The Great Outdoors 2 Flog It: Trade Secrets


The Great Outdoors 2

Paul Martin and experts offer tips on antiques and collectibles. Paul explores the history of the bicycle and the team take a tour of travel-related antiques.


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Transcript


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In over ten years on Flog It!,

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we have valued thousands of your items

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and we've stood by you in the saleroom

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as they've gone under the hammer.

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-Yes!

-Wow.

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During that time, we've all learnt a great deal

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about antiques and collectibles,

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and here's where you can find out more.

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This is Trade Secrets.

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The British are great travellers,

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and we're always looking to the wider world

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for inspiration and adventure.

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Many of the objects you bring to our valuation days

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are testament to our wanderlust.

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Our experts are always happy to hear your stories

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and give you information and a valuation.

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But what makes something collectable and valuable?

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Well, sit back and enjoy the ride...

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..because today, we're taking you on a whistle-stop tour

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of travel and the great outdoors.

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They called it a quinary.

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Quinary? You learn something on Flog It! every day, don't you?

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Our journey begins with first-class advice

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from our experts.

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Take them to your local saleroom and find out what they're worth.

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We'll be meeting some unlikely daredevils along the way.

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So you did wing-walking at 75?

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Yes.

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And I'll be travelling back in time on two wheels.

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-I think I've changed my mind.

-No, you've got to have a go!

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You may be surprised to find

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that objects that once helped us travel

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can now help our bank balance,

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as Philip Serrell found out.

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Well, you know, I like daft, quirky things, and, erm,

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and those propellers are a piece of sculpture in their own right.

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They're laminated. They look cool, they look good.

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-Did you fly in?

-Yes. The rest of it's outside.

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-What do you know about it?

-My grandfather acquired it,

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probably in the 1930s.

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He was a bit of a collector of antiques,

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more nautical than anything from the air.

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He was ahead of his time if he was collecting 70-odd years ago!

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He had a contract to run

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down to Southampton and Portsmouth, to the dockyards

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because they were breaking up boats,

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and then acquired or bought this.

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I bet he's got some real fascinating stuff.

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It's one of those bizarre instances

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of the way the antique world has progressed,

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because, you know, people become much more decadent in their taste,

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and you find yourself looking at something like this

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and it's got possibilities in the antique world.

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I think one of the things is, people watch programmes like Flog It!

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and whereas five or ten years ago they might have discarded something,

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now they appreciate that something has a value

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and they're able to realise it.

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-I think you could put £120 to £180 as an estimate on it.

-Mm.

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I think we can put a fixed reserve of £100 on it.

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I think if you have a real good result at the auction,

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it could conceivably top the £200 mark.

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Propellers make really good money.

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With regard to that one, it was hard to put a price on it

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because I wasn't sure what it was off.

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A lot of propellers that come on the market

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are six foot and they're hard to display at home.

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But this little one - perfect.

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-It wouldn't get us airborne.

-No, it wouldn't!

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Interest here on the book. Four-blade propeller.

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-I've got 12 bids on the book here.

-12 bids!

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Starting...

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320.

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Per blade, Paul, was my valuation!

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£300 on the book. 320.

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320. 340. 360.

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380. 400. 420.

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Wow.

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440.

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£420 commission bid. 440.

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All done at £420, then.

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Yes! £420!

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I think things like propellers and gas masks,

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it's really quirky stuff,

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so you can go and find those in the attic or wherever

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and it will surprise you. Never discard them.

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Take them to your local saleroom and find out what they're worth.

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Today's trash could be tomorrow's treasure,

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so think carefully before throwing away anything,

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especially if it's good quality and of some age.

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Now, from a flying propeller

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to a rare piece of flying history that proves what we all say -

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provenance is key.

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I want to know about your badges. What are they all about?

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That one was when I did a couple of wing walks.

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-Wing walks?

-Wing walks.

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And the second one I did when I was 75.

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-So you did wing-walking at 75?

-Yes.

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Maggie's achievements on the wing were just so surprising.

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She said that she did her first wing walk at the age of 75.

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I was, you know, amazed.

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She did it all for charity. Obviously a game girl.

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Wing-walking at 75 - wow!

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And parachute-jumping. I've done two jumps, as well.

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You're a very, very brave woman!

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So planes have obviously been a part of your life.

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Probably from my father, yes.

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-There he is there in the First World War.

-That's right.

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And he worked in the Royal Flying Corps.

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So this here, RFC,

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is Royal Flying Corps, which predates the RAF.

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-So this was First World War aeroplanes.

-Yes.

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He was in the First World War and the Second World War.

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-What was his name?

-Theodore Frederick Saunders.

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Theodore Frederick Saunders. Wow.

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Items from the First World War are so collectable.

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It's just edging out of living memory,

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but everything is documented from this war.

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One can really delve deep and do your own research.

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That's why it's so important and so collectable.

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"Air Board Technical Notes".

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But what's nice is, it's stamped "Royal Flying Corps".

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It's a very interesting book, but a little dry.

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I understand. I don't know what else to do with it!

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This book is actually quite interesting.

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OK, it's technical notes again,

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-but it's got pictures of all the planes.

-That's right.

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We're not looking at lots of money.

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-No.

-It's going to be under £50, I'm afraid.

-That's all right.

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I'd never actually seen anything like this before.

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I thought they could be too rare.

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Being too rare means that they are too scarce

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to have a collectorship behind them.

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But what I didn't realise is that Royal Flying Corps items

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were such a short-lived regiment before it became the RAF,

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they will hold a value.

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And I was genuinely surprised at the time.

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The WWI Department of Aircraft Production technical notes.

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Good wartime memorabilia. Who'll start me? 50 to get on.

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£30? At 30, down here. At £30.

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In front of me at £30. Five now?

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At £30. Five. 40.

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Five. 50. Five. 60. At £60 in front of me now.

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Five. 70. Five. 80. Five.

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-90.

-This is good!

-Yes!

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Five. 100 bid. 100.

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-At 100 now. 110.

-I would never have believed that.

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At £100, then? Are you sure? In front of me at 110. Back in.

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120, if you like, sir. At 110.

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-Sold. £110.

-Goodness gracious! That's unbelievable!

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That could pay for another wing walk if you were allowed to do it.

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Remember, if you've got any militaria at home

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that you're thinking of selling,

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make sure you dig out

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any corresponding photographs or correspondence

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because it all adds to the story,

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and that adds to the value.

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Next, we're on the Isle of Wight.

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Will found a piece of history that's of real local interest.

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It's just a shame he didn't know what it was!

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Working in an auction house, we see a lot of items,

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there's a high turnover of lots,

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so generally you've either seen something similar or the same

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when something comes through the door.

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Matt, Ian, I'm not even going to pretend

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that I know what this is in front of us,

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but it's certainly caught my eye.

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I had to tell them, "I've got no idea what this is. You tell me."

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What you've got in front of you is the heart of a paddle steamer.

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This sat in front of a big triple-expansion steam engine,

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-the biggest type of engine you get in a boat.

-Yes.

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An engineer would stand here

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and he's controlling the engine and driving the boat.

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They told me everything they knew about this piece

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that they had found in an abandoned steamship.

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They knew exactly what it was.

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We operate a paddle steamer called Medina Monarch.

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It's the smallest one in the world,

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one of three working paddle steamers

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that carry passengers in this country.

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We were given the opportunity to go in and look for spares

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and we came across this.

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This was just lying about the ship.

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These were paddle steamers on the Isle of Wight

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that were abandoned, decommissioned,

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and these two guys saw an opportunity there to buy an abandoned steamboat

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and plough money, effort and time into restoring it,

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and they got it back on the river.

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I'm going to say £50 to £100.

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If you've got someone who really knows what it is

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and what's it worth to them,

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they're going to be prepared to pay what they're prepared to pay,

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no matter what the estimate is.

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Matt and Ian are helping to preserve

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-a very special piece of maritime history.

-We are.

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And it's a great big lump of brass

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that you wheeled into the valuation day.

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It's being sold to raise money

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-to do up your paddle steamer, is that right?

-It is.

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It's going under the hammer now. Good luck, guys.

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The auctioneer said there was enough interest from around the country,

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I think a couple of phone bids against a commission bidder.

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400. 410.

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420.

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It's a lot better than 50 quid!

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490. 500?

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-Phone's in now.

-520, phone bid. 540.

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560.

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560. 580.

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580, yes. All done at 580?

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600 back in.

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-600. 620.

-Good work.

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640. Is the phone bidder out?

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-Oh, come on!

-All done at 620. Selling at £620.

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Yes! £620!

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That's got to make you feel good.

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-Brilliant.

-Good for you.

-We're really chuffed.

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-That goes a big way towards that finance, doesn't it?

-It does.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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It's that element of history that would have been lost,

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and so you need people like Matt and Ian to salvage these pieces

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from being lost for ever.

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Saving derelict objects

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can be a great way of making money for old rope,

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or even old brass.

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But obviously, you need permission from the owner

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before you take anything away.

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Salvage yards and good old-fashioned tips

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are also great places to save historic items from the fire

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and give them a new lease of life.

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Not all items need to be used for their original purpose,

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as Adam found out.

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I choose my contributors and items based on a couple of basic rules.

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The owner has to be a good character...

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-You didn't lose your accent.

-No.

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-And you've not lost your humour.

-Oh, you mustn't do that!

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..it has to be an unusual item...

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What is a man like you doing with a trench periscope?

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..and I have to know what it is and roughly what it's worth!

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And it ticked all three boxes.

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It's a handy gadget. When have you had the chance to use it?

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If you're a little fella and you want to look at a football match,

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that's what you need.

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-It's French manufacture.

-Yes.

-World War I?

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Yes, definitely.

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And it's got this very nice leather protective case.

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-Where did you get this from?

-Bury St Edmunds.

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This bloke who had an army shop, and, er,

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you know, surplus army stuff,

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-and I had a swap and that was it.

-You did a deal.

-Yes.

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-Why are you selling it?

-I've been forced into it.

-Who by?

-My wife.

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-"Get rid of your junk!" she said.

-ADAM GASPS

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It's quite an interesting item now.

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I would think it'd make about £50 in the current market.

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It should do, I hope. Maybe more. Would it make more, no?

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-50 or 60. I don't think it'll make much more.

-That's all right.

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50 to 60 is really keeping it very tight, isn't it?

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It doesn't leave much room for any discrepancy.

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That's because I'm pretty sure there must've been one

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that I remember going for about £50 or £60 pretty soon before that,

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so I thought, "Let's see if we can get it really accurate."

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-John, that WWI periscope is a lovely little item.

-It is.

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Real quality, isn't it? I'm pleased you picked that.

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-Beautiful leather case. Not a lot of use.

-Nice thing.

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It's just a bit different, isn't it?

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-Yes. Slightly different.

-We had fun filming it.

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-Look at...

-Look at the family over there!

-Turn that around!

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Look at that! That's a cracking family you've brought along.

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-Lots of moral support.

-They're good.

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Good luck. This periscope is now going under the hammer.

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Lot 130 now.

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We have the First World War hand-held periscope

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with its fitted leather case.

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Interest on the sheet shown. I start at £30. 32.

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35. 38. And 40. 42.

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45. 48. Above at 48. 50. 55.

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60. Five. 70.

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-Five. 80.

-Lovely.

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90. 90 at the back. Coming in?

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Gentleman at 90. I'll take five again.

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90 by the door, at 90. Any advance on £90?

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-Yes!

-£90?

-90 quid. You've got to be happy with that.

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Yes, yes. That's a result.

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That'll be tea and cakes for the rest of my life.

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Tea and cakes for the family!

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For the rest of my life!

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He used to use the periscope

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so that he could have a better view at the football.

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I think I asked him, "How would you manage without the periscope?"

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He said quite simply,

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"Football's on telly these days, lad!"

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Made me feel a bit silly, really!

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It may have seen action in WWI,

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but I love the way John found another use for the periscope

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at the football.

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Often, an item isn't redundant,

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it just needs a little imagination to bring it back to life.

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And now to a gentler way to enjoy the outdoors,

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with a piece that would add character to any garden...

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A local lad, then?

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-You can tell that, the way I talk!

-Yes, I can!

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'..much like its owner.'

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I've got to say, looking at this really quickly,

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£40 to £60.

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You don't know what I'm talking about.

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-£40 to £60 for the trolley sack.

-Oh, sorry! That!

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-That blanket come off my bed this morning!

-I think...

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You liked that, did you?

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I think that is great.

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What's its story? Where's it comes from?

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-I...

-Your garden?

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For starters, I suffer from old-timers' disease.

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-I can't remember.

-I know the feeling.

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I believe I bought it from an antique dealer.

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-Did you? We've got to be looking at around about £100, £150.

-Yes.

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-Happy with that?

-Oh, yes!

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-Shall we put this into the auction without the trolley?

-Yes.

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-I tell you what...

-Bung me in, as well!

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On to lot 10 now. Lot 10 is the 20th-century heavy figural sundial.

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50 bid. At 50. Five. 60. Five.

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-We're in.

-We're all right.

-75. Above at 75. 75.

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Where's 80? At 75. 80's bid. 85.

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-This is good.

-90. Five.

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At £95, are you all done?

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-Not bad at all.

-Not bad!

-I'm happy, so you must...

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-Even for scrap, I couldn't have got that sort of money.

-No.

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-What are you going to do with it?

-Well, I make people smile.

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I'll probably give it to the wife and she'll go and waste it on food!

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It just goes to show that even the impractical has a value.

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So, what are the insider tips so far?

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When it comes to travelling the outdoors,

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the planes, trains and automobiles of the past

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have a huge collectors market.

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Keep hold of anything transport-related

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until you've had it valued.

0:17:040:17:06

Salvage yards can be a great place to pick up a bargain,

0:17:060:17:10

so go and have a rummage.

0:17:100:17:13

And an object can have many uses,

0:17:130:17:15

so just because it's not fit for its original purpose,

0:17:150:17:19

that doesn't make it worthless.

0:17:190:17:22

There are some wonderful works of art out there,

0:17:240:17:27

great names and superb antiques.

0:17:270:17:28

We want to give you some information on what makes them special.

0:17:280:17:33

As we've seen so far on today's show,

0:17:350:17:37

it's not just the traditional items

0:17:370:17:39

that can go down a storm in the saleroom.

0:17:390:17:42

Objects that cash in on our nostalgia for methods of transport

0:17:420:17:46

can be very lucrative, too.

0:17:460:17:49

Take, for example, the velocipede, or as you may know it -

0:17:490:17:52

the bicycle.

0:17:520:17:54

From the Pennyfarthing to the tandem,

0:17:540:17:56

the Raleigh to the Racer,

0:17:560:17:59

bikes have been part of our daily lives for decades.

0:17:590:18:02

Over the years on Flog It,

0:18:020:18:04

I've learned a lot about the cycles of the past and future...

0:18:040:18:07

-Paul, this is the YikeBike.

-Gosh!

0:18:070:18:11

..and how much they can earn you at auction.

0:18:110:18:14

And it all started in the Midlands.

0:18:140:18:17

-Steve.

-Hi.

-This a very small part of your bicycle collection.

0:18:180:18:22

Tell me, how did the bike evolve?

0:18:220:18:24

Bikes came to Coventry in 1869

0:18:240:18:25

when a fellow called Rowley Turner pedalled into Coventry.

0:18:250:18:29

He went to a sewing machine factory,

0:18:290:18:31

they were making sewing machines in the city,

0:18:310:18:33

and he came on a bike like this, a bone-shaker.

0:18:330:18:36

He sold it to the factory that they ought to make these things,

0:18:360:18:39

and that was the beginning of cycle-making in Coventry.

0:18:390:18:43

The first really important bike to be produced in Coventry

0:18:430:18:46

was the safety bike.

0:18:460:18:49

The new design, with a diamond frame and same-size wheels,

0:18:490:18:52

offered an alternative to the dangerous, cumbersome high-wheelers

0:18:520:18:56

known by most of us as...

0:18:560:18:58

Now that I'm standing by the side of you, I think I've changed my mind.

0:19:020:19:05

No, no! You've got to have a go! I'm sure you can do it.

0:19:050:19:09

-What's the technique?

-The technique is,

0:19:090:19:11

you've got to put one foot on the step,

0:19:110:19:14

either step, it's up to you, whatever you feel comfortable with,

0:19:140:19:17

and then you've got to pull yourself up in the saddle,

0:19:170:19:20

holding onto the handle bars.

0:19:200:19:22

-I'm sure you can do it! Give it a go.

-OK.

0:19:230:19:27

And then hop. Hop, hop!

0:19:270:19:29

Get some momentum and jump up into the saddle.

0:19:290:19:32

-Go on! Give it a go!

-The grin on his face...!

0:19:320:19:36

-Yes!

-JAUNTY MUSIC

0:19:390:19:41

A Pennyfarthing like this one

0:19:470:19:49

can make thousands of pounds at auction.

0:19:490:19:52

Even if it is unrideable!

0:19:520:19:54

-Agh!

-CLUNK!

0:19:540:19:56

HE LAUGHS

0:19:560:19:59

The mass production of bikes led to the evolution of a new sport.

0:20:030:20:07

And memorabilia from this time is highly sought after,

0:20:080:20:11

as Michael Baggott discovered.

0:20:120:20:14

-This is from my grandfather, who was called Eli Pope.

-Right.

0:20:140:20:18

This is his picture there.

0:20:180:20:20

-Oh, right.

-He built this five-wheeled bicycle.

0:20:200:20:23

I don't know the name for a five-seater bicycle.

0:20:230:20:26

-They call it a quinary.

-Quinary. You learn something every day on Flog It!

0:20:260:20:30

-I'd never heard it.

-Even I do.

0:20:300:20:32

He then also raced with it on the old Crystal Palace track

0:20:320:20:37

and he won this medal for winning the race.

0:20:370:20:40

-So rather than a cup, he got a watch!

-A gold watch.

0:20:400:20:44

Michael valued the collection at £150 to £250,

0:20:440:20:48

but didn't realise

0:20:480:20:49

Sylvia's grandfather had a great cycling reputation

0:20:490:20:52

and was a member of the Dunlop Team.

0:20:530:20:57

How did this affect the sale price?

0:20:570:21:00

I have got to start the bidding here at £300.

0:21:000:21:04

-Fantastic!

-£300. 320 on the phone.

0:21:040:21:08

340. 360.

0:21:080:21:10

-Sylvia!

-It's going up!

-340. 360 you say.

0:21:100:21:13

360. 380. 400.

0:21:130:21:16

-£400. And 20. 440.

-Come on!

0:21:160:21:20

-460.

-I can't believe it.

-Fantastic!

-500.

0:21:200:21:24

-And 20.

-It deserves to make it.

0:21:240:21:26

550 now. 580.

0:21:260:21:29

At 580, then, if you're done...

0:21:290:21:32

-Oh, pedal power!

-Wowee!

-£580!

0:21:320:21:36

You may be surprised to know that bikes from your living memory

0:21:360:21:40

have rocketed in value, too.

0:21:400:21:41

This Chopper was no exception.

0:21:420:21:45

I had one. I had a bright orange one.

0:21:450:21:48

-Oh, right.

-I was very lucky.

0:21:480:21:50

-But I love this ultra-violet colour. It's so girly, isn't it?

-It is.

0:21:500:21:54

Well, if we said this has a valuation at £350 to £450,

0:21:540:21:59

what would you say to that?

0:21:590:22:01

I'd say that was very good.

0:22:010:22:03

Fingers crossed. Here it goes.

0:22:030:22:04

275. 300.

0:22:040:22:07

325. 350.

0:22:070:22:10

All done at £350, then? Are we quite sure?

0:22:100:22:13

He's sold it. 350.

0:22:140:22:17

Rare Choppers have been known to sell for up to £2,000,

0:22:170:22:21

so have a look in your garage for any unwanted two-wheelers.

0:22:210:22:26

Maybe it's time to do some recycling!

0:22:260:22:31

Lots of you have told me that Flog It has inspired you

0:22:340:22:38

to explore the world of antiques.

0:22:380:22:39

But what inspired our experts?

0:22:390:22:42

The first item I ever bought at auction,

0:22:420:22:44

or anywhere else for that matter,

0:22:440:22:46

is this little white china dish.

0:22:460:22:48

Made in Germany in the late 19th century,

0:22:480:22:51

it's typical of so much souvenir-ware made in Germany,

0:22:510:22:55

and it commemorates the opening of Delabole Railway Station

0:22:550:22:59

in October 1893.

0:22:590:23:01

It's important to me because,

0:23:020:23:04

as I say, it was the first thing I ever bought,

0:23:040:23:07

and I bought it at a cattle market in Holsworthy, down in North Devon.

0:23:070:23:12

Running parallel and concurrently with the cattle market,

0:23:120:23:16

the pig auction and the sheep auctions and so on,

0:23:160:23:18

there'd be a little sale of furniture, household effects,

0:23:180:23:22

bric-a-brac and so on.

0:23:220:23:23

In those early days, I just loved going to Holsworthy

0:23:230:23:26

and poking around.

0:23:260:23:27

I saw this and thought I had to have it,

0:23:280:23:31

and I probably paid about ten bob for it -

0:23:310:23:33

50 pence.

0:23:330:23:36

We talk about the auction room a lot on the show.

0:23:410:23:44

For the past 11 years,

0:23:440:23:45

we've been seeing people buying and selling in the saleroom.

0:23:450:23:48

But there is an alternative.

0:23:480:23:51

If you're just starting out

0:23:510:23:52

or you're serious about adding to a collection,

0:23:520:23:55

for me, there is a better way.

0:23:550:23:56

But where do you start?

0:23:560:24:00

Petworth in West Sussex would be ideal,

0:24:000:24:02

as it lays claim to no less than ten of these...

0:24:020:24:05

Antique shops.

0:24:060:24:09

If you want to buy an antique or a collectable

0:24:090:24:11

but don't want the uncertainty of the auction room,

0:24:110:24:14

antique shops may be the best place for you.

0:24:140:24:17

They stock everything,

0:24:170:24:19

from 18th-century furniture, to books, paintings and lamps.

0:24:190:24:23

You can browse at your leisure, negotiate a price

0:24:230:24:26

and still walk away with a bargain.

0:24:260:24:29

And that's not all.

0:24:290:24:30

With antique shops come antique dealers.

0:24:300:24:33

By their very nature,

0:24:330:24:34

dealers love antiques and they love to talk.

0:24:340:24:37

More often than not, you come across one who really knows his stuff.

0:24:370:24:41

All you have to do is be brave enough to ask.

0:24:410:24:45

I'm no stranger to antique shops,

0:24:450:24:48

so I'm going to ask two local furniture dealers

0:24:480:24:50

for their tips of the trade,

0:24:500:24:52

starting with furniture expert Tony Wilkinson.

0:24:520:24:55

Tony, hello. There is a misconception that

0:24:550:24:58

from the outside you look in and go, "It's a bit posh and too expensive."

0:24:580:25:02

Can you tell me a little bit about yourself?

0:25:020:25:04

Well, you're absolutely right. It's one of the big problems.

0:25:040:25:08

When running a shop like this, you try and get it looking terrific

0:25:080:25:13

and then find you've frightened off half the customers.

0:25:130:25:16

But once they come through the door,

0:25:160:25:19

they'll be surprised at what value for money some of this is.

0:25:190:25:22

-And there's something for everybody, price ranges?

-Absolutely.

0:25:220:25:25

From, you know, a couple of hundred pounds

0:25:250:25:27

for a really nice pair of chairs,

0:25:270:25:29

up to 10, 15,000, 20,000.

0:25:290:25:32

But most of the furniture couldn't be made today

0:25:320:25:35

for what we're selling it for now.

0:25:350:25:37

Can you give the viewers any tips on what you look out for

0:25:370:25:41

when buying your passionate piece of 18th-century English?

0:25:410:25:44

I always say to somebody,

0:25:440:25:45

what they want to do is not to rush up to a piece.

0:25:450:25:48

Stand back from it,

0:25:480:25:49

look at its general proportion and see how it stands.

0:25:490:25:52

If anything jars, that probably means something is wrong.

0:25:520:25:56

-It's been altered at some stage.

-Something's going wrong there.

0:25:560:26:00

But having established the proportions right,

0:26:000:26:03

get up to it, look at the detail, look at the surface and colour.

0:26:030:26:07

-That's the thing that can't be changed.

-It's the richness.

0:26:070:26:10

And make sure the thing is as original as possible.

0:26:100:26:14

-Pay a bit more to buy something really good.

-Yes.

0:26:140:26:18

And that doesn't just apply to buying furniture.

0:26:180:26:21

That's good advice when buying any antique.

0:26:210:26:24

OK, first stop, lots learnt there and some really useful tips.

0:26:240:26:27

Dealers like Tony often specialise,

0:26:270:26:30

so if you've got something in mind, do your homework.

0:26:300:26:33

The beautiful thing is, antique shops are not chain stores.

0:26:330:26:36

Each and every one of them is different.

0:26:360:26:40

So if one shop doesn't have what you're looking for, another might.

0:26:400:26:44

And you might make a day

0:26:440:26:45

of searching the shops for something that suits your taste.

0:26:450:26:49

For me, it's primitive country furniture.

0:26:490:26:51

I'm always happy to get some advice

0:26:510:26:53

from dealer David Swanson about what to look out for.

0:26:530:26:56

What do you look for when you go out buying your key pieces?

0:26:580:27:01

Firstly, hopefully it hasn't been enhanced to make it more saleable,

0:27:010:27:05

it hasn't been altered.

0:27:050:27:07

And then, very importantly,

0:27:070:27:10

its charm, its quirkiness,

0:27:100:27:12

its character and colour.

0:27:120:27:16

And that's built up over two or 300 years.

0:27:160:27:19

-Hundreds of years of dust, dirt...

-Smoke, polish.

-Yes.

0:27:190:27:24

In the trade, it's called a skin. It's either got a skin or it hasn't.

0:27:240:27:28

-And if it doesn't have a skin, don't buy it.

-Don't look at it.

0:27:280:27:31

Cross the threshold of these shops

0:27:310:27:33

and you'll discover an abundance of antiques and expertise.

0:27:330:27:37

They want your business,

0:27:370:27:38

so some dealers will let you pay in instalments

0:27:380:27:41

and even loan you an item to take home, to see if it works in situ.

0:27:410:27:46

Even if you don't buy anything,

0:27:460:27:47

you can learn an awful lot along the way.

0:27:470:27:50

Looking for antiques to buy can be great fun,

0:27:500:27:53

whether it's in Petworth, Tetbury, Hungerford,

0:27:530:27:55

or in a town or city near you that has a scattering of antique shops.

0:27:550:28:00

Because if you can't find it one, you'll find it in the other.

0:28:000:28:03

Well, I hope we've piqued your interest

0:28:110:28:13

with our rundown of travel-related antiques.

0:28:130:28:16

If you think you've got something of interest at home,

0:28:160:28:20

don't just leave it there.

0:28:200:28:21

Get it valued,

0:28:210:28:22

because, remember, there are all kinds of collectors out there.

0:28:220:28:26

At £580, then, if you're done.

0:28:260:28:29

I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:28:290:28:30

See you next time for more Flog It! Trade Secrets.

0:28:300:28:34

Paul Martin and a host of regular experts offer tips and advice on antiques and collectibles. The programme is imbued with a spirit of adventure as the team take a tour of travel-related antiques, and Paul Martin explores the history of the bicycle.


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