Episode 2 Celebrity Antiques Road Trip


Episode 2

Celebrities hunt for antiques across the UK. Pals Ricky Tomlinson and Micky Starke are joined by Catherine Southon and Margie Cooper on a rollocking road trip adventure.


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Transcript


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-The UK's favourite celebrities...

-Just thought I'd touch BASS.

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..paired up with an expert.

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Boo!

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And a classic car.

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No hands!

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Their mission - to scour Britain for antiques.

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My office... Now!

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The aim - to make the biggest profit at auction.

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But it's no easy ride.

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GEARS CRUNCH Who will find a hidden gem?

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-HONK!

-Like that.

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Who will take the biggest risk?

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This could end in disaster.

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Will anybody follow expert advice?

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-But I love this!

-Why would you buy something you won't use?

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There will be worthy winners and valiant losers.

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No, I don't want to shake hands!

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Put your pedal to the metal.

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Let me get out of first gear.

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This is the Celebrity Antiques Road Trip.

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Yeah!

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Hold on to your hats.

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Today's show features a couple of likely lads from Liverpool.

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Actors Ricky Tomlinson and Mickey Starke.

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We'll probably stumble on a Picasso or something,

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-like that, you know.

-But it'll probably...

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It'll only be an old one!

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Yeah! It'll probably be a Picasso pottery jar or something like that.

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-That'll do!

-In his clay period.

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THEY LAUGH You never know, chaps.

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The fellas have been bezzie mates for 40 years,

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and became household names in the hit '80s soap, Brookside.

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Working-class hero Ricky has starred in many roles over the years,

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but is renowned for his portrayal of sofa sloth Jim Royle

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in The Royle Family.

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Mickey is a popular and versatile actor.

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His long career includes

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appearing in hit soaps such as Coronation Street.

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They each have a big bag of readies, a sum of £400.

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If you find an old ear anywhere, it could belong to Van Gogh!

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I believe Van Gogh's ear is now worth more than his paintings.

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So I've heard.

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Boom, boom!

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Today's experts are our gorgeously fabulous Margie Cooper

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and Catherine Southon.

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Think they are good mates, aren't they, Mickey and Ricky?

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Mickey and Ricky, it sounds like two budgerigars!

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I used to have a budgie called Ricky.

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-You had a budgie called Ricky?

-I did, yeah.

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Used to say, "Who's a little beauty?"

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He spoke, he was brilliant, was Ricky.

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-How can you have...

-That was just a by-the-by.

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How can you have a budgie and call it Ricky?

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-Yeah, it's called Ricky.

-Ricky!

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-You didn't have another one called Mickey?

-No, I didn't.

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Budgerigars?

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HE LAUGHS

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Our gal pals have the scrumptious 1976 Triumph Stag.

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I just remember Jim sitting on that sofa, being all kind of like there.

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And watching the telly, he goes, "All right, Barb?

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"All right, Barb?"

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"Go on, Barb!"

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"Hiya, Barb," you're right. She was called Barbara, wasn't she?

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-Barb, "Here you are, Barb."

-"Here y'are!"

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-That's about as far as it goes!

-Is that it?

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Blimey!

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Is there any hint of rivalry

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in the 1965 Daimler, friendly or otherwise?

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This is a competition here now, to see who can make the most money.

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-Yeah.

-Because I'm desperate to win, because in real life,

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you've got far more money than me.

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-Well...

-Far more money than me, from what I've heard.

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It goes without saying. Yeah, but mine's all in property.

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It's buried in the garden.

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Ha-ha!

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Kicking off in Knutsford,

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our teams will road trip through Cheshire and Merseyside

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before heading to the West Midlands for an auction in Stourbridge.

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Looks like the girls are fashionably late.

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If you don't hurry up, all the bargains will be gone, lad.

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Hey, it's a good job we're not waiting to get married.

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-Too right!

-No, they'll be here in a minute.

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Yeah, I'm sure they will.

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-Ah!

-Oh, I love it.

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Arriving in style.

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Hello, you're just in time.

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Just... Just in time!

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-Morning.

-Good morning!

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Mickey's coupling up with Margie and Ricky with Catherine.

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-I am.

-Are you ready for the fray?

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I certainly... Oh, it's a race!

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Right, come on. No time for niceties.

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Here we go, the race is on.

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Blimey, they're eager. Right, the clock's ticking, you lot.

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Let's begin with Ricky and Catherine.

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So, this is the start of our journey now, kid.

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It all begins now, kid.

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So, we've got to go out with all guns blazing.

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We've got to win, it's imperative.

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-Really?

-It's imperative because otherwise,

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that'll be the talk of Liverpool, that I was beaten by Mickey Starke.

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Oh, we like a bit of passion, Ricky.

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Where are the other two?

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Hang on, what's going on here?

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Do you have any knowledge of roofs on Stag cars?

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No, but I'm willing to learn, Margie.

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That's the spirit, Mickey.

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Seat forward.

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-Ah!

-Give it a pull.

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-Oh, marvellous!

-Ahhh!

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We've done it.

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Nifty work, you two.

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We're away!

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Watch out, this lot are sharing their first shop.

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They're all heading to the town of Knutsford in Cheshire.

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They hold endurance races for Penny Farthing bicycles here,

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don't you know?

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First to get stuck in this morning is a super determined Ricky.

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Very posh, very posh!

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I'm not sure we've got this much money.

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Knutsford Antiques Centre has been trading for over 20 years.

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Looks just the ticket for our rummaging antiquers.

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Lizzie is in charge today.

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-Right, what do we want, Ricky? What are we looking for?

-Bargains.

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-Bargains!

-We're looking for bargains.

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I'm sure that lady, she's got a nice, kind face.

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-Has she?

-I'm sure she'll be gentle with me.

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Here's hoping!

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-That's all been relined, though.

-Hmm.

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Oh, isn't that lovely?

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I love that.

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6,500.

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What you got?

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19th-century French ormolu.

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OK, so this is all ormolu, it's gilded bronze, basically.

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Then you've got a painted scene on the front.

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So it's trying to be like a Sevres style.

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19th-century Sevres porcelain was renowned for

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its rich palette of colours.

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I don't know, what do you think about the scene on the front?

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-Do you like it?

-Well, it's romantic and that puts me in the mood.

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-Oh!

-Do you know what I mean?

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Crumbs!

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But I think it's trying to be an early French, 19th-century,

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good high quality, but it's actually a copy.

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Um, I don't think it's particularly well done.

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Regardless, Ricky really likes the look of it.

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-I just like that.

-Do you?

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Yeah, it's, er...

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-What, the colours?

-No, just, like, everything about it.

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It's just...

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To the untrained eye, obviously it's to the untrained eye, isn't it?

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I think if you look at it from a distance,

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you can see exactly what they're doing.

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I think if it was the right price, it's all about price, isn't it?

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-If you can get a few quid knocked off.

-Yeah.

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It's priced at £55.

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Time to talk to Lizzie.

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Now, listen, I don't know whether to go down on bended knee here.

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I'm looking for the best deal I can get with this.

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-Best offer today!

-I just like it.

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So, it doesn't matter to me whether it's worth £1 million or whatever,

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I just like it, and...

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What can I have it for?

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Well, we usually say 10%.

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But I'm a big fan of yours.

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-Good, good.

-So, we'll go down to 40?

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-I think we'll have that.

-Do you think?

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-Yes, I'm having that.

-Cor, you're well off the mark!

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I love it, I don't care if I'm off the mark. I like it.

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He doesn't hang about, does he?

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Wrap that up for me, please, kid.

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I'm made up with that, £40 I've got that for.

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That is a bit of a bargain. You're good at this.

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-I'm in with a chance there.

-You can come again!

-Absolutely.

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Right, what's next?

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Meanwhile, look who's arrived.

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Let's hope they're not here.

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Now, better late than never.

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Just take your time, you two.

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Shall we go and see what else we can find?

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Oh!

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-Ah!

-Our friends.

-Oh, hello!

-Better late than never.

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I'm afraid...the two bargains on display today have gone.

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They've gone today.

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-We've done it.

-Lizzie, have nothing to do with these two, Liz.

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-Have you bought already?

-Only a couple of little items.

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Are you not saying?

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-They'll raise about five grand each.

-Is that all?

-Oh, aye, yeah.

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Blimey, let's break up the scrum and stick with Mickey and Margie.

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-Ah.

-Yeah, I like that.

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Four faces of Buddha.

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-That's right.

-Is that a good thing?

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We turned that one down.

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See, I've spotted that there, the little powder flask with the dog on.

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You know me with dogs, I love dogs.

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You love dogs, don't you?

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You get it out, you know how clumsy I am.

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If it's got no dents...

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-Sorry!

-Oh, crikey!

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Ricky! Careful, that was close.

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-It is nice, that, isn't it?

-That's really nice.

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Powder flasks were an essential accessory to firearms

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until the 19th century when loaded cartridges became commonplace.

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I think that's stunning.

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-Have a little go at that.

-I think we've got to.

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What's that, £55?

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I would buy that at 55, I think it's gorgeous.

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-See if we can get it a bit cheaper.

-Absolutely.

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-I'll put my best voice on.

-Go on.

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Excuse me, madam. I'm a visitor to these parts.

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I'm sure you can knock a couple of quid off that for me, can't you?

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Er... 55, so...

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..I'll do the same. I'll go to 40.

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Ooh!

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-Job done.

-Yeah, happy with that?

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-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

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Lovely, lovely. I'm made up with that.

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Right, we're on a roll!

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Crikey, Ricky doesn't hang about.

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First shop, two antiques, bought for a total of £80.

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It would be rude to gloat, hey, Ricky?

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Anyway, so that's it, we're all done.

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-How about you, finished?

-Well, we're still looking.

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We've got our eye on a couple of things.

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Still looking? You only have five minutes left!

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Don't panic us, don't panic us.

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-Are you coming out?

-Well, no.

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No, you need the time.

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They're up to something, Margie. Let's go and get...

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-Go on. Hop it.

-We know.

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-Yeah.

-They've got nothing!

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-They've got nowt.

-Nothing.

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-Nothing, no hope.

-No hope.

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No life! No nothing.

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Charming!

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Come on, kid, let's have a look upstairs.

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-That's interesting, isn't it?

-Yeah, it is.

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"Persons throwing stones at the Telegraphs will be prosecuted."

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Oh, I like that. I remember those.

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-They were old when I was a kid, to be fair.

-I don't remember those.

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-So, for naughty boys?

-Yeah!

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Let's get a better look, shall we?

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-People do buy these things.

-Do they really?

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Or am I making a huge mistake?

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-No!

-Let's have a look. Oh, yeah, it's cast, isn't it?

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Oh, yeah, it's cast-iron.

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Yes, somebody's... You know, touched it up.

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-Oh, repainted.

-It's been painted and touched up but, I mean, come on!

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It's probably 70 years old.

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-Yeah.

-Isn't it?

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-How much is that, then?

-45?

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-45.

-Yeah, that's...

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What's the best price on that?

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-Um...

-Ten?

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We'll go to 30?

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-Hmm.

-What do we think?

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That's very fair, to knock it down that much.

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It is, actually, isn't it?

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And I've just got 25 in my hand.

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Oh, yeah, so have I.

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-What do you think, Liz?

-That'll do.

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Deal, thank you so much.

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-Thank you very much.

-Oh, we're up and running.

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Right, come on, that's us done.

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Well done, Mickey. £25 for the railway sign.

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30, £30.

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Thank you.

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And thanks very much indeed. Thanks.

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See you again. Bye-bye.

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-OK!

-This is our Faberge egg.

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Not so sure about that, but a great start, Mickey.

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Can I...? I know we've sort of finished.

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But can I just have a quick...?

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But hang on a minute, I thought they'd left.

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-Give you your...

-Yeah, don't think she likes that.

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Now, what's this she's spied?

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It just caught my eye.

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I think that the lawn mower in particular,

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because it's really brightly painted. Is it not your sort of thing?

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Yeah, it's great.

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Time for a closer inspection.

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-Meccano.

-Oh!

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Meccano.

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Now, I don't know how rare they are or anything.

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Meccano were the biggest British toy manufacturers in the '20s and '30s.

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This firm also produced Hornby Trains and Dinky Toys.

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I just think they're a bit of fun, aren't they?

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-Yeah, let's take them.

-The little Dinky... I don't know how red,

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I don't like the wheelbarrow so much that I love the roller.

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So do I, I love them all.

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-Yeah?

-They're great, them.

-What's on these?

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37 for the three.

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-WHISPERS:

-Not bad.

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I'm sure she'll be very gentle with us.

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Would you do sort of 20-ish?

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Could go up to 25, I could meet you in the middle, go to 25?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah?

-Yes!

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-Happy with that?

-Absolutely.

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If it goes wrong, you know who to blame.

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This extra purchase means they've spent £105 in their first shop.

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Lizzie, you're very kind. Thank you so much, thank you.

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-Thanks a lot, Liz.

-Really appreciate it.

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-Thank you!

-Three items!

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-There you go, kid.

-We are on a roll.

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These could make £1 million at the right time at the right place.

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I don't think so.

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I'll settle for half a million, come on.

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-I don't think so. Let's go. Thanks, kid!

-Thank you.

-Cheers, bye.

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Let's leave Ricky and Catherine

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and catch up with Mickey and Margie in the Stag.

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It's driving very nicely, isn't it?

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Oh, it drives like a dream.

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A friend of mine had one of these when we were lads.

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He took me for a spin and I've had a slight love affair with them

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-ever since.

-Aw!

-Yeah.

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What Mickey doesn't know is he's pointed the Stag

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to an area which built its fortune on salt.

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Mickey and Margie have powered their way to the Cheshire village

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of Marston to learn a little bit of local history.

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Salt has always been an essential ingredient for human survival

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and its availability has been pivotal to civilisation.

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Our pair are visiting Lion Salt Works, built in 1894.

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It's the only remaining open pan saltworks in the UK

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and one of only four in the entire world.

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Museum and arts manager Catherine West is going to tell us more.

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I'm Michael Stark, nice to meet you.

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Hello. I'm Margie.

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I'm Catherine. Shall we take a look and find out about salt in Cheshire?

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-After you.

-Thank you.

0:15:240:15:26

Cheshire is renowned for salt production

0:15:290:15:32

and the salt beds here are 220 million years old.

0:15:320:15:36

Rainwater percolates through 150 feet,

0:15:360:15:39

dissolving the rock salt as it goes, making salty water known as brine.

0:15:390:15:44

So, take us through the process. How is it produced?

0:15:460:15:48

Well, we'd have the brine running across on top of the salt.

0:15:480:15:52

And so actually they would pump that brine out.

0:15:520:15:55

And then it would be brought and it would be boiled.

0:15:550:15:58

So in a massive pan, but it would be about the size of a tennis court.

0:15:580:16:02

And so that would be heated right up so then it would be boiled,

0:16:020:16:06

then that salt would be kind of skimmed off

0:16:060:16:09

and we put it in big blocks of salt.

0:16:090:16:11

Then it would be dried, potentially crushed or cut,

0:16:110:16:14

depending on what kind of salt that we were looking for.

0:16:140:16:17

How long have they been producing salt here?

0:16:170:16:20

Believe it or not, this method of salt-making

0:16:200:16:23

actually dates back to Roman times.

0:16:230:16:25

Here in Cheshire where we are today,

0:16:250:16:27

there are large deposits of salt

0:16:270:16:29

and the Romans discovered that we have these natural brine pools

0:16:290:16:33

and that by boiling, we can produce salt.

0:16:330:16:36

The Romans were even paid in salt, weren't they?

0:16:360:16:39

-Oh, you know your stuff. Absolutely.

-Oh, yeah!

0:16:390:16:41

The Romans understood the benefits of salt.

0:16:420:16:45

As explorers, it was essential for preserving foods

0:16:450:16:48

and therefore their ultimate survival.

0:16:480:16:50

A Roman soldier's salary would be cut

0:16:520:16:54

if he was not worth his weight in salt.

0:16:540:16:57

Certainly, in Liverpool,

0:16:590:17:00

salt was one of the founding industries, really,

0:17:000:17:02

and that's why we have the salt dock next to Albert Dock,

0:17:020:17:06

to make sure that we could make the most of

0:17:060:17:07

getting that salt out across the world.

0:17:070:17:09

So the Trent and Mersey Canal, Weaver Navigation,

0:17:090:17:12

that was all a big part of making sure we had that transport

0:17:120:17:15

to get that salt around the world.

0:17:150:17:16

Cheshire salt was of high quality

0:17:180:17:20

and didn't deteriorate in warmer climates.

0:17:200:17:23

It would be shipped as far as Canada and America,

0:17:230:17:26

West Africa and India, New Zealand and Australia.

0:17:260:17:29

The men labouring here worked topless due to the intense heat.

0:17:330:17:37

They'd lose up to 12 pounds in sweat a day

0:17:370:17:39

due to the high temperature of the salt pans.

0:17:390:17:42

It sounds like a lot of hard work, doesn't it?

0:17:440:17:46

What sort of hours would they work

0:17:460:17:48

and what kind of dangers would they face?

0:17:480:17:50

Well, yes, for the workers, in this kind of atmosphere,

0:17:500:17:54

probably 12 hour days.

0:17:540:17:55

I mean, if you can imagine how hot it must have been as well,

0:17:550:17:58

and actually quite dangerous,

0:17:580:18:00

because the pans were heating up to be very hot.

0:18:000:18:03

And you were then trying to skim that off.

0:18:030:18:05

So it was quite a difficult environment to work in at the time.

0:18:050:18:09

Lion Salt Works not only produced salt for worldwide export -

0:18:120:18:16

in its heyday, Cheshire was responsible for 86%

0:18:160:18:19

of all salt supply in the country.

0:18:190:18:22

However, in 1986, the factory closed,

0:18:220:18:25

unable to compete with cheaper salt production works

0:18:250:18:28

established elsewhere in the world.

0:18:280:18:30

Catherine, thank you so much. It's been brilliant.

0:18:320:18:34

-We'll go and have a look through the museum.

-Great.

0:18:340:18:37

Back to Ricky and Catherine.

0:18:410:18:44

How did you get to meet Mickey?

0:18:440:18:45

I was compering a club a million years ago

0:18:450:18:48

and Mickey came with a band.

0:18:480:18:49

He was the front man of a band.

0:18:490:18:51

He was talking to me and I got... I said, "Are you in Equity?"

0:18:510:18:54

And he went, "No." And I said, "I think you should join."

0:18:540:18:56

He joined Equity and the next thing,

0:18:560:18:58

he's acting and he got into Brookside

0:18:580:19:00

and then he was in Coronation Street.

0:19:000:19:02

We're off to the Cheshire town of Frodsham.

0:19:040:19:07

The Beatles played one of their first gigs

0:19:070:19:09

in this town, don't you know?

0:19:090:19:11

This is us, then.

0:19:110:19:13

-Shop number two.

-This is us.

0:19:130:19:15

Are you ready? To rock and roll?

0:19:150:19:17

Hampton Village And Antiques Emporium

0:19:200:19:22

is bursting at the seams with stock.

0:19:220:19:25

Guitar? Headphones?

0:19:270:19:29

What do you think?

0:19:290:19:31

Shall we go and meet the man that does the deals?

0:19:340:19:36

-Yeah.

-He's the best person to meet.

0:19:360:19:39

Who's the man that does the deals?

0:19:390:19:41

I think that might be me, Rick.

0:19:410:19:42

I hope you're in a good mood today!

0:19:420:19:44

I'm looking for a bargain here today.

0:19:440:19:46

-Catherine. Hi.

-Nice to see you.

0:19:460:19:48

Thank you very much for having us here.

0:19:480:19:50

They've got £295 to spend.

0:19:540:19:56

Who's that? Who is it?

0:19:570:19:59

-I don't know.

-Who is he?

0:19:590:20:01

I think it's Schnozzle Durante.

0:20:010:20:03

-Yeah.

-Is it?

-Jimmy Durante.

0:20:040:20:06

-Jimmy Durante.

-There you go.

0:20:060:20:08

Jimmy Durante was one of America's most popular personalities

0:20:110:20:15

from the 1920s through to the 1970s.

0:20:150:20:19

What a hooter!

0:20:190:20:20

# But that was long ago... #

0:20:200:20:22

I think it's horrible.

0:20:220:20:24

It is horrible, but it's unique.

0:20:240:20:27

I mean...

0:20:270:20:29

It's a collectors item, isn't it?

0:20:290:20:30

Well, it is, it's a collectable.

0:20:300:20:32

But who wants those, though?

0:20:320:20:34

A collector. A collector!

0:20:340:20:36

Obviously.

0:20:360:20:37

Our Catherine hasn't heard of old Schnozzle Durante.

0:20:370:20:41

Tell us more, Ricky.

0:20:410:20:42

So, who is this Jimmy...?

0:20:420:20:44

Jimmy Durante was a big star in vaudeville in the States

0:20:440:20:48

and he used to play the piano,

0:20:480:20:50

and his name was Jimmy Durante, but because he had this real big hooter,

0:20:500:20:54

they called him Schnozzle.

0:20:540:20:56

And it's sort of, in a way,

0:20:560:20:57

it's a sort of a homage to him because he was that big of a star.

0:20:570:21:01

Well, then, we've got to get it.

0:21:010:21:03

I think we should get it.

0:21:030:21:05

-We should get it, yeah.

-Go on, kid.

0:21:050:21:06

Even if we lose £47.

0:21:060:21:09

We should get it.

0:21:090:21:10

Oh, Dave?

0:21:100:21:11

I don't think I'm the only one who hasn't...

0:21:110:21:13

Have you heard of this, whatever his name his, Durante?

0:21:130:21:16

Jimmy Durante, yes.

0:21:160:21:17

-He was a big star.

-Well, I've never heard of him.

0:21:170:21:19

A big star. Well, you never went to the pictures when you were a kid,

0:21:190:21:22

-did you?

-You're too young.

0:21:220:21:24

She's too young.

0:21:240:21:25

-Would you mind if I...

-This is supposed to be about antiques

0:21:250:21:28

and she doesn't know anyone over 35!

0:21:280:21:29

Let's get Jimmy out of his cabinet.

0:21:320:21:35

-So, come on, then. What can you do?

-Right, well...

0:21:350:21:37

There's £40 on the ticket.

0:21:370:21:38

It's cheap at that price, Catherine.

0:21:380:21:40

I don't think so!

0:21:400:21:42

Go on. The best price I can do it, £20.

0:21:430:21:46

-Sold!

-THEY LAUGH

0:21:460:21:49

Well done. Cheers, kid.

0:21:490:21:51

Sold!

0:21:510:21:52

What can I say? I mean...

0:21:540:21:55

-Thank you.

-Thank you very much.

0:21:570:21:59

I'd love to say that I'm really happy and I love this, but...

0:21:590:22:02

By Jiminy, Ricky's a swift buyer.

0:22:030:22:06

£20 for the Royal Doulton Jimmy Durante mug.

0:22:060:22:09

What's the mood in the cars, then?

0:22:110:22:13

The problem Ricky's going to have is he thinks the budget...

0:22:130:22:16

He'll think it's his money.

0:22:160:22:17

-Ahh!

-So we'll have to be very careful.

0:22:170:22:19

-So he'll be shrewd.

-Oh, he will be shrewd.

0:22:190:22:21

Yeah. And he's competitive.

0:22:210:22:23

-Is he now?

-Oh, yes. Yes.

0:22:240:22:26

No, I am bothered about winning.

0:22:260:22:27

-Really?

-Oh, yeah.

0:22:270:22:29

-Oh, no. I thought you'd be like, "No, no..."

-Listen to this.

0:22:290:22:31

I still get emotional watching replays of the 1966 World Cup final.

0:22:310:22:38

-If he wins, we won't hear the last of it.

-Oh, my God!

0:22:380:22:41

Blimey. We've got another day of this tomorrow.

0:22:420:22:45

Time for a bit of shut-eye. Nighty-night!

0:22:450:22:47

Wakey-wakey, rise and shine!

0:22:520:22:55

The fellas are on the move once more.

0:22:550:22:57

You must have been quite squashed in that car yesterday, Mick?

0:22:590:23:03

-Yeah.

-It's the first time I've ever seen anyone getting into a car

0:23:030:23:06

with the help of the shoehorn.

0:23:060:23:08

Shut up!

0:23:080:23:10

He's a cheeky devil.

0:23:100:23:12

And the gals?

0:23:140:23:16

Well, you should see what we've bought, Margie.

0:23:160:23:19

Oh, my. Was he... I bet he's...

0:23:190:23:21

Is he sort of very, very quick off the mark?

0:23:210:23:24

He's like lightning. Honestly.

0:23:240:23:26

We bought our first item within seconds.

0:23:260:23:29

-Yeah.

-The second one, we probably bought about two minutes later.

0:23:290:23:32

The third one...

0:23:320:23:34

was just as we were leaving the shop.

0:23:340:23:36

And then the fourth one... Oh, Margie, it's horrible.

0:23:360:23:39

Tell it like it is, Catherine.

0:23:410:23:42

Yesterday, our spirited gents rolled up their sleeves

0:23:420:23:46

and had a thoroughly lovely time.

0:23:460:23:48

Mickey purchased one solitary item,

0:23:480:23:51

the railway plaque, so still has a huge £375 for the day ahead.

0:23:510:23:55

Ricky, on the other hand, couldn't stop spending.

0:23:570:24:00

He has the late 19th-century urn.

0:24:000:24:03

The copper powder flask.

0:24:030:24:04

The collection of little toys.

0:24:040:24:06

And his absolute fave, the Royal Doulton Jimmy Durante mug.

0:24:060:24:11

-£20.

-Sold!

0:24:110:24:13

Well done. Cheers, kid.

0:24:150:24:16

He has £275 left to splash.

0:24:160:24:20

-Thank you.

-Cheers, bye.

0:24:200:24:21

-You know what's happened?

-Yeah, they're talking.

0:24:260:24:28

-They're in the working men's club...

-Talking.

-They've got their pie.

0:24:280:24:31

How many people do they know in and around Liverpool?

0:24:330:24:36

Well, this is the thing. We could be waiting hours.

0:24:360:24:38

They know everyone, don't they?

0:24:380:24:39

ENGINE GRINDS

0:24:410:24:42

-Oh!

-This could be them.

0:24:420:24:44

They make an entrance, don't they?

0:24:440:24:46

-Here they come.

-Hey.

0:24:460:24:48

Good morning. How are we?

0:24:480:24:51

-Ready for a bit of action?

-Lovely to see you both.

0:24:510:24:53

-Oh, we're going to get a double hug.

-Aw!

0:24:530:24:55

Steady on, Margie.

0:24:550:24:57

-MICKEY:

-Morning. How are you? Pleasure to see you.

0:24:570:24:59

How are you, Margie? How are you?

0:24:590:25:01

-I'm all right, darling.

-Good to see you.

0:25:010:25:02

-All the best.

-CATHERINE:

-Yeah, good luck.

0:25:020:25:05

-You'll need it.

-MICKEY:

-I can feel the warmth

0:25:050:25:07

coming from him!

0:25:070:25:08

-So, you put the world to rights?

-MICKEY:

-We certainly did.

0:25:100:25:13

Let's nip in with Ricky and Catherine, shall we?

0:25:210:25:24

So, how was your first experience of the world of antiques yesterday?

0:25:240:25:28

Absolutely brilliant.

0:25:280:25:29

It was an eye-opener.

0:25:290:25:31

A slight disagreement between the experts and the amateur, but...

0:25:310:25:33

Just a slight...

0:25:330:25:35

I'm dying to see it put to the test.

0:25:350:25:37

It's going to make thousands, though,

0:25:370:25:39

that's what's going to happen.

0:25:390:25:40

Whilst over in the fabulous Stag...

0:25:400:25:42

So, we're off to Liverpool and Southport.

0:25:430:25:48

-Right.

-And I believe the shop is on Tunnel Road?

0:25:480:25:52

Tunnel Road. I was born about 200 yards from there.

0:25:520:25:56

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Do you have any connections

0:25:560:25:58

-to get cheap merchandise?

-I hope so. I don't think so.

0:25:580:26:01

But it might be nice, wouldn't it?

0:26:010:26:02

It would be.

0:26:040:26:05

We're in Mickey's stomping ground, the city of Liverpool.

0:26:050:26:08

The Tunnel Furniture Company is Mickey's next stop.

0:26:130:26:16

Here we are.

0:26:170:26:19

-Right, Marge?

-Yeah.

-My neck of the woods.

0:26:190:26:21

Oh!

0:26:250:26:26

-Garden stuff.

-Yeah, garden stuff.

0:26:260:26:28

Seems to be coping all right. Wow!

0:26:300:26:32

It's an Aladdin's cave, this, isn't it?

0:26:320:26:35

Have they got ants in their pants?

0:26:350:26:37

With six rooms stuffed full, they've got a lot to look through in here.

0:26:400:26:44

Are you a bit over-phased?

0:26:450:26:47

Oh, now, I like this, Margie. Art Deco.

0:26:490:26:52

-That's nice, isn't it?

-That's nice.

0:26:520:26:54

It's like a sort of Teasmade, is it?

0:26:540:26:55

Yeah. It's obviously made in the shape of a...

0:26:550:26:59

A ship, isn't it?

0:26:590:27:01

You've got your...

0:27:010:27:02

-Tea and sugar and whatever.

-Yeah, tea and sugar.

0:27:020:27:04

-That's nice, that, isn't it?

-Yeah.

-So, how old would that be, then?

0:27:040:27:08

Well... Got to start being suspicious.

0:27:080:27:11

And I think you'll find that that is, amazingly, a really good repro.

0:27:120:27:16

Moving on. Anything else take your fancy?

0:27:160:27:19

-Oh, look.

-Oh, one of those railway signs. Yes.

0:27:210:27:24

Oh, my goodness. That's all right.

0:27:240:27:25

I like them. Yeah, that's quite a good one.

0:27:250:27:27

Gas pipeline warning.

0:27:270:27:29

People do collect those.

0:27:290:27:30

-Do they?

-Yeah. Amazingly.

0:27:300:27:33

See how much money.

0:27:330:27:34

27.

0:27:360:27:37

-What do you think?

-Do you think?

0:27:380:27:40

-Yeah, might be...

-Could do.

0:27:400:27:42

Yeah, yeah.

0:27:420:27:43

Well, that's one contender.

0:27:430:27:45

Gosh. You've got to have eyes in the back of your head, haven't you?

0:27:470:27:50

Oh, aye.

0:27:500:27:51

Oh, here, we've got... Oh, what've you seen there?

0:27:510:27:54

Microscopes. I like them.

0:27:540:27:55

-Do you like microscopes?

-Yeah, yeah. Do you know what would be good?

0:27:550:27:58

-What?

-We could look into them

0:27:580:28:01

and inspect Ricky and Catherine's profits!

0:28:010:28:03

Ah, just as I thought, nothing.

0:28:060:28:08

The jokes just keep on coming.

0:28:080:28:10

So you like those?

0:28:100:28:11

I do like them, yeah.

0:28:110:28:13

-Possibility?

-Mm.

0:28:130:28:16

A second possible, but, hello, what's this?

0:28:160:28:20

-Oh, it is nice, that, yeah.

-Yes, Satsuma.

0:28:200:28:22

-Satsuma?

-Yes, Satsuma.

0:28:220:28:25

Japanese porcelain.

0:28:250:28:26

-Ah.

-That's quite nice, because inside...

0:28:260:28:29

-Ah, right, OK.

-That's all hand-painted.

0:28:290:28:31

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Oh, wow.

0:28:310:28:34

-That's interesting, isn't it?

-Yeah, if you look at all their faces,

0:28:340:28:37

-they're all different.

-Right, yeah.

0:28:370:28:38

Satsumaware is divided into two distinct categories.

0:28:400:28:44

The original plain dark clay from the early 1600s,

0:28:440:28:49

or the elaborately decorated styles for the export market,

0:28:490:28:52

like this one, probably dating from the early 20th century.

0:28:520:28:56

But there's no ticket price.

0:28:560:28:58

-I think we need to speak to Paul, don't we?

-Yeah, let's get him over.

0:28:580:29:01

Paul! Paul!

0:29:010:29:03

Paul!

0:29:030:29:05

Oh. Here he is.

0:29:050:29:06

Paul, we spotted a lovely little Satsuma...

0:29:060:29:09

Well, no, it's not that lovely.

0:29:090:29:11

-It's not that lovely.

-It's beautiful.

-A little Satsuma dish.

0:29:110:29:14

-Like a powder dish?

-Yes, a powder dish.

0:29:140:29:17

I could do you that for about 45 quid.

0:29:170:29:19

-Yeah, 40?

-Yeah, go on.

0:29:190:29:21

-I think we'll have that.

-40, yeah, we've done well.

0:29:210:29:24

-That's the first.

-That's nice.

0:29:240:29:26

And the microscopes?

0:29:260:29:28

-Now, do they come as a pair?

-No, they're different prices.

0:29:280:29:31

I thought they were a pair for 70 quid.

0:29:310:29:33

See, a pair for 75 would be brilliant, wouldn't it, for us?

0:29:330:29:35

We're working against Ricky Tomlinson, you know...

0:29:350:29:38

If you're working against Ricky Tomlinson,

0:29:380:29:39

you can have them for the 75!

0:29:390:29:41

Ooh, that is a result, cheers! Nice one!

0:29:410:29:45

This is going well.

0:29:450:29:46

We'll have those.

0:29:460:29:48

Now, what about that? Just throw in that gas thing.

0:29:480:29:51

-That's got to be 15 quid.

-Shall we go for that?

0:29:510:29:53

-Yeah, I think that's fair enough.

-Thanks, Paul, you've been great.

0:29:530:29:56

That's £130 for the railway plaque,

0:29:560:29:59

the pair of microscopes and the Satsuma powder bowl.

0:29:590:30:02

-Cheers.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you so much.

0:30:020:30:04

-Cheers, Paul.

-See you.

-Bye, Paul.

0:30:040:30:07

Over to the Jag and Ricky and Catherine.

0:30:140:30:17

So, yes, you know where we're off to now, Catherine?

0:30:170:30:20

-Where are you taking me?

-Liverpool!

0:30:200:30:22

-SCOUSE ACCENT:

-Liverpool, Liverpool!

0:30:220:30:24

-Liverpool!

-Liverpool!

0:30:240:30:26

Oh, dear, Catherine.

0:30:260:30:28

That's right, this pair are also in the city of Liverpool.

0:30:280:30:32

This is where we do our deals, I reckon.

0:30:350:30:37

-This is where it all happens.

-Yes!

0:30:370:30:39

Penny Lane Emporium has lots of dealers selling their goodies.

0:30:390:30:43

What will we find in here then?

0:30:450:30:47

Isn't that lovely?

0:30:470:30:48

We might find some of your old stuff here.

0:30:500:30:52

HE LAUGHS

0:30:520:30:54

It's funny, isn't it, things like this now becoming collectable.

0:30:550:30:58

-Yeah.

-Fantastic.

0:30:580:31:00

-I mean, you probably had one like that, did you?

-I did.

0:31:000:31:03

What about this? I like this.

0:31:070:31:08

-Ah.

-Ahhh!

0:31:080:31:10

That's a bit of class, isn't it?

0:31:100:31:12

-I like that.

-Isn't that elegant?

0:31:120:31:14

-I think that's lovely.

-Mmm.

0:31:140:31:16

That's lovely, I like that, I do like that.

0:31:160:31:18

I love these shades, and the fact that they're...

0:31:180:31:20

I mean, that one's obviously not got a bulb,

0:31:200:31:22

but don't they look lovely when they're lit?

0:31:220:31:25

I do like that, actually.

0:31:250:31:26

I think that's very elegant.

0:31:260:31:28

1920s, it could be.

0:31:280:31:31

I think that's really stylish.

0:31:310:31:32

And it's priced at £150.

0:31:340:31:36

Let's get dealer Mark over.

0:31:360:31:38

Mark!

0:31:380:31:39

Mark.

0:31:390:31:40

-Mark?

-Mark?

0:31:400:31:42

Hi, there. You found something?

0:31:420:31:44

We have.

0:31:440:31:45

Not probably what we'd normally find, but we quite like this lamp.

0:31:460:31:50

-Oh, it's lovely, yeah.

-And I'm guessing the person's not here.

0:31:500:31:53

That's right, yes, Diane's not here at the moment.

0:31:530:31:56

You couldn't give her a ring for us, could you,

0:31:560:31:58

and let me have a word with her?

0:31:580:32:00

I can certainly give her a tinkle, yes.

0:32:000:32:02

It's just a bit out of our price range at the moment, so...

0:32:020:32:04

-Bear with me.

-I think, what do we want to pay, ideally?

0:32:040:32:08

I think £100 tops, really.

0:32:100:32:13

About a hundred-ish if we can...

0:32:130:32:14

-I know it's asking...

-I can only go to 125, so I'll give her a tinkle.

0:32:140:32:18

Give her a tinkle and see what she says.

0:32:180:32:20

Prepare yourself, dealer Diane.

0:32:200:32:22

Ricky Tommo with you, kid.

0:32:220:32:23

Now, listen, we like this little, erm,

0:32:230:32:25

this lamp here, you know,

0:32:250:32:27

the brass standard lamp.

0:32:270:32:29

Now, listen, you're in a good mood, Diane,

0:32:290:32:31

everything's going well and we're going well,

0:32:310:32:33

and I want to win this blinking competition.

0:32:330:32:35

Come on, what's the lowest you can go, Diane?

0:32:350:32:37

-Well, I want you to win it. How about 90?

-90! Ha-ha-hey!

0:32:370:32:42

You're on, thank you very much, I'm going to stop the call immediately,

0:32:420:32:46

in case you change your mind!

0:32:460:32:47

Ta-ra, thanks, Diane!

0:32:470:32:49

You are brilliant!

0:32:520:32:53

Well done! Thank you, Diane.

0:32:530:32:56

I'm made up with that.

0:32:560:32:57

-Thank you very much.

-Congratulations.

-God bless.

0:32:570:32:59

-Thank you!

-Sound as a pound.

0:32:590:33:01

You've done well with that. I think you will, actually.

0:33:010:33:03

Well done, Ricky.

0:33:030:33:05

That's a £60 discount on the Edwardian brass lamp.

0:33:050:33:08

Thank you so much.

0:33:080:33:10

Back to best pals Mickey and Margie.

0:33:120:33:14

-Pressure's on now.

-Pressure's on.

0:33:180:33:20

We haven't got long now to get stuff on the table.

0:33:200:33:22

-No, we haven't, but I'm confident.

-To impress those two.

-Oh, yes.

0:33:220:33:26

But I have absolutely every faith in you, Margie.

0:33:260:33:30

-I can rely on you.

-Oh, my goodness me.

0:33:300:33:32

They've travelled to the seaside town of Southport,

0:33:340:33:37

home to the oldest pleasure pier in the UK.

0:33:370:33:41

And this fine emporium, Theantiquesman.

0:33:430:33:46

They have £245 to spend in here.

0:33:460:33:49

-Wow, look at this.

-Now, what's that you've got, Mickey?

0:33:550:33:58

Avast behind! Oh, it's not a telescope, what is it?

0:33:580:34:01

It's a fireman's hose.

0:34:010:34:02

I knew that all the time!

0:34:040:34:05

Easy mistake, Mickey.

0:34:050:34:07

I quite like these.

0:34:090:34:10

-What's that?

-That's a bamboo brush pot.

0:34:100:34:14

-A brush pot?

-Yeah, you know, for painting brushes.

0:34:140:34:16

Oh, right! Oh, I see.

0:34:160:34:18

Artists' paintbrushes.

0:34:180:34:19

-Yeah.

-Yeah, I do like that, would that be expensive?

0:34:190:34:22

-Well, I don't know.

-Unusual, isn't it?

-We'll have to wait and see.

0:34:220:34:25

Possible. No ticket price.

0:34:250:34:27

Moving on.

0:34:270:34:29

That's a funny old thing next to your telescope.

0:34:290:34:32

Oh, yeah. What is it?

0:34:320:34:34

Ooh!

0:34:340:34:35

Oh, it's a spade.

0:34:350:34:37

-Right.

-Ah!

0:34:370:34:39

Militaria thing?

0:34:390:34:40

-Yeah.

-Some kind of cutting thing.

0:34:400:34:42

Yeah, the soldiers would have them on their belts.

0:34:420:34:47

To cut a...?

0:34:470:34:49

Digging their, well, trenches.

0:34:490:34:51

-Cutting a trench.

-Yeah, yeah.

0:34:510:34:52

Gosh.

0:34:520:34:54

Can dealer John tell us any more about it?

0:34:540:34:57

Yeah, it's for digging trenches.

0:34:580:35:00

It is military.

0:35:000:35:01

-Is it?

-It is military, yes.

0:35:010:35:03

-OK.

-It's got all the military numbers on the side.

0:35:030:35:07

-Oh, in there, OK.

-So you arrive on the battlefield,

0:35:070:35:09

and the first job is to dig a trench?

0:35:090:35:12

And it's very unusual,

0:35:120:35:13

because it's got the actual leather part and it's never been used.

0:35:130:35:17

Yeah, we thought, yeah, there's no creases.

0:35:170:35:19

So, what's that bit for there?

0:35:190:35:21

That's... That would come up and that would...

0:35:210:35:23

Very...

0:35:240:35:26

For a hard rocky stone or something?

0:35:260:35:28

-Yes, yes.

-What an interesting thing.

0:35:280:35:30

It is. I like that.

0:35:300:35:32

Yeah. How much is it, to me, with a bad cold?

0:35:320:35:36

OK. Without a cold, £50.

0:35:360:35:39

With a cold, £30.

0:35:390:35:43

Interesting pricing.

0:35:430:35:45

How much can this brush pot be?

0:35:450:35:47

-£90.

-Oh!

0:35:470:35:49

-John.

-It's a lot, that, John, it's a lot.

-Well...

0:35:500:35:52

I see that, I like it. I really like it.

0:35:520:35:55

Time for Mickey to have a go at the old deal-making.

0:35:550:35:58

Look at me.

0:35:580:36:00

-Look at me in the eyes.

-Yes.

0:36:000:36:02

I want...

0:36:020:36:04

the brush pot...

0:36:040:36:05

..for £70.

0:36:060:36:08

Now look at me in the eyes.

0:36:100:36:11

I can't, I'm not that good an actor.

0:36:110:36:13

For £90.

0:36:130:36:15

Oh, you're not going to ease it?

0:36:150:36:17

-Two for a oner?

-Two for a oner?

-Yeah?

0:36:190:36:22

-It's all right.

-Go on, go on, two for a oner.

0:36:220:36:24

Two for a oner. Done it.

0:36:240:36:26

So that translates into English as £65 for the bamboo brush pot

0:36:260:36:30

and 35 for the entrenching tool.

0:36:300:36:31

Pay the gentleman.

0:36:310:36:33

I certainly will. Here we go. There we have...

0:36:330:36:36

And that deal takes their tally to five lots for auction.

0:36:360:36:40

Excellent.

0:36:400:36:41

80, 90, 100!

0:36:410:36:43

Thank you so much, John.

0:36:430:36:46

It's a pleasure doing business with you.

0:36:460:36:48

Brilliant experience.

0:36:480:36:50

Thank you very much.

0:36:500:36:52

Right, bye, John. Thank you.

0:36:520:36:54

That's our shopping done, innit?

0:36:540:36:55

-Yeah, great.

-I think we've done well.

-We have. Come on, let's go!

0:36:550:36:58

Meanwhile, what are Ricky and Catherine up to?

0:37:000:37:02

We bought something yesterday doggie-related,

0:37:030:37:06

and you are a bit of a doggy fan, aren't you?

0:37:060:37:08

I'm a big doggy fan. I love, I love dogs.

0:37:080:37:10

My favourite breeds are the bull breeds, bull mastiffs, bulldogs,

0:37:100:37:14

English bull terriers.

0:37:140:37:16

And because of this love for all things canine,

0:37:180:37:20

Ricky and Catherine have detoured to Atherton in Greater Manchester.

0:37:200:37:24

They've come to the Guide Dogs training centre,

0:37:260:37:29

to hear how, 86 years ago,

0:37:290:37:31

four dogs would set in motion

0:37:310:37:33

the beginning of ground-breaking training,

0:37:330:37:37

ultimately bringing life-changing independence

0:37:370:37:39

to tens of thousands of people -

0:37:390:37:41

an incredible story of trust in man's best friend.

0:37:410:37:44

Ricky's come to hear about the pioneering work

0:37:470:37:49

of those who trained the first dogs for the blind.

0:37:490:37:53

Centre manager Sue Richardson knows the story.

0:37:530:37:55

-Hello!

-You must be Sue?

0:37:580:37:59

I am. Lovely to meet you.

0:37:590:38:01

-Nice to meet you, kid.

-Nice to meet you.

0:38:010:38:03

-Thanks for letting us in, kid.

-You're very welcome, yeah.

0:38:030:38:05

You can hear the dogs barking.

0:38:050:38:07

Hello, Catherine. Lovely to meet you.

0:38:070:38:09

Yes, come on in.

0:38:090:38:10

The guide dog story starts at the end of the First World War.

0:38:120:38:15

In 1916, a German doctor trained dogs to help veterans

0:38:150:38:19

blinded by gas attacks.

0:38:190:38:21

But by 1931, his techniques had found their way to Britain.

0:38:230:38:27

We had two ladies, Muriel Crook and Rosamond Bond,

0:38:280:38:30

who'd heard of some training success across Europe

0:38:300:38:34

with blind people with dogs,

0:38:340:38:35

and they decided they wanted to launch something over here.

0:38:350:38:39

The ladies were German shepherd breeders

0:38:400:38:42

and organised the training of the first four British guide dogs -

0:38:420:38:45

Judy, Flash, Folly and Meta -

0:38:450:38:48

from Muriel's home in Wallasey.

0:38:480:38:50

The four men who volunteered were taking a brave,

0:38:520:38:54

bold step into the unknown.

0:38:540:38:56

It was a four week class.

0:38:570:38:59

They went through the rigorous training,

0:38:590:39:00

and it took quite a lot of confidence on their behalf,

0:39:000:39:03

because obviously they didn't have any eyesight at all

0:39:030:39:06

and they were learning to work with dogs who they didn't know particularly well,

0:39:060:39:09

so it took quite a lot of courage and bravery,

0:39:090:39:11

and they were learning to do things even like run along with the dogs.

0:39:110:39:14

So these two ladies then basically started,

0:39:140:39:17

"Right, we really need to do this properly."

0:39:170:39:20

In 1936, the first house was created

0:39:200:39:23

where people were trained regularly from there.

0:39:230:39:26

By 1956,

0:39:260:39:28

102 dogs had been trained when the ladies created a breeding programme.

0:39:280:39:34

It really, again, really started off very well in England,

0:39:340:39:38

probably in about the late '60s, early '70s,

0:39:380:39:40

that was our proper breeding programme.

0:39:400:39:43

And now we breed up to 1,400 puppies a year.

0:39:430:39:45

Rosamond and Muriel's training programme

0:39:450:39:48

acclimatised the dogs to busy roads and obstacles,

0:39:480:39:52

common in everyday life.

0:39:520:39:54

This training is still used by the Guide Dogs charity today

0:39:540:39:58

and is carried out by volunteers.

0:39:580:40:00

Over the years, the golden retriever crossed with the Labrador

0:40:000:40:04

has proven to be the most successful guide dog.

0:40:040:40:06

Would you like to meet some of the puppies? These little ones?

0:40:060:40:09

-Yes, please.

-Yes? OK.

0:40:090:40:10

-Hello!

-Thank you.

0:40:100:40:12

-Who have we got here?

-So, this is...

0:40:120:40:15

Kerry. Hiya, Kerry.

0:40:150:40:17

14 weeks.

0:40:170:40:19

Oh! Hello!

0:40:190:40:20

And this is Chas, and he's 18 weeks.

0:40:200:40:23

-Hello!

-So he's a little bit older.

0:40:230:40:25

We just take them out and about on the bus and the train...

0:40:270:40:30

-Great.

-And we just get them used to everything.

0:40:300:40:33

And they're lovely.

0:40:340:40:36

And they're allowed to play with toys and our own pet dogs.

0:40:360:40:40

They have a lovely puppyhood.

0:40:400:40:41

You don't take old chaps in, do you?

0:40:410:40:43

You can come if you like!

0:40:450:40:47

If you can sit and lie down!

0:40:470:40:49

-Going to take the challenge?

-Yes...

0:40:490:40:51

But what's it like to be guided by a dog?

0:40:510:40:54

Ricky's joining a class.

0:40:540:40:56

-Right, are you ready?

-Yeah. Yeah.

0:40:560:40:58

OK, let's go. Forward...

0:40:580:41:01

So what's happened here,

0:41:010:41:03

we've set up what we call an artificial obstacle course,

0:41:030:41:06

which really approximates what a dog would have to deal with

0:41:060:41:10

with a guided owner, out on the street

0:41:100:41:12

when it's moving past street furniture,

0:41:120:41:14

groups of people...

0:41:140:41:15

-So...

-Fantastic.

0:41:150:41:17

Yeah. It's very disorientating,

0:41:170:41:20

I'm sure Ricky's probably finding this quite interesting, to be honest.

0:41:200:41:23

It's an amazing experience, kid.

0:41:280:41:30

It's absolutely... You can't...

0:41:300:41:32

You can't describe it, though, see, can you?

0:41:320:41:36

You... You... I'm trusting him, in this case the dog and you.

0:41:360:41:40

When the dogs are trained, there's no you,

0:41:400:41:42

there's just the dog and the handler, isn't there?

0:41:420:41:45

Over 80 years ago,

0:41:490:41:50

four courageous blind men and their loyal dogs

0:41:500:41:53

helped to transform the lives of the blind and partially sighted.

0:41:530:41:58

Since then, the charity has helped over 29,000 people to achieve

0:41:580:42:03

life-changing independence.

0:42:030:42:06

A remarkable feat illustrating the exemplary training

0:42:060:42:09

and the wonderful bond between guide dog and his owner.

0:42:090:42:13

With the shopping now complete,

0:42:190:42:21

time to reunite and have a nosey at one another's buys.

0:42:210:42:25

Prepare to be dazzled.

0:42:250:42:26

Did you have a good time today?

0:42:280:42:29

Marvellous, wonderful, couldn't have gone better.

0:42:290:42:31

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Good.

0:42:310:42:33

-So, are we going to reveal?

-I'm going to show you what we bought.

0:42:330:42:36

-Exactly.

-Dun-dun-dun!

0:42:360:42:38

-That's lovely.

-CATHERINE AND RICKY HUM

0:42:400:42:42

Oh.

0:42:450:42:47

-Ooh.

-Ooh. Oh, hey.

0:42:470:42:48

Now, unfortunately, we did have a bit of a mishap,

0:42:480:42:50

-we're missing a...

-We're missing a...

-Oh, no.

0:42:500:42:53

..a shade, but that's fine.

0:42:530:42:55

We've still got our beautiful lamp stand.

0:42:550:42:58

And look at all our objets d'art.

0:42:580:42:59

-Ooh, that's nice.

-Can I just move in?

0:42:590:43:01

-Yes, you can.

-And have a look.

0:43:010:43:03

What's happened here? Has he got... Is there a lid on there?

0:43:030:43:06

No, because it's a world famous entertainer.

0:43:060:43:08

Oh, it's a character jug.

0:43:080:43:10

-And who is it?

-Oh, it's Schnozzle Durante!

0:43:100:43:12

Oh, that's wonderful.

0:43:120:43:14

-Well done.

-Do you like that?

0:43:140:43:15

He picked that. I think it's horrible!

0:43:150:43:17

-Yeah.

-Do you like it?

0:43:170:43:19

-MICKEY:

-Jimmy Durante?!

-Oh, yes.

0:43:190:43:21

That's great, that, Mick, innit?

0:43:210:43:22

# Fairy tales can come true, it can happen to you

0:43:220:43:25

# If you're objet d'art... #

0:43:250:43:27

Catherine doesn't have a clue!

0:43:270:43:29

-Yes, love that.

-And then you've got the...

0:43:290:43:32

We don't mention that, we move on.

0:43:320:43:33

Let's have a look at yours.

0:43:330:43:35

We think that could have come from Imperial Russia.

0:43:350:43:38

See, no use talking to her.

0:43:390:43:42

-No use talking.

-All right, OK.

0:43:420:43:43

That looks nice, that.

0:43:430:43:45

That's not 32 carat, it's just 18.

0:43:450:43:48

Looks more like boiled carrots.

0:43:480:43:50

And, you know, shall we reveal...

0:43:500:43:52

Come on, then. Let's have a look at your...

0:43:520:43:54

-Let's have a look at your stuff.

-We haven't really...

0:43:540:43:56

-Come on.

-Here we go.

0:43:560:43:58

-MICKEY:

-Reveal!

-There we go.

0:43:580:44:00

-Now, then. Oh...

-So...

0:44:020:44:04

I love your Satsuma.

0:44:040:44:06

Yeah, I have to show you something nice about it.

0:44:060:44:08

-Go on, then.

-On both sides, you've got the painting inside.

0:44:080:44:13

That is very unusual.

0:44:130:44:15

That is very unusual.

0:44:150:44:16

How much did you pay for that?

0:44:160:44:18

-40 quid.

-Yeah.

0:44:180:44:19

-Hundred quid, hundred and 20 quid, that.

-You reckon?

0:44:190:44:22

-It's beautiful.

-That I've never seen, it's a trench cutter.

0:44:220:44:25

-It's a what?

-Trench cutter.

-Trench spade?

0:44:250:44:28

-Trench spade?

-You must call a spade a spade.

0:44:280:44:31

They used to have them in the American army, digging themselves...

0:44:310:44:34

-That's unusual, isn't it?

-I just thought it was a bit interesting.

0:44:340:44:37

-I think you've got a lovely selection, there.

-It is.

0:44:370:44:40

I think that is really interesting. I think that is fantastic.

0:44:400:44:44

-I like a bit of Satsuma.

-That is the best thing out of the lot,

0:44:440:44:47

-although I hate saying that.

-Really?

0:44:470:44:49

-It is really nice.

-Are you a sore loser?

0:44:490:44:51

I am. But, no, it's beautiful.

0:44:510:44:52

Well done, you.

0:44:520:44:54

Fantastic. Come on, then.

0:44:540:44:56

-Let's go.

-OK.

0:44:560:44:57

We'll see you... We'll speak to you a bit later.

0:44:570:45:00

See you later at the auction.

0:45:000:45:01

-MICKEY:

-See you at the auction.

0:45:010:45:03

Come on, then.

0:45:030:45:04

Come on, you lot, dish the dirt.

0:45:040:45:07

I think, quite interesting.

0:45:070:45:08

Yeah? Yeah.

0:45:080:45:10

From the little digging spade to the microscopes, yeah,

0:45:100:45:14

-I think it's quite interesting.

-I think what is lovely

0:45:140:45:17

is that Satsuma dish, which...

0:45:170:45:19

It is really unusual to be painted inside like that,

0:45:190:45:22

it's really quality.

0:45:220:45:23

Think they've got the edge on the auction?

0:45:230:45:25

No, I think we're... I'm quietly confident,

0:45:250:45:27

I think we can swing this.

0:45:270:45:28

What did you think when they saw the Schnozz?

0:45:280:45:31

-Well, she knew who it was right away.

-They knew.

0:45:310:45:34

-Right away.

-You're pretty good.

0:45:340:45:36

It's made by a quality maker, isn't it, and stuff like that.

0:45:360:45:39

-I think that'll do really well.

-I think it will. Well...

0:45:390:45:42

-Well, kid, you've been great.

-Let's go.

-Thank you.

-Come on.

0:45:420:45:45

And what do you think your mate Ricky said about this?

0:45:450:45:48

-He'd say...

-AS RICKY:

-"I tell you what, lad,

0:45:480:45:51

"why don't we go to the ale house and have a bevvy

0:45:510:45:55

"and forget all about it?!"

0:45:550:45:57

Margie is speechless for once.

0:45:570:46:00

We're off to auction,

0:46:020:46:04

and the West Midlands,

0:46:040:46:05

destined for the town of Stourbridge.

0:46:050:46:08

Are you looking forward to seeing Catherine, Rick?

0:46:080:46:10

Yeah, I am. I was made up with her.

0:46:100:46:11

She taught me a lot. And very competitive, like me.

0:46:110:46:14

Thinks we're on a sure thing, I can't wait to beat you.

0:46:140:46:17

I'll shake your hand and commiserate with you,

0:46:170:46:19

-but I think we're on a winner.

-Well, I think we are.

0:46:190:46:23

Fieldings Auctioneers is the location for today's auction battle.

0:46:230:46:27

This should be exciting.

0:46:290:46:30

-Hello!

-Hey, you all right, kid?

0:46:340:46:37

-Oh!

-You all right?

-Ready for the fray?

0:46:370:46:40

Oh, yes. Yes, we're up for it.

0:46:400:46:42

-Are you up for it?

-What do you think, Rick?

0:46:420:46:44

You were a good loser. A very good loser.

0:46:440:46:47

-Story of my life!

-Take no notice of him, come on.

0:46:470:46:49

Super confidence from Ricky, eh?

0:46:490:46:52

Ricky and Catherine spent £215 on five lots.

0:46:520:46:55

Ricky being an impulsive buyer.

0:46:550:46:58

Mickey and Margie spent £255, also on five lots.

0:46:580:47:02

Mickey proved to be a natural haggler.

0:47:020:47:05

Nicholas Davies is the gavel-basher for today.

0:47:070:47:10

What does he think of our road trippers' offerings?

0:47:100:47:13

At £75, then, done and finished.

0:47:130:47:15

One lot I'd be worried about selling,

0:47:150:47:17

the Royal Doulton Jimmy Durante jug, just a bit out of fashion, really.

0:47:170:47:20

So it may struggle.

0:47:200:47:22

At the moment, the military's doing quite well,

0:47:220:47:24

so the trench cutter could be an interesting lot.

0:47:240:47:27

A bit different, bit unusual, should do OK.

0:47:270:47:29

Thank you, Nicholas. And we are also open to internet bidders.

0:47:300:47:34

Wow, what do you think?

0:47:340:47:36

Smart, isn't it?

0:47:360:47:38

-It is.

-It's your lot up first.

0:47:380:47:40

Are you nervous?

0:47:400:47:41

I am a bit nervous, yeah.

0:47:410:47:43

Doulton character jug.

0:47:430:47:44

Yes...

0:47:440:47:47

No, he's lovely. He's lovely. They could make one of you.

0:47:470:47:50

-There's confidence. It's oozing out of him.

-There is one of me, yes.

0:47:500:47:53

-Is there?

-Yeah.

-Oh, we need to get one.

0:47:530:47:55

It's much bigger, though, isn't it?

0:47:550:47:57

The nose is a lot...

0:47:570:47:59

The nose is a lot bigger!

0:47:590:48:03

Yeah, first, Ricky's favourite.

0:48:030:48:05

The Royal Doulton Jimmy Durante mug.

0:48:050:48:08

Here's your chance to make someone happy.

0:48:080:48:11

Where'd you start me on this one?

0:48:110:48:13

£10? £10 for it, quickly, come on.

0:48:130:48:15

It's here to go. £10.

0:48:150:48:16

It's got to be sold. Are you coming online at £10?

0:48:160:48:19

£10 there.

0:48:190:48:20

Hooray!

0:48:200:48:21

We've taken off.

0:48:210:48:23

15 if you're coming back online with £10 in the room.

0:48:230:48:25

15, are you coming back? At £10, maiden bid.

0:48:250:48:28

Internet's gone quiet. It was a long way away,

0:48:280:48:30

to be fair. It was Australia.

0:48:300:48:31

-What's wrong with that...?

-They don't know him.

0:48:310:48:33

Where's the American bidders?

0:48:330:48:35

Last chance. All finished and done?

0:48:350:48:37

Oh! Well, that's a surprise.

0:48:390:48:41

Thanks very much, Mick, for your support.

0:48:410:48:44

Thank you for your support.

0:48:440:48:45

I feel really humbled.

0:48:450:48:46

Don't worry, Ricky, you bought from the heart, and that's what counts.

0:48:480:48:51

Listen, don't be worrying.

0:48:530:48:54

Any idiot could have bought that.

0:48:540:48:56

Don't rub it in, Mickey, your bamboo brush pot is next.

0:48:590:49:02

Bids this time will open at £35.

0:49:030:49:05

35.

0:49:050:49:06

£35 I'm bid.

0:49:060:49:07

40. Five?

0:49:070:49:08

£40 in the room. 45 online if you're coming back.

0:49:080:49:11

-£40 in the room.

-It's good, though, it's online.

0:49:110:49:13

50 in the room.

0:49:130:49:14

55 online, are you coming back?

0:49:140:49:16

-Clearing it.

-60 in the room. 65 online.

0:49:160:49:18

-70.

-Ah! Profit.

0:49:180:49:20

75 online? £70 in the room.

0:49:200:49:22

75. 80. Five. 90. Five?

0:49:220:49:25

-Stop.

-Stop, he says!

0:49:250:49:28

-Oh, no, it's good.

-I'm selling at £110, are we all sure?

0:49:280:49:32

110. Sold.

0:49:320:49:34

Lady's bid. Paddle up, 608.

0:49:340:49:36

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

0:49:360:49:38

I think Ricky's upset.

0:49:400:49:42

Well done, Team Mickey.

0:49:420:49:43

A great profit.

0:49:430:49:45

You see, it's not the winning, it's the taking part.

0:49:450:49:49

Come on, Ricky, never fear, your 19th century urn is up next.

0:49:520:49:57

£20 for it, quickly, anybody coming in for this one? Nice piece at £20.

0:49:570:50:00

Internet's thinking about it.

0:50:000:50:01

-At £20. No interest at 20.

-Oh, come on, internet.

-20, I've got you.

0:50:010:50:04

-A bid at 20.

-We're off.

0:50:040:50:06

At £20, maiden bid. Come on, be quick.

0:50:060:50:08

At £20. 25 anywhere else?

0:50:080:50:09

-We need more than that.

-£25?

0:50:090:50:10

For an extra fiver. At £20, then.

0:50:100:50:12

Come on!

0:50:120:50:14

Internet's quiet. Room's quiet.

0:50:140:50:17

£20 it is. Paddle aloft.

0:50:170:50:19

That's a bad result.

0:50:190:50:20

-I know!

-It's a bad result.

0:50:200:50:22

My bad result was coming out with him.

0:50:220:50:25

I'm sure things will pick up soon, Ricky.

0:50:250:50:28

Ricky, five, six years, you'll forget this ever happened.

0:50:280:50:32

Next, Mickey's microscopes.

0:50:360:50:39

-There they are.

-£20.

0:50:400:50:42

Put the hammer down, 20 quid.

0:50:420:50:43

Two microscopes, £20 I'm bid.

0:50:430:50:45

-25 anywhere else?

-Come on.

-Maiden bid seems cheap.

0:50:450:50:48

Very cheap, this. 25 anywhere else?

0:50:480:50:50

-Oh, no!

-£20.

0:50:500:50:51

-I'm going to have to sell them at £20.

-Oh, we're...

0:50:510:50:53

Internet. 25 online.

0:50:530:50:54

-Got you, 30 in the room.

-Oh, no.

0:50:540:50:57

-Come on.

-At £35 I'm asking.

0:50:570:51:00

-Oh, no!

-35. 40? Still only £20 each.

0:51:000:51:02

£40 in the room.

0:51:020:51:04

45, are you coming back online?

0:51:040:51:06

-£40.

-You're lucky, they were going to sell at 20, then.

0:51:060:51:08

Online, quickly, one last bid.

0:51:080:51:10

£40, then, room bid, I'll have to take it at 40.

0:51:100:51:12

-Are we all done?

-Oh, no.

0:51:120:51:14

-£40 for the two microscopes.

-That's not a big loss.

0:51:140:51:17

Oh, congratulations!

0:51:170:51:19

-Well, we were...

-I'm thrilled.

0:51:190:51:22

Don't take it the wrong way.

0:51:220:51:24

Great support, fellas.

0:51:250:51:27

Don't worry, Mickey, plenty more to go.

0:51:270:51:31

You see, that vindicated me.

0:51:310:51:32

-You see, you put the jinx on it.

-I did put the jinx on it.

0:51:320:51:35

-Carry on doing that.

-Wiped our profit on the brush.

0:51:350:51:37

Yeah. It's wiped our profit on the brush.

0:51:370:51:39

Ricky's next with the copper powder flask.

0:51:390:51:43

-It's this.

-Oh, look, that looks nice.

0:51:430:51:45

-Always collectable.

-Bids and interest at £30. £30.

0:51:450:51:48

£30 straight in.

0:51:480:51:49

Takes the commission bid out.

0:51:490:51:51

This is good.

0:51:510:51:53

Online at £30. 35 on the internet.

0:51:530:51:54

40, you're out. 35, internet bid.

0:51:540:51:57

Seems about right at 35. 40 anywhere else in the room?

0:51:570:52:00

40 anywhere else online?

0:52:000:52:01

-Come on...

-No.

0:52:010:52:02

This is good, this is our good thing.

0:52:020:52:04

£35. All done and finished?

0:52:040:52:07

That's what we paid.

0:52:070:52:09

35.

0:52:090:52:11

-I liked it.

-I thought that would make more.

0:52:110:52:13

So did I, Catherine.

0:52:130:52:14

That's a real bargain for a lucky buyer.

0:52:140:52:16

I'm putting on my trying-to-care face.

0:52:180:52:20

Are you?

0:52:200:52:21

Dry your eyes, Ricky.

0:52:230:52:25

Right, Mickey's next to go with his entrenching tool.

0:52:250:52:28

-Bids and interest, 35.

-Interest, £35.

0:52:280:52:31

-What did you pay, again?

-35.

0:52:310:52:32

Handy for the garden, if you're desperate. At £35. 40 anywhere else?

0:52:320:52:36

£35 for the military.

0:52:360:52:37

At 35. 40, can't tempt anyone else?

0:52:370:52:40

-Surely another one.

-On commission at 35.

0:52:400:52:43

Bid's left with us. All sure and done at 35?

0:52:430:52:45

Last chance.

0:52:450:52:47

Darn it.

0:52:490:52:51

-I, well...

-HE CHUCKLES

0:52:510:52:54

Another interesting buy at a snip of a price.

0:52:540:52:57

Oh, we only broke even.

0:52:570:52:59

We broke even.

0:52:590:53:01

I hate that.

0:53:010:53:02

Ricky's Edwardian lamp is next to go.

0:53:030:53:06

Looks much better on the screen, anyway!

0:53:060:53:08

£100 for the standard lamp. Anybody coming in at £100?

0:53:080:53:11

No interest at £100.

0:53:110:53:12

I'm going to drop it down, then. £50 for it.

0:53:120:53:14

I can't bear it. It was such a good thing.

0:53:140:53:17

No interest at £50.

0:53:170:53:18

Can't tempt anyone at £50 for the standard lamp,

0:53:180:53:20

-the brass standard lamp?

-If you start...

-Come on.

0:53:200:53:23

-I am absolutely astounded.

-It's so sleek, it's such a nice thing.

0:53:230:53:26

This is ridiculous. At £50 I'm bid.

0:53:260:53:28

Do I see 55? Any other competition?

0:53:280:53:29

Surely. Someone shine a light on it.

0:53:290:53:32

£50. 55 anywhere else?

0:53:320:53:34

£50, the maiden bid, and I will sell at £50.

0:53:340:53:36

No other competition for the standard lamp?

0:53:360:53:38

You've all got standard lamps at home, I presume.

0:53:380:53:40

-At £50. We all sure, done and finished?

-I loved it.

0:53:400:53:42

I really, really loved that.

0:53:420:53:43

-Gosh.

-Hope you're satisfied now.

0:53:430:53:46

-Yes.

-You're satisfied now, aren't you?

0:53:460:53:49

-No, I feel terrible.

-That's a real shame, Ricky.

0:53:490:53:52

It was an elegant thing.

0:53:520:53:54

I'm only laughing on the inside.

0:53:540:53:55

-You're gloating.

-No, we're not.

0:53:550:53:57

We're not gloating, honestly.

0:53:570:53:59

Mickey's railway plaques are next.

0:54:020:54:03

Anybody coming in for these at £20?

0:54:050:54:07

Can't tempt anyone at £20.

0:54:070:54:08

You're going to make me work hard.

0:54:080:54:10

-Yes.

-£10 for the two, then, quickly.

0:54:100:54:12

Where are all the hands? £10 for these two. Ten, thank you. Ten.

0:54:120:54:15

I'll take 15 off anyone else.

0:54:150:54:16

This is a disaster.

0:54:160:54:18

-£10, it is.

-It's not.

0:54:180:54:20

At £10 it is, then.

0:54:200:54:22

12 at the back. 15.

0:54:220:54:23

Oh, go on, an extra three quid.

0:54:230:54:25

-No?

-Yeah, yeah.

0:54:250:54:27

Are you sure? Oh, go on, yeah.

0:54:270:54:28

It'll be hilarious. £12 at the back.

0:54:280:54:31

Put it on your cooker for 15 quid.

0:54:310:54:33

Can't tempt you? It's £12 at the back of the room.

0:54:330:54:35

-At £12, then.

-Get it down, get it down!

-Are we all finished at £12?

0:54:350:54:38

Right... Oh...

0:54:380:54:39

RICKY CHEERS

0:54:390:54:41

-LAUGHTER

-It wasn't a loss, was it?

0:54:410:54:44

Oh, don't worry.

0:54:440:54:46

Ricky's enjoying himself.

0:54:460:54:49

Never mind, Mickey, you're still in the lead.

0:54:490:54:51

-It's not a loss, it's a disaster.

-It's only a small loss.

0:54:520:54:54

It's a disaster, not a loss.

0:54:540:54:56

Next, it's Ricky's collection of Meccano and Dinky toy garden tools.

0:54:580:55:03

They are sweet, they are small.

0:55:030:55:05

If you've got a window box, they could be really handy.

0:55:050:55:08

Where do you start me? £10 for them.

0:55:080:55:10

Ten. 15.

0:55:100:55:12

-20. 25. 30.

-There you go.

0:55:120:55:14

Oh, go on. You love them.

0:55:140:55:16

-You'll kick yourself.

-One more, one more.

0:55:160:55:18

-Not for a fiver?

-Go.

0:55:180:55:20

-35.

-Yes, go on.

0:55:200:55:21

Oh, go on, you love them.

0:55:210:55:23

40?

0:55:230:55:25

40. Are you sure, this time?

0:55:250:55:28

Absolutely? Because you weren't sure last time.

0:55:280:55:30

£40 at the back. 45 anywhere else?

0:55:300:55:32

45 online? 45 anywhere else in the room?

0:55:320:55:34

£40 on the back row.

0:55:340:55:35

I'm selling them at £40.

0:55:350:55:36

Last chance. At £40, they're going.

0:55:360:55:38

-Sold.

-Well done.

0:55:380:55:40

That's good. Good.

0:55:400:55:42

-Nice one.

-Finally, a profit for Ricky.

0:55:420:55:46

I want to borrow the wheelbarrow to take the profits home in.

0:55:460:55:50

Meccano!

0:55:510:55:53

Chin up, Ricky. Right, it's the final lot of the day.

0:55:550:55:58

Mickey's Satsuma powder bowl.

0:55:580:56:00

£45. Takes all the other bidders out straightaway.

0:56:010:56:03

At 45, we're in and 50 online.

0:56:030:56:05

55. And 60 online, are you back?

0:56:050:56:07

It's 55 on commission with us.

0:56:070:56:09

-You should double. Come on.

-60 anywhere else in the room?

0:56:090:56:11

£60 on the internet. It's back.

0:56:110:56:13

In the room - I'll come back to you. 65.

0:56:130:56:15

Let's do the room. 65, 70.

0:56:150:56:16

-75?

-I'm out.

0:56:160:56:18

75, madam?

0:56:180:56:19

75. 80 behind.

0:56:190:56:21

85? 90 behind.

0:56:210:56:22

Very good. This is good!

0:56:220:56:24

120. 130.

0:56:240:56:26

-Well done.

-140. 150. 160. 170.

0:56:260:56:30

180. 190. 200.

0:56:300:56:31

Oh, my goodness!

0:56:310:56:34

That's a definite no, isn't it?

0:56:340:56:36

-Well done!

-Satsuma's not doing that well.

0:56:360:56:39

I know, but this is a good quality...

0:56:390:56:41

This is a good example.

0:56:410:56:43

£190. Are we all sure, now?

0:56:430:56:44

At 190. Finished and done?

0:56:440:56:47

-BANGS GAVEL

-Oh, well done.

0:56:470:56:50

I'm really pleased for you.

0:56:500:56:51

No. No, I don't want to shake hands.

0:56:510:56:54

Blooming heck!

0:56:540:56:56

What a way to end the auction, eh?

0:56:560:56:59

Right, here we go.

0:56:590:57:01

Now time for the calculations.

0:57:010:57:04

Starting with £400, Ricky and Catherine made a loss of £87.90.

0:57:050:57:10

Their final total after all auction costs is £312.10.

0:57:100:57:16

Mickey and Margie started with the same amount

0:57:180:57:20

and, after all sale room costs,

0:57:200:57:24

made a profit of £62.34.

0:57:240:57:26

They are today's glorious Road Trip winners

0:57:260:57:29

with final takings of £462.34.

0:57:290:57:34

All profits go to Children In Need. Well done.

0:57:340:57:37

Well, well indeed.

0:57:370:57:40

-That was great fun.

-It's over.

-It's over.

0:57:400:57:42

Yes, thank you so much, Margie.

0:57:420:57:44

Absolutely wonderful. I've really enjoyed it.

0:57:440:57:46

Brilliant. Thanks, Catherine.

0:57:460:57:48

I hope to hear from you again.

0:57:480:57:50

I can't say the same about you.

0:57:500:57:52

Never mind. There we go.

0:57:520:57:54

Bye!

0:57:540:57:56

All's well that ends well.

0:57:560:57:58

Been good fun, Rick, I've had a great time.

0:58:030:58:06

Learnt a bit, met new friends.

0:58:060:58:08

Our experts... Our experts have been superb, haven't they?

0:58:090:58:11

-Oh, wonderful.

-Absolutely superb.

0:58:110:58:13

How knowledgeable, hey, how knowledgeable.

0:58:130:58:15

They can tell you anything about everything.

0:58:150:58:17

Yeah. Pity they didn't know who we were, isn't it?

0:58:170:58:19

Yeah. Yeah. She kept calling me Mickey.

0:58:190:58:22

We've loved having you.

0:58:220:58:24

Bye-bye, fellas!

0:58:240:58:26

Celebrity likely lads from Liverpool, pals Ricky Tomlinson and Micky Starke, are joined by Catherine Southon and Margie Cooper on a rollocking road trip adventure. Kicking off from Knutsford, Cheshire, they head for auction in Southport via a visit to Liverpool. Ricky turns out to be an impulse buyer while Micky adopts a more relaxed approach. Gamble buys include antiques from Japan and China, but what will sell closer to home?

Micky also learns why topless men from a small Cheshire town made global impact with their sweaty and salty occupation, while dog lover Ricky discovers the incredible history of guide dog training in the UK.