Sarah Greene and Peter Duncan Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


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Sarah Greene and Peter Duncan

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Presenters Sarah Greene and Peter Duncan are in the company of Natasha Raskin and Catherine Southon.


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The nation's favourite celebrities...

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Oh, I like that.

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..paired up with an expert...

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Oh, we've had some fun, haven't we?

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..and a classic car.

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It feels as if it could go quite fast.

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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-CONCERTINA WHEEZES

-Fantastic.

-Yes!

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I'll do that in slow-mo.

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The aim? To make the biggest profit at auction.

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Come on, boys!

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But it's no easy ride.

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Ta-dah!

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Who will find a hidden gem?

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"Don't sell me!"

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Who will take the biggest risks?

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Go away, darling!

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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I'm trying to spend money, here.

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There will be worthy winners...

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Yes!

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..and valiant losers.

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Put the pedal to the metal.

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This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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MUSIC: Blue Peter Theme

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On today's show, we are joined by a pair

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of legendary children's television presenters

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and old Blue Peter pals, Peter Duncan and Sarah Greene.

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ENGINE ROARS

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LAUGHTER

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Actress and presenter Sarah became a familiar face on our TV screens

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at the age of just 22,

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when she paired up with Peter and Simon Groom

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to host Blue Peter.

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And what a year it's been,

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especially for Peter and me, as Blue Peter's newest members.

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I don't think either of us will forget 1980 in a hurry.

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Sarah went on to front other hit TV shows,

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including Saturday Superstore and Going Live,

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which she presented alongside a fresh-faced Phillip Schofield.

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We've done really well.

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Over the six years, we've done really well.

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-Yes.

-We've had everybody on.

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Your favourite, Michael Fallon, the junior minister for education.

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-What a star he was!

-Marvellous.

-LAUGHTER

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Going right back, Peter, going right back.

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I sort of got into it by accident

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because of having been in a drama and you,

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you were meant to have been in it before, anyway, weren't you?

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Yeah, I was going to do it before,

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because Biddy Baxter wanted me to take over from John Noakes and,

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being an actor, I thought, "No, that's the end of acting."

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And then she phoned me again and said,

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"Do you want to do Blue Peter now?"

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I switched on the telly that day - I was just about to go on holiday -

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and there you are, doing your first-ever programme.

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When I saw you and Simon, I thought, "God, we could...

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"What a fool I would be not to do this, now."

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Fellow actor and presenter Peter

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was best known as the daredevil and action man of Blue Peter

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in the '80s.

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That's it, pop your leg right over. And this leg.

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You kind of forget where you are for a minute, don't you, really?

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As long as you don't step back and admire your work.

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Peter went on to have his own series titled Duncan Dares.

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He still hasn't lost his adventurous ways,

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recently showing off his acrobatic side on the TV series Tumble.

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This morning, our celebs are starting their journey

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in this 1965 Jaguar E-type coupe - lovely.

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How is it feeling? The car?

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Oh, well...it's a thrill beyond a thrill, really, isn't it?

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-You're loving it.

-Yeah.

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It's that, sort of, large frontage to the car

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that makes you feel very much a man, you know?

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SARAH LAUGHS

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Oh, gosh...ha!

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On this trip, Sarah and Peter will be joined

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by auctioneers extraordinaire

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Natasha Raskin and Catherine Southon,

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who are slipping along in this beautiful blue 1959 Porsche 356.

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I don't know if you knew we were getting a blue car,

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because we dressed to match.

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Yes, we match the car!

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But it's so exciting, seeing as it's blue,

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talking of blue, Blue Peter...

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-Oh, yes!

-How exciting to have Sarah Greene and Peter Duncan.

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Oh, my goodness. Sarah Greene, Peter Duncan were my heroes.

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-Really?

-I was glued to Blue Peter.

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I wanted to be, in particular, Sarah Greene.

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So Sarah was your, sort of, style icon and you wanted to be her.

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-You've got to shop with Sarah, then.

-Oh...

-It has to be that way.

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Once paired up, our teams will hit the road

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with £400 in their pockets.

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Starting in Guildford,

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they will embark on a buying bonanza around Surrey, Hertfordshire

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and northwest London before making their way

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to Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire for auction.

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You are kidding me!

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Look at this car, look how cool...

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-ENGINE ROARS

-Oh-ho-ho!

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Hello!

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Catherine Southon. Lovely to meet you.

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-Nice to see you.

-Hello.

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-Good morning, Sarah, hello.

-Hello, Natasha.

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-Nice to see you. How are you?

-I'm very well.

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Now, Catherine said to me in the car as we were driving along

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that you were her style icon when you were on Blue Peter.

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Oh, no... No pressure.

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-You're mine, Catherine.

-Oh, thank you!

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And she told me that Peter was as mad as a clown,

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so we went together really nicely.

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So I think I'm going to just shuffle over beside you, Peter,

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because apparently, we are a couple of clowns!

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-Yeah, that's good.

-Mad as a box of fish.

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-We've got clown trousers on.

-You guys have a Porsche 356!

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-I can't believe it, I'm so excited!

-Let's get in it.

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-We'll see you later.

-Have fun!

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Oh, it's quite low.

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-Seat belts, then.

-Seat belts.

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-You just turn that...?

-Yeah, but it's got buttons.

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I've never seen that before.

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-ENGINE RUMBLES

-Oh...oh!

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Peter, when I was in school,

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I was busy trying to get the boys' attention

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and they were giving me none.

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-They were too busy watching Flash...

-Oh, Flash, yeah.

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I was only on screen 28 seconds.

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-It was a very short, short cameo.

-Did you sit there with a stopwatch?

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But it lingers. No, I counted it, yeah.

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Blue Peter - I was a massive, massive Blue Peter fan.

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I only did it for three...

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I know, when you're little, three years is a long time and,

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actually, for me, it was an amazing experience.

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But what you were fantastic at was making things.

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It was the TV programme ones...

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Willo The Wisp, or something?

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-Yes. Kenneth Williams.

-Yes.

-Yes.

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And you made an Evil Edna.

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The great Kenneth Williams came into the studio

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and was on the programme with me

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and that was a big thrill, a big thrill.

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That was another thing - you met so many amazing people.

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And that is why, Sarah Greene, I wanted to be you in the '80s.

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Oh, Catherine.

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Bless!

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You're well known as an actor. You've been known as a daredevil.

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You're not afraid.

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How do you reckon you're going to handle the full-throttle activity

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of haggling with an antiques dealer?

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Well, I used to travel...

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I used to make these docs, taking my kids round the world,

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and obviously, one of the features, like this TV programme here,

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you're going and filming it, you know?

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And you'd go into the market and I found the best technique

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was to send the kids in.

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So I'd send the seven-year-old son in to do the haggling

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and, of course, that would have a wonderful effect,

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because he charmed them, absolutely.

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Obviously we can't do that today!

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Afraid not.

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This morning, Peter and Natasha have pootled five minutes

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along the road to their first shop in Compton.

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They've arrived at Old Barn Antiques,

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where they hope dealer Chloe will have something special.

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-Lady of the house.

-Hello?

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Wipe that dust off, we might buy it!

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-Hello, how do you do? I'm Peter.

-Hello.

-Nice to meet you.

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-Hello.

-Natasha.

-Nice to see you.

-How are you?

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-I'm all right, thank you.

-You're well?

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Are you excited to welcome us to your wonderful shop?

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Well, I don't know whether excited is the word, but...

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-It's different.

-What about a huge discount

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for arriving in my E-Type Jag?

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I think I'll stick to my Land Rover, if you don't mind.

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Doesn't look like charm will win you a discount here, Peter,

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although compact and bijou, the shop is jam-packed

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with the combined treasures of six dealers.

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-That is interesting, isn't it?

-Oh, no! Oh, gosh! See that?

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-Gosh!

-It's a slippery egg-holder.

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It's super-sweet.

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-"Happy birthday", it says, all over it.

-Oh, no!

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Whoops!

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I hope your haggling is better than your juggling.

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I mean, that's quite cool, what you've just picked up there.

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Horn letter opener. What an unusual handle, like a spiralling shell.

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-Peter Pannish, almost. Isn't it?

-It is really cool.

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I like that, but I've no idea that anyone would want to buy that.

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I mean, it's a bit of a punt, isn't it?

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It's not sharp, it's safe, child-friendly.

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It's a really pretty thing. I like that.

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But it's all about whether or not you like it.

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I think it could have a chance, if we got it for a tenner.

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The vendor has priced the unusual horn letter opener at £16.

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Time now for Peter to attempt his first haggle.

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Look out, Chloe.

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-What has she put on it? 16?

-16, she had put.

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And it does say..."Trade 1."

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What does that mean?

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You can only take one off. £1?

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Yes, to make it 15.

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But there's two of us, that's "trade 2", at least.

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But...see, we could make it 15, so how about 12?

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12. What about sticks 11?

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-Go on, then.

-All right, then.

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-Thank you very much.

-Glad you found something, anyway.

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That's Peter out of his shopping starter blocks,

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spending £11 on his first lot for auction.

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Good man.

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Bye!

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Meanwhile, Sarah and Catherine have headed

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to Runfold near Farnham in Surrey to begin their shopping.

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They've arrived at the Antiques Warehouse.

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We must remember, though, we're not buying for ourselves, sadly.

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I know - and will you do me a favour, Catherine?

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Would you keep reminding me of that? Because I will forget.

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-I will, I will.

-I'm not buying for me.

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-This is an Aladdin's cave, isn't it?

-There's a lot to see.

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Hello, how nice to see you. Very nice to meet you.

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-I'm Sarah.

-Lovely to meet you.

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-Catherine. Nice to meet you.

-Hi.

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Set in two Elizabethan barns,

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shopkeeper Hillary has an array of fine furniture and collectables

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belonging to around 20 dealers.

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This looks like the, sort of, kitchen area.

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-How does kitchenalia do, Catherine?

-Depends what it is.

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Just thinking about the success and popularity of shows like Bake Off

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and this, sort of, renaissance of baking.

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-Baking...

-Whether there is something, like, cake forks,

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something like that.

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Yeah, no, I think you're onto a good thing.

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If were going to go for something like cake forks,

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I think maybe not silver-plated ones.

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We need to go for something silver.

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Let's go and have a look.

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OK. Silver cake forks. Where are you?

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Right...

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Silver, silver, silver.

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I'm slightly overwhelmed. There is so much here.

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-There is so much here.

-Um...

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That's quite sweet.

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-Isn't that lovely?

-The only reason I'm looking at that

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is because it's a pocket watch.

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-And it's heart-shaped.

-It's heart-shaped.

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I have to be honest, pocket watches in general are a bit of a no-no,

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unless there's something quite special about them,

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or unless they're gold, or they're by a particular maker.

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But that's a fob watch, a ladies fob watch,

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in the form of a heart - I think it's quite sweet.

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It could be worn as a pendant, anyway, couldn't it?

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It could be worn as a pendant, yeah.

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Looks like the girls have fallen in love with a heart-shaped silver fob,

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which has a ticket price of £90.

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Anything else you fancy, girls?

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There was something quite big downstairs that I saw.

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-Oh, OK.

-And heavy.

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Sounds interesting.

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What are your feelings about using the chimney pots as big planters?

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Just like a piece of garden statuary, really?

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-Yes, yes.

-These, I love.

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I'm not talking about these. I'm talking about that.

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These are so much more standard and, kind of, almost fairly common.

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-Yes.

-But I love the shape of that one.

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-No, that's what caught my eye...

-Like it. Love it.

-..as we swept in.

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But my worry is that if I was going to get this, I'd want two.

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I'm just wondering if there's another one floating around.

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-Hillary.

-Hello.

-Hillary, Hillary, Hillary.

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We like your chimney pot. Is it on its own?

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No. I think they've been split up and I think there's another one

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buried over there somewhere.

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-Shall we go and have a look?

-Shall I come and help you?

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I think it's tucked behind this...

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-This shrub, here.

-How does it look?

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Because the key thing is, really, condition on these things.

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I think there might be a little chip out of one of them

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at the bottom somewhere.

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What I love this, down the bottom, this sort of smokiness.

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-This has really had a lot of wear.

-Yes, yes.

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It feels good, it looks good...

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I mean, this has got a good 100 years on it, hasn't it?

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-Does I'd classify as an antique, then?

-Oh, yes.

-Yes, it does.

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I can actually say that that belongs in the...?

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-Absolutely.

-OK.

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At £85 each, the combined ticket price

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for the 19th-century terracotta chimney pots would be £170.

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What is your absolute very best on these,

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if we were to buy a pair?

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Let me just think. I've got to do a little calculation.

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I could make them 120. How does that sound?

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120...for the pair?

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-For the pair.

-Mm...

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-It's a really big discount.

-It's a big discount,

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and I'd say we're getting there, Hillary - we're getting there.

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Hard-nosed negotiator Sarah isn't quite ready to seal the deal,

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as something else has caught her eye -

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a set of French Art Deco hors d'oeuvres servers.

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I'm thinking, once upon a time,

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they would have been in a really nice presentation set.

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They probably would, yes.

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You haven't got a box for them or anything?

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Or did they come like that?

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They didn't come with a box, no.

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Are they actually silver, the handles?

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Yes, French silver. They won't have the English hallmark on them, but...

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-So, these are probably silver gilt.

-It's silver gilt, yes.

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And these are silver. They are very light.

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Mind you, you wouldn't want anything heavy when you are serving

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something like this, but they are quite light.

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They're quite big and butch-looking, but I quite like them.

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I absolutely love those. I think they're good.

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How much are they?

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I think it says 75 on the ticket.

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I'd like to talk about combining.

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Can I offer you, for this and the chimney pots, 130?

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I could come down to...40 on those. That's nearly half price.

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So that adds up, 160 for the two.

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Can we take it to 150?

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Oh, dear... You do drive a hard bargain, don't you?

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Well, as I've had those for an awfully long time,

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I think I might just be prepared, this once, to do it.

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Thank you very much.

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Thank you very much. I'm on my bended knee, saying thank you!

0:14:460:14:49

These two aren't finished yet.

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They are both still keen on the silver heart-shaped fob watch.

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What can that be? What's the bottom price on that?

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-Can you remember what was...?

-I think it was on it for 90.

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I could come down to 75.

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I think that's still too steep for us.

0:15:040:15:07

I think... To be perfectly honest, I think the only way

0:15:070:15:09

we'd be interested in it if it's more, sort of, 40.

0:15:090:15:12

£50. If it can be around that, then possibly...

0:15:120:15:15

It's got to be 60.

0:15:150:15:16

I'd hoped you'd say 55, but do you know what?

0:15:160:15:21

Hillary, you've been so helpful, let's say 60.

0:15:210:15:25

So that brings us to a total of...

0:15:250:15:29

-We were at 150, so...

-210.

0:15:290:15:33

Correct, Catherine.

0:15:330:15:34

The newly acquired fob watch

0:15:360:15:38

is added to the 19th-century chimney pots they bought for £120

0:15:380:15:40

and the Art Deco hors d'oeuvre servers that they got for £30 - wow.

0:15:400:15:46

Back with Peter and Natasha,

0:15:520:15:54

and they've made their way to Woking.

0:15:540:15:55

During Peter's days presenting on Blue Peter,

0:15:550:15:59

he was well-known as a daredevil and a sportsman,

0:15:590:16:03

so Natasha is taking him on a trip that he is sure to enjoy

0:16:030:16:07

at the Hockey Museum.

0:16:070:16:08

They are meeting curator Mike Smith to find out more about the history

0:16:100:16:14

of one of the world's most popular sports.

0:16:140:16:18

Yes, so, the obvious question we want to know

0:16:180:16:20

is how did it all begin?

0:16:200:16:22

No definitive answer to that.

0:16:220:16:23

We know that a stick-and-ball game

0:16:230:16:25

was being played by the Egyptians 2,000 BC,

0:16:250:16:28

so that's 4,000 years ago.

0:16:280:16:30

-No!

-And all manner of communities, civilisations

0:16:300:16:35

played what would be a stick-and-ball game.

0:16:350:16:37

It started to evolve in the 18th century.

0:16:370:16:40

They were playing a primitive form of hockey in schools

0:16:400:16:44

and different schools formulated their own rules.

0:16:440:16:47

The game's popularity grew through the 18th and 19th centuries

0:16:490:16:53

and by the 1800s, an official Hockey Association was formed.

0:16:530:16:57

So the hockey that we play now, by the rules now,

0:17:000:17:03

how did that spread round the world?

0:17:030:17:05

I think the catalyst for that

0:17:050:17:06

was hockey getting into the Olympics in 1908.

0:17:060:17:09

Is it as popular now? Is it gaining popularity worldwide?

0:17:090:17:13

I know the Indians and Pakistanis play it, don't they?

0:17:130:17:15

The Indians and Pakistanis do play,

0:17:150:17:18

but that's thanks to the British Army

0:17:180:17:19

that took the game out there

0:17:190:17:21

in the latter part of the 19th century,

0:17:210:17:24

the early 20th century.

0:17:240:17:25

And the officers had probably played hockey at school and at university,

0:17:250:17:30

so they took it with them and got the men playing hockey.

0:17:300:17:33

So hockey became a very strong sport within the services.

0:17:330:17:36

Once considered too dangerous a sport for females,

0:17:360:17:40

it wasn't until the 1880s that woman's hockey was introduced

0:17:400:17:43

in British schools - scary.

0:17:430:17:46

I sort of remember, as a kid, that actually,

0:17:480:17:51

girls played hockey more than boys.

0:17:510:17:52

Very much so, yes.

0:17:520:17:54

At the back end of the 19th century,

0:17:540:17:55

the ladies had to fight very hard to be able to play it,

0:17:550:17:58

as it was their fathers and brothers that were playing the game.

0:17:580:18:01

Almost a sort of suffragette-type of movement -

0:18:010:18:04

they had to form their own clubs

0:18:040:18:06

and they didn't get a lot of help from the blokes,

0:18:060:18:08

because it wasn't seen to be ladylike to play sport.

0:18:080:18:12

-People were so sexist in those days.

-Very much so.

-Absolutely.

0:18:120:18:15

But good on them for persisting.

0:18:150:18:17

Now, my real connection to it is that I...

0:18:170:18:19

In the '80s, I made a Blue Peter film,

0:18:190:18:21

and I was dressed up as the goalie.

0:18:210:18:23

Well, let's take a look at you in action, then, Peter...

0:18:230:18:25

Stick your arms in...

0:18:250:18:26

..up against the British Olympic hockey team.

0:18:260:18:30

Poor Peter took a bit of a battering.

0:18:300:18:33

PETER YELLS

0:18:340:18:35

Ow!

0:18:370:18:38

'I was just a dummy, standing in goal.

0:18:380:18:41

'And they, you know,'

0:18:410:18:42

they were whacking these balls at me as hard as they could

0:18:420:18:45

and when they hit you, you know, you were doing all this.

0:18:450:18:48

You wouldn't want to do that sort of thing,

0:18:480:18:49

cos it's dangerous, really.

0:18:490:18:51

Now, that sounds like a challenge if ever I heard one.

0:18:510:18:54

And with Natasha being a hardy Scot, well, she's up for it.

0:18:560:19:01

Scary!

0:19:010:19:03

-Peter.

-Aye...

-Your time has come.

-Aye, I know.

0:19:030:19:08

-I'm in goals this time.

-Yeah.

0:19:080:19:10

-You ready for a bit of competition?

-I have my balls.

0:19:100:19:13

You've got just two, there. I'm going to give you five.

0:19:130:19:15

-Five? OK.

-Five shots at goal.

0:19:150:19:18

-Best of five...

-Best of five.

-..wins.

0:19:180:19:21

OK. So, if I get three, I win. If you get three...

0:19:210:19:25

If I lose two... If... Yeah.

0:19:250:19:28

Enough about the rules. Shall we just play?

0:19:280:19:30

Better than doing the maths.

0:19:300:19:32

Anyway, it's perfect hockey weather here in Woking.

0:19:340:19:38

Peter is stepping up to the first ball. Can he score?

0:19:380:19:41

LAUGHTER

0:19:410:19:42

That'll be a "no", then.

0:19:420:19:44

-Does that one count?

-I'm afraid it does, old chap.

0:19:440:19:46

Oh...!

0:19:460:19:48

Right, can he hit ball two properly?

0:19:480:19:52

OK, better, but way off the mark. That's 2-0 to Natasha.

0:19:550:19:58

He shoots - he scores!

0:20:000:20:01

Oh, nice!

0:20:010:20:03

SHE LAUGHS

0:20:030:20:04

-Oh...!

-Back of the net!

0:20:050:20:08

It all comes down to the final ball. Go on, give it some welly!

0:20:080:20:12

Yeah!

0:20:140:20:15

What a save!

0:20:150:20:17

Sorry, Duncan.

0:20:170:20:19

This time, goalie wins.

0:20:190:20:21

Don't worry, you're still my team-mate.

0:20:210:20:25

High five, hockey stick.

0:20:250:20:27

-Ow!

-SHE LAUGHS

0:20:270:20:29

Back with Sarah and Catherine,

0:20:340:20:36

it's more shopping that's on the agenda,

0:20:360:20:38

so they've motored along to Ripley in Surrey.

0:20:380:20:42

Originally a 17th-century coaching inn,

0:20:420:20:44

J Hartley Antiques is packed with everything from period furniture

0:20:440:20:47

to quirky collectables.

0:20:470:20:50

Look at that!

0:20:500:20:52

Oh, there's all sorts in here, Catherine.

0:20:520:20:54

I have to tell you...

0:20:540:20:56

..probably the most unusual thing in here has caught my eye.

0:20:580:21:01

-I actually love this.

-I love it.

0:21:010:21:04

I love this ladder. Are we allowed a ladder?

0:21:040:21:07

We can have whatever you want.

0:21:070:21:08

I can imagine that in somewhere that is extremely modern and stark.

0:21:080:21:12

-Mm-hm.

-Interior or exterior, in any garden.

0:21:120:21:16

-It's kind of a bit shabby chic, isn't it?

-It is, and it's been...

0:21:160:21:19

But it's been done quite well, I think.

0:21:190:21:21

-I wonder where it comes from?

-I don't know.

-Shall we ask?

0:21:210:21:23

Better call dealer John over.

0:21:230:21:25

John? Hello?

0:21:250:21:27

We quite like your ladder.

0:21:270:21:28

That actually belongs to Deirdre.

0:21:280:21:31

Right. Who's Deirdre?

0:21:310:21:32

The lady who has this room.

0:21:320:21:34

Has it actually got a price on it, Sarah?

0:21:340:21:36

She may have it hidden under the fabric.

0:21:360:21:38

Let's have a look. I can't see it under there, no.

0:21:380:21:43

-Has she actually got a ticket on it? Do we know?

-It's free!

0:21:430:21:46

You wish!

0:21:460:21:47

John is off to ask Deirdre for a price. Deirdre?

0:21:470:21:51

Why do you love that so much?

0:21:510:21:53

It's about where I can see it being placed.

0:21:530:21:56

The possibilities are endless for interior design, aren't they?

0:21:560:22:00

I mean, you wouldn't use this as a ladder.

0:22:000:22:02

It looks very rickety and I wouldn't...

0:22:020:22:04

That's the one thing I wouldn't use it for, quite right!

0:22:040:22:07

John is back. What's the news?

0:22:070:22:10

Deirdre says it's £80 and a French orchard apple ladder.

0:22:100:22:15

Apple orchard - I'm kind of loving it more, now.

0:22:150:22:18

Really? So if it came from an abattoir in Swindon,

0:22:180:22:21

you'd not have wanted it?

0:22:210:22:22

-LAUGHING:

-I wouldn't have liked it then!

0:22:220:22:24

-OK. Shall we have a look around and have a mull about that?

-Yes.

0:22:240:22:28

Doesn't take Sarah long to spy another unusual item.

0:22:320:22:36

Look at those!

0:22:360:22:37

They've got a bit of age to them, but aren't they...?

0:22:390:22:42

Again, a little bit like our ladder thing downstairs,

0:22:420:22:45

just up on a wall somewhere.

0:22:450:22:48

I mean, just to be funny, because they are quite funny.

0:22:480:22:50

-They're quite comical.

-I don't want the poles.

0:22:500:22:52

-I don't care about the poles.

-No, no, me neither.

0:22:520:22:54

-I just want the skis.

-Yeah.

0:22:540:22:56

£55 that's on them. Actually, they look in pretty...

0:22:560:22:59

They're rusty and they've been here ages, but...

0:22:590:23:02

Oh, look, oh, look. This is all coming off, here.

0:23:020:23:05

But we are not buying them to use, are we?

0:23:050:23:07

I'm just thinking about the negotiation, that's all.

0:23:070:23:10

-I think if we got those for 25...

-Yeah.

0:23:100:23:14

-..I think I might go for the ladder.

-Do you?

0:23:140:23:17

Crafty. Best talk to John. John?

0:23:170:23:21

-Your skis.

-They were my father's.

-Oh!

0:23:220:23:27

And he skied on those and I learned to ski on those,

0:23:270:23:30

so because they are sentimental,

0:23:300:23:31

I don't really want to slash them out.

0:23:310:23:33

Well, we have a proposition.

0:23:330:23:35

Of course, when we thought about this figure,

0:23:350:23:38

we had no idea about your back story to this.

0:23:380:23:41

25.

0:23:410:23:42

Without the poles. We don't need the poles.

0:23:450:23:47

Oh, boy...

0:23:470:23:49

Um... I should have been sitting down.

0:23:490:23:51

Knowing Dad, he would have knocked them out for about £40.

0:23:510:23:55

Can we meet somewhere? Can we meet in the middle?

0:23:550:23:57

35?

0:23:570:23:59

Yeah... Yeah, absolutely.

0:23:590:24:03

-Right.

-Absolutely.

-Deal done.

0:24:030:24:06

A generous price gets the girls the vintage 1950s skis for £35.

0:24:060:24:11

Sarah is still after the French apple orchard ladder,

0:24:140:24:17

so she's asked John to see if Deirdre would accept £50.

0:24:170:24:20

I'm afraid the absolute death on that is £58.

0:24:200:24:25

58. OK.

0:24:250:24:27

Come on, Catherine. You're going to have to...

0:24:270:24:31

Oh, please don't make me make that decision!

0:24:310:24:34

Let's make a decision... Let's make it together.

0:24:340:24:37

Do we want it?

0:24:370:24:38

Well, do you?

0:24:410:24:43

-I say yes.

-Yes!

-Yes.

0:24:430:24:45

LAUGHTER

0:24:450:24:47

Oh, no, what have we done?!

0:24:470:24:48

We are buying a ladder for £58. Are we going to do it?

0:24:480:24:52

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:24:520:24:54

They got there eventually.

0:24:540:24:56

So, they've bought the French orchard ladder for £50

0:24:570:25:00

and the vintage skis for 35.

0:25:000:25:03

I really thought we were going to buy jewellery today.

0:25:030:25:06

-I had it in my mind.

-I know.

-We were going to buy gems.

0:25:060:25:08

-Goodbye, thank you.

-We couldn't have gone further away.

0:25:100:25:13

I'll say!

0:25:130:25:14

And after that peculiar spot of shopping,

0:25:140:25:16

both teams' first day is done.

0:25:160:25:18

So, nighty-night, sleep well.

0:25:180:25:21

It's the next morning and Sarah and Peter are together again. Aw!

0:25:250:25:30

Quite a tight road, this. We might get stuck in a tree.

0:25:300:25:33

Yeah, you are very, very...very skilled

0:25:330:25:37

at navigating these nadgery lanes.

0:25:370:25:40

Nadgery is an official word meaning very narrow and winding.

0:25:400:25:43

Catherine and Natasha are also back on the road,

0:25:430:25:47

making their way to Shendish in Hertfordshire,

0:25:470:25:49

to meet their celebrity partners.

0:25:490:25:51

Yesterday was wild.

0:25:510:25:53

I think we went across every single genre possible and we bought...

0:25:530:25:59

We bought the craziest things you can imagine.

0:25:590:26:01

Give me a clue. What kind of genre?

0:26:010:26:03

CATHERINE LAUGHS

0:26:030:26:06

-Sporting...

-OK.

0:26:060:26:09

Um...and then...

0:26:090:26:11

-We did go a bit traditional.

-OK.

0:26:110:26:13

And then we went... We went a bit wild, too.

0:26:130:26:16

This could mean anything, Catherine. These are not clues.

0:26:160:26:19

Peter and Natasha have only bought one item so far -

0:26:190:26:23

the unusual horn letter opener -

0:26:230:26:25

which means they are still loaded, with £389 to spend today,

0:26:250:26:31

while the girls have had a much more successful shopping spree,

0:26:310:26:34

buying an impressive five lots -

0:26:340:26:37

the vintage 1950s skis, the French apple orchard ladder,

0:26:370:26:42

the rare silver heart-shaped fob watch,

0:26:420:26:45

the pair of 19th-century terracotta chimney pots

0:26:450:26:49

and the French Art Deco hors d'oeuvre servers -

0:26:490:26:52

leaving them with just £97 to play with.

0:26:520:26:55

How many of your things have you got?

0:26:580:27:00

Shall I tell you how many I've got? Am I allowed to tell you?

0:27:000:27:03

I've got five things.

0:27:030:27:04

See, I don't hang about, me, Peter. I don't hang about.

0:27:040:27:07

But the other thing is we have got some money left over...

0:27:070:27:10

-Can I have the money that's left over, then?

-No.

0:27:100:27:13

Harsh! But you've got plenty of your own cash, Peter.

0:27:130:27:17

-Stop!

-Good morning!

-Hello!

0:27:170:27:20

Guten morgen.

0:27:200:27:21

Good morning, sweetheart. Are you all right?

0:27:210:27:23

Yeah, absolutely. Raring to go.

0:27:230:27:25

I have arranged this for us, as well.

0:27:250:27:27

Thank you, yes.

0:27:270:27:28

-Are you happy about that?

-Good morning.

-Hello.

0:27:280:27:31

Well, wish us luck, ladies, because we need it more than you do.

0:27:310:27:34

-Be positive, be positive.

-Positive thinking.

0:27:340:27:36

You start out so sweet and nice,

0:27:360:27:37

but there is this undercurrent of competition that surfaces...

0:27:370:27:41

Moi? Never!

0:27:410:27:42

No, Peter is really the competitive one, not me.

0:27:420:27:45

This morning, our two teams will recommence their road trip

0:27:470:27:50

in the historic town of Berkhamsted in Hertfordshire.

0:27:500:27:53

-Now, what about shopping today?

-We have a job on, here.

0:27:530:27:56

I mean, clearly, the opposition have streaked ahead of us.

0:27:560:28:00

They are getting worried. I think they are getting worried.

0:28:000:28:03

I think Natasha is getting slightly worried.

0:28:030:28:05

They've only bought one item.

0:28:050:28:06

-NATASHA:

-We need to be calm and cool and focused.

0:28:060:28:10

You need to make me happy, Natasha.

0:28:100:28:12

I'll try! And we need to spend some money.

0:28:120:28:14

-11 quid.

-How much have we spent? 11 quid?

-Of 400.

0:28:140:28:18

They've got lots of things to buy today.

0:28:180:28:20

Better get on with it, then.

0:28:200:28:22

Both teams have arrived in Berkhamsted,

0:28:220:28:24

where they will begin their day at Heritage Antiques.

0:28:240:28:29

-Look, they're coming.

-Get a game plan.

0:28:290:28:31

Look at that, sort of, striding walk, there.

0:28:310:28:34

You know what you need? You need a hat.

0:28:340:28:36

We just walked so casually, the sass coming off of you two!

0:28:360:28:39

You've got five, I've got one. I'm going in.

0:28:390:28:42

-Are you? Are you? Are you?

-Oh, sorry.

-Are you sure?

0:28:420:28:44

I found a Blue Peter book that you're in.

0:28:440:28:46

-You look much younger.

-We're not like that.

0:28:460:28:49

- After you, after you. - I know. Thank you, Catherine.

0:28:490:28:51

Sorry, we don't care about you.

0:28:510:28:53

Now, now, Peter.

0:28:530:28:55

Crammed with antiques from 31 dealers,

0:28:560:29:00

there is plenty to go around and, straight away,

0:29:000:29:03

Peter has clocked something he likes.

0:29:030:29:05

Just saw it as I came in,

0:29:050:29:06

because I bought one of these in, um...France.

0:29:060:29:09

What have you got? Oh, the burner!

0:29:090:29:10

Yeah, yeah, look.

0:29:100:29:12

See, what you do is, it is a wood burner,

0:29:120:29:14

but this is Art Deco, it says.

0:29:140:29:16

-You put all your wood in there.

-That's right.

0:29:160:29:18

I've got one exactly... Only a French version of this.

0:29:180:29:20

-I think it's beautiful.

-You think it's beautiful?

-125.

0:29:200:29:23

Do you know what I have to tell you? I really like that.

0:29:230:29:25

-Do you? Really?

-I think it's supercool.

0:29:250:29:27

No, I have recently become quite obsessed with wood burners.

0:29:270:29:30

Obviously, the very modern style. But these ceramic pieces...

0:29:300:29:34

They evoke a nice era, don't they?

0:29:340:29:36

-That must be, what, '30s?

-Yeah, well, I believe so.

0:29:360:29:39

Ha-ha! With a ticket price of £125, it is down to Peter to do the deal,

0:29:390:29:45

so Pauline has got the owner on the phone.

0:29:450:29:48

Well done, Pauline.

0:29:480:29:49

Peter, I've got Tony on the phone for you.

0:29:490:29:51

-Oh, cool, cool.

-OK? Thank you.

0:29:510:29:52

Hi, Tony. I've just seen your beautiful Art Deco log burner.

0:29:520:29:56

-What price could I have it for?

-(£60!)

0:29:560:29:59

100, so that's only 25 off. Can we... What about 85?

0:29:590:30:03

-'Can't do.'

-Can't do 85. Somewhere in between?

0:30:030:30:06

'Sorry, has to be 95.'

0:30:060:30:09

95. 95. 95. Going once, going twice...

0:30:090:30:13

Tony, it's done. 95.

0:30:130:30:15

Blimey. Natasha's in shock.

0:30:150:30:17

Peter has gone and bought the early 20th-century wood-burner for £95.

0:30:170:30:22

Now, where are the girls?

0:30:240:30:26

I'm glad they've got so much outside we can look at today.

0:30:260:30:29

Oh, this is lovely. This is perfect.

0:30:290:30:31

This is just for us today and I feel very relaxed.

0:30:310:30:34

I feel like we should just pull up a chair and sit all day.

0:30:340:30:38

-SARAH CHUCKLES

-And just laugh at them.

0:30:380:30:40

While the girls are busy being smug,

0:30:420:30:44

Peter's got his shopping head firmly on.

0:30:440:30:46

Right, what have you got in there?

0:30:460:30:48

I didn't even know all this stuff was outside?

0:30:480:30:50

-I know. I know. Look at this now.

-Look what you've got!

0:30:500:30:52

So, I have been to Africa quite a lot and when I was there, I bought

0:30:520:30:56

a fantastic thing that was very similar to this,

0:30:560:30:59

sort of, East African.

0:30:590:31:01

And they're kind of all something to do with fertility

0:31:010:31:03

and obviously praying to gods.

0:31:030:31:05

But they're beautiful, aren't they?

0:31:050:31:06

-They're really nice.

-Feel the weight of them.

0:31:060:31:08

-Feel the weight.

-OK. Give me one.

0:31:080:31:09

Oh, I tell you what, they are weighty. Beautiful wood.

0:31:090:31:13

I have to confess, I don't know the wood, but it's very beautiful.

0:31:130:31:15

-Do you know the price?

-No. There's no price on them.

0:31:150:31:18

Better get Pauline and her trusty phone back to call Stewart,

0:31:180:31:21

the owner of the ticketless fertility figures.

0:31:210:31:25

I've got Peter from Blue Peter here.

0:31:250:31:27

He would like to talk to you about

0:31:270:31:30

your pair of carved bodies. OK?

0:31:300:31:34

Hello, mate. I wondered really what price you could do them for.

0:31:340:31:38

'About £30.'

0:31:380:31:39

-For both?

-'Yeah, for both.'

0:31:390:31:42

Yeah, £30 for both. What about 25?

0:31:420:31:44

He's getting the hang of this.

0:31:460:31:48

OK. All right. £30. 15 each.

0:31:480:31:52

Do you know, I'm enjoying myself so much today,

0:31:520:31:54

I'm not in the mood for haggling any more? 30 quid, it's a deal.

0:31:540:31:57

And just like that, Peter's bought another lot for auction.

0:31:570:32:00

Catherine, when you come to places like this where you've got

0:32:020:32:05

this great, big, old mixture of stuff,

0:32:050:32:07

do you ever find any proper sort of historical treasures?

0:32:070:32:11

Oh, yes. Yes. We've just got to look. Got to look high and low.

0:32:110:32:15

Looking everywhere. On the floor, under things.

0:32:150:32:18

Yes. And I'm also looking at hats.

0:32:180:32:19

That hat doesn't look very historic to me, Sarah.

0:32:190:32:23

-I don't know. What do you think?

-It's tiny.

-Um, it is a bit small.

0:32:230:32:27

-It's not really...

-Let's have a look.

0:32:270:32:30

-I don't think that is right at all.

-Oh, no. That's too high for you.

0:32:300:32:34

-It's a bit too high, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:32:340:32:36

While the girls are playing dressing up, Peter's playing puppets.

0:32:360:32:41

Hello, everybody! And it says on it, look, look, it says,

0:32:410:32:44

"Vintage Pinocchio."

0:32:440:32:46

So, it's a vintage, which is, uh... And it's beautiful.

0:32:460:32:49

-It's 33 quid, you could get that down a bit.

-OK.

0:32:490:32:51

But if it's really old... Is it old?

0:32:510:32:53

It's not that old. I would say it's probably about 1970s.

0:32:530:32:55

Now, what I'm worried about - not worried at all -

0:32:550:32:58

-is these two letters, AF...

-What does that mean?

-..means "as found".

0:32:580:33:01

So, there must be some sort of damage on it somewhere.

0:33:010:33:03

-Well, it's the...

-Is it just the strings?

-It's the strings.

0:33:030:33:05

-Is that the only bit of damage you can see?

-Yes. And I can fix that

0:33:050:33:08

-cos I'm in theatre.

-I think I quite like him.

0:33:080:33:09

Shall we go and speak to Pauline about him?

0:33:090:33:11

-Shall we take him with us?

-Or in fact, before we do that,

0:33:110:33:13

-shall I show you what I've come up with?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:33:130:33:15

-OK. Come with me, you two.

-I'll take my little man with me.

0:33:150:33:18

So...

0:33:180:33:19

Behold.

0:33:200:33:21

-He doesn't look very impressed.

-I know.

0:33:210:33:23

-You wanted something in a pair.

-Yeah, I like pair things.

0:33:230:33:25

-A pair of brass...

-Goblets.

-..oriental vases.

-Oriental? Ooh.

0:33:250:33:31

They're quite exciting. They're trumpet-shaped.

0:33:310:33:33

But how nicely turned this trumpet shape is.

0:33:330:33:37

-And such a good price.

-Such a good price.

0:33:370:33:38

-Now, believe it or not...

-Are you a double act?

0:33:380:33:41

..these belong to Pauline.

0:33:410:33:42

-Now, they're not going to change anyone's life.

-No, no, no.

0:33:420:33:45

-But have you seen the ticket price?

-10 quid, yeah.

-(10 quid.)

0:33:450:33:47

I'm not even going to bargain with you on that. Done.

0:33:470:33:50

Oh, thank you very much.

0:33:500:33:51

-Well, I wasn't going to suggest that.

-You can come again.

0:33:510:33:54

I was going to say, "Let's get them at half price."

0:33:540:33:56

-But, do you know what, Peter, you're an honest man.

-Fiver each, then.

0:33:560:33:59

Let me show you this other thing.

0:33:590:34:00

I found another pair, leaded windows.

0:34:000:34:03

So, this here is named Transvaal, which was a colony of South Africa,

0:34:030:34:07

-that was founded in 1910.

-Yeah, yeah, I know, I know.

0:34:070:34:09

Then, to go with it, we also have Cape Colony,

0:34:090:34:12

-so, another South African area...

-Wow!

0:34:120:34:16

..around the Cape of Good Hope.

0:34:160:34:17

So, they're not stained glass,

0:34:170:34:19

they're painted glass with leaded panels.

0:34:190:34:21

But it's certainly an attractive pair

0:34:210:34:23

and what I think is interesting

0:34:230:34:25

is that these probably came from a whole set.

0:34:250:34:28

These are not the only two colonies in South Africa,

0:34:280:34:30

so I would imagine that they've came from

0:34:300:34:32

a grand home which had every single colony painted and their crest.

0:34:320:34:36

-Nice sturdy oak frames.

-Yeah.

-Good weight.

-And we've got a lot of money

0:34:360:34:39

-to spend, but not as much as on the ticket.

-Don't tell Pauline that.

0:34:390:34:42

With the ticket price of £118 for the pair,

0:34:420:34:45

Peter is taking the helm again and calling the vendor. Standby.

0:34:450:34:50

Hello, hello. Listen, I love your windows.

0:34:500:34:54

I'm just wondering what price I could have them for.

0:34:540:34:57

-'I would go to 100 on them.'

-100.

0:34:570:34:59

-'But I paid more than 80 myself.'

-Did you pay more than 80? Oh, I see.

0:34:590:35:02

There's a couple of other things we're going to look at.

0:35:020:35:05

Nice to talk to you. Thanks very much. All right, bye-bye.

0:35:050:35:08

-OK. So, what was the best price, £100?

-Well, 100, really,

0:35:080:35:11

because she paid 90 for them and she's got to make a profit.

0:35:110:35:14

While Peter's considering another purchase,

0:35:140:35:17

the girls are back out in the sun.

0:35:170:35:19

-Flaky chairs.

-Bistro chairs.

-They're a little bit like the ladder,

0:35:220:35:25

-aren't they?

-There's a couple.

0:35:250:35:26

-They are. They've got that same look, but shall I test?

-Yes.

0:35:260:35:29

Have a test and see what you think.

0:35:290:35:31

-Would you sit on and lean back on that in comfort, really?

-No.

-No?

0:35:310:35:35

I feel very lopsided.

0:35:350:35:37

In that case, I think you've made the decision for us.

0:35:370:35:39

And I'm going to get flaky paint all over the car.

0:35:390:35:43

Having already secured five lots

0:35:430:35:45

and nothing here tickling their antique taste buds,

0:35:450:35:48

the girls are heading off.

0:35:480:35:49

Peter, on the other hand, still has some haggling to do.

0:35:510:35:54

I do want to buy Pinocchio because I think that's...

0:35:540:35:58

I think it's beautiful and it's funny and I think maybe

0:35:580:36:02

people would buy it for a child or somewhere to sit. What can we...

0:36:020:36:07

-What's the price?

-We've got 33 on it.

-Yeah.

0:36:070:36:11

-I think 25.

-25.

-How's that?

-Twice my age. Yeah, done.

-Done.

0:36:110:36:15

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

0:36:150:36:17

So, 25 on the puppet, 10 on the trumpet vases,

0:36:170:36:20

-30 on the things.

-Yeah.

-95 on the wood burner.

-Yeah.

0:36:200:36:24

Wait a minute, already we're at four, five items.

0:36:240:36:27

-So, what do you think about these windows.

-I like the windows.

0:36:270:36:30

To be honest, I love both your items, but I like the windows

0:36:300:36:33

-more than the £10 vases.

-You've dealt on the vases, Peter.

0:36:330:36:35

Oh, I've dealt on the vases. I've got to have the vases.

0:36:350:36:38

I'm sorry to tell you, you've got to have the vases.

0:36:380:36:40

-You want to go for these windows?

-Yes.

-You're sold on those at £100?

0:36:400:36:42

-Yeah, yeah.

-Do the deal.

0:36:420:36:44

-£100. £100?

-Yeah, yeah.

-Well done. How much are we up to now?

0:36:440:36:48

I'm not sure what I did there but, anyway, it feels good...

0:36:480:36:51

He's a buying machine, spending a whopping £260.

0:36:510:36:56

260. 20, 40, 60, 80, 100,

0:36:570:37:00

20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 20, 40, 60!

0:37:000:37:03

He's throwing it at you, Pauline. For God's sake.

0:37:030:37:06

-Could you check that, please?

-Oh, come on.

-She runs a tight ship.

0:37:060:37:10

I used to be a bank teller, I know what I'm doing.

0:37:100:37:12

-Look, I've got the thumb.

-Are you sure?

-You're short.

0:37:120:37:15

-You're short £20!

-It usually works.

0:37:150:37:17

There you are, you see.

0:37:170:37:19

You could lose your Blue Peter badge for that.

0:37:190:37:22

Having bought all their lots for auction,

0:37:260:37:28

Sarah and Catherine are taking

0:37:280:37:29

the afternoon off and have journeyed

0:37:290:37:31

15 miles down the road

0:37:310:37:33

to Stanmore in North West London.

0:37:330:37:35

Sarah has a passion for aviation after setting up her own

0:37:370:37:41

aerial filming business with her late husband Mike Smith,

0:37:410:37:45

so Catherine has brought her to Bentley Priory, which played

0:37:450:37:48

a pivotal role during the Battle of Britain

0:37:480:37:50

as Fighter Command HQ.

0:37:500:37:53

This was when one of Britain's darkest moments also became

0:37:560:38:00

her finest hour thanks to a man called Sir Hugh Dowding

0:38:000:38:04

and the innovative air defence system he created.

0:38:040:38:07

It is sensational.

0:38:090:38:11

The girls are meeting Bentley Priory trustee Natasha Brown

0:38:110:38:16

to find out more.

0:38:160:38:17

This was Fighter Command in 1936.

0:38:170:38:20

The RAF had it from 1926, when it stopped being a school.

0:38:200:38:24

And as notoriously happened during World War II,

0:38:240:38:27

a lot of mansions were taking over by the army, the RAF

0:38:270:38:31

to be prisoner of war camps or intelligence centres

0:38:310:38:34

and this was Fighter Command.

0:38:340:38:36

Why was this Fighter Command?

0:38:360:38:37

Strategically, it's placed right in front of the London Basin,

0:38:370:38:41

so you can see London.

0:38:410:38:43

-You can see the views from here.

-Exactly.

-Spectacular.

-Stunning.

0:38:430:38:45

-And this man...

-I was going to say, he's looking out over us now.

0:38:450:38:49

Sir Hugh Dowding, yeah, was actually in charge at the time,

0:38:490:38:52

from 1936 to 1940.

0:38:520:38:55

And he is pivotal in the whole of the Battle of Britain

0:38:550:38:59

and us winning the war.

0:38:590:39:03

Fought in the skies, the Battle of Britain took place

0:39:030:39:06

during World War II between July and October 1940.

0:39:060:39:11

A crucial victory for this country,

0:39:110:39:13

it made Hitler's invasion plans all but impossible.

0:39:130:39:17

Heavily outnumbered by the Luftwaffe,

0:39:190:39:21

which was the largest air force in the world at the time,

0:39:210:39:25

Britain's success is largely credited to Sir Dowding

0:39:250:39:28

and his air defence system.

0:39:280:39:30

So, this was the nerve centre.

0:39:320:39:34

This is like going backstage in the theatre.

0:39:340:39:36

I know, it's amazing, isn't it?

0:39:360:39:38

It's like the back of a set, all the bits of scaffold and wood.

0:39:380:39:41

Well, this is actually a complete recreation

0:39:410:39:44

of what was actually here.

0:39:440:39:45

So, we went into the archives of the RAF to find out

0:39:450:39:48

and there were plans of what he did.

0:39:480:39:50

Dowding's system brought together technology, ground defences

0:39:500:39:54

and fighter aircraft into a unified system of defence.

0:39:540:39:58

Radar gave early warning of Luftwaffe raids, which were also

0:40:000:40:05

tracked by the Observer Corps.

0:40:050:40:06

Information on the incoming aircraft was first filtered

0:40:070:40:11

at Bentley Priory, then passed on to various group HQs

0:40:110:40:15

and sector stations who would scramble fighters into action.

0:40:150:40:19

-So, the map that we have in here...

-Yes?

-Mm-hm.

0:40:210:40:24

..is from the Scottish coast all the way down and across the south coast.

0:40:240:40:28

So, this is looking out to sea, really.

0:40:280:40:30

This is what's approaching us.

0:40:300:40:32

So, what the radar were great at was distance and what this

0:40:320:40:35

information brought in was the number of people and

0:40:350:40:38

so that was the strength and then also the height at which they

0:40:380:40:41

were coming in because that was critical for us.

0:40:410:40:44

Where we had such a fewer number of planes to fight these guys,

0:40:440:40:48

we had to make sure that what we did,

0:40:480:40:50

we did precisely and it wasn't just where they were located,

0:40:500:40:53

but the height at which, so that we knew how high we needed

0:40:530:40:57

to come down in order to get them.

0:40:570:40:58

And what's the speed involved here,

0:40:580:41:00

in terms of them getting the information

0:41:000:41:02

and then getting our aircraft to go and intercept the enemy?

0:41:020:41:05

It was a really quick turnaround,

0:41:050:41:06

so, we're looking at something about four minutes

0:41:060:41:08

on a quick turnaround basis.

0:41:080:41:09

So, every 30 seconds, you'd get new information coming through

0:41:090:41:12

so you could follow the path of everything coming through.

0:41:120:41:15

Once they knew that it was really an enemy aircraft approach,

0:41:150:41:17

that's when the information went through

0:41:170:41:20

from the teller up at the top

0:41:200:41:21

through to the special operations room.

0:41:210:41:23

As well as processing huge amounts of information quickly

0:41:260:41:29

and managing the position of the fighter aircraft,

0:41:290:41:32

the operations room also directed other elements

0:41:320:41:36

of the defence network, including anti-aircraft guns,

0:41:360:41:40

searchlights and barrage balloons.

0:41:400:41:43

So, this was the operations room.

0:41:440:41:47

This filled the space at two levels,

0:41:470:41:49

with balconies and a big map in the middle,

0:41:490:41:52

and you can see that in this model.

0:41:520:41:54

This model, again, is taken from the archives.

0:41:540:41:56

So, we took all of the information and this is placed from

0:41:560:41:59

photographs in the archive drawings to show with the map in the middle.

0:41:590:42:03

But this time, the map is centred on the country and not on the sea.

0:42:030:42:07

So, this is Observer Corps information also being

0:42:070:42:09

filtered through into here, so that they can really plot and plan

0:42:090:42:13

where the planes are going.

0:42:130:42:14

This is the Dowding system.

0:42:140:42:16

This is the culmination of working with the radar,

0:42:160:42:20

working with Observer Corps,

0:42:200:42:21

working with all of these new technologies

0:42:210:42:24

and this new information to actually make sure

0:42:240:42:26

that we didn't over-use them, but we used them strategically

0:42:260:42:30

and that we lost as few as possible

0:42:300:42:32

because we had this brilliant information.

0:42:320:42:35

After the Battle of Britain,

0:42:350:42:37

Hitler realised he couldn't win in the skies and that was a big win.

0:42:370:42:42

He then couldn't invade us in the way that he had wanted to.

0:42:420:42:46

-We have so much to be thankful for, don't we?

-Mm. Absolutely.

0:42:460:42:49

It's an amazing story that people need to remember.

0:42:490:42:52

Peter and Natasha have also made their way to North West London.

0:42:580:43:02

They've come to Pinner for their final spot of shopping

0:43:020:43:05

at A&C Antiques And Collectables.

0:43:050:43:08

-Last chance to spend some money.

-Yeah.

0:43:080:43:11

-Hello.

-Hello.

0:43:120:43:14

Hi, I'm Tasha.

0:43:140:43:15

Oh, hello there, I'm Cris.

0:43:150:43:17

-Cris, this is Peter.

-Hi, Cris. Peter. Are you all right?

0:43:170:43:19

Ooh, is that for sale?

0:43:190:43:20

Huh. Lordy.

0:43:220:43:23

Peter's keen to spend all of their remaining £129 and has spotted

0:43:250:43:29

something outside that could fit the bill - a pair of birdbaths.

0:43:290:43:33

I love these. They're definitely old, aren't they, really?

0:43:330:43:36

Well, certainly the rust gives a little bit of an idea of age.

0:43:360:43:40

But, yes, these are typical, Victorian, I guess, cast iron.

0:43:400:43:44

-But really heavy. Heavy.

-Heavy.

0:43:440:43:46

Just like the back of our wood-burner.

0:43:460:43:49

-I wonder how much they cost.

-Yeah, shall we go and ask Cris?

0:43:490:43:51

Do you want me to go and get her?

0:43:510:43:54

-She's coming.

-Cris!

0:43:540:43:55

Cris, do you know the price of the birdbaths?

0:43:550:43:57

Yeah, they were 125 each or a couple of hundred for the pair.

0:43:570:44:01

That's way out of our league, I'm afraid.

0:44:010:44:04

The very, very, very best would be 150 for the pair.

0:44:040:44:08

-That would be the best.

-Well, we don't even have 150.

0:44:080:44:11

We don't have 150. Shall I tell you how much we have?

0:44:110:44:13

So, I've spent 271,

0:44:130:44:18

so I've got 129 left.

0:44:180:44:20

-OK, then, yeah. For 129.

-Oh-ho!

0:44:240:44:26

Well, Peter, Cris has made your wish come true.

0:44:260:44:29

They are very nice. They are very nice.

0:44:290:44:31

-That's great.

-They are lovely.

-Well, that's a bit of a shock.

0:44:310:44:34

-OK, then, 129.

-That's a very good deal.

0:44:340:44:36

I'll say.

0:44:360:44:38

That generous discount bags Peter and Natasha the bird baths for £129,

0:44:380:44:43

which they'll add to the wood-burner to create one lot for auction.

0:44:430:44:48

Steady on, old chap.

0:44:520:44:54

HE GROANS Crikey!

0:44:540:44:57

Shopping complete for both teams,

0:44:570:44:59

it's time to get an eyeful of each other's lots.

0:44:590:45:02

Dum, dum, dum...

0:45:040:45:06

You went with Pinocchio!

0:45:060:45:08

-That's exactly who it is.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:45:080:45:11

It's in need of slight repair, string-wise.

0:45:110:45:13

What about your kind of, hmm, ethnic figures?

0:45:130:45:16

You didn't sound very impressed by them.

0:45:160:45:17

-Well, this is a good story because Peter's wife is a midwife.

-Yeah.

0:45:170:45:20

And these are for fertility.

0:45:200:45:22

-They're quite impressive looking, aren't they?

-They're cool.

0:45:220:45:24

-I think so.

-They've got bosoms on their head

0:45:240:45:26

-and there's a pair here, too.

-They're everywhere.

-Yes, yes.

0:45:260:45:29

-You're holding back a bit now, aren't you?

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:45:290:45:31

And you notice, I've bought everything in pairs except

0:45:310:45:33

for Pinocchio and this object over here which is my favourite.

0:45:330:45:37

The piece de resistance.

0:45:370:45:38

It is a bright blue wood-burner, Art Deco-style. Look.

0:45:380:45:42

Lid comes out like that. You put your wood in there.

0:45:420:45:44

Bit of methylated spirit on that, it'll sell for 200 quid.

0:45:440:45:47

I love these. I think they're absolutely brilliant.

0:45:470:45:49

Did you choose them, Peter?

0:45:490:45:51

-No, no.

-They've got style.

0:45:510:45:52

Natasha saw them and she persuaded me and instantly when I saw them,

0:45:520:45:56

I concurred with her that this was a good choice.

0:45:560:45:58

-Well done, you. Well done.

-They're a wee bit on my head.

0:45:580:46:00

I've spent every pound of my £400 to get these things together.

0:46:000:46:03

-Have you?

-Every penny.

-I have to congratulate you on that.

0:46:030:46:06

Congratulations to both of you.

0:46:060:46:08

-And you did the same, of course.

-Of course! Almost.

0:46:080:46:12

'You fibbers! Time to reveal all.'

0:46:120:46:16

It's a stepladder!

0:46:160:46:17

It's an apple orchard ladder from the 1920s from France.

0:46:170:46:22

-Can I reveal back what's under here?

-Yes.

0:46:220:46:24

-Ooh!

-There we are.

-Oh!

0:46:240:46:27

I thought it was all going to be small chimney pots.

0:46:270:46:30

We've bought things to do with fire and burning things.

0:46:300:46:33

-It's great!

-I know.

-How good are they for the garden?

0:46:330:46:36

-That's what they're for.

-Thank you, yes.

-Beautiful.

0:46:360:46:38

That's exactly what they're for.

0:46:380:46:40

-What do you think of these little devils?

-Really gorgeous.

0:46:400:46:43

They're the Devil's fork and spoon.

0:46:430:46:45

-They're Deco.

-Silver-gilt.

-Silver-gilt, and they're French.

0:46:450:46:49

-They are beautiful.

-They are so attractive.

0:46:490:46:51

They are for serving hors d'oeuvres or whatever you want, really.

0:46:510:46:53

That's a cutie, I tell you. That wee sweetheart,

0:46:530:46:55

-little pocket watch.

-Do you love that?

0:46:550:46:57

Well, when was the last time you saw one in a heart-shaped?

0:46:570:46:59

-That's so cute.

-I think we've done pretty well.

0:46:590:47:02

I think we've all done spectacularly well.

0:47:020:47:04

And I am fascinated.

0:47:040:47:05

-Shall we go and talk about our sales behind our backs?

-I think we should.

0:47:050:47:09

-Let's go and have a chat.

-Come on.

0:47:090:47:10

'Out of earshot, what do they really make of each other's lots?'

0:47:110:47:15

What do you think of the African figures?

0:47:150:47:18

Well, they're brand-new.

0:47:180:47:19

I mean, let's be honest, they're just off the plane.

0:47:190:47:22

-THEY LAUGH

-But you never know,

0:47:220:47:25

it's the sort of quirky thing that someone might pick up on.

0:47:250:47:27

I particularly like the ladder cos I'm a comedy ladder man.

0:47:270:47:30

I'm always buying ladders. I've got five ladders at home.

0:47:300:47:32

-Not sure about the strange sort of demonic cutlery.

-I like that.

0:47:320:47:37

I do like it, but it's a bit weird.

0:47:370:47:39

I don't know. It all depends who's there on the day, doesn't it?

0:47:390:47:42

-Whose do you prefer?

-Ours.

0:47:420:47:45

-Yay! We can say that.

-I do. I really do.

0:47:450:47:49

TIM: No shame in that, Sarah.

0:47:490:47:51

After starting way back in Guildford in Surrey,

0:47:510:47:54

Sarah and Peter are now en route

0:47:540:47:56

to auction in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire.

0:47:560:47:58

-Obviously, Pinocchio I love.

-Yes.

-But I'm quite sad that he's going...

0:48:020:48:05

Do you think he'll come to life today at the auction?

0:48:050:48:07

-I hope so, Peter.

-Do you think if someone offers him for a fiver,

0:48:070:48:10

-he might sort of spring to life and object?

-I hope you're allowed...

0:48:100:48:13

I mean, I hope he's allowed to do that.

0:48:130:48:15

Mm. Me too.

0:48:150:48:18

Natasha and Catherine have already arrived

0:48:180:48:20

in the historic riverside town of Tewkesbury

0:48:200:48:23

and are waiting for their celebrity partners

0:48:230:48:26

at Church Street Auctions.

0:48:260:48:27

-ENGINE REVS

-Can you hear what I can here?

0:48:270:48:30

I can hear a roaring.

0:48:300:48:31

-Listen to her roar!

-The roar of success!

0:48:310:48:35

-All right, steady on.

-Look, these girls look ready for action.

0:48:350:48:39

You look absolutely beautiful! Look at this gorgeous dress.

0:48:390:48:42

Thank you very much.

0:48:420:48:43

-That, to me, is a winning dress.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

0:48:430:48:46

-Don't worry. You get to drive it after the auction, too.

-Do I?

0:48:460:48:50

-You sure do.

-Oh, we're leaving. I'll take it home.

0:48:500:48:52

Feeling positive. Feeling good.

0:48:520:48:54

-We're just talking of auctions, are you feeling lucky?

-Yeah.

0:48:540:48:57

-Are you feeling lucky?

-Are you all right?

-I am, actually.

0:48:570:48:59

-Very Art Deco.

-We are positive!

0:48:590:49:00

-Shall we take our positive energy indoors?

-I think we should.

0:49:000:49:03

-Ladies, after you.

-We'll follow in your wake, I think.

0:49:030:49:05

On this Road Trip, Sarah and Catherine spent £303

0:49:070:49:10

on five auction lots.

0:49:100:49:12

While Peter and Natasha also bought five lots,

0:49:130:49:16

spending every single penny of their £400 budget.

0:49:160:49:21

The man presiding over today's auction is Beau Howell.

0:49:210:49:24

So, what does he make of our celebrities' lots?

0:49:240:49:27

..at £8.

0:49:270:49:29

The Swiss watch, I like very much, the silver one,

0:49:290:49:31

I think that's lovely.

0:49:310:49:32

And the wrought iron birdbaths,

0:49:320:49:34

it's a shame that the fire's with them, but I like them a lot.

0:49:340:49:37

I think they're great pieces.

0:49:370:49:39

Find your seats, you two, as you're first up...

0:49:390:49:42

..with the brass vases and unusual horn letter opener.

0:49:440:49:47

15, anyone?

0:49:470:49:49

Come on. They've got to be worth that. It's yours for 15, surely.

0:49:510:49:54

Surely.

0:49:540:49:55

-IN COCKNEY ACCENT:

-Tenner! Anyone at all? £10.

0:49:550:49:57

He doesn't sound like he's from Tewkesbury, does he?

0:49:570:50:00

-£10 I've got. 12 anywhere?

-Come on.

0:50:000:50:02

-All finished at 10.

-Come on. Surely.

0:50:020:50:05

Are you finished? Are you sure?

0:50:050:50:07

Sold for 10.

0:50:070:50:08

Not the best of starts.

0:50:100:50:11

Onwards and upwards, we hope.

0:50:120:50:15

I think people are not in a spending mood, unfortunately.

0:50:150:50:18

Well, Sarah, hopefully someone will want to fork out for

0:50:180:50:22

your 20th century French apple orchard ladder.

0:50:220:50:25

I have a couple of bids on it and I can go in at £60.

0:50:250:50:30

-No!

-Yeah!

0:50:300:50:31

-£60 I've got.

-That's brilliant! Sorry.

0:50:310:50:33

65 anywhere? All finished at £60?

0:50:330:50:37

THEY LAUGH

0:50:390:50:42

A small but sweet profit there for Sarah and Catherine.

0:50:420:50:46

-£10, anyone?

-Utterly amazed.

-That's very good.

0:50:460:50:48

-You're well in the lead.

-I'm really surprised.

0:50:480:50:50

You shouldn't be to shocked. You did buy them.

0:50:500:50:53

You might have to get up and do a bit of an act, Peter.

0:50:530:50:55

All right, OK.

0:50:550:50:56

Yes, Peter, as it's the turn of your porcelain puppet.

0:50:560:51:00

Hello, everybody!

0:51:010:51:03

Would he like to bid?

0:51:030:51:05

Not until somebody else does, no. Would you like to bid?

0:51:050:51:08

No, I don't bid!

0:51:080:51:09

£10 for him? Tenner?

0:51:090:51:11

£10? Come on. He's worth £10.

0:51:110:51:14

-10, I've got.

-Thank you, sir. You're kind. You take me home.

0:51:140:51:17

-I cook and clean for you.

-£12?

0:51:170:51:19

Are you all finished at 10?

0:51:190:51:21

You're not going to let him go for that, surely?

0:51:210:51:23

Don't sell me! Don't sell me!

0:51:230:51:25

-THEY LAUGH

-All done?

-I hate you!

0:51:250:51:29

-Yours, sir.

-There you go, mate.

0:51:290:51:31

Thanks a lot.

0:51:320:51:33

-May you be very happy together.

-LAUGHTER

0:51:330:51:36

Despite Peter's performance, that's another loss. Rotten luck.

0:51:360:51:41

We bought it for 25, it sold for 10. A good strong second for us there.

0:51:410:51:45

Maybe Sarah's vintage skis will be more to this crowd's liking.

0:51:470:51:51

-£10 for them.

-Could you sell them separately?

0:51:510:51:54

-£10 I've got.

-There you go. He's amazed.

0:51:540:51:58

12.

0:51:580:51:59

14.

0:51:590:52:01

16. 18. 20.

0:52:010:52:04

22.

0:52:040:52:06

-Here you go.

-24.

-Oh, my God. You've got some actual bidding.

0:52:060:52:08

25. No?

0:52:080:52:10

£25, straight down there. All finished at £25?

0:52:100:52:14

CATHERINE SIGHS Another loss there.

0:52:140:52:17

Where are all the Blue Peter fans when you need them, hey?

0:52:170:52:20

It's slightly bizarre. Do you think they know something we don't?

0:52:200:52:24

Surely your incongruous linked birdbaths

0:52:240:52:28

and early 20th-century wood-burner will sell well, Peter.

0:52:280:52:31

-And I go in at £200.

-Yes!

-Wow, that's very good.

0:52:310:52:36

£200 I've got. 220 anywhere?

0:52:360:52:39

-220.

-That's it, sir.

0:52:390:52:40

-240.

-Go on!

0:52:400:52:43

250. 260. 270.

0:52:430:52:47

Nope. 260, on my right.

0:52:470:52:50

All finished at 260. All done?

0:52:500:52:53

Yes! Yes!

0:52:530:52:57

Finally, a profit for Peter and Natasha. Hurrah!

0:52:570:53:01

Well done. Well done, well done.

0:53:010:53:03

-That's brilliant.

-Well done!

-That was fantastic.

0:53:030:53:06

It was, indeed.

0:53:070:53:09

Right, can Sarah and Catherine pull in a profit

0:53:090:53:12

with their silver heart-shaped fob watch?

0:53:120:53:14

-50 I've got. Is there 55 anywhere?

-Come on!

0:53:150:53:19

-It is worth a lot, lot more than that.

-It is. Come on.

0:53:190:53:21

All finished at £50. Are you sure?

0:53:210:53:24

It's incredibly beautiful, I have to tell you.

0:53:240:53:26

No?

0:53:260:53:28

Ah! So close yet so far. What a shame.

0:53:290:53:32

-We loved it.

-And that's all that matters.

-Yes.

-It is.

0:53:330:53:38

Well, not if you want to win, it's not.

0:53:380:53:40

Peter and Natasha's pair of lead glass windows are up next.

0:53:410:53:45

40 I've got. 45 anyway?

0:53:450:53:48

45. 50. Do you want 55?

0:53:500:53:52

55 I'm out on the floor. 55. 60 anywhere?

0:53:520:53:56

-All done?

-Oh, that's sore.

-No!

0:53:560:53:59

-That's sore.

-THEY GROAN

0:53:590:54:02

Ouch. It is indeed another disappointing loss there.

0:54:020:54:05

-Someone's got a deal there, haven't they?

-I tell you what,

0:54:060:54:08

there are some bargains being got today, aren't there?

0:54:080:54:11

Time now for Sarah and Catherine's priciest purchase,

0:54:110:54:15

their 19th-century terracotta chimney pots.

0:54:150:54:18

-£60 I've got. 65 anywhere?

-There's two!

-65. 67.

0:54:180:54:24

Do you want 70? 70 I'm out.

0:54:240:54:26

-That's it. That's it.

-70. 75.

0:54:260:54:28

No? 75. 77 anywhere?

0:54:290:54:32

-All finished at 75?

-Oh, no. Surely not.

-All done?

-Come on.

0:54:320:54:36

-77.

-Ah!

0:54:360:54:39

Come on!

0:54:390:54:41

80. 82?

0:54:410:54:44

82. Come on. 84?

0:54:440:54:47

84.

0:54:470:54:48

No? 84 on my left.

0:54:480:54:50

All finished at £84. All done.

0:54:500:54:53

-Thank you.

-1984.

-Now, how about the other one?

0:54:550:54:58

Nice try, Sarah, nice try.

0:55:010:55:03

-Wait for the final reckoning.

-I know.

0:55:030:55:06

Here it comes, Peter, your last lot,

0:55:080:55:09

the pair of carved African fertility figures.

0:55:090:55:13

£20, someone?

0:55:130:55:16

Look at them, the weight of them!

0:55:160:55:17

15? Anyone at all? £15 for two African fertility figures.

0:55:170:55:22

Come on now.

0:55:220:55:23

Come on. They're worth that, surely.

0:55:230:55:25

Tenner?

0:55:250:55:27

Here we go.

0:55:270:55:29

-£10?

-£10!

0:55:290:55:32

-Fiver?

-A fiver?!

0:55:320:55:34

All right. I'll buy 'em for a fiver.

0:55:340:55:37

Yes!

0:55:370:55:39

I'll see you at the stage door.

0:55:390:55:40

What a hero.

0:55:400:55:42

-Sold to me.

-Well done.

-Sold to the auctioneer.

0:55:420:55:44

I love that auctioneer. He is the best auctioneer I've ever met.

0:55:440:55:48

Well, they've sold, just.

0:55:480:55:50

Sadly, Peter and Natasha end on another loss.

0:55:500:55:53

He's bought them for six.

0:55:530:55:55

He bought them for five.

0:55:550:55:58

-Didn't he bid against himself for six?

-No.

-Five. OK.

0:55:580:56:02

It's been a tough old crowd today.

0:56:020:56:05

But what will they think of the final lot,

0:56:050:56:07

Sarah and Catherine's Art Deco silver hors d'oeuvre servers?

0:56:070:56:12

15, anyone? £15?

0:56:120:56:14

£15 I've got. 17 anywhere?

0:56:140:56:17

That's a start. Come on. 17?

0:56:170:56:20

Anyone at all? £17?

0:56:200:56:23

Nobody's interested. What's happening?

0:56:230:56:25

I know. They were our best...

0:56:250:56:27

Oh, dear. No happy ending there, it would seem.

0:56:290:56:32

-Let's go and do maths.

-Must we?

0:56:320:56:34

-Let's do it.

-We must, we must.

-OK.

0:56:340:56:35

-Nice bloke, though.

-Yes, yes. Thank you.

0:56:360:56:39

After beginning with £400,

0:56:400:56:42

sadly, Peter and Natasha made a loss

0:56:420:56:44

of £121.20

0:56:440:56:47

after paying auction costs,

0:56:470:56:50

which means they end their journey with £278.80.

0:56:500:56:55

Sarah and Catherine also kicked off with £400 and unfortunately

0:56:560:57:01

they too made a loss after auction costs

0:57:010:57:03

of £111.12,

0:57:030:57:06

which means they're crowned today's winning losers, so as to speak,

0:57:060:57:11

finishing with £288.88.

0:57:110:57:15

So close. I call that quits, actually.

0:57:150:57:17

-I think so, too.

-It's a draw!

0:57:170:57:19

-It's a draw.

-Well done!

-Well done, everyone.

0:57:190:57:22

What I've learnt from this experience is all you need in life

0:57:220:57:25

is an E-Type Jaguar and two lovely ladies to share

0:57:250:57:28

the passenger seat with you.

0:57:280:57:29

-I hope I'm one of those.

-Yes, two!

0:57:290:57:31

-Well, talking of E-Types. You've got to jump in it now.

-Oh.

-It's the end.

0:57:310:57:35

-The end of the road.

-Not in that car again.

0:57:350:57:37

-It's been a pleasure.

-And you, darling.

-Well done.

0:57:370:57:41

-Good luck.

-Bye!

-Thank you!

0:57:410:57:43

And so, despite the disappointments, our celebrities depart with a smile.

0:57:430:57:46

ENGINE STARTS

0:57:480:57:51

-BOTH:

-Bye-bye!

-Bye!

0:57:510:57:55

What's been your best bit about being on the Antiques Road Trip?

0:57:570:58:02

-REVS ENGINE

-Oh.

0:58:020:58:05

I thought you were going to say being with me.

0:58:050:58:06

Just sitting in this white E-Type Jag with you by my side,

0:58:060:58:10

-talking of old times.

-Oh!

0:58:100:58:13

I mean, let's forget all the buying and the selling

0:58:130:58:15

and the extraordinary disaster that happened.

0:58:150:58:18

I used to have a model of this when I was a little boy, this car,

0:58:180:58:21

you know, so this is like some sort of childhood fantasy.

0:58:210:58:24

-It's a dream come true.

-It is.

-A dream come true.

0:58:240:58:26

Well, isn't that nice.

0:58:260:58:28

Until we meet again.

0:58:280:58:30

Ta-ta, roadtrippers.

0:58:300:58:32

Two favourite Blue Peter presenters Sarah Greene and Peter Duncan are in the company of Natasha Raskin and Catherine Southon as they hunt for antiques around Surrey, Hertfordshire and north west London.

Peter detours to learn how hockey became a popular sport the world over, while keen aviator Sarah sees how the Battle of Britain was won.

An incredible haul of antiques, including chimney pots, Pinocchio and a pair of African fertility figures, go under the gavel at an auction in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire.