Best of British Flog It: Trade Secrets


Best of British

The team advise on what to look for among the best of British objects. Plus a follow-up with one visitor who put the proceeds of her sale to interesting use.


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Transcript


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Over the last 11 years on Flog It!,

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we've travelled the length and breadth of the British Isles

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several times over.

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Along the way, you've turned up in your thousands

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with beautiful items for our experts to muse over.

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Do you take a wee dram?

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Only for medicinal purposes! THEY LAUGH

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This little nation of ours boasts a rich and proud antique heritage.

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So, in today's programme,

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we're going to give you the low-down on some of our great British makers.

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In this episode, we'll be looking at the best of British -

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antiques and collectibles from up and down the country.

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This is a lovely one we found, as well.

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The Bridlington Excelsior Prize Silver Band.

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And sometimes, it's not just what you have,

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it's knowing where they came from

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and the best place to sell them.

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That really makes a difference.

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Coming up, we'll give you the know-how to find your own

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best of British.

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If it's from a limited edition of 100,

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try and get the earlier pieces.

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This is where I drop it.

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James Lewis visits Derby to learn some trade secrets

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from one of Britain's iconic ceramics makers.

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This is just not easy, is it?

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When it comes to English greats,

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we'll let you know when damage won't dent their appeal.

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A bit of sticky tape isn't necessarily a bad thing.

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Now, the great thing about this show is, we get to visit

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the four corners of the United Kingdom.

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And there's always a buzz amongst our experts

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as to whether you will bring us some local treasures to look at.

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And you never disappoint.

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'So, if you want to buy a bit of British, here are some pointers.'

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Whatever you buy, make it the best you can afford.

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So, rather than perhaps buy five items at £100 each,

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buy one for £500.

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You go with your gut reaction, but if you've got

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a little bit of knowledge, turn everything upside down.

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Strangely, in our business,

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we attach value to who made something, who painted something,

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when it was made, rather than the object itself.

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Look out for stylised pieces from the 1950s. They're on the up.

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So here are some of our very best finds

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and what you can learn from them.

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'And British names don't come any bigger than Royal Worcester.

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'For Flog It! expert Philip Serrell, it's almost a way of life.'

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I think the wares are stunning and because I'm in Worcester,

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it's something that I've tended to specialise in throughout the years.

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Highly decorative wares and models of the 19th century,

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and then in the 20th century, the real key for me,

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I suppose, are the hand-painted wares - cattle by the Stintons,

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hand-painted fruit by people like Sebright.

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You know, I remember Adam took in a vase by White

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that was decorated in peacocks.

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And you've brought me a lovely example

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of a Worcester vase. Can you tell me how you came to own it?

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Well, it was my parents'.

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They acquired it from friends about 40, 45 years ago.

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And my parents gave it to me about 15 years ago.

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Worcester porcelain is one of the most historic

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and longest-established porcelain factories in the world and because they're one of the best,

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they are widely collected all around the world.

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It's obviously hand-painted, brightly enamel painted, with...

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-That's a peacock, isn't it?

-I think so, yes. It certainly looks like it.

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Peacocks in Worcestershire are an unlucky bird,

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because the peacock tail is meant to represent the devil's eye, and if

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you have a peacock tail in the house, it's meant to bring you bad luck.

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Now, the lid doesn't sit on quite right. Oh, look!

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-They didn't come out the factory like that!

-No, that's courtesy of my father.

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Your father did that to preserve it?

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-To preserve the lid.

-To preserve the lid.

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Unfortunately...is that a crack? It is. A hairline crack in the lid.

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The damage on that vase really didn't count

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as a major damage at all. And, if anything,

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it showed that it had never been near a dealer's shop,

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it had never been in a fair, it was just nice and honest and genuine.

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A bit of sticky tape isn't necessarily a bad thing.

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And the date code for this,

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we add up all these dots here, there are 17 dots in total

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which...my calculations make it around 1908, when that was made.

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So, if we turn it back round again,

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we've got a very handsome Worcester vase with cover.

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So, I think that we should put an estimate of £200 to £300

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and I think it will make 300 to 350, eventually,

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once everyone's had a bid at it. Does that sound acceptable?

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-Sounds reasonable to me, yes. But I would want a reserve on it.

-20 quid?

-Oh, no...

-I'm joking!

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-No, I would say 200.

-OK.

-Does that sound all right?

-Yes.

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You'd have thought that was primed to go in Philip's sale,

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and it was, because Philip has the big collections of Worcester,

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every sale he has, he's in Worcestershire

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and it's one of the things he specialises in.

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So, in that respect, it was the perfect sale for the vase to go in.

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Lot 760 is this really lovely vase.

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I've got 400. Will you go 420? 420.

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Straight in there at 400.

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If you think about it, there's probably more Worcester porcelain

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in Worcester than there is anywhere else.

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And so, as the local auctioneer, I'm probably going to sell more Worcester,

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and so, people tend to come to us for it.

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-700.

-Oh, my giddy aunt.

-720.

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-750. 780.

-Gosh, it's going on and on, isn't it?

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850, 880, 900.

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920.

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You need to be mindful, all the time, that whatever you see

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is someone's property, and it's your job, your duty,

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to get the most that you can for it.

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-Oh, Barbara...

-Let's see if we can get four figures. 1,100.

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-£1,100.

-Wow!

-50, is it?

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You can never predict what's going to happen in an auction.

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1,150, is it?

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-1,150.

-This is quite special.

-Yeah.

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-There is the bid. In America.

-In America, that's gone to the States.

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-At £1,200, and I sell, then...

-How are you feeling?

-Wonderful!

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GAVEL FALLS

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£1,200 - the hammer's gone down. That's what we like to see!

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'Selling the vase in Worcester meant the buyers knew where to look.

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'And now this classic English piece has a new home,

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thousands of miles away.

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You always have in the back of your mind, "local" -

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if it's local,

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it's going to have an interest.

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The auctioneer will work harder for you.

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And in Harrogate, there was this amazing postcard and photograph album.

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Tell me, how did you come about them?

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My mum had them at her house, and I just cleared her house out.

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What's amazing is the condition of the album, just to begin with.

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It's super. But what's even more interesting is what's inside, actually.

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The album is awash with postcards and photographs from the 1900s,

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1910, 1920. Some pre-war ones. This is a lovely one we found, as well.

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The Bridlington Excelsior Prize Silver Band.

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Things like that are just wonderful.

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They were all there their trophy, their twin-handled cup,

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and these lovely instruments all on display.

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God, it would have made a noise.

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Then we had the polling card which, again, was local. Local elections.

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All of these aspects - you could never photograph them again.

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This polling card, you could never make again.

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That group of people, that's what's so interesting about them. They're so local to that area.

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That's why people are after it.

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-I would like to put an estimate on it of about £300 to £500.

-Right.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes!

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But has Thomas got carried away by a few choice cards?

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'On the day, the auctioneer had his doubts.'

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-£300 to £500 on this.

-Hmm...

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There are one or two local ones here, but not that many.

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Which is a shame. I think, as so often with these things,

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they sell best in their own area,

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so if you had a great album of Yorkshire cards,

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they'd sell like mad, but when you get a mixed album like this, not quite so easy to sell.

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This will be a struggle, I think, personally.

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I agree with you, Paul, I think we are going to struggle on that one.

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I can remember when we got to the auction, Paul was, you know,

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"I've had a chat to the auctioneer. We don't think it's going to sell.

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"Oh, it's going to be taken home."

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First round, into the ring, the bell's not even gone,

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we're on the floor already, trying to claw our way up after the ten-second count.

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-This is going to be a tricky one, but I think we should just get it away.

-I don't know.

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And then, suddenly, the auction happened. There's a phone bid.

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Yes, quite a lot of them there, lot 509. Couple of hundred for it?

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200 I'm bid, 210, now, £200, the opening bid.

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210 I'm bid, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280...

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There's somebody with their paddle just up. You just love that.

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As an auctioneer, you cannot pray for anything better.

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Somebody doing this all the time,

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they've got somebody on the phone, or somebody's there,

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you've got two people doing that, both paddles up, it started. 300. And 20. 340, 360, 380, 400.

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410, 420, 430. 430, 440, 450.

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-Not bad.

-This is fantastic.

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The album is working. It's fighting its corner.

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And I felt vindicated that I put that bullish estimate on it.

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I was so wrong, cos I agreed with the auctioneer.

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I thought it would struggle.

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Ye of little faith!

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500, 510.

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510, 520, 530.

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It just went on and on and on and on.

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700, upstairs. At £700. Any more? 700, then, it's going at £700.

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Janet, £700!

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Unbelievable!

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I think she was ecstatic.

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I reckon it made that money because there were some interesting

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black-and-white photographs of the silver band.

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There were some colliery photographs.

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There was also that piece of political ephemera.

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And it was an early card as well.

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It was early 1900s, before women had the vote, so, again, fascinating.

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With all those things of local interest...

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that's why it made the £700.

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'And that's the thing about our beautiful country - every region has its own gems,

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'but with so much variety out there in the early days, even we were caught out occasionally.'

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She's a pretty girl. Oh, hi, Philip.

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-It's Newlyn.

-Newlyn copper.

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I'm not convinced that that's always been in there.

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-No, I don't think that has.

-No, it hasn't.

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It's slightly Arts and Crafts looking.

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-I'd imagine you're about right there.

-What £30 to 50?

-£50.

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-Purely because it's got Newlyn on. Otherwise, about 20 quid.

-Absolutely.

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That's the joy of Flog It! - the fact that you're standing there or sitting at your table

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and you never know what's going to pitch up next.

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I think that's quite sweet, that.

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So what do you know about Newlyn brassware?

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Well, I didn't know anything about it.

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It was just a present. And then I looked

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and saw it was made in Newlyn, but that's as much as I know.

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-Really?

-Yeah, really.

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I have seen one other piece, but bigger than that...a plate.

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-I quite like it. I think it's a bit of fun. I don't think it's worth a fortune.

-No.

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It's very easy to become insular in this job. I live and work in Worcester

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and I look at Worcester pots, Worcester pots, Worcester pots,

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and I don't get too much local Newlyn School copper that's made there.

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I wouldn't profess to be an expert in Newlyn metalware.

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I've had a word with Paul, but it's probably got a value of around £30 to £50.

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-Yeah, well, that'd be handy.

-What would you do with that?

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-I'd get some seed potatoes.

-Are you a big gardener?

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-I like a bit of gardening, yes. That keeps me on me feet, moving about.

-Yeah.

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I think seed potatoes are more important to Eric than Newlyn bowls. really,

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and I just think... that was just typical of him.

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If we put that in at £30 to £50, put a reserve on it of £25,

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I would hope that it would sell, because I just think it's an interesting thing.

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-Somebody will enjoy it, won't they?

-Absolutely. I think it's rather nice, actually.

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-Certainly, Eric, if I ever see any Newlyn copper again, I shall think of you, sir.

-Oh, thank you.

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-And gardening.

-Thank you very much.

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Philip valued it at £40.

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It's certainly undervalued.

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To be quite honest, it's a lovely example of Newlyn copper, beaten all the way around.

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You've got this lovely Cornish fish emblem throughout. He's going to have a surprise.

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We're going to start the bidding at £200. £200 straightaway.

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-Good grief!

-200 quid, straight in.

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You can't ever beat local knowledge, can you?

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260. At 270. 270 I'm bid. Anybody else? At 270 in front of me.

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-What do you think?

-I never thought 270...

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-That's really good, isn't it?

-I'm shaking.

-I'm bid 270.

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-At 270. Thank you.

-It went for more than we thought.

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I'm delighted. As I said,

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I'm not an expert in items from the Newlyn School.

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I'm delighted for you. And it's taught me a bit as well.

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That's the beauty of this game.

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-I thought it was worth about 50 quid.

-We can always learn more.

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I go out now and I know if I see a piece of copperware with fish on it there's a chance it's Newlyn ware.

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It might be by Pearson.

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Travelling hundreds of miles up and down Britain for Flog It!,

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our experts have picked up quite a few trade secrets along the way.

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Buying a British collectible,

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if you're buying something from a limited edition,

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make sure you're buying it at the start of the run.

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So, if it's from a limited edition of 100, try and get the earlier pieces or, obviously, the last.

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An antique or whatever you're buying should speak to you,

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and if you like the '60s then buy that.

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For me, it's the 17th century that speaks to me.

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And don't forget, the antiques market is international

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and great British names will attract worldwide attention.

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And always collect something you're passionate about - that way you'll never get bored.

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You can never have too much Royal Worcester. You should have more and more...and them some more!

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We British are a nation of porcelain lovers.

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We see more ceramics at our Flog It! valuation days than any other single category of antiques.

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And the great thing about porcelain is,

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normally all you need to know is right there in front of you, on the plate.

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Firstly, in its overall condition

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and, secondly, when you turn it over and look at the factory stamp marks or the potter's name.

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And with a little bit of information and a good guidebook,

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you can normally work out if what you have is of any value.

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James Lewis lives and works in Derbyshire,

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and it's so fitting that among the antiques

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he gets most excited about are pieces of this best British product.

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Derby has been famous for its porcelain from the mid-18th century,

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since the Dewsbury factory started work here.

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And it's been collected and treasured by Royal families,

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monarchs, collectors all over the world, for about 250 years.

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And for anybody who loves porcelain,

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this is just paradise.

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For me, it's England's finest factory and sometimes you get tingles.

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And, for me, they're coming all down the spine and all to the fingers.

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Over my 20 years as an auctioneer, I have handled thousands of pieces of Royal Crown Derby,

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but I've never really spent too much time thinking about the work that goes into it.

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But today, I have access to all areas of the factory.

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And rumour has it they're going to let me make a plate.

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-Tim, nice to see you.

-Morning, James.

-Hi.

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So, tell me, what's going on here?

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Here we're making one of your favourite plates, I believe, Marie Antoinette.

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What are you saying?

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THEY LAUGH

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-So where does it start from here?

-Well, it's just a roll of clay,

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it's made in the smith house, comes out through a machine, like a giant sausage machine.

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-Yeah.

-Comes out here and just cut in a roll.

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So how many of these do you make an hour?

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-You can make about 60 an hour.

-And if you're working hard(?)

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THEY LAUGH

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-This is going to fall apart.

-No, it won't.

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-You can do this.

-I'll try.

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You can do this!

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Just place it in the middle of the mould.

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It'll be a miracle if it actually gets to the mould.

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You think you're making pizzas, don't you?

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HE LAUGHS

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Pull the gate down.

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You need to press. Foot on there. That releases it.

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It will come off. There you go.

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Yay! I can't believe that actually worked.

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It wasn't that hard, was it?

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Brilliant!

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-The famous 1128. Or Imari.

-Yes, the Imari one.

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These are the patterns that Royal Crown Derby are most well-known for -

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the Imari. Called the Imari because of the influences from the Japanese port of Imari.

0:17:530:18:01

And the port of Imari was exporting porcelain that was mainly red, green, blue and gold.

0:18:010:18:08

Royal Crown Derby started these patterns around 1870

0:18:080:18:12

and this market is still as buoyant today as it was in the 1870s.

0:18:120:18:17

-Karen, hi.

-Hi.

0:18:240:18:25

-I've been told you're the queen of the fettlers.

-I believe so.

0:18:250:18:29

That sounds like something from The Hobbit.

0:18:290:18:32

What is a fettler?

0:18:320:18:33

A fettler is a person that cleans down a piece of work once it's made.

0:18:330:18:38

Clean all the rough edges, any blemishes, any marks.

0:18:380:18:42

Well, if you're working on one that I've just done, there'll be plenty of work to do.

0:18:420:18:47

-Is this one that I made earlier?

-One like you made earlier, yes.

0:18:470:18:50

-It'll have gone round the drying process for a couple of hours.

-OK. Right.

0:18:500:18:55

We've cleaned the edge off with a knife.

0:18:550:18:57

And then we'll use what we call a whirler...

0:18:570:19:00

-just to hold the sponge against the edge. And that is dissolving...

-The plate!

0:19:000:19:05

Yes, it will dissolve the plate if you leave it on there long enough.

0:19:050:19:08

Why couldn't I just have had a straight plate?

0:19:080:19:11

-A lot easier.

-Wouldn't have been so interesting for you.

0:19:110:19:15

-There you go. The next one's yours.

-I knew this was coming.

0:19:150:19:20

That's it.

0:19:200:19:22

That doesn't look like you were doing it at all.

0:19:220:19:26

-That would be enough.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah. That's fine.

0:19:260:19:30

You're just being kind. ..Excuse me, would this pass?

0:19:300:19:34

-You'd pass that, wouldn't you?

-Yeah.

0:19:340:19:37

OK, now this is where I drop it.

0:19:400:19:43

-Not too bad.

-That looks fine.

0:19:450:19:49

We can send that on its way now to be inspected.

0:19:490:19:51

-And who inspects it?

-Christine will inspect that.

0:19:510:19:54

-Be kind!

-I will.

-Thanks very much. Thanks.

0:19:540:20:00

-That's lovely.

-Is that all right?

-Yeah, it's OK.

-Thank goodness for that.

0:20:090:20:13

The last time I saw my plate, it was unfired clay.

0:20:210:20:24

Since then, it's been fired, glazed, fired again,

0:20:240:20:27

then the underglaze blue and fired again.

0:20:270:20:30

And it's been decorated and gilded and fired again,

0:20:300:20:35

but now it's ready for the final stage, my gilding.

0:20:350:20:39

-Emma, hi.

-Hello.

0:20:460:20:48

Right. It's starting to look like the 1128 pattern that I recognise.

0:20:480:20:52

-So you're filling in the white gaps.

-Anything you see that's white,

0:20:520:20:57

we will fill with 24-carat gold and then it will go off to be fired and burnished.

0:20:570:21:01

-Right. Now, I was always told that the gilder's job was the most responsible one.

-Yeah.

0:21:010:21:07

If you make a mess, all the work that everybody else has done is ruined, isn't it?

0:21:070:21:11

-No pressure(!)

-No pressure. Right, great. Thanks very much.

0:21:110:21:14

-Would you like to have a go?

-Come on. Right, here goes.

0:21:140:21:18

-Right.

-Right.

0:21:200:21:23

It's brown. Why does it look brown?

0:21:230:21:25

Because all the oils and the chemicals that are in the gold,

0:21:250:21:31

and then when it's fired, all of those come out. And that's why it goes into burnishing.

0:21:310:21:36

-Everything that's left on the top gets burnished out and the gold's left underneath.

-OK.

0:21:360:21:40

-It's...

-Ooh!

-No, that's fine.

0:21:400:21:43

If you need a cloth, we have one there.

0:21:430:21:46

I'm going to need more than a cloth, I think!

0:21:460:21:48

We're going to need a whole sink. So we get it quite close, do we?

0:21:480:21:51

Yeah. Just take a little gold off your brush so you don't run.

0:21:510:21:54

-That's it.

-I haven't run in years.

0:21:540:21:57

SHE GIGGLES

0:21:570:22:00

Fantastic!

0:22:000:22:01

I think you could get a job here if you wanted.

0:22:010:22:04

You've got a very steady hand. I'm impressed.

0:22:040:22:08

I've gone over here.

0:22:080:22:10

Just put your brush down, pick up the cloth. That's it.

0:22:100:22:14

That's it. And just wipe it off.

0:22:160:22:18

-Fantastic!

-I've still not done it.

0:22:180:22:22

This is just not easy, is it? It really isn't.

0:22:220:22:25

It's like anything else - practice makes perfect.

0:22:250:22:28

It is.

0:22:280:22:30

I've been doing this for 15 years now and I'm still learning every day.

0:22:300:22:34

-It can be a lot of fun sometimes. It's a lovely job.

-Very rewarding.

0:22:340:22:40

It is. And if you've got an artistic nature,

0:22:400:22:44

then it is a really fulfilling job.

0:22:440:22:47

That's very good.

0:22:470:22:49

Are you sure you don't want a job here?

0:22:490:22:52

Do you know, I love Royal Crown Derby,

0:22:520:22:55

and to see a factory employing real human beings,

0:22:550:23:01

not doing everything by machine, is lovely.

0:23:010:23:04

Yeah. And this will be a completely unique and individual piece.

0:23:040:23:10

You're telling me!

0:23:100:23:12

That's one word for it!

0:23:120:23:13

Ah, no!

0:23:130:23:16

The next stage is, it'll be fired,

0:23:160:23:17

then it'll be moved on into burnishing where it'll be polished up

0:23:170:23:21

and the end product will be what you see in the shop.

0:23:210:23:24

Finished! Look at my plate!

0:23:280:23:29

I'm so proud of it! OK, I didn't do all of it but I did some.

0:23:290:23:33

I've sold these for years and years and I always appreciated them,

0:23:330:23:37

but I appreciate them even more

0:23:370:23:40

now I know how much work goes into them.

0:23:400:23:42

One thing is for sure, I am not going to give up the day job,

0:23:420:23:46

I'm going back to auctioneering.

0:23:460:23:49

And the great thing about Royal Crown Derby

0:23:510:23:53

is it's still out there to be collected.

0:23:530:23:55

And if you can find an Imari piece from around 1870,

0:23:550:23:58

it could be worth several thousand pounds.

0:23:580:24:00

James Lewis may have lost his heart to those wonderful ceramics,

0:24:020:24:05

but for David Fletcher, his passion lies with another great British icon.

0:24:050:24:11

It's a car mascot...

0:24:110:24:14

modelled as a cartoon character called Old Bill,

0:24:140:24:18

created by a man called Bruce Bairnsfather.

0:24:180:24:22

And this is a model of Old Bill, a bust of Old Bill made in bronze.

0:24:220:24:28

The helmet's actually signed Bruce Bairnsfather.

0:24:280:24:31

He was a Tommy, a British soldier

0:24:310:24:33

who got up to all sorts of escapades

0:24:330:24:36

and found himself in pretty grisly situations,

0:24:360:24:39

as you might expect any poor soldier in the First World War to experience.

0:24:390:24:44

And people used to decorate their car radiators with objects like this.

0:24:440:24:50

They would affix them to the radiator cap.

0:24:500:24:52

I would save this because... it belonged to my dad.

0:24:520:24:59

So for purely personal, sentimental reasons, really,

0:24:590:25:04

he collected anything to do with Old Bill.

0:25:040:25:08

And when he died, we sold his collection with the exception of this particular piece.

0:25:080:25:13

And did you know that the police are referred to as the Old Bill

0:25:130:25:19

because in the early 1920s they used to have moustaches like this?

0:25:190:25:24

I've often wondered what some of our successful owners have done with the money in the past.

0:25:280:25:33

You probably have as well. So we've caught up with a few of them.

0:25:330:25:37

Anne came along to our Cheshire valuation day in 2010

0:25:400:25:43

and brought a rather unusual brooch, which caught David Fletcher's eye.

0:25:430:25:48

Tell me a bit about it.

0:25:480:25:49

It was given to me on my wedding day 29 years ago

0:25:490:25:53

by my late husband

0:25:530:25:55

and I wore it at our wedding reception and during our honeymoon.

0:25:550:25:59

-I bet your eyes popped out, didn't they?

-Mm-hm.

0:25:590:26:02

Your loss is our gain, as they say.

0:26:020:26:06

I went with an open mind. I had no idea what value it was.

0:26:060:26:10

-It splits apart. Do you want me to show you?

-Yeah, you show me, please.

0:26:100:26:13

OK, so you're taking it out of it's case - fantastic.

0:26:130:26:17

And you're left with two... or at least a pair of clips.

0:26:170:26:21

So, really, whoever buys this is getting three

0:26:210:26:23

pieces of jewellery for the price of one.

0:26:230:26:27

Fantastic.

0:26:270:26:29

But why do you want to sell it?

0:26:290:26:30

-We've got alpacas...

-Alpacas!

-Yeah.

0:26:300:26:33

And we want to buy some land to keep them on.

0:26:330:26:36

We've got eight.

0:26:360:26:37

Scarlett, Honeysuckle, Buttercup,

0:26:370:26:40

Noah, Jacob, Monty, Daisy

0:26:400:26:45

and Olympia Rose, who was born during the Olympics.

0:26:450:26:48

OK. But I'm not sure how much land an alpaca uses,

0:26:480:26:53

but I think this will make between £1,000 and £1,500.

0:26:530:26:57

It's a sparkler. I do love it, I must admit.

0:27:020:27:05

It's going under the hammer now.

0:27:050:27:07

585. Give me 800.

0:27:070:27:09

800 on the phone. At £800, I'll take 20. 820, 840.

0:27:090:27:14

It was a bit slow to start and I thought it wasn't going to sell.

0:27:140:27:18

And 50. 1,100.

0:27:180:27:19

Sold!

0:27:190:27:21

1,200 and 50.

0:27:210:27:24

1,300. 1,300 on the phone. And 50 in a new place.

0:27:240:27:27

But then all the bidders started and I was very pleased with what I got.

0:27:270:27:31

1,350, now in the room with 1,350.

0:27:310:27:34

Thank you, sir.

0:27:340:27:35

-Yes! Yes, £1,350!

-Yeah.

0:27:350:27:38

-And have you got your eye on some land already?

-Not yet.

0:27:380:27:42

We want to really get enough money together to get enough land for

0:27:420:27:45

when the herd grows.

0:27:450:27:47

So that's a great start for the fund.

0:27:470:27:50

But since then, her empire has expanded in a slightly different direction -

0:27:500:27:54

a new business.

0:27:540:27:56

I've just opened, and I'm really excited about it.

0:27:560:27:58

I'm like a child in a sweet shop.

0:27:580:28:00

I love craft things.

0:28:000:28:02

Meanwhile, Honeysuckle, Noah

0:28:020:28:04

and the gang remain in their rented accommodation.

0:28:040:28:07

But don't worry - they're still very much part of the plan.

0:28:070:28:11

This is a picture of two of our alpacas - Honeysuckle and Buttercup.

0:28:110:28:14

And this is the alpaca wool.

0:28:140:28:17

I can't wait to get our own alpaca wool onto these shelves!

0:28:170:28:21

'So it just goes to show, you can turn your unwanted antiques into almost anything.'

0:28:210:28:29

Well, that's it for today's show

0:28:290:28:30

and I hope we've given you some food for thought.

0:28:300:28:33

Join me again soon for more inside information and surprising sales.

0:28:330:28:36

But until then, it's goodbye.

0:28:360:28:39

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0:29:030:29:06

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