All that Glisters Flog It: Trade Secrets


All that Glisters

Antiques series. Paul Martin and the Flog It! experts explore all that glisters. Featured items include an unusual adornment for a dog and two space age compacts.


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Transcript


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For many years, you've trusted the "Flog It!" team to value

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and sell your unwanted antiques and collectibles.

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I'm sure we're going to find a new home for it.

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And to date, we've sold £1 million worth.

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And during that time we've learned a great deal about the objects

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that have passed through our hands.

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In this series, I want to share some of that knowledge with you

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so stand-by to hear some of our trade secrets.

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In the latter part of the 16th century,

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William Shakespeare wrote, in the Merchant of Venice,

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"Everything that glitters is not gold."

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His meaning - everything that looks valuable isn't necessarily so

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- gold or not.

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The brilliant thing about antiques is everything has a good value

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because of the wonderful stories they tell.

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Having said all of that,

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today's show is dedicated to everything that glitters -

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all the shiny objects that have crossed our tables at valuation day.

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Coming up on the show, Mark uncovers a hidden gem...

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Wow!

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..Anita reveals the secrets of a very special stone...

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This little baby here is worth its weight in gold.

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-..Charlie needs to do some more homework...

-Shoot the valuer!

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..and "Flog It!"'s youngest visitor is also the canniest!

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-Yes!

-The hammer's gone down.

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-Jack, do you know where all the money's going?

-To my bank!

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-THEY LAUGH

-The Jack bank!

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We humans are always looking for ways to adorn ourselves.

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These days the wedding ring is about as bejewelled as a man would get

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but history tells us the richest and most fabulous people

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advertised their status by adorning themselves

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in precious metals and jewels.

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So what do our experts think you should take with you

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when looking for a quality piece of jewellery?

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Make sure you look at it objectively.

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Don't just fall in love with it cos it's sparkly and glistney

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because all that glistens might not be gold.

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I would always advise you to take a magnifying glass, take a little

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look so you can examine the hallmarks and the stones for any flaws.

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Look for inclusions in the stones

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because they do have a detrimental effect on the value.

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The flecks of carbon in diamond, for example,

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they can be a big problem.

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Always take your loop because you can be very disappointed when

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you get home and you haven't taken it, you find out why it was cheap.

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Now, diamonds might be a girl's best friend,

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but there's nothing to say we fellas can't enjoy some bling.

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Anita came across something for the chaps that put a twinkle in her eye.

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I bought them for my husband for a special anniversary,

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probably in the '80s sometime.

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-Were you madly in love with him at the time?

-I think so.

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-Are you still madly in love with him?

-Yes!

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These are gorgeous.

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Now, they are 18 carat gold, so they are high carat.

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You bought him the best.

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We have this lovely central panel of lapis lazuli.

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'Isn't that a beautiful word?'

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Lapis lazuli is so easily identified by its colour.

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Isn't it beautiful?

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It's that mouthwatering singing blue,

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mined from the bowels of the earth

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and brought into the light to gladden our eyes

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with this vibrant colour.

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So what we've got is high carat gold, a beautiful stone

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and lovely diamonds.

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I like these very, very, very, very much and if I had some lovely chap

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that wore cuff links I would buy them as a present as well.

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But I haven't so I won't bother.

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'Sometimes the older pieces, especially if it's carved,'

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will be more sought after than modern examples

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and our cuff links were fairly modern.

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-Now, I would put a value on these of £250 to £350.

-Yes. Lovely.

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Thank you again for bringing them along

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-and I'll see you at the auction.

-Thank you, Anita.

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620 is a pair of 18 carat gold lapis lazuli and diamond cuff links.

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Start with 250 on the cuff links. 250. Bid 260.

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270. 280. 290. 300.

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320. 340.

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-Oh, my goodness!

-No, it's 340. In the corner. 360.

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380. 400. 420. 440.

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Online at 440.

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-Are you done at £440?

-Yes! The hammer's gone down!

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-Good result!

-Isn't that wonderful!

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It's a fashion thing.

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Fashion changes all the time and we follow the fashion

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and we pluck from the past items

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which will suit the fashion of today.

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And this is why these cuff links, as well as being very good quality,

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were fashionable and desirable in today's market.

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Lapis lazuli, spiked with gold, can be found on all sorts of pieces,

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and the older ones can be very valuable.

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The Egyptians used it on their scarabs and,

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since medieval times, artists have taken the ground down pigment

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of lapis, called ultramarine, to use in their paintings.

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So look out for that tell-tale vibrant blue

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and you could be as rich as a King.

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From Anita's modern minimalist cuff links,

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to an altogether more ornate piece from a fascinating era.

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-Wow! Where did you get that from?

-It belonged to my grandma.

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-Do you know anything about it at all?

-Not really.

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-Just that it belonged to her.

-Well, it's fantastic, isn't it?

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It's actually a little brooch, of course,

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and these are diamonds in here. And it's mounted, I think, in platinum.

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-Right.

-It's what we call Belle Epoch jewellery.

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'The Belle Epoch era really typifies, for me,'

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the late 19th and very early 20th century.

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So we're going from that quite heavy, chunky Victorian jewellery

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to a very fine, more European French style.

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It's very light, the stones are very good quality.

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It was probably made sometime between 1900 and 1915.

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From 1900 onwards, platinum became much more widely used.

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When you're mounting a stone like diamonds,

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they're much better to be mounted in a white metal.

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'They reflect the inner beauty of the diamonds and just the quality,

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'even though it wasn't marked, meant it was platinum, not silver.'

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-Have you ever worn it?

-Never?

-Not once?

-Not once.

-That's a shame!

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What do you think of it, Alex?

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I like the shape of it, the way it looks a bit like a flower.

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Yes, it does, doesn't it? The petals on the outside.

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It's super quality and it's actually quite valuable.

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I think if we were putting it in for auction

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we should put somewhere in the region of £400 to £600 on it.

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-Wow!

-That's wonderful, isn't it?

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The Belle Epoch was a time of freedom and hope

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at the dawn of a new century.

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Were the bidders just as optimistic?

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450 on the floor. Any advance on 450?

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460 on the phone. 460.

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-On the telephone.

-470. 480.

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-490.

-Brilliant.

-490. 500 on the phone.

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520. 540. £540.

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All done at 540? All done at 540? 540.

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And it's gone down. We'll take that, won't we, 540?

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-Yes!

-Happy?

-Happy, happy.

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What a great example of how a piece of jewellery

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can convey a mood and a time!

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You can learn to "read" the design to help identify the age of an item.

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The cameo as a motif was highly prized by the Georgians.

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Elaborate jet pieces found favour with the Victorians

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after the death of Prince Albert.

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And, as we've seen, flowers and natural images

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were the touchstones of jewellers at the turn of the 20th century.

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Sometimes the story behind a piece of adornment can be

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just as valuable as the item itself.

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Our expert with the Midas touch, Michael Baggott, struck gold

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when he came across a very special watch.

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The watch comes from my grandfather, who was called Eli Pope.

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-This is his picture, there.

-Oh, right.

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He built this five wheel bicycle

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and he raced with it on road and on the old Crystal Palace track

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and he won...he got this medal for winning a race.

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-So rather than a cup he got a watch.

-Gold watch, yeah.

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We've got an inscription, which is nice.

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It says, "1 mile bicycle handicap won by E. Pope."

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When you've got a piece that someone will bring to "Flog It!"

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and say, "This belonged to my grandfather and he did this."

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If it hasn't got that inscription,

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you're taking that story on trust and however sincere and truthful

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that is, in the antiques business you have to be able to prove things.

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I think he possibly used to carry it around when he was racing

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-because it's got a fair few dents in it.

-Yes.

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But it's appropriate to a cyclist and someone that is timed

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because it's got a special feature to it.

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-Do you know what that special feature is?

-I know it's a stopwatch.

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It is. Any idea of what the watch is made of?

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-I think it's gold plate or something.

-Gold plate.

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The back plate is plated for strength

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but actually, the case and the bezel are 18 carat gold.

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So it was a worthy thing to win

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and it's marvellous to have the history with it.

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It's very difficult to value this because it's got a little chip

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to it which knocks the value of the watch per se.

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Condition is always very important so the condition of this watch,

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without its story, would have impacted greatly on its value.

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The story actually equalised that and did it a little bit better

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but you should always be aware of condition.

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Especially when buying time pieces.

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We should be in the region of about £150 to £250 on it. Would that be...

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-Yes, yes. Thank you.

-A great pleasure to see you.

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I have got to start the bidding here at £300.

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-Fantastic!

-£300.

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320 on the phone. 340.

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360. 380. 400.

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-420. 440. 460.

-Can't believe it!

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480. 550 now. 580.

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580 on the phone. 600, can I say?

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At 580, then, if you're done?

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-Oh, pedal power! £580!

-Wowee!

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The fact that this watch was a presentation

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for a very unusual sporting event is always going to add interest.

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It's not just for a watch collector, it's not just for someone who

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values the gold, it's for someone who values the story.

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Watches are a potential gold mine for collectors

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and our experts are brimming with tips.

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Go for the flashy ones and the rare ones

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and the movements that do all sorts of things.

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And there are some major makers to go for, of course

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- Rolex, Patek Philippe, Omega, Longines -

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good Swiss makes that we see regularly.

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Just because it says Rolex doesn't mean to say it is a Rolex.

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With high quality watches the finish is absolutely superb.

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If you've got any doubts about it at all,

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if it doesn't feel right, walk away from it.

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Pocket watches are incredibly undervalued,

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particularly 18th century ones.

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So if you wanted to start a collection,

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start a collection of those.

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Phillip Serrell also found a shiny trinket which had a story to tell

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- though not one you'd expect.

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Everybody at home is watching this and thinking that's a bangle.

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-Is that what they're thinking?

-Probably.

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We know different. Dog collar.

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'If you want a bit of bling for your dog,'

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I mean, today you might put him in the latest designer coat

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or cover but 100 years ago,

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you'd have bought him a really ritzy collar, wouldn't you? And they did.

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You can just see there how the clasp operates and it's almost...

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It's silver plated. You've got some marks here which are plate marks.

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And then we've got in script around the border.

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-Lady Constance Trentham, which is very Gosford Park, isn't it?

-Yes!

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I think it's a very, very rough rule of thumb

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- anything that's inscribed or decorated

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is going to be worth more than a plain Jane.

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Not always but most of the time.

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And I think that little bit of inscription around the collar,

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for me, that just added to it.

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And people collect dog collars.

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There is a big demand for these. You can have them in silver.

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You can get some really early 18th century ones that are in brass

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-with sort of really Walt Disney spikes coming out.

-Poor dogs!

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But they're good, they're attractive things

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when they've got a lovely patina.

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If you want to age something, you know, it's not divine inspiration.

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It's a question of holding it and looking at it

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and quietly working out and working out the method of manufacture,

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working out the style of script on there,

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looking at the age of it, the wear of it.

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It may have been Edwardian, it may have been a bit earlier than that.

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But I think that's such a fun thing. It really was a cool thing.

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I reckon that this will make between £60 and £90 at auction.

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And I think if you get two people who are really avid,

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then it could go and make well over £100.

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I love this. It's really, really cute.

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-We're looking at £60 to £90 for it. Great valuation.

-It will sell.

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I like dog collars. Strange little thing I don't tell many people!

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679 is the electroplated dog collar. What a charming little thing there,

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engraved for Lady Constance Trentham.

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And she must have had a tiny little dog.

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Start with 50 bid. 55. 60. 65.

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70. 75. 80. 80 bid. Any more, now, at £80?

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At 80. 85. 90. 90 still here. At £90. Any more?

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At 95. 100. 100 still with me.

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Will take a ten. At 100. All done now at £100?

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Yes! Hammer's gone down! That's sold. £100.

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And bizarrely, I think that's one of those things

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that would be worth a good bit more today.

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Big area of collectability because it's different. It's different.

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People want different things.

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How many of your friends have you been to and they go,

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"Look at my silver plated dog collar."

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It doesn't happen, it's different.

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Charlie Ross's eye was caught by a bit of sparkle

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that could so easily have been overlooked as old costume jewellery.

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-You don't like it, do you?

-No. I don't.

-I can tell.

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It's been sitting in a box somewhere, presumably.

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-Yes, actually. In the teapot. Yeah.

-Right.

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It's first half of the 20th century.

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1920s, 1930s, I think. Do you know where it comes from?

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No. I know nothing at all about it.

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Looking at all of those stones, I think

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probably what is now Sri Lanka, what was Ceylon.

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Because those stones were indigenous to Ceylon or Sri Lanka,

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as it is now, and I'm lucky enough to have been there.

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That it was likely that piece of jewellery was made there

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because all those stones, or the majority of those stones,

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'would have been natural to Sri Lanka.'

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We have got a citrine and a garnet, then a smokey quartz,

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really rather a splendid sapphire.

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Then we've got a cabochon amethyst.

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By cabochon it's rounded. It's in the form, really, of a bead.

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Amethyst.

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Then we've got the zircon and then,

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although it's a slightly different colour,

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-we've got another garnet at the end.

-Right.

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Garnets come in different shades of orangey red.

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So how did Charlie know he was looking at the real thing,

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and not a worthless glass imitation?

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Have I got a bit of glass in my hand?

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Have I got a semi precious stone in my hand? What do I do?

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Pick up a piece of glass, put it into my hand,

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semi precious stone in that hand, close your eyes

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and ipso facto you will find the glass warming up

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and the semi precious stone will remain cold.

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-Have you had it insured?

-No.

-No.

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No, I didn't think it was worth anything.

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-Did you think it was a bit of costume jewellery?

-Yes.

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So you thought it was worth £10, I suppose?

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Didn't think it was worth anything at all.

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-Anything at all?

-No.

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So, it will come as a pleasant surprise to be

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-told that it's worth £100-£150.

-Lovely, yes. Thank you.

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Charlie knew a semiprecious bracelet when he saw one,

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but it quickly proved to be more precious than even he expected.

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220. 230, 240,

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250, 260,

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270, 280.

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-Oh, they love it.

-290, 300.

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310, 320.

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330, 340.

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Oh, crumbs.

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350, 360, 370, 380.

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And we're still going.

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390, 400.

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At £400. With the lady at 400, now. At £400.

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-Are we all done?

-Oh, gosh.

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At £400.

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Bang, that hammer's gone down.

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£400!

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Shoot the valuer!

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If you're going to sell a bit of jewellery, for goodness' sake,

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make sure you know what it is.

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Yes, and any good auction house, of course, will give you a valuation

0:18:010:18:05

prior to sale and will tell you whether something is genuine or not.

0:18:050:18:10

So, how can you tell a diamond from the rough?

0:18:100:18:13

As well as Charlie's warmth test, try the breath test.

0:18:130:18:16

If you breathe on glass, it will fog up,

0:18:160:18:19

but a diamond will remain clear as day.

0:18:190:18:22

What else should you bear in mind?

0:18:240:18:28

Remember to take your loupe,

0:18:280:18:29

which will help you to identify the four Cs...

0:18:290:18:32

Colour and clarity define the quality of a gem

0:18:390:18:42

and how many faults or inclusions it has.

0:18:420:18:46

Have a go at studying the gem through your loupe,

0:18:460:18:49

but, it is a specialist field,

0:18:490:18:51

so ask an expert if you are in doubt.

0:18:510:18:53

With a little research, you can

0:18:540:18:56

learn to identify one of the hundreds of cuts out there,

0:18:560:18:59

from the traditional rose, to the curved cabochon.

0:18:590:19:02

You can learn about the carat,

0:19:020:19:04

which is the weight of your gemstone,

0:19:040:19:06

by using a simple and inexpensive card to measure it.

0:19:060:19:09

And by examining the four Cs, along with the quality of the design,

0:19:090:19:13

you could be going for gold.

0:19:130:19:15

Nothing fires the imagination of the "Flog It!" experts more than

0:19:190:19:22

a military medal and the stories associated with them.

0:19:220:19:27

But why is one medal more desirable than another?

0:19:270:19:30

Expert and auctioneer Will Axon has seen a fair few in his time,

0:19:300:19:34

and he jumped at the chance to visit the place that's been

0:19:340:19:37

responsible for striking them for more than 200 years.

0:19:370:19:40

Well, they've let me in.

0:19:440:19:46

Here I am. The Royal Mint.

0:19:460:19:48

Everyone thinks coins, don't they,

0:19:480:19:49

when they think of the Royal Mint, but I am here to

0:19:490:19:51

look at something that interests me more than coins - medals.

0:19:510:19:55

But, before Will got to handle the medals

0:19:550:19:58

awarded for service in the Armed Forces,

0:19:580:20:00

he met one of the foremost experts in the field of mint medals,

0:20:000:20:04

Kevin Clancy, curator of the Royal Mint Museum.

0:20:040:20:08

It really began about 200 years ago with the Waterloo Medal.

0:20:080:20:12

And you have an original Waterloo Medal here?

0:20:120:20:15

Cos I know, from my auctioneering background, that they

0:20:150:20:18

-are highly collectable, aren't they?

-We do.

0:20:180:20:20

-The Royal Mint made all the Waterloo Medals.

-Well, come on.

0:20:200:20:23

Let's get down to it. Let's have a look at them in the flesh.

0:20:230:20:27

All sorts of medals flashing there in front of me.

0:20:270:20:30

Wow, look at this. There, of course,

0:20:300:20:33

is the Waterloo Medal.

0:20:330:20:34

And you've got various

0:20:340:20:36

versions, is that right?

0:20:360:20:38

That's right. The nature of our collection is about how

0:20:380:20:40

a coin or medal has been produced.

0:20:400:20:42

But to think, how would you commemorate Waterloo?

0:20:420:20:44

What device would you use?

0:20:440:20:46

That's a creative problem that someone's got to solve.

0:20:460:20:48

And, in this instance, it's the winged figure of Victory.

0:20:480:20:51

Which we can see here.

0:20:510:20:53

With the word Waterloo underneath and the date.

0:20:530:20:56

And it's become an extraordinarily

0:20:560:20:59

potent symbol of campaign medals.

0:20:590:21:02

This is the start, this is where it all began.

0:21:020:21:05

I see you just going in and grabbing one,

0:21:050:21:07

I think I'm going to follow suit,

0:21:070:21:09

because I thought I might have to have the odd white gloves on.

0:21:090:21:11

And, the other interesting point here is, of course,

0:21:110:21:15

is it hasn't been awarded.

0:21:150:21:16

So they're not actually named, which must make them

0:21:160:21:18

a bit of an anomaly, as far as medal collecting must go?

0:21:180:21:22

That's right. For people who collect military medals, they're often

0:21:220:21:25

interested in that story,

0:21:250:21:26

the action that the person was involved with.

0:21:260:21:29

Because I'm amazed by what we've got here.

0:21:290:21:32

I mean, again, this is quite mind-boggling for me.

0:21:320:21:35

This is a medal roll for the Waterloo Medal

0:21:350:21:38

and it lists every single person it was awarded to,

0:21:380:21:41

from the highest ranked officer, right down to the privates.

0:21:410:21:44

That's right. And the reason that the Royal Mint Museum would have such

0:21:440:21:48

a document is that all these medals were named at the Royal Mint.

0:21:480:21:52

So, we needed to know the names, we needed to know that

0:21:520:21:55

information about the people who were receiving the medals.

0:21:550:21:58

You know, just names on a page to us now,

0:21:580:22:02

but you can see, almost,

0:22:020:22:05

the wish to find out more, delve deeper.

0:22:050:22:09

Now, if we're talking medals for bravery of gallantry,

0:22:090:22:13

there is one that tops the list, isn't there? The VC.

0:22:130:22:15

Now, tell me you've got one of those here.

0:22:150:22:18

We have an example of the Victoria Cross in the collection.

0:22:180:22:21

Wow, look at that!

0:22:210:22:22

From our point of view, it's one of the only official medals

0:22:220:22:25

that the Royal Mint hasn't made.

0:22:250:22:27

It was made by Hancocks, is that right?

0:22:270:22:29

It was made by Hancocks. It was from the word go, 150 years ago,

0:22:290:22:31

and still is. This is as high as it gets,

0:22:310:22:34

as far as the gallantry awards are concerned.

0:22:340:22:36

Let me see. What do you reckon?

0:22:360:22:38

Do you think they'd notice if I sneaked out with that?

0:22:380:22:42

The rumour is that the metal that they're actually made from

0:22:420:22:46

is not that good a quality. Am I right?

0:22:460:22:49

-The story is that the metal is from cannons...

-Gun metal, isn't it?

0:22:490:22:53

..captured in the Crimean War. It's a base metal.

0:22:530:22:57

It's a fairly simple design, but it means so much.

0:22:570:22:59

It's the highest award that you can get,

0:22:590:23:01

but it's made from the most basic of metals.

0:23:010:23:04

It's the heroism behind the medal that attracts the collector.

0:23:040:23:08

No medal shows that better than the Victoria Cross, Britain's highest

0:23:080:23:12

and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy.

0:23:120:23:17

This one was awarded to Private Sidney Godley in 1914

0:23:170:23:21

and it sold in auction in 2012 for over a quarter of a million pounds.

0:23:210:23:26

Now, Kevin, I'm no medals expert,

0:23:270:23:30

but you've seen and handled so many,

0:23:300:23:32

you must have some top tips that you are able to pass on to our viewers.

0:23:320:23:36

Condition is hugely important in anything you're buying,

0:23:360:23:39

of course, particularly medals, I would say, and coins.

0:23:390:23:42

The way in which you look after it subsequently

0:23:420:23:45

is again very, very important.

0:23:450:23:47

Beyond that, it is in some ways where your heart and, let's face it,

0:23:470:23:50

where your pocket might lead you.

0:23:500:23:52

Your interests could go in all sorts of directions

0:23:520:23:55

in relation to medals.

0:23:550:23:56

The stories are fascinating.

0:23:560:23:59

It's something that can illuminate the past

0:23:590:24:01

in a way that few other objects can.

0:24:010:24:03

Here at the mint, they produce medals for present-day conflicts.

0:24:050:24:09

But perhaps surprisingly,

0:24:090:24:11

they're currently also making Second World War medals.

0:24:110:24:14

One of these is the Arctic Star.

0:24:140:24:16

From 1914 to 1945, Allied convoys sailed across the Arctic,

0:24:190:24:24

to deliver four million tonnes of vital supplies to the Russians.

0:24:240:24:29

Conditions were amongst the worst faced by any Allied sailor,

0:24:290:24:32

with extreme cold and ferocious pack ice.

0:24:320:24:35

The loss rate for ships was higher than any other

0:24:350:24:39

Allied convoy route, with 3,000 sailors losing their lives.

0:24:390:24:44

After a successful campaign,

0:24:440:24:46

the veterans have finally been recognised for their heroism.

0:24:460:24:49

It's estimated that 120,000 of them

0:24:490:24:52

or their next of kin are eligible to receive the Arctic Star.

0:24:520:24:57

Will had an unprecedented sneak look at the process

0:24:570:25:01

of making this most deserved of all medals.

0:25:010:25:04

When you think that these people have waited 68 years to be appreciated.

0:25:040:25:08

-Exactly.

-That's a long time to wait.

0:25:080:25:10

So there must be a sense of honour amongst anyone working here.

0:25:100:25:13

Yes, there's real pride here.

0:25:130:25:14

People are really proud of what we make in the Royal Mint,

0:25:140:25:17

especially the medals.

0:25:170:25:19

I tell you what, is there any part of this process that

0:25:190:25:22

I might be able to have a go at?

0:25:220:25:23

You can have a go, if you think you're up to it.

0:25:230:25:25

If you're going to trust me with a 360 ton press?

0:25:250:25:28

Yes, yes, you'll be fine.

0:25:280:25:30

-This is it here, is it?

-Yeah, don't forget your glasses.

0:25:310:25:34

No, I've got my safety goggles. Right.

0:25:340:25:38

-So I've got a nice stack here.

-Nice, shiny blank.

0:25:380:25:41

OK, you put it in the press.

0:25:410:25:43

-Locate it in the die.

-Yeah.

0:25:430:25:45

-Locate the star now.

-Locate the star...

0:25:450:25:48

-That's fine.

-I think that's about right.

0:25:480:25:50

-Where's my hammer? Oh, no...

-The green.

0:25:500:25:53

-Just press once?

-Yeah.

0:25:530:25:54

Right, now press it again.

0:25:540:25:56

-Oh!

-There we are. Take it out, Will.

-Is it safe?

0:25:580:26:01

Yeah, yeah, it's fine, yeah.

0:26:010:26:03

That's fine. No holes, no scratches.

0:26:030:26:06

That's great, Will.

0:26:060:26:07

So now it needs to go to the clipping?

0:26:070:26:09

It needs to go to the clipping, yeah.

0:26:090:26:11

Now I need to clip this excess.

0:26:110:26:13

I'm assuming this has got to be pretty accurate, otherwise...

0:26:130:26:16

Yes, it has.

0:26:160:26:17

Make sure you locate properly, Will.

0:26:170:26:20

-You happy?

-You better check it.

0:26:200:26:23

It's fine, now, Will.

0:26:230:26:25

What you mean "fine now"? It wasn't before?

0:26:250:26:27

-So down comes my safety?

-Yeah.

0:26:270:26:30

Press the foot pedal.

0:26:300:26:32

-OK?

-Slightly nervous, isn't it?

0:26:340:26:36

I suppose you're pretty used to it.

0:26:360:26:38

-My medal, in theory.

-Your medal's coming out.

0:26:380:26:40

Let's have a look. Front...

0:26:400:26:42

-Yeah, yeah.

-That's OK, Will.

-Is that OK?

-Yes, that's OK.

0:26:420:26:45

It's got to be cleaned later. No, no.

0:26:450:26:47

-We've got a misclip, Will.

-That's a misclip.

0:26:470:26:49

-We've got a misclip.

-How did that happen? Not my fault!

0:26:490:26:51

I probably didn't locate it...

0:26:510:26:53

-Oh, I'm so glad I got you to check it!

-This is a reject.

0:26:530:26:55

-We'll make another one.

-Really?

-We'll make another one, yeah.

0:26:550:26:58

Just a few more to go, Will.

0:27:010:27:03

Once Will's got that right,

0:27:050:27:07

the medal is pierced and polished.

0:27:070:27:09

Rhiannon, you're on the final process.

0:27:170:27:20

-Yes, I am.

-The ribbon.

0:27:200:27:21

Well, I've got a medal here.

0:27:210:27:23

-Any chance I could swap that for one with a ribbon on?

-Course you can.

0:27:230:27:27

That's very kind of you.

0:27:270:27:28

I'm glad you are doing that fiddly work and not me.

0:27:280:27:31

-And that's in the box it will be presented to, yeah?

-Yes, it is.

0:27:310:27:34

Wow, look at that.

0:27:350:27:37

Stunning, isn't it? The finished product.

0:27:370:27:39

To think that I've had a small part to play, even if it is

0:27:390:27:43

just helping to strike a medal, that...

0:27:430:27:46

You know, it's in some way respectful

0:27:460:27:49

to what they gave for their country

0:27:490:27:52

70 years ago, but still relevant, really

0:27:520:27:56

and worth commemorating, certainly.

0:27:560:27:58

With medal collecting, valour is the crucial element.

0:27:590:28:03

If you're going to start your own collection, here's a tip.

0:28:030:28:06

Hone in on a battle or the era that intrigues you most

0:28:060:28:09

and enjoy getting to know the stories of gallantry

0:28:090:28:12

behind that scrap of metal.

0:28:120:28:14

Anita Manning is probably the most

0:28:200:28:22

stylish member of the "Flog It!" team.

0:28:220:28:24

She loves colour and is also rather partial to a bit of adornment.

0:28:240:28:29

MUSIC: "Theme from Jurassic Park" by John Williams

0:28:290:28:33

I love jewellery.

0:28:330:28:35

It doesn't need to be gold and it doesn't need to be diamonds.

0:28:350:28:39

I love ambers.

0:28:390:28:41

And for me, they're very, very, very special.

0:28:410:28:44

Now, amber is a precious substance

0:28:440:28:47

and it is made of the fossilised resin

0:28:470:28:52

of giant and ancient pine trees

0:28:520:28:56

40 to 60 million years old.

0:28:560:29:00

And it's the type of thing which reaches

0:29:000:29:03

very high prices in the auction.

0:29:030:29:06

But, when something is very precious like that, we often find that

0:29:060:29:11

things are copied and that there are imitations

0:29:110:29:15

and we find these in the sale rooms and we also find them

0:29:150:29:18

in my little collection of amber, as well.

0:29:180:29:21

And I don't mind them too much.

0:29:210:29:23

I mean, it's very handy

0:29:230:29:25

to be able to identify the true amber.

0:29:250:29:30

And, in this one here,

0:29:300:29:32

it looks in the spectrum of ambers,

0:29:320:29:34

but, in actual fact, it is a Bakelite.

0:29:340:29:37

How do we tell the difference?

0:29:370:29:40

There's first the hot pin test.

0:29:400:29:42

If you heat a little pin

0:29:420:29:45

and put it into the amber in a place where you can't see it,

0:29:450:29:49

maybe near the string hole, if it's amber,

0:29:490:29:52

it will emit this wonderful pine perfume,

0:29:520:29:57

whereas, if it's plastic or Bakelite,

0:29:570:30:01

the smell will be really horrid.

0:30:010:30:04

True amber has a magnetic quality and,

0:30:040:30:08

if you cut up lots of different little bits of paper

0:30:080:30:11

and rub the amber on some wool,

0:30:110:30:14

it will magnetise and draw the paper.

0:30:140:30:17

So these are handy wee things to know, if you're not sure

0:30:170:30:20

if it's amber.

0:30:200:30:22

People worshipped amber, because it was a sun...

0:30:240:30:27

They called it a sun-reflecting stone.

0:30:270:30:31

And, if we look at something like that,

0:30:310:30:33

which has depth and colour

0:30:330:30:36

and substance and great beauty,

0:30:360:30:40

this is the real amber.

0:30:400:30:43

And this little baby here

0:30:430:30:45

is worth its weight in gold.

0:30:450:30:48

Anita's precious amber spent millions of years

0:30:580:31:01

buried in the soil.

0:31:010:31:03

But, a few years ago,

0:31:030:31:05

I went hunting for treasure unearthed in more recent times.

0:31:050:31:08

It's everybody's dream to find buried treasure,

0:31:170:31:20

and one freezing January afternoon in 1943,

0:31:200:31:23

in the middle of the dark days of World War II,

0:31:230:31:26

Gordon Butcher was hard at work

0:31:260:31:28

ploughing a field in the middle of Mildenhall in Suffolk.

0:31:280:31:32

Suddenly, the plough hit something in the field

0:31:330:31:36

and Gordon ran round to see what it was.

0:31:360:31:39

He started digging and he unearthed a huge black metal rim

0:31:390:31:44

of a large plate, some two foot in diameter.

0:31:440:31:48

Gordon quickly fetched his boss,

0:31:480:31:50

Sydney Ford, and together,

0:31:500:31:52

they dug down into the soil and found many more objects,

0:31:520:31:56

including dishes, goblets and spoons,

0:31:560:31:58

an astonishing 34 items in all.

0:31:580:32:01

Thinking the finds were just pewter or lead, Sydney Ford gathered them

0:32:010:32:05

all up and stuffed them into a crude old sack and took them home.

0:32:050:32:08

There, he started to clean them up,

0:32:080:32:10

and he even straightened out all the dented items quite crudely.

0:32:100:32:14

Once they were cleaned up,

0:32:140:32:16

he put them on display on the mantelpiece and the sideboard.

0:32:160:32:19

In those days, any large, valuable collection found underground

0:32:210:32:25

came under the law of treasure trove.

0:32:250:32:27

If it was deemed to be lost, it belonged to the finder,

0:32:270:32:30

but if it was thought to have been buried intentionally,

0:32:300:32:33

it belonged to the Crown

0:32:330:32:35

and the finder received a reward related to the value of the hoard.

0:32:350:32:39

The find should have been declared immediately,

0:32:390:32:41

but it was another three years before it was brought to

0:32:410:32:44

the attention of the local authorities

0:32:440:32:46

and that came about because a local doctor went round to visit

0:32:460:32:49

Ford in his house after the war

0:32:490:32:51

and saw the collection on display.

0:32:510:32:53

And it was only then that the Mildenhall Treasures were

0:32:530:32:56

revealed as the most important collection of Roman silver

0:32:560:32:59

ever to be found in Britain.

0:32:590:33:01

I've come to the Mildenhall Museum to find out a little bit more

0:33:010:33:04

and talk to trustee Peter Merrick.

0:33:040:33:07

Peter, thank you very much for joining us.

0:33:070:33:09

Now, this is the largest item. Tell me about it.

0:33:090:33:12

Yes, it is an extraordinary large thing.

0:33:120:33:15

It weighs 18lb, or 8.25 kilograms.

0:33:150:33:18

What does it depict? What's going on there?

0:33:180:33:21

Well, in the middle, there's Oceanus,

0:33:210:33:24

or Neptune, he's been called in Greek times.

0:33:240:33:27

And dancing maidens and men all around,

0:33:270:33:30

beautiful dresses, with other animals.

0:33:300:33:33

It is exquisite.

0:33:330:33:35

Let's take a look at some of the other finds

0:33:350:33:37

you've got on the table.

0:33:370:33:38

It really is a treasure trove.

0:33:380:33:40

Yes, we think it's absolutely wonderful.

0:33:400:33:42

I've noticed there's a few dents on some of them.

0:33:420:33:45

Is that because they've been knocked by a plough over the years?

0:33:450:33:49

Well, as far as anyone knows,

0:33:490:33:51

the only damage that ever occurred was when they were found.

0:33:510:33:54

Oh, really?

0:33:540:33:55

By the plough. But the whole story is shrouded in mystery.

0:33:550:34:00

So what was his reward for finding this?

0:34:000:34:02

He got £1,000.

0:34:020:34:04

That's nothing, is it, really? Absolutely nothing.

0:34:040:34:07

If he'd have reported this straightaway as a find,

0:34:070:34:09

he would have got the whole reward, wouldn't he?

0:34:090:34:12

Its value, its true value?

0:34:120:34:14

Allegedly, he would have got £50,000 for it,

0:34:140:34:17

but because he left it for so long, then all he finished up with...

0:34:170:34:22

The ploughman, Gordon Butcher, got 1,000 and so did Sid Ford.

0:34:220:34:26

It's not a lot, is it?

0:34:260:34:28

This is a fantastic collection of treasure.

0:34:280:34:30

Who knows? There might be even more out there.

0:34:300:34:33

We've got metal detectors going around like lunatics

0:34:330:34:36

looking for them.

0:34:360:34:37

Still to come, the kids are in town...

0:34:420:34:44

When little Katie put them on the table, I thought,

0:34:440:34:47

"I've never seen these before!"

0:34:470:34:50

..and they have treasures to impress the experts...

0:34:500:34:53

This is the highlight of my day.

0:34:530:34:55

..as well as the bidders.

0:34:550:34:57

Wow!

0:34:570:34:59

-What do you think about that?

-Amazing.

0:34:590:35:01

An area of collecting that has huge appeal is coins.

0:35:080:35:12

You shower us with them on "Flog it!".

0:35:120:35:14

From commemorative coins, to gold sovereigns,

0:35:140:35:16

whole collections and coins made into jewellery.

0:35:160:35:20

We're a nation, I think, of collectors.

0:35:200:35:24

I coined the term collectaholics. They're absolutely addicted.

0:35:240:35:27

So I can relate to it. Although I've never been particularly bitten by

0:35:270:35:32

the coin bug myself, I can certainly understand why you'd want to.

0:35:320:35:36

But it's easy to feel overwhelmed by over 2,000 years' worth of coins

0:35:360:35:40

to choose from. So, where to begin?

0:35:400:35:44

There are a few key things that collectors bear in mind,

0:35:440:35:47

and Michael Baggott came across a coin that encapsulated all of them.

0:35:470:35:52

This is a fantastic condition gold coin.

0:35:520:35:56

We've got the head of King James I.

0:35:560:36:00

He reigned from 1603 to 1625.

0:36:000:36:04

The denomination of this is actually a laurel.

0:36:040:36:07

We've got the denomination actually struck here, which is XX,

0:36:070:36:11

and that's the number of shillings it represents.

0:36:110:36:14

So, it's a 20 shilling piece.

0:36:140:36:16

We have to think about a whole series of things

0:36:160:36:19

when we value coins. These, which are hammered coin...

0:36:190:36:22

And a hammered coin is anything that is struck by hand

0:36:220:36:26

and does not have a milled edge.

0:36:260:36:27

The first thing is, how even is the flan?

0:36:270:36:30

The flan being the surface of the coin.

0:36:300:36:33

We've got a little bit of trimming here, but that's fine.

0:36:330:36:36

But really, it is in absolutely wonderful condition.

0:36:360:36:40

And at the auction, it was clear the collectors agreed.

0:36:400:36:43

1,150, for the gentleman behind you. At 1,150...

0:36:430:36:47

Condition, condition, condition.

0:36:470:36:49

1,150, then...

0:36:490:36:51

Good price, £1,150.

0:36:510:36:54

That coin perfectly sums up the things to check for

0:36:540:36:57

if you're thinking of collecting.

0:36:570:36:59

Most important is condition.

0:36:590:37:02

You can get something that's incredibly early,

0:37:020:37:05

or even a Roman coin, and it can be worth a very small amount

0:37:050:37:09

unless the condition is very crisp and fine.

0:37:090:37:12

Really, you've got to look for condition.

0:37:120:37:14

Still on really early coins, you can get some that were

0:37:140:37:17

in uncirculated condition.

0:37:170:37:18

You can still see just the very finest

0:37:180:37:20

wisps of hair on the monarch's head and they are beautiful.

0:37:200:37:24

And whatever you do, don't be tempted to polish your coin.

0:37:240:37:27

That all important patina of age

0:37:270:37:29

shows that something is the genuine article.

0:37:290:37:32

And that's what the collectors want to see.

0:37:330:37:35

If a coin is not supposed to have a hole in it,

0:37:350:37:37

and it has a hole in it,

0:37:370:37:39

it's not worth anything as a coin, so remember that.

0:37:390:37:42

A lot of coins have been turned into jewellery

0:37:420:37:44

and they've been drilled or they have jewellery mounts still on them.

0:37:440:37:48

If you see any blemishes like that,

0:37:480:37:50

a coin collector would no longer be interested in it,

0:37:500:37:53

and it's worth then it's scrap value.

0:37:530:37:55

Inevitably, very rare coins are highly sought after

0:37:570:38:00

and can fetch staggering sums.

0:38:000:38:02

This Queen Anne, period Vigo, five guinea coin from 1703

0:38:040:38:08

sold for £240,000 in 2012.

0:38:080:38:13

As with any collecting, it always pays to do your research.

0:38:130:38:17

If you're collecting coins, go immediately

0:38:170:38:19

and get yourself very good guides to coins. You're lost without it.

0:38:190:38:23

Then you know what you're looking at.

0:38:230:38:25

Then get familiar with condition.

0:38:250:38:27

You're only going to know that if you go to specialists

0:38:270:38:31

and handle coins in that condition and become familiar with it.

0:38:310:38:35

Once you've done that, there are enough price guides and general

0:38:350:38:39

reference works for you to work out a framework and collect from there.

0:38:390:38:42

Coins are collectable for many reasons.

0:38:440:38:47

They're a window into history,

0:38:470:38:48

they have intrinsic gold value, and they're terribly rare.

0:38:480:38:53

But you might be surprised to hear that one of the most collectable

0:38:530:38:56

coins on the market seems at first glance

0:38:560:38:58

to be one of the most ordinary...

0:38:580:39:00

the humble penny.

0:39:000:39:02

In 1933, the Royal Mint only struck a tiny number of pennies,

0:39:020:39:06

as there were already enough in circulation.

0:39:060:39:09

Exactly how many were produced has become

0:39:090:39:12

a subject of speculation amongst collectors.

0:39:120:39:15

One man who should know is Kevin Clancy, Royal Mint curator.

0:39:150:39:20

The truth of it is we don't know how many were made.

0:39:200:39:22

People might tell you they do know, but the truth is there isn't

0:39:220:39:25

a record that says six, seven, eight or however many were made.

0:39:250:39:29

Almost certainly less than ten,

0:39:290:39:32

and they've sold for in excess of £25,000 in recent times.

0:39:320:39:37

It's the story behind this that people are attracted by.

0:39:370:39:41

Don't be fooled, there were plenty of forgeries, but you never know.

0:39:410:39:45

If you're doing some renovation

0:39:470:39:48

and see something shiny in the rubble,

0:39:480:39:50

you might just have turned up your own lucky penny.

0:39:500:39:53

Now, it doesn't always follow that

0:39:580:39:59

if an item has been made of precious metal or adorned with gems

0:39:590:40:03

that it's going to increase in value, but in most cases, it does.

0:40:030:40:07

Take this exquisite example of Huguenot craftsmanship,

0:40:070:40:10

made in 1710.

0:40:100:40:13

Reputedly, it's the world's largest solid silver wine cooler

0:40:130:40:18

and it weighs a staggering 3,000 ounces.

0:40:180:40:22

If this same wine cooler had been made

0:40:220:40:25

using the finest Cuban mahogany of the day, richly carved and adorned

0:40:250:40:30

like this has been, it would set you back around £20,000 to £30,000.

0:40:300:40:35

This one? Well, you can definitely add another couple of noughts.

0:40:350:40:39

So, when does that extra sparkle make all the difference?

0:40:390:40:42

When buying precious metal object in silver or gold,

0:40:470:40:49

name and craftsmanship are absolutely crucial alongside

0:40:490:40:53

condition and markings etc.

0:40:530:40:56

I would always advise people to be guided by the individual quality

0:40:560:41:01

of an object, and if you just buy on names, you could come a cropper.

0:41:010:41:05

The name can be the value, really, but not all pieces are named.

0:41:060:41:10

So, if it's an unnamed piece, go for quality of craftsmanship.

0:41:100:41:14

A good finish, good materials, and you can't really go wrong.

0:41:140:41:18

Anything fashioned from gold and silver has that extra little

0:41:180:41:21

je ne sais quoi that our experts love,

0:41:210:41:24

and Adam Partridge knew exactly what he had in front of him.

0:41:240:41:28

They were really smart.

0:41:280:41:30

Enamelled with birds, in lovely condition, by a great maker.

0:41:300:41:32

They ticked all the commercial boxes.

0:41:320:41:34

Aren't they wonderful?

0:41:360:41:37

Silver and enamel menu holders,

0:41:370:41:39

obviously for the dinning table, in sets of eight and upwards.

0:41:390:41:44

These were produced by a company called Sampson Mordan & Co,

0:41:440:41:47

which is quite a famous company,

0:41:470:41:49

particularly well known for inventing the propelling pencil.

0:41:490:41:55

Sampson Mordan is one of the major names in small silver, I would say.

0:41:550:41:58

They were prolific manufactures, but always very high quality

0:41:580:42:02

and small items. Desktop items, ink wells, the list is endless.

0:42:020:42:07

They assayed items in London, Birmingham, and these ones,

0:42:070:42:11

more of interest to me, as I'm in the north-west,

0:42:110:42:13

were assayed in Chester...

0:42:130:42:14

which is slightly rarer, slightly more interesting,

0:42:140:42:17

than the ones that were in Birmingham or London.

0:42:170:42:20

We can put an estimate of £100 to £150, but I wouldn't be surprised

0:42:200:42:24

if they made more like £200 to £250 once the bidding had happened.

0:42:240:42:29

Two silver menu holders, with a value of £100-150.

0:42:300:42:34

Adam, I like these. Assay marked in Chester, very good quality.

0:42:340:42:39

-Sampson Mordan. Good name.

-I like them a lot.

0:42:390:42:42

It gets exciting now. Here we go.

0:42:430:42:45

'Where they going to fly at auction?'

0:42:450:42:47

We've got 520 here. 550, 580...

0:42:470:42:50

-600, 620...

-I can't believe this.

0:42:500:42:53

-650, 680...

-Still going.

0:42:530:42:57

700, 720?

0:42:570:42:59

£700. There's the bid on that telephone at £700.

0:42:590:43:03

At £700 and done, thank you.

0:43:030:43:06

-Bosh!

-Excellent, thank you.

0:43:060:43:08

What do you think? A big smile there.

0:43:080:43:10

Small silver is extremely desirable,

0:43:110:43:14

so I was a bit conservative with my estimate on those ones.

0:43:140:43:18

Oh, well, Adam, at least you were right

0:43:180:43:20

about the collectability of Sampson Mordan.

0:43:200:43:22

Their charm and quality always attract the buyers.

0:43:220:43:26

Why not see if you can find any of their propelling pencils,

0:43:260:43:29

enamelled vesta cases or pin cushions?

0:43:290:43:32

Small items with glittering prices.

0:43:320:43:35

We often come across this question on "Flog it!" -

0:43:350:43:38

to scrap or not to scrap our precious objects

0:43:380:43:41

made of gold or silver?

0:43:410:43:44

And the team is divided on the matter.

0:43:440:43:46

Scrapping is a real bugbear of mine

0:43:470:43:50

and it's not a big question for me at all.

0:43:500:43:52

I can't stand it that things get scrapped.

0:43:520:43:56

If something is horrible, it's thin and tinny,

0:43:560:43:59

and has no artistic merit whatsoever,

0:43:590:44:02

but it's worth £300 if you melt it down,

0:44:020:44:04

melt it down and hopefully an artisan silversmith

0:44:040:44:07

will get hold of that and make something beautiful.

0:44:070:44:10

If you've got a lovely piece, though, beautifully made,

0:44:100:44:13

don't scrap it, because it'll probably be a one-off

0:44:130:44:15

and there won't be another one around,

0:44:150:44:17

so think carefully before you put everything in a melting pot.

0:44:170:44:20

When we scrap gold or silver,

0:44:200:44:21

we're aiming to maximise price by weight,

0:44:210:44:24

but when Michael Baggott came across a silver teapot,

0:44:240:44:27

it wasn't so much the weight that appealed, as what it told him.

0:44:270:44:31

It's a super thing,

0:44:310:44:33

and anybody that knows anything about silver will be looking at that

0:44:330:44:36

and saying, "Oh, that's a beautiful London teapot of about 1830." But...

0:44:360:44:41

Oh! The first hint that something's up

0:44:410:44:44

is the fact that I'm having difficult lifting it.

0:44:440:44:46

Lifting it, yes.

0:44:460:44:48

Weight, when you're looking at silver, is a very good indicator,

0:44:480:44:51

not in itself, but taken as a whole, as to quality.

0:44:510:44:54

Obviously, the heavier something is, the more expensive it is to make,

0:44:540:44:58

so obviously there might be more

0:44:580:45:00

skill required in the manufacture of it.

0:45:000:45:02

-Actually, the second thing is this handle.

-Oh, really?

0:45:020:45:06

-Because it's horn.

-Oh, right.

0:45:060:45:09

English handles are silver with ivory insulators or they're wood,

0:45:090:45:14

so we're not in England anymore.

0:45:140:45:16

Turn it over, and, great, that's what we want to see.

0:45:160:45:21

We've got H&C in a rectangular punch,

0:45:210:45:25

then we've got an elephant, which is signs of things not English,

0:45:250:45:30

and a little A.

0:45:300:45:32

These are the marks that were used by Hamilton and Company,

0:45:320:45:36

who were probably the leading silversmiths in Calcutta,

0:45:360:45:39

and things were worked to a very heavy gauge.

0:45:390:45:42

So whenever you see something which is very elaborate like this

0:45:420:45:45

and it weighs a tonne, those are the warning bells that it's going

0:45:450:45:49

to be a piece of colonial silver.

0:45:490:45:52

It's still not, frustratingly, as valuable as if it were English,

0:45:520:45:55

despite the fact it's much rarer.

0:45:550:45:58

Rarity doesn't always mean value,

0:45:580:46:00

because it can mean that there are less collectors,

0:46:000:46:04

and if there are less collectors for something, it won't make as high a price at auction.

0:46:040:46:07

At auction, it's going to be in the region of about £350 to £550.

0:46:070:46:14

-OK.

-That's the sort of bracket and see how it goes.

0:46:140:46:17

A piece like this is about so much more than its weight.

0:46:170:46:21

It evokes an important part of British history.

0:46:210:46:24

But would the bidders agree?

0:46:240:46:26

I'm going to start the bidding at 600. Is there 20 in the room?

0:46:260:46:30

-At £600, it's selling.

-Good grief.

-Is there 20? At £600. Any more?

0:46:300:46:35

At £600. Commission bid. Are you all done? That's £600, last time.

0:46:350:46:42

Yes, the hammer's gone down. £600.

0:46:430:46:45

Strangely, at the time we sold it, it was less valuable

0:46:460:46:49

than an English teapot,

0:46:490:46:51

because Indian colonial silver was in a slump.

0:46:510:46:54

That's now not the case and colonial silver is sought after,

0:46:540:46:58

so were it to be offered again today,

0:46:580:47:00

it would probably make slightly more.

0:47:000:47:02

But that's just how the markets go.

0:47:020:47:04

Sophia's solid silver teapot may have conjured up

0:47:040:47:07

the days of the Raj, but Anita found two starry items which oozed

0:47:070:47:12

the style of another bygone era, and were truly out of this world.

0:47:120:47:16

These wonderful compacts from the 1950s were absolutely marvellous.

0:47:170:47:22

When little Katie put them on the table, I thought,

0:47:220:47:25

"I've never seen these before!"

0:47:250:47:28

-Do they belong to you?

-Yeah, they do.

0:47:280:47:30

-Do you play with them?

-No.

-No?

0:47:300:47:33

Compacts you usually keep in your handbag to powder your nose

0:47:330:47:36

when you're out. These are like dressing table examples of them.

0:47:360:47:41

If we open it up, it's very interesting.

0:47:410:47:43

It's called The Flying Saucer.

0:47:430:47:46

It is a lot of fun. I like it.

0:47:460:47:49

This other one, again a dressing table example,

0:47:490:47:55

and this one is called Pygmalion, Made in England.

0:47:550:47:59

The inventiveness and the reflection of what was happening at the time

0:47:590:48:04

was shown in these little compacts

0:48:040:48:07

and I think they were really just the best fun in the world

0:48:070:48:10

and a perfect example of 1950s bags of style.

0:48:100:48:14

I think we'll estimate them

0:48:140:48:15

at maybe £50-60 with a reserve of maybe 45

0:48:150:48:20

but hope that we've got those hip kids

0:48:200:48:23

that are out for that type of item.

0:48:230:48:26

I can start the bidding straightaway at £120.

0:48:260:48:30

-SHE GASPS

-Wow!

0:48:300:48:32

180. 180 on commission.

0:48:320:48:35

200.

0:48:350:48:36

On the phone at 200. 220.

0:48:360:48:38

THEY GASP

0:48:380:48:41

No? At £240, these very rare compacts.

0:48:410:48:45

Selling now.

0:48:450:48:46

-Wow!

-What did you think about that?

-Amazing!

0:48:460:48:50

What mattered was the style

0:48:500:48:53

and the period. That's what made these items interesting,

0:48:530:48:58

not the components

0:48:580:49:00

that made the item.

0:49:000:49:02

The sparkly nature of those compacts was only part of their appeal.

0:49:030:49:07

Their space-age kitsch was a real bonus.

0:49:070:49:09

Appealing to people's nostalgia can prove profitable.

0:49:090:49:13

Sometimes, though, all that glisters is indeed gold,

0:49:150:49:19

or in this case, a very special piece of silver.

0:49:190:49:22

There is absolutely no doubt that this is the highlight of my day.

0:49:230:49:28

-Do you know what you've got here?

-No, not really.

0:49:280:49:30

-I had a quick look last night on the internet.

-What name did you find?

0:49:300:49:34

-Omar Ramsden.

-Yeah.

-Never heard of him.

0:49:340:49:36

You'd never heard of him? What's it made of?

0:49:360:49:38

-Silver.

-It is indeed.

0:49:380:49:40

Very, very typical piece.

0:49:400:49:41

You could see this was Omar Ramsden from the other end of Ely Cathedral.

0:49:410:49:46

Omar Ramsden was born in 1873, died in 1939,

0:49:460:49:49

and was one of the great 20th-century silversmiths

0:49:490:49:55

in this country.

0:49:550:49:56

Quality, quality, quality, but also he did his own enamelling.

0:49:560:50:02

A lot of silversmiths would send their work off to an enameller

0:50:020:50:06

to have that work done.

0:50:060:50:07

He did his own enamelling so that he did the whole object.

0:50:070:50:12

And it's hugely collectible.

0:50:120:50:14

I'm going to turn it over, just so we get all the info here.

0:50:140:50:18

The monarch, there we are, George V, and the date letter, 1935,

0:50:180:50:24

and it's even got Omar Ramsden and the OR mark on it.

0:50:240:50:28

Frankly, it couldn't be better. What's it worth, Jack?

0:50:280:50:32

-I don't know, 500, maybe?

-£500, you think?

0:50:320:50:35

Jack was a very bright boy, IS a bright boy,

0:50:350:50:37

but I can't believe he looked at a bit of Omar Ramsden and said,

0:50:370:50:40

"I think this is worth £500," not at his age.

0:50:400:50:42

Well, he's got a huge future ahead of him if it was his own valuation.

0:50:420:50:47

This is worth over £1,000.

0:50:470:50:50

What?!

0:50:500:50:51

Oh, that was a funny noise, Jack!

0:50:510:50:53

This is worth, in my opinion, certainly £1,000-1,500.

0:50:530:50:57

Wow.

0:50:570:50:59

Wow, indeed, and at auction the shocks kept coming.

0:50:590:51:03

1,100, 1,200, 1,300,

0:51:030:51:05

1,400, 1,500,

0:51:050:51:07

1,600, 1,700,

0:51:070:51:10

at 1,700,

0:51:100:51:11

at 1,700,

0:51:110:51:13

1,800, 1,900.

0:51:130:51:15

-We've done it.

-2,000, 2,100,

0:51:160:51:20

2,200, 2,300, you're both out down here.

0:51:200:51:22

2,300. 2,400?

0:51:220:51:24

-2,400 this side.

-This is great, Jane.

0:51:240:51:27

2,500.

0:51:270:51:28

2,600. At 2,600, look at the action pose.

0:51:300:51:33

2,600. 2,700.

0:51:330:51:34

2,600 there. Where are the other two phones now?

0:51:340:51:37

I sell on the phone with the bid.

0:51:370:51:40

At £2,600, are you sure you're done?

0:51:400:51:42

-Yes!

-The hammer's gone down.

0:51:430:51:45

£2,600!

0:51:450:51:48

OK, Jack, do you know where all the money's going?

0:51:480:51:51

-Er...

-Has Mum and Dad decided?

-To my bank.

0:51:510:51:54

The Jack Bank!

0:51:550:51:56

A good, full price,

0:51:580:52:00

but it was the quality.

0:52:000:52:02

Everybody knows that if you buy the best

0:52:020:52:05

and you buy a bit of Omar Ramsden,

0:52:050:52:07

the fact that it's 2,600 on that day -

0:52:070:52:10

it comes up in another five years' time, it'll be 3,600.

0:52:100:52:14

It's not going to go down.

0:52:140:52:15

There's no more of it being made

0:52:150:52:17

and that was a perfect hallmark,

0:52:170:52:20

no chipping to the enamelling. The whole thing was perfect.

0:52:200:52:23

If you can't stretch to gold or silver, take my advice -

0:52:250:52:28

go out and buy some pewter.

0:52:280:52:30

That would be my number one choice.

0:52:300:52:31

Start off with the small plates,

0:52:310:52:33

18th-century ones, with a stamp on it, the maker's initial,

0:52:330:52:36

known as a touch mark.

0:52:360:52:37

They start at around £30-60 in auction.

0:52:370:52:40

Work your way up to the larger plates, the chargers.

0:52:400:52:43

Hopefully, get one with a broad rim, late 17th-century,

0:52:430:52:46

again, with a bit of punch detail,

0:52:460:52:48

a stamp mark on it and a little bit of wriggle work, as it's known,

0:52:480:52:52

decoration in the style of William and Mary or King Charles II.

0:52:520:52:56

Now, they're affordable as well.

0:52:560:52:59

They start at around £100-200 in pretty average condition,

0:52:590:53:02

so there you are, get out there and get buying.

0:53:020:53:04

It's great way to get into precious metal.

0:53:040:53:06

If you're interested in something shiny

0:53:080:53:11

that's a cut above the rest, there's a lot to think about.

0:53:110:53:14

Bear in mind changing fashions.

0:53:140:53:16

Objects go in and out of vogue,

0:53:160:53:18

so think about whether it shines out above the crowd now

0:53:180:53:21

or whether it makes sense to hang onto it for the future.

0:53:210:53:25

On trend right now are British colonial objects

0:53:250:53:28

and seek out home-grown, retro, quirky items

0:53:280:53:31

which have a new-found appeal.

0:53:310:53:33

A good name can help increase the value.

0:53:330:53:36

But named or not, remember the mantra -

0:53:360:53:39

quality and craftsmanship

0:53:390:53:42

and if you can tick those boxes, you'll have a piece

0:53:420:53:45

that should endure the changing fluctuations in fashion.

0:53:450:53:49

And there's a simple trick to test whether all that glisters is gold...

0:53:490:53:53

..use a magnet.

0:53:540:53:56

Iron or nickel will jump to a magnet,

0:53:560:53:58

while gold and silver won't be drawn towards it at all.

0:53:580:54:01

And finally, take a leaf out of Katie and Jack's book.

0:54:030:54:06

Encourage children's early interest in collecting

0:54:060:54:09

and you never know -

0:54:090:54:10

you could be looking at the antique collectors of the future.

0:54:100:54:14

-Yes!

-The hammer's gone down.

0:54:140:54:16

"Flog It!" expert Anita Manning has eyes like a magpie

0:54:200:54:23

when it comes to spotting sparkly, shiny things

0:54:230:54:25

and it was just like her to zoom in on something rather special

0:54:250:54:29

Marion brought along to a valuation day in Cheshire back in 2012.

0:54:290:54:33

These are divine. Tell me about them.

0:54:390:54:42

I got these about ten years ago on the internet, £50,

0:54:420:54:46

including postage and packing.

0:54:460:54:48

When they arrived, they were a bit black,

0:54:480:54:50

but when I took a closer look at them,

0:54:500:54:51

I realised that they were absolutely exquisite.

0:54:510:54:55

I loved my day at "Flog It!" Tatton Park.

0:54:550:54:58

Anita Manning was lovely to me, very friendly, she loved my hat pins,

0:54:580:55:05

and she's very interested in jewellery

0:55:050:55:08

and items like that anyway, so it was just great.

0:55:080:55:11

Let's look at the actual items.

0:55:110:55:15

We have a little diamond set in silver or a white metal.

0:55:150:55:20

I'm not sure yet whether it's a white gold or a silver.

0:55:200:55:25

Dating, I would say, the late 1800s

0:55:250:55:27

and it would be one of these wonderful, big Belle Epoque hats

0:55:270:55:32

that you would wear.

0:55:320:55:34

Now, value - you've paid £50 for them.

0:55:340:55:37

-Well, somebody a while back offered me £650.

-In your hand?

0:55:370:55:43

In my hand, yes, cash.

0:55:430:55:45

But I actually declined it.

0:55:450:55:47

If you're wanting your 650 in your hand,

0:55:470:55:50

you're probably having to consider going with

0:55:500:55:53

a reserve of near enough £750.

0:55:530:55:57

-Well, I'd be happy for that.

-Shall we give it a go?

-Let's...

0:55:580:56:01

Let's give it a go!

0:56:010:56:03

And she wasn't disappointed.

0:56:060:56:08

740. In the room at 740.

0:56:080:56:10

At 740, selling them. At £740.

0:56:100:56:13

£740!

0:56:150:56:18

Which was brilliant,

0:56:180:56:19

cos that money went towards my 50th birthday party,

0:56:190:56:23

which was coming up later that year

0:56:230:56:25

and I had a great time.

0:56:250:56:27

I had friends and family, great food, a dance and we all had a great time.

0:56:270:56:32

Apart from enjoying a party, Marion is a real second-hand rose.

0:56:330:56:37

Those hat pins were part of a covetable collection

0:56:370:56:40

of vintage clothing and jewellery she's put together

0:56:400:56:43

over several decades.

0:56:430:56:45

I've been very lucky over the years of collecting

0:56:450:56:48

to acquire some very special pieces

0:56:480:56:51

that give a glimpse into our social history, really.

0:56:510:56:55

A 94-year-old lady sold these to me on the internet.

0:56:550:56:59

The beautiful embroidery on here,

0:56:590:57:01

it's so delicate you'd hardly think it was done by hand,

0:57:010:57:04

she did as the bombs were falling overhead in Portsmouth.

0:57:040:57:08

And she was willing to share her tips on collecting with us.

0:57:090:57:12

I'd recommend for anybody, if they were interested

0:57:140:57:18

in getting into acquiring items of vintage clothing,

0:57:180:57:22

to go along, if they can, to a vintage clothing store -

0:57:220:57:25

they're up and down the country - or vintage fairs,

0:57:250:57:28

where they actually get the chance to try things on,

0:57:280:57:32

see how they fit, see what suits them,

0:57:320:57:35

and then you can progress to looking at things online,

0:57:350:57:40

but be very careful about measurements,

0:57:400:57:43

because vintage clothing can be very different to modern sizing,

0:57:430:57:47

so if the measurements aren't given on the description, ask.

0:57:470:57:50

So if you're interested in starting out collecting vintage,

0:57:520:57:56

the place to start is to really think about your shape, your style,

0:57:560:58:00

what do you think would suit you,

0:58:000:58:01

because there's different shapes to different eras.

0:58:010:58:05

Also, you might be interested in a particular era

0:58:050:58:08

because of the music or the dance of that era.

0:58:080:58:11

Now, I hope we've inspired you today to go out there, get buying,

0:58:180:58:21

start a collection and, remember,

0:58:210:58:23

always trade upwards and look for quality

0:58:230:58:26

and enjoy yourself. Join us next time for more trade secrets.

0:58:260:58:29

Paul Martin and the Flog It! experts explore all that glisters.

Featured items include an unusual adornment for a dog and two out of this world, space age compacts.

Expert Will Axon tries his hand at medal making on a visit to the Royal Mint.

And we pay a visit to a Flog It! fan who sold a collection of hat pins to indulge her love of vintage glamour.


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