Play Time - Part 1 Flog It: Trade Secrets


Play Time - Part 1

Tips on antiques and collectibles. The team relive their childhood memories as they take a look at antique toys and games.


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Transcript


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Now, we've all got things tucked away in cupboards or in the attic.

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Treasures that have been forgotten about for many years.

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But if you take a closer look, you might just find something

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of real value.

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Something a collector will be waiting for.

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I have an automatic gold detector in my fingertips!

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Over the last 11 years on the show,

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you've literally brought in thousands of items

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for our experts to wax lyrical over.

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And now I want to share some of that knowledge with the rest of you

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to help you get in the know.

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On today's show, we're looking back at childhood memories.

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And what's the stuff of those memories?

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Well, it's toys, of course.

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-It's lovely, isn't it?

-Where did you get it from?

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And we'll be letting you in on the secret of what's a winner

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and what's a damp squib

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when it come to selling those childhood treasures.

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If you can find and immaculate

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and complete old Monopoly set you're into money.

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We've got an Aladdin's cave of play things and we'll be lifting the lid on what to look out for

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in antique toys.

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I think this is all her original dress, which is marvellous.

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Wonderful glass eyes. Later, they were plastic.

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If we knock them against our teeth, we can tell they're glass.

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And today's the day Elizabeth Talbot reveals a soft spot

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for a childhood favourite.

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He's gorgeous! He's waving, look.

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One of my favourite toys from my childhood

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has to be my Dinky and Corgi cars.

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Every time I see one at a Flog It valuation day,

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it brings back memories of a happy childhood for me.

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I think that's what the collectors are looking for.

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Evocative of a time before computer games

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when you had to use your own imagination to play with your toys.

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But what separates a collectable classic

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from something of just sentimental value?

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Things that are original and retain their original packaging

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and is in as good a condition as possible are more valuable.

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So often, especially with Dinky toys,

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a Dinky toy might be worth £50, but the box it came in might be worth 100.

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I suppose that's condition, isn't it?

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Toys and games have got to be in good condition.

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Sadly, not played with!

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Sad to think of a toy or game that hasn't been used,

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but the more mint-like the condition,

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the more value it will have.

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And boxed, if possible.

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So the message is loud and clear.

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Condition, condition, condition!

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Now let's take a closer look at some of the most exciting

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and pristine toys we've ever seen on the show.

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-What a wonderful treasure you've brought in!

-It's lovely, isn't it?

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-Where did you get it from?

-It belonged to my father.

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But the strange thing was, we none of us saw it when we were children.

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We only, unfortunately, discovered it after he'd died.

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-We were going through his things to sort through them.

-No!

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-Never got it out at Christmas or anything?

-No.

-So the family could play along?

-No.

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The other nice thing to see straightaway is the inset brass plaque here,

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engraved with the maker's name. Which is?

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"Toulmin & Gale, from Cheapside in London."

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There's nothing cheap about this box, is there?

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Toulmin & Gale, actually, were a very long-established firm,

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founded in the early part of the 18th century.

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They went right through the 19th century,

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even winning a gold medal in the 1862 International Exhibition.

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-We've naturally got a whole set of chess.

-Yes.

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-We've got a set of dominoes.

-Yes.

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A full set of draughts.

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Games, of course, are common, and have been common for thousands of years.

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A compendium of this quality

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and range of games

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would not have been common.

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It would have been for the upper classes.

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Then we've got a Bezique game, which I never know how to play!

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-No!

-But my favourite, I have to say, and I'm not a betting man,

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-but I love this horse-racing game.

-It's lovely.

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We've only put a few horses out, and a few of the jumps,

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-but there's more fitted inside.

-Yes.

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And even the beakers for shaking the dice, it's just absolutely superb.

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There are so many fragile, breakable, and, of course, small pieces

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that could have been lost.

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So when you open a box like this,

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and find it virtually intact,

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and untouched,

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well, it's a collector's dream.

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So we've got to think of a price. We're quite excited about it

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and have to think of a price.

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But I would put it in with a "come and get me" estimate.

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-To get their taste buds watering, if you like.

-Yes.

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-So I would put something like 400 to £600 on it.

-OK. That's good.

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Mark might not be a gambling man,

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but he is hedging his bets.

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The name and the quality will surely raise the stakes?

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280 now. 300.

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320 bid. 340 against you in the room.

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-Climbing.

-360.

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If you want something like this, of the quality and complete nature,

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you certainly need to have a decent few counters in your wallet.

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Cos they don't come cheap.

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600 on my right. Going 620?

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-620 with you. Thank you.

-This is great.

-Good advice.

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660 now. 680. 700.

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Look out for unusual objects in there. You know,

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little games pointers made of ivory or silver.

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All those little things add value to pieces.

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-900 seated. Lady's bid at £900.

-Brilliant.

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-900.

-920.

-920 offered.

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940, the lady. 940 I'm bid.

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-Absolutely brilliant. 940... 960.

-Still going strong.

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We might get to a thousand!

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-£980. Lady's bid at 980.

-1,000.

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-1,000.

-1,000!

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Fantastic!

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£1,000 against you. Lovely lot. Don't let it go.

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1,050. Thank you.

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1,050 I'm bid. I'm looking for 1,100.

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If you're all done? At 1,050 I'm selling.

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-Amazing!

-Crash! £1,050. Margaret, I'm tingling.

-Amazing.

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One of the best games compendiums I've ever seen.

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Not bad for something she didn't even know was in her father's house!

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And there was another treat for the collectors

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when Michael found a pre-war toy complete with its original accessories.

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I remember seeing a Chad Valley doll at Llandudno.

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If you want to get your end, and I'll get mine. We'll have a look.

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Right. Oh, isn't that lovely!

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So we've got the little girl in her bed. How did you come by this?

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It was donated to St David's Hospice

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and I asked if I could take a few things along today.

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-They said, "Take our pretty doll."

-Right.

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Everything we need to know about this little doll

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is actually on the box here!

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It's The Chad Valley, which is an English company

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that specialised in making toys and especially dolls with this felt covering.

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This is all her original dress, which is marvellous.

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'Chad Valley is one of those companies'

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that's immediately recognisable as a British toy manufacturer.

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Being in a country where the toys were made

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leads to an appeal within that market.

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It's the "Bambina", which is not a doll I've come across before.

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But what's super about this little doll,

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is even though someone's had her out and played with her,

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they've put her back in the box. It's all in card, all terribly fragile.

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But it's all been kept in wonderful condition by this box.

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The one thing you learn is, the more ephemeral the object,

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the more valuable it is.

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So the toy might be kept, but the box it comes in

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is the first thing on the fire, in the bin, in the skip.

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And even though this box is dreadfully tired,

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-I cannot tell you how many times these get thrown away.

-Yeah.

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Have you got any idea when it was made?

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Not really, but we had a bit of paper with it

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and that said 1934.

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I wouldn't argue with your bit of paper!

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-No.

-I wouldn't be that specific as your bit of paper.

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To have all of this, to have the original label,

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to have the box, which is almost, from a graphic design point of view,

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I like the box more than the doll!

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-I think we can put it into auction at 50 to £80.

-Yeah.

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Put a £50 reserve on it, and see where it goes from there.

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It's always important when you're selling something for a charity

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that it does as well as it possibly can.

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It adds a bit of pressure on to us.

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-I've been joined by Heather. Who have you brought along?

-Marie.

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Marie, hi. Love the blue T-shirts. St David's Hospice.

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-It's a charity.

-Yes. We have to raise 1.3 million

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to actually keep the hospice running.

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So we do a lot of work to fundraise towards that.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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Lot 394, folks.

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A 1930s Chad Valley soft-bodied cloth doll Bambina.

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It starts, though, at £50.

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Five. 60. Five. 70.

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Five. 80. Five.

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Toys are strong collectables now

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because people are trying to recapture

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some of the innocence of youth. Some of their childhood.

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But it's also very much a collectors' market.

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So once you feed into it, once you collect dolls,

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which are all in different numbers

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of heads and sizes and styles,

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you want the rarer and rarer ones.

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It's like collecting coins or stamps, in a way.

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-150. 160.

-Fantastic.

-170.

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180. 190. 200.

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-Great feeling.

-For charity, isn't it?

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As, of course, collectors start their collections and go on,

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they're willing to spend more and more money.

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A market that probably didn't exist 50 years ago for collectable toys

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is now very strong

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with lots of specialist sales throughout the country.

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280. 300.

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At £300.

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Gosh, I'm tingling!

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Anybody new? At £300.

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Fantastic. That can't be bad, can it!

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£300 for charity.

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-I'm exhausted!

-Thank you so much.

-Don't set me off!

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With toys, the maker is always important.

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Even if they look well loved.

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-Are these your toys?

-Those were my toys.

-Were yours. Do you remember playing with them as a child?

-I do.

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-Were they in the family? They weren't bought new.

-They came down through the family.

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And you want to sell them now?

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-Yes.

-Your childhood memories, out through the window?

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-That's it. Yes.

-Dear me!

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-You can't do that!

-I'm the last of the Anderson line.

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-I think these were made in Germany.

-Right.

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And I think they were made in the '20s.

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They work from clockwork, and our little pig here plays the drums.

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And our little violinist, he's on the fiddle!

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-Right.

-They're German. Do you know how I know that?

-No, no.

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I know that cos it says here, "Made in Germany"!

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-So I'm an all-seeing expert here, Norman.

-Yes.

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They were made by a company called Schuco.

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'They made little motor cars that you wound up.'

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They made little pigs and teddy bears where the head came off

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with scent bottles inside.

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They made all manner of good quality little toys like that.

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And their wares are sought after.

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-Have you got the key to wind him up?

-I haven't.

-You haven't?

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There are specialist toy hospitals,

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and if you go to people who restore teddy bears and this type of thing,

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if you go to a specialist,

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'finding a spare key shouldn't be too problematic.'

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What are they worth? I think they'll make 40 to £60 estimate.

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-For the two?

-For the two, yes.

-Yes.

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Put a reserve on of £30?

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-Right.

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

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Let's hope they drum up a bit of interest at the auction!

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-It's going under the hammer.

-Lot 136

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is a lot comprising two Schuco tin-plate toy clockwork pigs.

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On the floor at 35. Fresh bidder.

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-40. 45.

-Oh, come on.

-50.

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Animals, in particular, are collectable,

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because you get people that collect any type of animal.

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-Come on!

-60, fresh bidder.

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65.

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And for some reason, don't ask me,

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pigs are very collectable.

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Good.

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85.

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90.

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-Any advance on £90?

-Come on!

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All done at 90... 95 back in.

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£95. Any advance on 95?

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95.

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It trotted on, didn't it? 95.

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I loved them to bits. Great fun. And to tell the truth,

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I had a wee play with them myself!

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So Schuco is definitely a name to look out for.

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But when it comes to toys, there's one that touches all our hearts.

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# For every bear there ever was

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# Will gather there for certain cos

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# Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic! #

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Oh, teddy bear! Look at that teddy!

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We've all got one at home. They come in to every valuation day

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and they can be very valuable.

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-Have you given your teddy bear a name?

-Yep. Albert.

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-Albert. Ah. He's not for sale, is he?

-No!

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No. You just want a valuation.

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You've brought in today these wonderful bears.

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The Farnell's bear, for me,

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every time, was the most fascinating toy.

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Just beautiful, and in such good condition.

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Tell me where they're from.

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-They've been passed down through my wife's side of the family.

-Right.

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Was she allowed to play with them as a child?

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She was allowed to play with them at the bottom of the stairs,

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because Granny didn't like noisy children!

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Should be seen and not heard!

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-That's right.

-Were you allowed to play with them?

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I wasn't. I was allowed to hold them at some point,

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but we weren't allowed to play with them, cos of Granddad.

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The fact you weren't allowed to play with them means they are in excellent condition.

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The wonderful thing about this one is he's actually still got his growler.

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-He has.

-Can you make him growl for me?

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FAINT GROWL

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LOUDER GROWL

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Any kind of original features that antiques still have,

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for example, the growler in the bear that was still working,

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certainly add to the value.

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That's what collectors want. It ticks so many boxes for collectors.

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That's terrifying! You wouldn't want to meet him in the woods!

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Oh, no!

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But I've rather taken to him, I have to say.

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I think he's absolutely wonderful. He's got this lovely label here

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which tells us he's actually a Farnell bear.

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Now, Farnell's was basically the English equivalent of Steiff.

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In 1906, with the craze of teddy bears,

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they were credited with producing the first English teddy bear,

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which, I believe, went on to rival Steiff's bears in Germany as well.

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But they are fundamentally important in the history of the teddy bear.

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He's quite an early chap. We've got wonderful glass eyes.

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Later, they were plastic. If we knock them against our teeth,

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we can tell that they're glass.

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Nice felt pad, there. Original stitching.

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So I would date him to around the 1930s, 1940s.

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-He's got the most wonderful expression on his face.

-Yes.

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It must have been so tempting to play with him when you were younger, and not be allowed!

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My grandma was always stood guard over Tony and me.

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-Was she?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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Then this little chappie, unfortunately, we can't attribute him to any particular factory.

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-But he looks like he's around the same sort of date.

-Yes.

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Unfortunately, with teddy bear collectors, the name is pretty much everything.

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If you can attribute them to a particular factory, that's fantastic.

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A nice, 1930s, 1940s bear.

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We're looking somewhere probably in the region of 100 to £150.

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Purely because unfortunately we can't attribute him to a particular factory.

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The Farnell's Alpha Bear, I think he is gorgeous.

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We're looking somewhere in the region of maybe 300 to £500.

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-OK.

-But you never know.

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As long as they go to someone who looks after them. That's what I'd like.

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Exactly.

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# Today's the day the teddy bears have their picnic! #

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'Despite that wonderful pedigree, my favourite was our second lot,

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'the less distinguished cousin!'

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I think he's been duffed up a bit and needs a lot of love!

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He's the cheaper of the two,

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but I think he looks more expensive, put it that way.

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But it's just my opinion.

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Let's see who's going to put their paws up. Here we go.

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The Alpha Toys teddy bear, the Farnell's.

0:16:540:16:58

I've got 320 on the net.

0:16:580:17:00

390.

0:17:000:17:01

It was incredibly nerve-racking, cos the bidding was quite slow,

0:17:010:17:04

initially.

0:17:040:17:06

-I'll take 580 in the room.

-Brilliant.

0:17:060:17:08

I've got 570 now on the net.

0:17:080:17:10

600, now.

0:17:100:17:12

I found other similar comparables of Farnell's bears

0:17:120:17:14

that were selling for that sort of region, the three, four, five, £600 region.

0:17:140:17:18

But I don't think I particularly appreciated

0:17:180:17:23

how good a condition that bear was in

0:17:230:17:25

and how much of a premium it would have added.

0:17:250:17:27

850.

0:17:270:17:29

-880.

-I can see you willing this on!

0:17:290:17:32

Your head's nodding with the bidders!

0:17:320:17:35

"One more, one more!"

0:17:350:17:37

It was wonderful. I was thrilled to bits.

0:17:370:17:39

1,300.

0:17:390:17:41

Wow!

0:17:410:17:42

-1,350.

-Gosh!

0:17:420:17:44

It's a bit special!

0:17:440:17:46

At 1,300... 1,350 back in. 1,400?

0:17:470:17:50

1,400. 1,450?

0:17:510:17:53

No? At 1,400, then. On the steps at 1,400.

0:17:530:17:56

Selling, then, at 1,400.

0:17:560:17:59

-Fantastic!

-That's one down!

-Lovely.

0:17:590:18:01

One more to go. My favourite, next!

0:18:010:18:03

'How much difference did that lost label make?'

0:18:040:18:07

I think we all loved the second bear

0:18:080:18:10

because he probably wasn't going to make as much and because he lost his label at some point.

0:18:100:18:14

-The mohair teddy bear.

-Here we go.

0:18:160:18:18

Someone's got good taste out there.

0:18:180:18:20

£100. Finished.

0:18:200:18:22

Well, I still prefer that one!

0:18:240:18:25

That was the right money, £100.

0:18:250:18:27

A grand total of £1,500.

0:18:270:18:29

Keeping them in good condition is incredibly important for their future value.

0:18:290:18:33

So it's very difficult. It is very sad about a bear that hasn't been cuddled.

0:18:330:18:38

That's what they were made for, at the end of the day!

0:18:380:18:41

When it comes to collecting toys,

0:18:420:18:44

here are some handy hints on how to play the market.

0:18:440:18:47

Fortunately, if you want to get into the games collecting market,

0:18:470:18:51

there's many price points to start with.

0:18:510:18:54

You can find something as simple as a 1970s Rubik's cube.

0:18:540:18:59

Make sure it hasn't been done, of course!

0:18:590:19:01

If you can find an original Monopoly, with the old shoe and the iron.

0:19:010:19:07

Nowadays, I don't know what they have - racing cars and things.

0:19:070:19:09

But if you can find an immaculate and complete old Monopoly set, you're into money.

0:19:090:19:15

And now here are some of my trade secrets.

0:19:150:19:18

With toys, quality is always important.

0:19:190:19:22

Watch out. Missing pieces in games and jigsaw puzzles will really put the collectors off.

0:19:220:19:28

And they don't come much more fussy than doll collectors!

0:19:290:19:32

So, does it have its original clothing and accessories?

0:19:320:19:35

That's the detail they're after.

0:19:350:19:37

But with enough charm, even mass-produced, damaged toys

0:19:370:19:42

can still find a new home.

0:19:420:19:44

With teddy bears, it's all in the name.

0:19:450:19:47

So make sure you check the labels.

0:19:470:19:49

Elizabeth Talbot will be sharing more teddy bear know-how shortly!

0:19:490:19:54

We've all got something at home, that one special item that we're particularly attached to.

0:19:540:19:58

But I want to know what's the one thing

0:19:580:20:00

our experts would rescue from a burning building!

0:20:000:20:03

Today, it's the turn of James Lewis.

0:20:070:20:09

If there was a fire at home,

0:20:090:20:11

I would probably save something that belongs to my daughter.

0:20:110:20:15

Assuming she was out of the house already!

0:20:150:20:17

It's a little stuffed rabbit that she calls Rabby.

0:20:170:20:21

My life would not be worth living

0:20:210:20:24

if anything happened to that!

0:20:240:20:25

It's just a little... Probably a collectable of the future,

0:20:250:20:29

worth absolutely nothing at the moment apart from for her.

0:20:290:20:32

I think that is probably the most precious, loved thing in the house.

0:20:320:20:37

A toy in good condition is a rarity indeed

0:20:400:20:42

because it's in their nature to be played with too hard,

0:20:420:20:45

to be bashed around a bit and enjoyed.

0:20:450:20:47

Teddy bears are especially prone to being cuddled into a state of disrepair!

0:20:470:20:52

But what makes a good teddy bear in the first place?

0:20:520:20:55

Flog It expert Elizabeth Talbot went down in the woods to find out.

0:20:550:21:00

I like teddy bears because they are very much individual personalities.

0:21:100:21:15

Little characters, very much like these ones!

0:21:150:21:17

Hello, chaps!

0:21:170:21:19

Traditionally, there are certain firms of teddy bear manufacturers

0:21:190:21:22

who make teddy bears out of alpaca hair.

0:21:220:21:25

Farnell was probably the most famous company that did that.

0:21:250:21:30

They had a special range.

0:21:300:21:32

But I do know one other company that still includes alpaca hair in some to their teddy bears.

0:21:320:21:36

It's not very far from here.

0:21:360:21:38

Merrythought has been making teddy bears

0:21:380:21:40

at its Victorian factory in Shropshire since 1930.

0:21:400:21:45

It's a family-run firm, and the last remaining British manufacturer

0:21:450:21:48

still producing bears by hand.

0:21:480:21:51

Elizabeth is meeting Sarah Holmes,

0:21:510:21:53

who runs the company with her sister, Hannah.

0:21:530:21:56

-Morning, Sarah.

-Hello.

-Lovely to meet you.

0:21:560:21:58

I'm so excited to be here.

0:21:580:22:00

I've rushed over from the alpaca farm.

0:22:000:22:02

How did it all start?

0:22:020:22:04

-You've been here since 1930?

-1930, yes.

0:22:040:22:07

My great-grandfather established the business in 1930.

0:22:070:22:10

And it's been in Ironbridge and part of Shropshire ever since.

0:22:100:22:14

The classic teddy bear that people are familiar with,

0:22:140:22:17

it's arguable in terms of who really established that.

0:22:170:22:21

Alpha Farnell and Steiff were two of the very earliest.

0:22:210:22:25

The Alpha Farnell teddy is what is commonly associated with as being the classic teddy bear

0:22:250:22:30

with the long limbs and the hump on the back.

0:22:300:22:32

They ceased production in the late '60s.

0:22:320:22:36

So hence their original designs from pre- that era are very sought after.

0:22:360:22:41

Then Merrythought took on the brand

0:22:410:22:44

in the mid-1990s.

0:22:440:22:46

Which was great, because it means we are able to bring Alpha Farnell back to life.

0:22:460:22:50

From my perspective, there are some serious collectors

0:22:500:22:52

who look for the Cheeky and the "punkinhead" and the different ones.

0:22:520:22:56

Where did they come from? Whose inspiration were those?

0:22:560:22:58

They are so different.

0:22:580:23:00

It was actually our original designer, Florence Attwood,

0:23:000:23:03

who was wonderfully talented in designing teddy bears.

0:23:030:23:07

So this would be the very first Merrythought teddy bear.

0:23:070:23:09

-This was designed by Florence?

-Yes.

-How wonderful.

0:23:090:23:13

And he is from about 1930 in age?

0:23:130:23:16

This particular bear is from 1931.

0:23:160:23:18

So he would have been one of the very first to be produced.

0:23:180:23:21

But Florence went on to design a huge array of different styles of teddy bears.

0:23:210:23:26

Rather famously, the Cheeky bear

0:23:260:23:28

and the Punky bear

0:23:280:23:30

in the late '40s

0:23:300:23:32

and early '50s.

0:23:320:23:34

Yes, the Punky bear is a very unique teddy bear!

0:23:340:23:38

It still has a very strong collectors' following today

0:23:380:23:40

and they are quite sought after at auction.

0:23:400:23:43

I wanted to ask you, do you have any alpaca bears here?

0:23:430:23:45

-We certainly do.

-Do you?

-We use alpaca quite a lot, actually.

0:23:450:23:49

Obviously alongside mohair.

0:23:490:23:51

There's one little white teddy bear here, made from alpaca.

0:23:510:23:55

Oh, he's so fluffy. He's lovely.

0:23:550:23:57

It's a very fine fibre and creates a very soft finish.

0:23:570:24:01

They're quite distinctive. He's made from alpaca.

0:24:010:24:04

I can certainly show you a few more.

0:24:040:24:07

I'd love to see a few more, please!

0:24:070:24:09

This is a hive of concentrated activity. Amazing.

0:24:150:24:18

What's actually happening in this room?

0:24:180:24:20

This is where we make all our teddy bears.

0:24:200:24:22

Everything we produce is made from start to finish under this roof.

0:24:220:24:26

Just to give you an idea of the process,

0:24:260:24:30

we start by cutting out each of the shapes that make our pattern for our teddy bear.

0:24:300:24:35

Those shapes are then sewn together.

0:24:350:24:37

And then we move on to the next stage where the eyes are put in.

0:24:370:24:40

The bears are part stuffed.

0:24:400:24:43

Then the joints are put in. A fiddly process.

0:24:430:24:46

And then the bears are assembled. The arms, legs and head are all attached to the body.

0:24:460:24:50

And then the final stage is hand embroidering the nose

0:24:500:24:54

and the smile on the teddy bear.

0:24:540:24:56

-Very important part.

-Absolutely.

0:24:560:24:57

-It brings it to life.

-Yes, gives it its character.

0:24:570:25:00

-Ah, the all-important eyes.

-Absolutely.

0:25:040:25:06

They're put in by hand as well.

0:25:060:25:08

So that's why some bears have this wonderful expression where maybe their eyes are not quite level

0:25:080:25:13

or they're a bit close together.

0:25:130:25:15

But it actually adds to the bespoke nature of them.

0:25:150:25:18

-Though a Merrythought bear wouldn't pass quality control if his eyes weren't level.

-OK.

0:25:180:25:23

But I notice from a collector's point of view

0:25:230:25:25

they will often spend money where they feel there is a personality,

0:25:250:25:30

to purchase a bear with a bit of a quirk.

0:25:300:25:32

-It isn't always a bad thing.

-No. Absolutely.

0:25:320:25:36

But it's fascinating to see how that's achieved.

0:25:360:25:39

Teddy bears' eyes are magical

0:25:430:25:44

because they're the window on the teddy bear's soul, being very romantic!

0:25:440:25:48

But teddy bears' eyes are important in dating them.

0:25:480:25:52

The earlier ones, from the 1904 period of Steiff

0:25:520:25:55

and the early Farnell's

0:25:550:25:57

were the little metal boot button eyes which were black painted.

0:25:570:26:00

But through the early 20th century, glass was used in different colours

0:26:000:26:03

to give the pupil and the surround in a nice coloured way.

0:26:030:26:06

Then as the 20th century developed

0:26:060:26:08

the synthetic man-made plastics were inserted and used

0:26:080:26:12

because they were cheaper and easier to mass-produce

0:26:120:26:14

but also increasingly it was a safety element, which was important.

0:26:140:26:18

-This is the assembly.

-Yes. We call it fitting up.

0:26:210:26:25

Is this how a bear in 1931 would have been assembled?

0:26:250:26:28

-With the pins?

-Absolutely.

-Just the same.

0:26:280:26:31

This technique wouldn't have changed since teddy bears started.

0:26:310:26:37

Have you ever put a leg on back to front?

0:26:370:26:38

Yes!

0:26:380:26:40

That was a special edition, that one!

0:26:400:26:42

Penny's got a lot of responsibility,

0:26:460:26:49

because the expression and personality of the bear comes out first through the eyes

0:26:490:26:53

and then it's enhanced by the facial features, the nose and mouth.

0:26:530:26:56

And although they are working to a pattern,

0:26:560:26:58

you cannot but help have slight variations

0:26:580:27:00

because every stitch is unique. It is unique.

0:27:000:27:04

Therefore each bear has a very slight kind of individual nature which sets it apart.

0:27:040:27:10

Expression has always commanded quite an important consideration for collectors.

0:27:100:27:15

A bear that looks appealing, whether it looks sad or lonely,

0:27:150:27:18

or quite mischievous,

0:27:180:27:20

can tempt people to bid that bit more at auction and pay more.

0:27:200:27:24

It's like the cherry on the top of a cake.

0:27:240:27:25

Just kind of finishing it off.

0:27:250:27:27

Oh, look at him. He's gorgeous!

0:27:270:27:29

He's waving, look!

0:27:290:27:31

Happy bear.

0:27:310:27:33

Sarah, I have to say I've had such an amazing day.

0:27:360:27:39

I'll enjoy teddy bears even more after today.

0:27:390:27:41

That's nice to hear. You're very welcome.

0:27:410:27:43

I've had the most magical day here in Ironbridge.

0:27:440:27:46

I've learned such a lot. It's been a wonderful experience

0:27:460:27:49

which I'll remember for years to come.

0:27:490:27:51

But I've learned such a lot about parts of teddy bears I'd never even considered!

0:27:510:27:55

To see these craftswomen at work has brought the whole thing to life for me. It's been wonderful!

0:27:550:28:01

Well, it really has been wonderful to take a trip down memory lane

0:28:060:28:10

and to discover more about the world of antique toys and games,

0:28:100:28:13

especially when the prices at auction

0:28:130:28:15

can be stuff that dreams area made of.

0:28:150:28:19

Don't set me off!

0:28:190:28:20

I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:28:200:28:23

Join me again soon for more inside information and surprising sales.

0:28:230:28:27

But until then, it's goodbye.

0:28:270:28:29

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