Women in Antiques Flog It: Trade Secrets


Women in Antiques

The Flog It! team take a look at the work of some of the 20th century's leading female ceramicists and Paul Martin visits an art collection in Wales.


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Transcript


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Flog It has been on your screens for over ten years now

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and during that time we've helped you sell your unwanted antiques and collectables.

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-APPLAUSE

-Sue!

-£600.

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-Yes!

-Yeah!

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And hopefully, you've taken home a lot of information, too.

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This series is all about giving you more.

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Welcome to Flog It! Trade Secrets.

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On today's show, we'll be meeting a few famous names in British antique history.

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And we'll be finding out that even though they're popular,

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there's always more to learn about these Flog It! favourites.

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And who better to learn from than Flog It's dedicated team of experts

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whose passion is the world of antiques and collectables?

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In today's show, we look at some of the items that turn up all the time

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at our Flog It valuation tables.

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Stunning Clarice Cliff!

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-Do you like it?

-Not a lot, no.

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And see what alternatives you should be looking for.

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Charlotte Rhead, I think, is undervalued.

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What insider tips can our experts offer the budding collector or dealer?

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Everybody always equates best to the most valuable,

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and that isn't necessarily the case.

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You pick an object up

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and the hairs on the back of your neck go up

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and you get excited.

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I think that's when you know you've got something good.

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I've learned over the years that British ceramics

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play a very important part of our antique history.

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Many of those creations were ground-breaking in their day,

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as were the people who created them.

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And I'm always saying Flog It! wouldn't be Flog It! without Clarice Cliff on the show.

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But who were the other women making a splash in the Potteries?

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On Flog It, we're very familiar with the Potteries' most famous daughter.

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But her work is not to everyone's taste.

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Bleurgh! I hated it when I saw it, I hated it when I sold it,

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and in truth, I still don't like it too much now. But it was Clarice Cliff.

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I can't stand Clarice Cliff.

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-Do you like it?

-Not a lot, no.

-Dreadful, isn't it?

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Why do people buy this?

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My husband bought it because he thought it was a good investment.

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-He bought it for his pension fund.

-How much did he pay for it? £8.

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A lot of people tend to collect what they think they should collect,

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what the newspapers, what the magazines,

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dare I say it, what the television programmes tell them they should collect.

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I'm of the school that I think you should go and buy and collect

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what you have a real passion for, what really turns you on, what does it for you.

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Clarice Cliff worked at the Newport Pottery, a factory set up in 1928.

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And I would think this dates to around about 1930.

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-There are some inherent problems with it.

-Yes.

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Apart from the fact that it's horrible, you've got a chip there.

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-This coffee pot is really quite badly crazed.

-Mm.

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When I saw it at the valuation day, it was the condition,

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it was really in poor order, but I was mindful of the fact that if it was a rare thing,

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it could've made its money.

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Now, you'd normally see this in reds and greens.

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And I wonder whether this is perhaps an early blue design that they failed with.

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It's a rich era, really, I think, the '30s, for ladies

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in that the First World War had come and gone,

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we were building up to the Second World War.

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I also think that ladies, in a way, might be a little bit more creative than chaps.

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But I guess the one real reason might be

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that they probably charge less, or their pay rate was less than a man's.

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-I think we've got to put £200 to £300 as an estimate on it.

-Yeah.

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We'll put a fixed reserve on it of £150.

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The one thing I would say to you is I've never seen this in this blue colour before.

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-Really?

-Yeah. If that is that rare

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and the Clarice collectors really leap into it,

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you know, they could... the damage might become an irrelevance

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-simply because of its rarity.

-I see, yeah.

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We've got the Clarice Cliff blue firs pattern coffee set.

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The minute you hear the auctioneer go, "I've got commission bids and three phone lines,"

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you sort of know you're on a winner.

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1,300, my bid. 1,350.

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On the phone, 1,350.

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'But the opening bid took us all by surprise.'

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-2,300.

-Gosh, this is rare!

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They know something we don't know, Philip.

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2,600. Are we all done at £2,700, then?

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Hammer's gone down. What a wonderful moment.

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-£2,700!

-Oh, dear.

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How do I explain Clarice Cliff's appeal?

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Well, I'm not sure I can. You're talking to the wrong bloke.

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'So far, so Clarice Cliff.

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'But who were the other women whose designs have stood the test of time?'

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The Charlotte Rhead bowl in Edinburgh,

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a real good piece of Art Deco pottery

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with those stylised trees, very typical of the 1930s style of decoration.

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It dates from the 1930s

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and it's a piece by one of the most well-known ceramic designers of the 20th century called Charlotte Rhead,

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who worked in the Potteries in Stoke-on-Trent

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at a similar time to Clarice Cliff, who everybody's heard of.

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Poor Charlotte Rhead has lived in Clarice Cliff's shadow

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probably ever since the 1930s.

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Clarice Cliff with her bold and jazzy, colourful designs.

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Charlotte Rhead was rather more muted, I suppose, in style.

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And most of her things were vases and bowls

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and big trays and chargers with various designs.

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But this is quite an unusual design for her, cos they're mainly stylised flowers and foliage

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-and here you've got more trees really, haven't you?

-Yeah.

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Charlotte Rhead is an unsung hero of the Potteries.

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Her technique was rather than hand-painting, she was a tube-liner,

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so she piped out these tube-line designs,

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similar to the Moorcroft pottery of the period.

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The most desirable are the ones that are signed on the bottom.

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-Mm-hm.

-And luckily, yours is one of those that's signed on the bottom.

-Oh, I see.

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I suppose it's all about fashion and name.

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Everyone's heard of Clarice Cliff, most people have heard of Susie Cooper.

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Charlotte Rhead, perhaps not so much.

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When you see sometimes huge prices paid for Clarice Cliff and the likes,

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-and this is probably going to make £40, something like that.

-That's fine. That's fine.

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-We could put an estimate of £30 to £50.

-OK.

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Charlotte Rhead, I think, is undervalued.

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She was a great exponent of pottery of the period.

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Start at £30. 30 bid. 30 bid.

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'Did Adam's valuation reflect Charlotte Rhead's limited appeal?'

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-5. 70. £70 on commission.

-What did we say?

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Any advance on 70?

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-At £70.

-Spot on.

-THEY LAUGH

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'Not a bad price. But what did Isla plan to do with the money?'

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When I did a search on Charlotte Rhead,

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I discovered that she had breast cancer

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and subsequently died from it,

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and because I'm in remission from breast cancer,

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if there's any money, that's where it's going, to cancer care.

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-What more appropriate way of spending the proceeds?

-'Here, here!

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'And now to another Potteries contemporary of Charlotte Rhead and Clarice Cliff.'

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-It's by Susie Cooper, as I'm sure you know.

-Yes.

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-How long have you owned it?

-Er, 54 years. It was a wedding present.

-Really?

-Yes.

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Susie Cooper was born in 1902, the youngest of seven daughters,

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and she started working for Gray's, a very influential potter in the Potteries,

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at the age of 20, so she got going very early.

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Susie Cooper was an important designer

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and quite rare, because there weren't many lady designers working in industry.

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And she became governor of her own firm. The company became known as Susie Cooper.

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She specialised in tablewares.

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You don't get so much decorative pottery by her.

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This shape is known as the falcon shape, for obvious reasons.

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If you look at the spout, it in profile look rather like a falcon

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-with its bill taking the form of the spout.

-Yes.

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I think women came to the forefront, in terms of design

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and in terms of decorating for a number of reasons, really.

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It was a relatively liberated time.

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Society was more responsive, I think, to young women than it had been before.

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There were fewer men about. Let's not forget that.

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There were a great number of men in their teens and early 20s

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who were killed in the First World War. They might have gone on to be decorators.

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It's in perfect condition. A slight crackle.

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A sort of crazing, which you do get.

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I suspect it's just age which has caused the glaze to shrink, really.

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Susie Cooper is definitely, and in my view quite rightly,

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overshadowed by Clarice Cliff.

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Clarice Cliff was avant garde.

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She introduced bold shapes, bold designs. But she had a sort of freedom.

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She was given her own studio and allowed to get on with it.

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-It was bought in 1955...

-Yes.

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..which I think tells us that the pattern, the decoration, is actually a bit later.

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So we have a 1930s shape decorated in the mid-1950s.

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I think things should speak of their period.

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Something that was made in the 1930s

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should look as if it was made in the 1930s.

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'That's why Clarice Cliff is so collectable.

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'She absolutely reflects that time.'

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-I think this is going to make somewhere between £40 and £60.

-Right.

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-How about a reserve of £30?

-That sounds reasonable.

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It's a nice little set, this.

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At £55. At 55. Is there 60? At 55. I'm not going to dwell on it.

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-At 55.

-He's going to sell.

-At 55.

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-All done?

-Yes!

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Susie Cooper is not as highly regarded

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and I think the owner was indeed disappointed in my valuation.

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But that's just the way the market is, really.

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'Very true. The market is a fickle beast,

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'and you never know, Susie Cooper may yet rise in value.

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'So if you've got some of her work, keep hold of it.

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'Around the time that Brenda's mother acquired her Susie Cooper tea service,

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'another woman was making a splash in the world of ceramics.'

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I was delighted to see this Midwinter service, or part of it,

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they only brought part to the valuation day

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with a promise that they had a service for six at home.

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It's made by the Midwinter factory and they were in operation between 1910,

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when it was established by William Midwinter,

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and it operated right through to about 1987.

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The amazing thing was, it came out looking as fresh

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and as wonderful

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as probably the first day they were presented as a wedding present.

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During the mid part of the 20th century, Jessie Tait was commissioned by William Midwinter

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to create this rounded square shape.

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Jessie Tait was an amazing lady. She's actually, since the programme was filmed,

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she has actually died. She died in the early part of 2010.

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She was a very influential lady throughout the 20th century,

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and from the 1940s to the 1980s,

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carried forward the female role, as it were,

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in terms of cutting-edge design within the Potteries.

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I think you and I agree that it's very much of the period

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-but actually it looks very much now, as well.

-Yes, both.

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She was very clever in terms of fusing

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the modern taste and modern capabilities of production

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with obviously what she's learnt from tradition

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and taking the two things forward together.

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I mean, to see one or two pieces now and then is something we might expect,

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but to see so much is really quite exciting.

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I think realistically anywhere between £350 and £550

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-would be a fair bracket of value.

-Yes.

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She's probably one of the leading lights, or is the leading light,

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in terms of her chosen career, definitely.

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Lot 56, the Midwinter dinner, tea and coffee service.

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Selling at £380. Bid's at the back of the room.

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-All done at £380?

-We're going to take that, aren't we?

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Dinnerwares, tablewares,

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tea services are not selling particularly well

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because people have too busy a life,

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they perhaps don't sit down to a full laden table

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with all the matching crockery.

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If they do, it then needs to be really dishwasher proof

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if they're going to enjoy it to its full and relax about using it.

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So such a service is really bucking current trends

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for lots of reasons. And it was just wonderful, yes.

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'Often you can snap up a set for less than the individual pieces.

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'And Jessie Tait's work may prove a canny investment in the future.

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'There's one more established Flog It favourite

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'which is the magical work of another of Stoke's visionary women.'

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Doncaster valuation day, I remember it well.

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It was a dream valuation day

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and I remember this lady pulling out this Fairyland Lustre bowl.

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I saw her from the other side of the room. I was straight there.

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-What a wonderful piece you've got here.

-It is beautiful.

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-As soon as I saw it, I ran over, didn't I?

-Yes.

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It's beautiful. It's by Wedgwood

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and we've got the Wedgwood mark on the bottom there.

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And it's Fairyland Lustre. That's what it's known as.

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And it was designed by a very interesting lady called Daisy Makeig-Jones,

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who was at Wedgwood for many years.

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Daisy Makeig-Jones was a genius designer, really.

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I believe she had a dispute with Wedgwood and left under a cloud

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and smashed loads of pots, which all helps add to the mystique and the rarity of Fairyland Lustre.

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And the castle often features

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and the fairies always feature.

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And you can see the exquisite decoration all round.

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If you have a look at that, the decoration is absolutely magnificent.

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No offence to Charlotte Rhead and Clarice Cliff

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with their simple painted and tube-lined designs,

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but this is an absolute masterpiece of pottery.

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It's smothered in decoration, in gilding, there's a huge amount of effort and man hours

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that goes into the creation of Fairyland Lustre.

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-I think we could put a reserve of 800.

-Do you really?

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So it doesn't go for any less.

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-Fine.

-No leeway at all. I shall tell him myself.

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The Daisy Makeig-Jones Fairyland Lustre bowl,

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discovered by Adam Partridge, and I remember her saying,

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"Ooh, I don't really want to sell it, but if it makes 800 or 900, I'm prepared to let it go."

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We have five telephones.

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-Yes.

-I'll start it on the commission bid of £800.

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But whenever you get something good, you have that feeling

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and you know something's going to happen.

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1,500. 1,500.

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And 50. 1,550.

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1,600.

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You know, if Adam had put 2,000 to 2,500 on that bowl,

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I don't think we'd have sold it.

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I don't think there would've been very much interest at all,

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because the majority of people would've gone, "Oh, it's too much."

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But put a low estimate and it builds and it builds.

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2,200. 2,300. All sure at 2,300?

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-HAMMER BANGS

-Yes! That's a sell. £2,300.

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The name Daisy Makeig-Jones to some people was like,

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"Who's that, then?" until you say Wedgwood Fairyland Lustre

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and she's the person that has made that famous.

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'Another name to add to the list of innovative women in ceramics.

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'Her work is highly sought-after and commands high prices.

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'So look for smaller pieces of Fairyland Lustre

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'or the less ornate examples.

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'Since her death, Jessie Tait is definitely one to watch.

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'And remember, there may be more value for money in buying a service

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'than in individual pieces.

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'Many feel that Charlotte Rhead and Susie Cooper are underrated,

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'but as such, they could represent a sensible investment.

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'When it comes to Clarice Cliff, the market is very complex

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'with different ranges and colourways attracting vastly different prices.

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'Pieces from the long-running crocus range can be picked up for £30 to £50,

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'but rare combinations of shape and pattern

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'command exceptionally high prices.

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'The world record, set at the height of the market in 2004,

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'was £39,500

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'for an 18-inch charger in the May Avenue pattern.

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'Clarice Cliff's work has gone from being thought avant garde

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'to being regarded as iconic of its time.

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'The same is true of many great names in the world of antiques and collectables

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'and a clever collector will look ahead and buy when things are new or unfashionable.

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'That was certainly true of two Welsh women

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'whose eye for a bargain resulted in a collection

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'that's now considered priceless.

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'In the early 20th century, two spinster sisters,

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'Gwendoline and Margaret Davies, began collecting art.

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'Today their collection is seen as one of the largest and most important

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'of French Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works in the world.'

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The 260 works of art were bequeathed to the National Museum of Wales in Cardiff

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and I've come here to talk to Dr Ann Sumner, head of fine art,

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to take a look at this incredible collection

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but also find out a little bit more about these remarkable women

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and the role they played in Welsh history.

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'And the star of their collection is undoubtedly La Parisienne by Renoir,

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'one of the most famous Impressionist paintings in the UK.'

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This is absolutely stunning. Look at this French ultramarine blue.

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That sort of shouts out at you and it's quite bold, the brushstroke. Tell me about it.

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Well, this painting was one of the most famous pictures

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at the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874

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and it really made Renoir's name.

0:18:440:18:46

And Gwendoline Davies purchased this in 1913

0:18:460:18:51

and they didn't start collecting Impressionist paintings until 1912,

0:18:510:18:54

so this is only the second year of collecting Impressionist paintings.

0:18:540:18:58

-Tell me about the ladies. They must've been so remarkable.

-They were.

0:18:580:19:01

The Davies sisters were the granddaughters of David Davies of Llandinam,

0:19:010:19:05

-who was a self-made industrialist.

-In coal.

-In coal, in railways,

0:19:050:19:10

and actually developing Barry docks, as well.

0:19:100:19:13

So they were to inherit an enormous amount of money

0:19:130:19:16

when they both became 25.

0:19:160:19:19

They both drew.

0:19:190:19:21

Margaret painted throughout her life.

0:19:210:19:23

And, in fact, they had this extraordinary exposure

0:19:230:19:28

to the Salon in Paris, to the Royal Academy in London,

0:19:280:19:31

because that's what really interested Jane Blaker, their governess.

0:19:310:19:34

And when they went to London, she would turn up

0:19:340:19:36

and take them off to the Royal Academy to see the latest British paintings.

0:19:360:19:40

And then when they went to France, which was primarily for shopping

0:19:400:19:43

and to see the theatre and to go to the opera,

0:19:430:19:46

she also made sure they went to the Salon and they saw the best exhibitions.

0:19:460:19:50

Why were the sisters exceptional as collectors?

0:19:500:19:53

Well, first of all, they were women,

0:19:530:19:55

but also, they were really, really unusual in that they were buying Impressionist paintings

0:19:550:20:00

and that was exceptional at that time.

0:20:000:20:02

-Cos it was considered avant garde. It wasn't the thing to invest in.

-No.

0:20:020:20:06

I mean, let's be honest, they were buying these paintings cheaply.

0:20:060:20:09

Relatively cheaply. They weren't fashionable.

0:20:090:20:11

That's the idea with antiques and collectables, isn't it? Get in before they're fashionable.

0:20:110:20:16

They were certainly getting bargains, to a certain extent, with some of the pictures they were buying.

0:20:160:20:22

Did they collect mainly impressionistic works?

0:20:260:20:29

Well, as you can see from the gallery that we have here,

0:20:290:20:32

they started off collecting in a slightly different vein.

0:20:320:20:36

They bought works by Corot, works by Millet, by Daumier.

0:20:360:20:40

So they bought French paintings, but not initially French Impressionist paintings.

0:20:400:20:44

-And then, of course, Turner. Turner is the artist who they were really interested in.

-I've spotted some.

0:20:440:20:50

And they started off buying some of these wonderful works here.

0:20:500:20:53

And you can see, in a way, they were drawn to this impressionistic style of painting by Turner.

0:20:530:20:58

And it's not such a huge leap

0:20:580:21:01

-to then be appreciating Impressionist painting.

-I was going to say that,

0:21:010:21:04

-because there's a correlation. You can see how it's evolved. It's not random, is it?

-No, not at all.

0:21:040:21:09

Every single wall vies for your attention at once, doesn't it?

0:21:140:21:17

-Every work of art...

-There's just so much.

0:21:170:21:19

This is a lovely Manet, painted during the Franco-Prussian war, actually,

0:21:190:21:24

when Manet was serving in the guard.

0:21:240:21:26

He was actually a soldier at this time.

0:21:260:21:29

-And this was a wasteland.

-It is a barren landscape.

-Yes.

0:21:290:21:33

It's covered in snow, you get that heavy feeling...

0:21:330:21:36

-Of not wanting to be there.

-Yes, absolutely. And it was painted in about an hour and a half,

0:21:360:21:40

so we know it's one of Manet's first Impressionist paintings.

0:21:400:21:43

So it's a remarkable work.

0:21:430:21:46

Now, this was purchased for just over £200 in 1912,

0:21:460:21:50

so it's a real bargain.

0:21:500:21:53

'But I think the sisters' most favourite artist had to be Monet.

0:21:550:21:58

'They purchased nine of his works,

0:21:580:22:01

'three of which are paintings of his beloved Venice.'

0:22:010:22:04

Here we are, look. So typically Monet. Lovely pastel colours.

0:22:040:22:08

These are wonderful Monets. The San Giorgio Maggiore By Twilight

0:22:080:22:12

is probably one of the most famous paintings in our collections.

0:22:120:22:14

Monet himself came late to Venice

0:22:140:22:18

and he wished that he'd gone earlier.

0:22:180:22:20

He was incredibly inspired by the buildings and by the light.

0:22:200:22:24

-He actually painted in a gondola.

-You sound very passionate about Monet.

0:22:240:22:27

I love Monet. He's my favourite artist in this collection by far.

0:22:270:22:33

And the Davies sisters bought so well.

0:22:330:22:36

Oh, wow. Look at that.

0:22:400:22:43

Paul Cezanne.

0:22:430:22:45

One of his best-known works, actually, L'Estaque.

0:22:450:22:48

There must be so many interesting stories

0:22:480:22:51

with every single piece of art in here.

0:22:510:22:53

Well, I think what was interesting for the sisters was,

0:22:530:22:57

this wonderful lifestyle they had before the First World War

0:22:570:23:00

where they were holidaying all over Europe and also went to Egypt, this completely changed.

0:23:000:23:05

They volunteered for the Red Cross canteens,

0:23:050:23:08

and despite being in France and being so much involved in the war effort, they were still buying paintings.

0:23:080:23:13

Talk about confidence of brushstroke. Just take a look at this.

0:23:130:23:16

-Wonderful Provence landscape.

-Ohh!

-Actually painted on Cezanne's own family estate.

0:23:160:23:21

But it is an interesting situation, because they were very concerned about these paintings.

0:23:210:23:25

Paris was under considerable bombardment from the Germans

0:23:250:23:28

and so as quickly as possible, they got these pictures out of France, over to Britain.

0:23:280:23:33

And this was cutting-edge collecting, because these pictures were not appreciated in Britain at the time.

0:23:330:23:39

When they tried to lend them to the Tate Gallery a few years later, they were initially turned down.

0:23:390:23:44

And then, after a rumpus in the paper, lots of letters to The Times, they were put on loan.

0:23:440:23:48

-You see, the girls had an incredible foresight.

-They absolutely did.

0:23:480:23:52

'This is truly an incredible exhibition.

0:23:540:23:58

'Thanks to two remarkable women, works by Turner, Monet and Cezanne

0:23:580:24:02

'have found a home here in Wales.

0:24:020:24:05

'This is collecting at its best. And what a legacy to leave

0:24:050:24:08

'for us all to enjoy.'

0:24:080:24:10

I've often wondered what some of our successful owners

0:24:170:24:20

have done with the money in the past. You probably have, as well.

0:24:200:24:24

So we've caught up with a few of them.

0:24:240:24:26

'At one valuation day in Wiltshire in 2009,

0:24:280:24:31

'Thomas Plant's knowledge of those all-important hallmarks

0:24:310:24:35

'stood him in good stead with one visitor.'

0:24:350:24:38

It was given to me as a gift

0:24:380:24:41

from somebody who knows that I like small silver.

0:24:410:24:44

-But for me, it's a bit too big.

-It's not really small silver, is it?

0:24:440:24:48

-No, it's not as small as I usually collect.

-What do you usually collect?

0:24:480:24:51

Well, I like spoons, all sorts of different spoons.

0:24:510:24:54

-And I like little salts...

-Oh, yeah.

-..and little mustard pots.

0:24:540:25:00

'Linda is an avid collector of spoons

0:25:000:25:02

'and wanted to make room for the smaller items she collects.'

0:25:020:25:06

I just love collecting.

0:25:080:25:11

I love objects, I love the history of objects,

0:25:110:25:14

I love the form of them, the function of them.

0:25:140:25:18

I really can't help myself. So it's a curse or a passion.

0:25:180:25:23

'With such a diverse collection,

0:25:230:25:26

'Linda has to make some tough decisions on what to keep and what to sell.'

0:25:260:25:30

You've got these quite good marks on the base here.

0:25:300:25:34

-Yes, they're quite big, aren't they?

-Quite big and quite fine,

0:25:340:25:36

and as you know from collecting silver, they look quite fresh, so that's brilliant.

0:25:360:25:41

Because it's by Emick Romer and it's 1771,

0:25:410:25:44

you've got to think, the value is going to be higher

0:25:440:25:48

than a usual chalice from this date.

0:25:480:25:50

-Right.

-So I would put this in at auction between £300 and £500.

0:25:500:25:54

-I'd fix the reserve at 300.

-Mm-hm.

-How does that grab you?

0:25:540:25:59

-That was a nice friend, wasn't it?

-It was a nice friend.

0:25:590:26:03

Lot number 285 we're onto now,

0:26:040:26:06

which is the George III silver goblet by Emick Romer.

0:26:060:26:10

420. 440 anywhere?

0:26:100:26:12

-At 420.

-HAMMER BANGS

0:26:120:26:16

Yes! Good man, Philip!

0:26:160:26:18

'Linda made the money she wanted at auction,

0:26:180:26:21

'and was able to spend it on adding to her collection of Georgian spoons.'

0:26:210:26:24

I've been building up a collection of Georgian silver

0:26:250:26:28

for about five or six years.

0:26:280:26:31

I hadn't collected silver to that extent before.

0:26:320:26:36

But it just started with one spoon

0:26:360:26:40

and it was a very old spoon.

0:26:400:26:44

And I just realised what a very personal object that was.

0:26:440:26:48

I'm very pleased to have found this one,

0:26:480:26:52

which is a trefid spoon,

0:26:520:26:56

the top is a trefid shape.

0:26:560:26:58

And this one is dated

0:26:590:27:01

circa 1680 to 1685.

0:27:010:27:05

So it's in the reign of Charles II.

0:27:050:27:08

It's an absolutely beautiful spoon.

0:27:080:27:11

'Linda also has some more unusual items in her collection.'

0:27:130:27:17

As well as the spoons,

0:27:170:27:19

I've got a small collection of larger silver.

0:27:190:27:23

Again, personal items. I have pap boats. A couple of these.

0:27:240:27:30

Little things that cradle in your hand.

0:27:300:27:34

And they were used for feeding infants.

0:27:340:27:36

So simple and so beautiful to hold.

0:27:360:27:39

'It's clear that Linda has a passion for these beautifully-designed and crafted objects.

0:27:390:27:43

'But what tips has she got for anyone thinking of starting their own collection?'

0:27:430:27:49

One of my tips for people who wanted to start collecting anything, really,

0:27:490:27:54

is to focus on something you really like that you can afford.

0:27:540:27:58

You may not be able to afford it at the end,

0:27:580:28:01

because the thing about colleting is that

0:28:010:28:04

when you get the ordinary, you then want the extraordinary.

0:28:040:28:08

And that always costs a lot of money.

0:28:080:28:11

Hopefully today's show has given you some food for thought

0:28:140:28:18

and helped you rediscover some of those lost and overlooked items in your house.

0:28:180:28:22

I hope you've enjoyed the show. See you next time for more trade secrets.

0:28:220:28:26

The Flog It! team take a look at the work of some of the 20th century's leading female ceramicists and Paul Martin visits a fascinating art collection in Wales.


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