Upstairs Downstairs, Part 2 Flog It: Trade Secrets


Upstairs Downstairs, Part 2

Tips on antiques and collectibles. Paul Martin explores the history of the arts and crafts movement and looks at antiques from the servants' quarters.


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Transcript


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Navigating the world of antiques with its endless variety

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can sometimes feel like you're walking through a minefield.

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I want to share some of the knowledge that we've picked up

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over the last 11 years of filming "Flog It!".

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These are fabulous.

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The quality is just breathtaking.

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That's hundreds of programmes under our belt,

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and many thousands of your antiques and collectables sold.

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Are you all done?

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Yes!

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There's a whole world of trade secrets out there for you to know.

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'I love functional,

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'well-crafted objects that look deceptively ordinary.'

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Sometimes, everyday objects can be overlooked

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but they all have a fascinating story to tell.

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They may need more work in the research

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and be less well documented than the items of the grand

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and the wealthy, but they can all tell us something about our past.

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'So, today, we're heading below stairs to see which items

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'that were once workaday objects have real value today.'

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I love collectable, domestic objects because they all tell a story.

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They're all very accessible.

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'Coming up, Catherine Southon sniffs out an unusual piece.'

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'If you unscrewed the sections,'

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you could even smell the spices.

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This is something that I would desperately love to own myself.

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'Philip gets into the upstairs downstairs spirit.'

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'I think when it comes to collecting things like that,'

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it's saddos like me who really sort of get into this sort of

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social history element thing.

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'And our experts have plenty of tips about what to look out for

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'in the servants quarters.'

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There will always be a stall in fairs and markets with kitchenalia.

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'So, stay tuned to see what can make real money.'

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Wendy, I really appreciate what you brought today.

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What's the story behind it?

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The story, as far as I know, is that ladies in large houses with cooks

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couldn't get flour to make their game pies

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-because of the Napoleonic Wars.

-Right.

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So Wedgwood made these dishes that looked like a game pie.

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These were brought to the table with the game already cooked inside it.

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They're not very commonly found these days.

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I suppose they were practical, functional pieces in the kitchen

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and would have been used lots, so were damaged and thrown away.

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How have you come by it and what brought you to bring it today?

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Well, I used to work in a little lock-up shop

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that was next to a little antiques shop.

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I used to have coffee with the lady owner

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and she used to show me anything interesting she had.

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As soon as she told me the story of this, I just had to have it.

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Well, it is what's generically known as a game pie dish.

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There were several factories that produced these.

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The most famous were Wedgwood and Majolica made from the Minton's factory.

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This one is by Wedgwood.

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This very characteristic creamware is called caneware.

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Caneware is a type of stoneware which Josiah Wedgwood invented

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with the intention that it would be appropriate for being oven-proof.

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'The history of Wedgwood is long and fascinating.'

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It was founded in the 18th century by Josiah Wedgwood, who was quite a clever man, not just a businessman.

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He was quite an alchemist and interested in the chemistry behind potting.

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So he and his team patented

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quite a lot of new forms of body of ceramic and pot.

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Certainly, a very early 19th-century, early Victorian piece.

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It would originally have had a little caneware liner inside.

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Then around the outside reflects the intricacy of pastry cooks

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who could make wonderful shapes and patterns on pastry.

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Then the glorious lid, which has the little rabbit handle

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and these trophies of game - birds, ducks

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and the hares and rabbits round the outside, which add to the flavour.

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I notice by taking the lid off, this has had some historic restoration.

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-You say you bought it...

-In the '70s.

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I think, looking at this, it's had two little repairs to the rim.

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These have been quite neatly done.

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But I think, given the passage of so many decades,

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what was neat restoration then is beginning to discolour slightly

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and show up in a way it wouldn't have done several years ago.

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Although it's a shame it's damaged,

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the fact that people can see the genuineness of the condition,

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it's not restoration which makes it look as if it's perfect.

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A collector can see that it's honest and that counts for a lot.

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Restoration of any object is a thorn in the side of modern-day collectors.

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Because if the restoration is so good that it's near perfect,

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'it becomes a red herring for people

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'who think they're buying something which is pristine.'

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The modern-day concept is it's better to have something which has been damaged and preserved

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so it doesn't deteriorate further, rather than having something

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which is so good you lose trust in its authenticity as a whole.

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-You paid how much for it?

-I paid £30 at £1 a week.

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-How lovely! Have you got any idea what it might fetch now?

-No.

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I'd have thought, given that it isn't complete

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and there's a little restoration, that it would sell between £50 and £100 at auction at the moment.

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-Would you like a reserve on that?

-Yes, whatever you think.

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If we put £50, with auctioneer's discretion on it,

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-you've got the peace of mind.

-Yes.

-Thank you for bringing it in.

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'If you give the auctioneer discretion,

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'he's able to sell just below the reserve,

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'if he feels this is appropriate.'

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-Good luck.

-Thank you.

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The room is full of bidders. Let's hope they stick their hands up.

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The Wedgwood game pie dish in terracotta,

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with the little rabbit finial, rather a fun bid.

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£20 to start. 20 straight in. 20 I'm bid. 22. 25. 28.

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At 28 now. Take 30. Is that it? At £28. 30. Two.

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At 32. 35. 38.

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40. 42. 45.

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-Going to sell it.

-On the stairs at 45 now.

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Sell at 45. You're out down here.

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-Just!

-With the lady there at £45.

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I sell on the stairs. All done at 45.

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Directly above the former owner at 45...

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LAUGHTER

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Well done!

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'That pie dish had seen some use, but the buyer didn't object to a little bit of wear and tear.

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'And she was getting a slice of domestic history

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'for a very reasonable price.

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'It's always worth checking out items of kitchenalia,

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'as you never know what you'll find.

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'It may not be the finest quality, but it's got stories to tell.'

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-Judith, thanks for bringing in the pestle and mortar.

-My pleasure.

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-What can you tell me about it?

-I can't tell you a lot.

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We found it in my husband's parents' house when we were clearing up.

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He can remember it since he was about the age of ten,

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so it's about 55 years.

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He thinks that it was to do with his grandparents.

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Right. OK. It's certainly older than your husband remembers it.

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I've been looking at it and it can be quite hard to date

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this sort of treen or turned wood.

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Treen tends to have more of a provincial feel about it.

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More the farmhouse type kitchen table,

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or perhaps even like downstairs with the servants and so on.

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-I think we're probably into the 1700s.

-That's possible.

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His grandmother was in service at a big house in Tiverton.

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This would have probably been used below stairs in the kitchen

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or even for medicinal purposes,

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for preparing medicines and so on, for mixing up certain ingredients.

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I'm fairly certain it's a lignum vitae,

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which is a well-known wood for turning because it's so dense.

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-You can feel the weight, can't you?

-It's very heavy.

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Lignum vitae would have been an expensive wood.

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'It was fairly exotic. It's a very dense, hard wood.

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The pestle, I think, is probably associated, to be fair.

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I don't think they started off life together.

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If you put it inside, you can see the proportions are a little odd.

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-I thought that, yes.

-It's certainly done the job, hasn't it?

-Yes.

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-Have you given a thought of what it might be worth?

-Absolutely no idea!

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I'm going to suggest that we put it in the sale

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-around the couple of hundred pound mark.

-Wow!

-How do you feel about that?

-Very happy with that.

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-Let's straddle that £200. Let's put it in at 150 to 250.

-Fair enough.

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-That would be fine.

-Who knows? On the day it could make maybe £400.

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The 18th-century lignum vitae mortar and a treen pestle.

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£150 starts it. 160. 170.

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-180. 190. 200.

-Bid on the book.

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220. 240. 260. 280.

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£280. Where's 300?

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At £280. Straight ahead.

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-Now selling at 280...

-Come on. A bit more.

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-BANGS GAVEL

-It's gone. Top end, though, 280.

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-We are happy, Judith?

-I'm very happy!

-That's very good!

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'I love treen and I would have had that piece, given half the chance.

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'Where should a novice treen collector start?'

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The key word when collecting treen is the patina, the colour of a piece.

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That's what buyers are looking for.

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So, condition, colour and rarity, of course.

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A nice pair of early Georgian salts, they're going to be worth more

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than a mass-produced Welsh love spoon from the 19th century.

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It's always lovely when you're working on "Flog It!"

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to actually see something

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that you want yourself, something that you've been looking for.

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It is absolutely fantastic.

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This is something that I would desperately love to own myself.

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I have been looking for a lovely spice tower.

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So when this lady came along with this spice tower

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which was oozing charm,

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I was very excited because it was in beautiful condition.

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What you've got is a Victorian, 1860 in date, spice tower.

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So we have these little sections,

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which would have contained different types of spices.

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At the top, we've got the paper label that's been applied for mace,

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nutmeg and all-spice.

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With something like this, condition is very important.

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What was nice, the labels were intact

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and, importantly, it wasn't split.

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It's a fruit wood that could easily get split and chipped as well.

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The little pieces on the top could easily be chipped.

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'But it was in perfect, PERFECT condition.'

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And if you unscrewed the sections, you could even smell the spices.

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Wonderful!

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It belonged to my mother. It was in the house for a while.

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But she didn't get it from any further back.

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-She got it in a jumble sale.

-Did she?

-The legendary jumble sale, yes!

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What did she pay for it in her jumble sale, does she know?

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-Yes. 10p.

-Ten pence?

-Yes.

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Well, can I tell you that your mother had a very good eye?

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This is a fantastic piece.

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If you imagine in late Victorian, mid to late Victorian times,

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in a big country mansion,

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something like this, this lovely spice tower being downstairs in the kitchen.

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It was almost too good to be in the kitchen!

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That should have been upstairs with all the paintings and sculptures.

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To me, it's a work of art in itself.

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Now, estimate-wise, we could put an estimate of £100 to £150

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and I think it will do that all day long.

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I'd like to be a little bit tentative and put 80 to 120,

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just to pull everyone in.

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I think this is going to make nearer £200. It's fabulous!

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'But was Catherine getting carried away?'

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Let's put it to the test. Here we go.

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Lot number 600 is the 19th-century fruit wood spice tower.

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Mace, nutmeg and all-spice. Lot 600.

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Numerous commission bids here. Start me straight in at £160.

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£160 I have for starters. £160.

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At £160. 170 is there now? At £160. Straight in at 160 now.

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At £160. Are we all done, then, at £160...?

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Straight in. Straight out.

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-That is amazing!

-Cracking result.

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But they are incredibly rare in good condition.

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'Catherine would have snapped that spice tower up as a work of art.

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'What other tips can our experts offer?'

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Things that relate to how we used to live, things that are redundant.

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Kitchenalia, those can be very interesting.

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Buy the objects which aren't used any more,

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that have become redundant in our kitchens

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like the mincer.

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If you're going to collect something you need a theme. What better theme than booze?

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-Enjoy a drink?

-Oh, yeah.

-Oh, yeah?

-Oh, yeah.

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-Port, sherry AND Claret?

-All in one glass. Yeah.

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Drinks labels. I really enjoy those.

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One thing that I love about this job,

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it's not so much what this chair's worth, but whose bum sat on it.

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The drink labels, they tell a social history.

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They've either come from

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a really good 18th or 19th-century wine merchant's

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or they've come from a big country house, from a fantastic cellar.

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So my imagination builds up this fantastic picture

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of who's owned them before and, for me, that's the joy of the job.

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-Where did you get these from?

-Car-boot sale.

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How much did you pay for them? £6.

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-You're a man of generosity(!)

-Yeah. He wanted eight, actually.

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-And you beat him down?

-Yes. Aye.

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I think Barry was really cute.

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Because those aren't obviously valuable things, are they?

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He trawled round a car-boot sale, saw them for six quid,

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grabbed his opportunity.

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For me, one of the joys is, for a short period of time,

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he's owned a really cool thing.

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-Did you buy them cos you thought they were cheap or because they were nice?

-I liked them.

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Plus, I knew they were a giveaway at £6.

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-They were at eight as well!

-Aye. BOTH LAUGH

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-Where do you think they were made?

-I imagine Staffordshire.

-I think so.

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There's something on the back that could be Copeland.

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-They're certainly English. And what date do you reckon?

-1850s?

-Spot on.

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Picture the scene. You've got Downton Abbey or Upstairs, Downstairs.

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And Hudson walks down to the cellar, or sends his footman to the cellar,

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to bring out his lordship's finest claret.

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I think that scene is fantastic. "Bring out the Mouton Rothschild!"

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Up the stairs it comes, this fantastic port or wine.

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But he's got to identify it, so the cellar bins have those labels on. What a great story.

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You can just see the remains, and it is very faded.

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It would have had who the shipper was, the year,

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which vineyard it came from, and these were next to each barrel.

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I think they're really collectable. I think that we will put...

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£40 to £60 estimate on them, all day long.

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-Yeah.

-I think we reserve them at £30.

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-I think that's a real "come buy me" estimate.

-It should be.

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It's a real "come buy me" estimate and if you have a bit of luck,

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-they might just make £100.

-Yeah.

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-Are you pleased with that?

-Definitely. Yeah.

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-I've a wife and eight kids, so I need some money!

-Eight?

-Aye!

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Won't ask what YOUR hobby is!

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'Moving swiftly on...'

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-I think they'll do 100.

-They've got to.

-It's a good crowd.

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I'm hoping for 150. You know what Philip wants.

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-I know what I want!

-Yeah, the more the better!

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Three earthenware wine cellar labels with two numbered bin discs.

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Some nice 19th-century pottery. A lot of people like them.

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A lot of interest on commission. I'm forced to start them at 140.

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-LAUGHTER

-£140.

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I'll take 150 from somebody in the room. 150, is it?

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-Come on.

-With me at 140.

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150. I'm out. Looking for 160.

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150 at the top. Still cheap.

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Finally, at 150. Have we finished?

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-Yes! Hammer's gone down at £150.

-You were right.

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'When it comes to collecting things like that,'

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it's saddos like me who really get into this social history element,

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because today, they don't have things like that, beautifully made things.

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It'd be some little computer-generated bit of plastic

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you just stick on with a drawing pin - who wants that?

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'Philip's right. A piece of social history is beyond price.'

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So here are my top tips.

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'If you're starting a collection,

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'it doesn't have to be an expensive item.

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'Kitchenalia is a great entry point.

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'You can even begin with downstairs and work your way upstairs.

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'Good condition helps, but a bit of wear on domestic items is expected,

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'so don't reject pieces on the basis of minor damage.

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'These quality wooden items had double appeal -

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'to collectors of kitchenalia and of treen.'

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There are wonderful works of art out there, great names and superb antiques.

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We want to give you more information on what makes them special.

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'So far, we've seen items that highlight the class divisions

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'of our nation's past.

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'At the end of the 19th century, there was a movement

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'which tried to break down barriers

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'and marry the beauty and craftsmanship of the aristocratic

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'with the practicality and usefulness of the domestic.

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'I'm talking about Arts and Crafts,

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'one of my absolute favourite periods of British design.

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'Its very distinctive style can be applied to a variety of objects,

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'from mirrors to jewellery...'

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-Would you be happy to sell at £100, £150?

-That would be very nice.

0:18:540:18:59

Benson Arts and Crafts oil lamp, 190...

0:18:590:19:02

'..and extends to furniture and even houses.

0:19:030:19:07

'It incorporated simple forms and used medieval romantic patterns.

0:19:080:19:14

'This superb drinking cup brought in by Ken is a fantastic example

0:19:160:19:21

'of the hand-crafted simple style

0:19:210:19:23

'espoused by the Arts and Crafts movement.'

0:19:230:19:26

A little bit of green agate.

0:19:260:19:28

It hasn't been cut and shaped and stylised.

0:19:280:19:31

They were saying it was morally reprehensible to facet their stones

0:19:310:19:35

when you're talking about Arts and Crafts movement.

0:19:350:19:37

It's stamped - Guild of Handicrafts, CR Ashbee.

0:19:370:19:41

'CR Ashbee was one of the leading exponents

0:19:410:19:44

'of the Arts and Crafts movement pioneered by William Morris.

0:19:440:19:48

'The movement was a backlash against increasing industrialisation

0:19:480:19:52

'at the turn of the 20th century,

0:19:520:19:55

'and an attempt to move back to the honest work of the craftsman.

0:19:550:20:00

'The influence of Arts and Crafts extended far and wide.

0:20:000:20:04

'It was embraced in Glasgow by Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

0:20:040:20:07

'Architect Mackay Hugh Baillie Scott applied its principles

0:20:070:20:11

'to the design of a whole house in the Lakes.

0:20:110:20:15

'It was truly international, spreading across America and Europe

0:20:150:20:19

'before finally emerging as the Mingei movement in Japan.

0:20:190:20:23

'With such a wide reach, how do you spot an Arts and Crafts piece?

0:20:250:20:30

'Look for simple forms and plain decoration.

0:20:300:20:33

'Pieces will emphasise natural materials.

0:20:330:20:36

'Arts and Crafts patterns are inspired by native flora and fauna.

0:20:370:20:42

'The construction of the item is often visible.

0:20:470:20:49

'Put simply, you can see the joins and, most importantly,

0:20:490:20:53

'they will be functional pieces.

0:20:530:20:56

'The Arts and Craft ethos can be best summed-up

0:20:570:21:00

'by its leading light, William Morris, who urged,

0:21:000:21:03

'"Have nothing in your house that you do not believe to be beautiful

0:21:030:21:07

'"or know to be useful."'

0:21:070:21:09

'Will Axon is one of our regular experts.

0:21:180:21:21

'When he isn't busy valuing objects for "Flog It!"

0:21:210:21:25

'you can find him in Cambridgeshire, doing his day job as an auctioneer.'

0:21:250:21:29

£50 and selling this time... Thank you.

0:21:290:21:32

'But as he's keen to point out, there's a lot more to do

0:21:320:21:35

'than simply climbing on the rostrum and wielding a gavel.'

0:21:350:21:39

The public sees most auctioneers during the sale or the viewings,

0:21:390:21:43

so they're unaware of what goes on between sales.

0:21:430:21:45

That's the one.

0:21:490:21:50

We have a huge number of items go through the saleroom day to day.

0:21:500:21:54

We have general sales every month. They will consist of 500, 600 lots.

0:21:540:21:58

There's a huge quantity of items that come through our door,

0:21:580:22:03

so we have to be aware of who they belong to, what sale are they in, what's the estimate.

0:22:030:22:07

This is what I like about a general sale. You've got a nice French wall clock there.

0:22:070:22:12

You've got a royal wedding brick. I mean, that's an unusual lot.

0:22:120:22:17

When it comes to sale day, that's almost the release.

0:22:170:22:20

When someone's got something to sell, they may not know what it is, they give us a call.

0:22:220:22:26

I'll have a chat, get as much information as I can,

0:22:260:22:29

make an appointment to see them.

0:22:290:22:31

Once they've decided they want to sell, it gets catalogued,

0:22:310:22:35

we photograph the item.

0:22:350:22:37

The next time we see it, I'm on the rostrum wielding my gavel.

0:22:370:22:40

Obviously, we try to get as much as we can for the vendor for it.

0:22:400:22:44

Part of my job is getting out and about on the road, really.

0:22:440:22:48

I'm off to see a couple of clients today.

0:22:480:22:52

Both of them I've visited before, so this is like a follow-up visit.

0:22:520:22:55

-So, mainly carriage clocks.

-Mainly carriage clocks.

0:22:550:22:58

One bracket clock and one grandfather, the one behind.

0:22:580:23:03

A nice Edinburgh, domestic regulator, wasn't it?

0:23:030:23:06

-That's what they call them, yes.

-Happy to sell that.

0:23:060:23:09

These are nice quality clocks. Some of them are by known makers.

0:23:090:23:13

They've got that decorative quality,

0:23:130:23:15

so I'm pretty confident we'll get most of these away.

0:23:150:23:19

Lord Hemingford, or Nick as I know him, he's actually down-sizing.

0:23:220:23:26

So he just needs a bit of advice on what's left.

0:23:260:23:30

He's dispersing some pieces between the family.

0:23:300:23:33

Just wants an idea of if we can help with what's left.

0:23:330:23:37

-Hello, Will. Morning. Nice to see you.

-How are you?

0:23:400:23:43

You've been doing a bit of sorting out!

0:23:450:23:47

Well, it's a bit of a jungle. CHUCKLES

0:23:470:23:51

We're down-sizing because we're getting on a bit.

0:23:510:23:54

And we really have no idea what it's worth.

0:23:540:23:59

So a bit of professional expertise was necessary.

0:23:590:24:03

-It that an Atmos clock?

-Yes, it is.

0:24:030:24:05

My father-in-law was presented with it when he retired.

0:24:050:24:09

Jaeger-LeCoultre, of course, a great name in clocks and watch-making.

0:24:090:24:14

I think that would do quite well in the sale.

0:24:140:24:16

'As a general valuer, people assume that you must know everything about everything, but it's not the case.'

0:24:190:24:25

If there is something that I don't know, I'm not afraid to ask a colleague

0:24:250:24:29

or even another valuer off "Flog It!"

0:24:290:24:32

-I suppose the most interesting logistical piece is this one.

-Ooh!

0:24:320:24:37

I see! The old armoire.

0:24:370:24:39

-Would something like that sell?

-It would sell.

0:24:390:24:42

If someone's looking for one and they've got the space to accommodate it,

0:24:420:24:46

they'll be prepared to pay high hundreds, maybe even four figures.

0:24:460:24:50

I think it's nice that it goes to somebody

0:24:500:24:53

who is prepared to pay for it and therefore wants it.

0:24:530:24:58

That's better, perhaps, than going on the junk heap.

0:24:580:25:02

All good genuine pieces of family furniture, fresh to market,

0:25:020:25:07

just the way the market likes them, so there's plenty there for us.

0:25:070:25:11

We're into the hour before the sale so things start picking up.

0:25:170:25:20

People are arriving, double-checking something they maybe viewed yesterday,

0:25:200:25:25

just to make sure that it's still something that they want.

0:25:250:25:28

Bids are coming in. The phones are ringing.

0:25:280:25:30

People are registering on reception.

0:25:300:25:33

We try to keep general sales a bit more spit and sawdust than our fine sales,

0:25:330:25:37

because people like a saleroom where it's stacked high,

0:25:370:25:41

they have a rummage, gives them a feeling that they'll find a bargain at the bottom of a box.

0:25:410:25:46

Usually can pick up a bargain here because it's not got lots of jewellery.

0:25:460:25:51

A couple of lots that I'm interested in today.

0:25:510:25:53

I have a figure in my head that I will go up to.

0:25:530:25:56

Hopefully, I'll get it below that,

0:25:560:25:58

but you tend to go one over if it's something you really want.

0:25:580:26:04

The only tip I would give you as far as bidding is concerned

0:26:040:26:08

is have your limit.

0:26:080:26:10

Say to yourself what you're prepared to pay for something.

0:26:100:26:13

OK, go maybe one bid more. You don't want to lose it for a single bid.

0:26:130:26:17

But generally, if you've got your limit, stick to it.

0:26:170:26:19

Right, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to our first general sale of the new year.

0:26:220:26:27

Welcome to you all, as always.

0:26:270:26:30

He's really quick, keeps the auction going and a buzz in the saleroom.

0:26:300:26:35

£40 I'm bid now. At 40. Front row at £45...

0:26:350:26:38

'You see a lot of different styles of bidding.

0:26:380:26:40

'Someone might come for one specific item.'

0:26:400:26:43

They will march to the front of the room with their paddle in the air.

0:26:430:26:47

It's pretty obvious that they want to buy this lot.

0:26:470:26:50

£50 it is, then.

0:26:500:26:52

'Other people skulk at the back, hide behind a wardrobe.'

0:26:520:26:55

As you're going to bring the hammer down, they'll bid.

0:26:550:26:57

That psychological edge on the under-bidder might make them think,

0:26:570:27:01

"There's no point me carrying on." And they steal it at the back.

0:27:010:27:05

And lot 110 is a nine-carat gold five-stone ring.

0:27:050:27:09

£50 will it be? Straight in. 50, surely? 30 I'll take, if I must.

0:27:090:27:12

I'm looking round for you. 20 I have.

0:27:120:27:15

Saved you a tenner. At £20 I'm bid. And five. 30.

0:27:150:27:18

Five. 40. Lady's bid at £40. Is that all it's going to be?

0:27:180:27:23

I shall sell it. £40!

0:27:230:27:25

Your number today is 61.

0:27:250:27:27

The important part of my job, personally,

0:27:270:27:30

is the interaction with clients and the public.

0:27:300:27:33

These people coming to our sales want to be entertained, to a degree, but at the same time,

0:27:330:27:38

you're trying to persuade them to part with money.

0:27:380:27:41

You've got to do it in a nice way.

0:27:410:27:43

I think most clients who had something for sale were pleased.

0:27:430:27:48

As with any sale, some things do better and some do not as well,

0:27:480:27:51

but in general, people seemed happy.

0:27:510:27:54

A lot of it's clearing and finding its place in a new home.

0:27:540:27:57

Yeah, good day, all round.

0:27:570:27:59

For me, I've got the best job in the word.

0:27:590:28:02

-Those are nice.

-The dogs? They didn't sell.

-They didn't?

-No.

0:28:040:28:08

Where's Dad? Ask him for a tenner and they're yours for cash.

0:28:080:28:12

BOY LAUGHS

0:28:120:28:13

Well, that's it for today's show and, as we've seen, everybody loves the grand,

0:28:170:28:22

but don't overlook the seemingly ordinary.

0:28:220:28:25

It could be worth a great deal more than you'd expect in today's market.

0:28:250:28:28

See you next time on Flog It! Trade Secrets.

0:28:280:28:31

The team take a look at antiques from the servants' quarters. Paul Martin also explores the history of the arts and crafts movement.


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