general sales, all under the keen-eyed stewardship of auctioneer Robert Dodd.

0:45:550:46:01

-At £10!

-But what does he think of our celebrity hopefuls?

0:46:010:46:06

I think this originally was part of another piece of furniture.

0:46:060:46:10

So it could have been based on a campaign table.

0:46:100:46:13

That's probably what I'll use. As soon as you use the word "campaign",

0:46:130:46:18

military collectors prick their ears up.

0:46:180:46:21

I like this lot. It's very collectable. It was launched at an annual dinner dance for Dinky

0:46:210:46:26

and these were given to people who were there.

0:46:260:46:30

One or two collectors of Dinky and you've also got people who collect space-related items.

0:46:300:46:38

It's a shame we haven't got the provenance that it was a Dresser piece. This would be hundreds.

0:46:380:46:45

Maybe you're looking at £30, £40.

0:46:450:46:46

Absolutely stunning lot, this. This is the sort of thing that I can see

0:46:460:46:53

in somebody's collection, like putting a framed record next to it of the Sex Pistols.

0:46:530:47:00

Whether it will ever be used again, as it was first designed, who knows? But who cares?

0:47:000:47:05

Really what we want with every lot is two people who want something for completely different reasons.

0:47:050:47:11

-One will pay more than the other. That's an auction.

-Never a truer word said.

0:47:110:47:16

Our celebrity road teams began with £400 apiece.

0:47:160:47:21

-Yes!

-Tessa Sanderson and David Barby spent wisely and well - £180 on six auction lots.

0:47:210:47:28

Whilst Robin Cousins and David Harper showed great fortitude,

0:47:280:47:32

spending the entire budget, exactly £400. Bravo! Also on six auction lots.

0:47:320:47:39

OK, where is it? Bring it on!

0:47:390:47:42

Settle down now, Road Trippers. The auction is about to begin.

0:47:420:47:46

We kick off this hotly-anticipated sale with Robin's Liberty cream jug with sugar bowl.

0:47:470:47:54

Come on, Greenwich. Do your best.

0:47:540:47:56

Straight in at £38. Looking for 40. Hello? Anyone out there?

0:47:560:48:01

42. 5. 8. 50. I'm out.

0:48:010:48:04

Looking for 5. £60. No? 55, looking for 60.

0:48:040:48:07

Yes, 60, standing. 65.

0:48:070:48:10

Last time at £65.

0:48:100:48:12

Well, don't we all like a nice little profit to start us off?

0:48:120:48:18

Let's launch straight into Tessa's Trident Starfighter.

0:48:180:48:22

Can it make good on its £20 purchase?

0:48:220:48:26

It's got to start with a bid with me at a paltry £25. Looking for 28. £30. 2. 5. 8.

0:48:260:48:32

40. 2. 5. 8. 50 2 I'll take. £52 there.

0:48:320:48:36

55. £60. £70.

0:48:360:48:39

- Come on! - 90.

0:48:390:48:41

£90 I've got. 100.

0:48:410:48:44

- And 10. - Come on! Come on!

0:48:440:48:47

130. 140 I need. 130 there.

0:48:470:48:50

Are we all done? Last time.

0:48:500:48:52

At £130 for the Starfighter.

0:48:520:48:56

My goodness! A cracking start and all from a plastic toy. Who'd have thought it?

0:48:560:49:01

-Well done, you.

-Thank you.

-Well done.

0:49:010:49:04

Robin will need Lady Luck on his side today as his Dresser-esque jug

0:49:040:49:09

awaits the bidders. At least it's got "the look".

0:49:090:49:13

Bid's with me straight away at £30 on this. Looking for 32.

0:49:130:49:18

32. 35 with me. 38.

0:49:180:49:20

40 with me. Looking for 42.

0:49:200:49:22

42. 5 with me. Looking for 48. Are we all done? Last time at £45!

0:49:220:49:28

Well, a £20 profit, but it's not a Sanderson three-figure special!

0:49:280:49:33

20 quid. It's steady, it's calm.

0:49:330:49:37

We're doing profit, but not as much as plastic toys from the '80s.

0:49:370:49:41

Sorry, Robin, that's the market.

0:49:410:49:44

Tessa's next shot at glory comes with the 1980s punk toilet seat, another piece of plastic.

0:49:440:49:51

This is a bit special, this. If I was speaking to my ex-wife,

0:49:510:49:55

-this is a present I would definitely give her.

-Lovely!

0:49:550:50:00

- What a piece of art this is. - Fantastic!

0:50:000:50:02

-Absolutely stunning.

-Steady on, Robert. Tessa's already got a healthy lead.

0:50:020:50:08

-£30 on this.

-Wa-hey!

-32. 35 with me.

0:50:080:50:11

-Come on!

-Looking for 42.

0:50:110:50:15

45 with me. Looking for 48.

0:50:150:50:17

50 with me. 55. 60, I'm out.

0:50:170:50:20

Looking for 65.

0:50:200:50:22

-Last time at £60.

-Yeah!

0:50:220:50:26

-Tessa's storming ahead with modern collectables.

-Yes!

-Round of applause, please.

0:50:260:50:32

Robin's got another gorgeous lot to go. It's glass with class. Good luck, old fruit.

0:50:320:50:38

And it's got to start with a bid with me of £20. Looking for 22.

0:50:380:50:42

-5 with me. Looking for 28.

-In profit.

0:50:420:50:45

£25. Looking for 28 on this.

0:50:450:50:48

-Come on!

-28 I've got.

0:50:480:50:50

Last time at £28!

0:50:500:50:53

-Oh!

-Another profit, for sure, but not much antiques justice so far in Greenwich.

0:50:540:51:00

Wasn't plastic, but it's profit. We're not losing money yet.

0:51:000:51:04

I think they're rubbish, that team.

0:51:040:51:07

Don't worry, Robin. Up next, Tessa's trying to sell an antique on the Antiques Road Trip!

0:51:110:51:18

The lovely Regency snuffer and tray asks for a fair deal.

0:51:180:51:23

-The bid's with me at only £12.

-Ohh!

-Looking for 15 on this. 18.

0:51:230:51:28

22. 5, I'm out. Looking for 28.

0:51:280:51:31

28. Looking for £30. 32.

0:51:310:51:34

-Looking for 35.

-Come on.

-Looking for 38. 40.

0:51:340:51:38

-£40. Are we all done at £40?

-Come on!

-Are we all done?

0:51:380:51:43

At £40.

0:51:430:51:45

Well, it washed its face, but not a patch on the plastic loo seat.

0:51:450:51:50

So can Greenwich do right by Robin's Georgian carved serving tray? The one he didn't like much.

0:51:500:51:57

-The bid's with me at only £12 on this tray.

-Ohh!

0:51:570:52:00

15. 18. £20.

0:52:000:52:03

22. 25. Looking for 28. 28

0:52:030:52:07

-£30 I need. 32.

-Come on.

-5 I want. 35.

0:52:070:52:11

-Looking for 38.

-Go on!

-At £38.

0:52:110:52:14

Good result for Robin and if you're going to trail behind Tessa, it's nice to trail by a little less.

0:52:140:52:21

-I'm watching you.

-We're all watching, Tessa.

0:52:210:52:25

We continue with another proper antique - Team Sanderson's Victorian silver taper stick.

0:52:250:52:32

Start with a bid with me of only £50 on this.

0:52:320:52:35

-Straight in!

-Looking for 55. Hello! Has anybody looked at this?

0:52:350:52:41

50. I'm looking for 55.

0:52:410:52:43

55. 60 here. 65. 70 with me.

0:52:430:52:47

Wow!

0:52:470:52:48

80 with me. Looking for 85 anywhere.

0:52:480:52:51

-Are we all done?

-Come on.

-At £80 only.

0:52:510:52:55

-Excellent! Our retro star is still going for gold.

-Well done, well done.

0:52:550:53:01

A sad moment for Robin. He must part with his dear Minton skating tile.

0:53:010:53:05

Let's hope it makes him a huge profit.

0:53:050:53:09

-I can see why somebody bought this. Can't you?

-Exactly!

0:53:090:53:12

Give him a round of applause! He's a former world champion!

0:53:120:53:18

It's going to start with a big with me of £35 on this.

0:53:180:53:23

-Come on!

-Are you coming in? 38. 40. 2. 5. 8. 50. 5.

0:53:230:53:28

60. 5, I'm out. Looking for 70.

0:53:280:53:31

£70 on the phone. 75.

0:53:310:53:33

-80 I need.

-Come on!

-£80. 85.

0:53:330:53:37

-90 I want.

-On the phone.

-£90.

0:53:370:53:39

-95 there. Looking for 100.

-Go on!

-£100. Looking for 110.

0:53:390:53:43

-110.

-Yes!

-Looking for 120.

-Come on.

0:53:430:53:47

-£120. 130 I need.

-Go on!

0:53:470:53:49

Last time. At £120.

0:53:490:53:52

Not a total damp squib at all, but mildly moist, perhaps. The day so far is still Tessa's.

0:53:530:54:00

Now her 15th-century Art Nouveau-esque taper stick.

0:54:010:54:05

Straight in at £35 only.

0:54:050:54:08

Looking for 38 on these. 38. £40. 42, I'm out. Looking for 45.

0:54:080:54:12

-Come on.

-45. 48. 50 I want. 52.

0:54:120:54:16

55. 58. £60. 62.

0:54:160:54:20

65. 68. £70 in the middle of the room. Looking for 72.

0:54:200:54:25

- 75 I'll take. 78 I need. - Come on! - 82 I want.

0:54:250:54:30

85 I want. 85 there. 88. Looking for 90.

0:54:300:54:34

Last time at 88. Sure? Right in the middle of the room at £88.

0:54:340:54:39

Team Tessa is unstoppable still! The master has taught her well.

0:54:390:54:44

-At least Robin's still got his devoted expert.

-We're doing well!

0:54:440:54:49

The diamond cluster ring is Robin's star buy and last chance today.

0:54:490:54:55

The bid's with me, straight in on this at £150.

0:54:550:55:00

Looking for 160. 170. Looking for 180.

0:55:000:55:03

190. 200 anywhere on the ring? 200. And 10. 220, I'm out.

0:55:030:55:09

-£220 there.

-Come on!

-Looking for 230. I've got 220.

0:55:090:55:14

-Last time.

-Go on!

-At £220!

0:55:140:55:17

Well done, Robin, though after auction costs there will be little left from that £14 profit.

0:55:170:55:24

The day already belongs to Tessa, but let's see by how much with her mystery brooch.

0:55:250:55:32

We have been able to do a little bit of research on this.

0:55:320:55:36

-We almost, almost could prove, almost...

-Yeah.

0:55:360:55:41

..that Rebecca Inglis was the mistress of Horatio Nelson.

0:55:410:55:45

-Who died in 1805!

-It was close, it was close.

0:55:450:55:49

It was H Nelson.

0:55:490:55:52

-It was H Nelson.

-Really?

0:55:520:55:54

Yes, but it's Harry Nelson, a guy from Eltham.

0:55:540:55:58

Sadly, Robert is joking. If not, what an item to sell in maritime Greenwich!

0:56:000:56:07

Tessa expects every man to do his duty.

0:56:070:56:10

It's a lovely, lovely piece, this, and it's got to start with a bid of £70.

0:56:100:56:15

Whoo! I like that!

0:56:150:56:17

I've got 75.

0:56:170:56:20

75. 80 with me. I've got 85.

0:56:200:56:23

£90, thank you. Looking for 95. 95 on the telephone. looking for 100.

0:56:230:56:28

Are we all done? Are you sure? At £95 on the brooch!

0:56:280:56:34

Well, another Olympic profit for Tessa and a triumphant finish. Let's hope she can contain herself.

0:56:340:56:40

Give her a round of applause!

0:56:400:56:42

-Thank you!

-Thank you very much.

0:56:420:56:45

-Thank you.

-Didn't they do well?

0:56:450:56:48

-They did. Well done, you.

-Thank you!

0:56:480:56:51

-Fantastic.

-Well done. Well done.

0:56:510:56:53

Both teams began with £400.

0:56:530:56:56

Robin Cousins and his shopping partner did very well,

0:56:560:57:01

making a profit, after auction costs, of £23.12,

0:57:010:57:05

therefore they walk away with a silver medal and a proud £423.12. Yeah!

0:57:050:57:13

However, this lady shot for gold and made an earth-shattering profit of £224.26.

0:57:140:57:22

Tessa and cuddly David can take the top podium

0:57:230:57:27

with a golden £624.26.

0:57:270:57:31

All the profits will go to Children In Need, so well done, everybody.

0:57:340:57:38

-Well done, you guys.

-You, too.

-It's been fantastic.

0:57:380:57:42

-It's been gorgeous.

-May I escort you to the car?

0:57:420:57:46

-Bye!

-Bye-bye!

0:57:460:57:48

Sadly, after falling ill during this programme, David Barby later passed away.

0:57:490:57:56

He will be very greatly missed.

0:57:560:57:59

Thank you very much. Thank you.

0:57:590:58:02

-# Nobody does it better... #

-My God!

0:58:020:58:06

# Makes me feel sad for the rest... #

0:58:060:58:10

Don't look at anything else!

0:58:100:58:13

# Nobody does it half as good as you

0:58:140:58:22

# Baby, you're the best

0:58:230:58:29

# I wasn't looking

0:58:300:58:32

# But somehow you found me

0:58:320:58:36

# I tried to hide from your love light

0:58:370:58:43

# But like heaven above me

0:58:430:58:46

# The spy who loved me

0:58:460:58:50

# Is keeping all my secrets safe tonight... #

0:58:500:58:57

Former Gold Medalists Robin Cousins and Tessa Sanderson hit the road with £400 to invest in antiques, heading to Bury St Edmonds and then onto Safron Walden. Experts David Harper and David Barby lend a hand with the shopping and their hunt includes welcome visits to the Whipple Museum in Cambridge and the wonderful Fan Museum in London. The trip ends at auction in Greenwich. Who will walk away with the biggest profit?