Holidays and Travel Flog It: Trade Secrets


Holidays and Travel

Antiques series. Paul Martin and the Flog It! team go on a journey exploring antiques and collectables from the world of travel, from souvenirs to posh luggage.


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Transcript


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With over a decade of "Flog It!" valuation days and auctions

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all over the British Isles,

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we've built up a wealth of knowledge valuing your unwanted antiques.

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-And now, we want to share some of that with you.

-Hello.

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What have you got lurking in there?

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It's like a voyage of discovery in your sack, isn't it?

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Our experts are raring to go with inside information,

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so if there's something you need to know,

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you'll probably find it right here.

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Welcome to Trade Secrets.

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In today's show, we're investigating how holidays and travel

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can affect our collecting habits.

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Whether it's antiques, souvenirs or items of grand luggage,

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there's a ready market

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for any item associated with our desire to see the world.

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Coming up, the valuations we put on your items surprise and delight you.

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We'll put it into auction for £1,000-£1,500.

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-£400? Right.

-Is that good? Is that good news?

-That's amazing.

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There's joy all around

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when our estimates are blown out of the water at auction.

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-Sold.

-Yes!

-Brilliant! How about that?

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-£900.

-I can't believe that.

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£900!

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And I investigate the great British holiday institution - the beach hut.

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Sun shining down on us outside your own beach hut. What could be better?

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-Well, apart from a chocolate biscuit.

-There we go.

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We British are great travellers.

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We invented the steam engine,

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which led to the evolution of the railways and steamships,

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which ultimately revolutionised travel.

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Now, today, getting from A to B

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is all about doing it as quickly as possible.

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But in days gone by, it was a much more stately affair.

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Suitcases, beautiful early suitcases, and trunks,

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complete with labels of glamorous far-off places and shipping lines

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sell very, very well.

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Railway posters that you used to see in carriages

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advertising the pleasures of the seaside.

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Gosh, don't they make some money?

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Particularly the 1930s Art-Deco ski posters. But condition.

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You've really got to check condition.

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If the margins have been cut, if there are slight tears, rips,

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or if any damp has crept in, it will kill them.

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So, condition, period, Deco ski posters. You won't go far wrong.

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Over the years, we've seen some marvellous

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travel-related collectables on the programme.

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Kath delighted two of our "Flog It!" experts when she brought in

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a wonderful map from one of Europe's most sophisticated cities.

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David Barby had the pleasure of valuing the map

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whilst Adam Partridge worked his magic on the rostrum.

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Maps are very popular.

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Lots of people like maps,

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from the sort of enthusiast

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that likes an Ordnance Survey map of the area they live in

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to the real passionate collectors

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that want the rare and the wonderful maps.

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So, there's an awful lot to go at in maps.

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It's a map of Paris, dated 1780.

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Nine years before the French Revolution.

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I can imagine English tourists having this and going to Paris,

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looking out the sort of fashionable watering places,

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going to the shops, seeing the sights.

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At the same time, the Scarlet Pimpernel

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would have needed one of these, wouldn't he?

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-Yes, he would!

-During the French Revolution. This is extraordinary.

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Where did it come from?

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Well, my father left it to me with one or two books.

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-Did you have an interest in maps?

-Yes.

-Oh, right.

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Well, this is a beautiful map.

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It's a steel engraving and then all this is hand-tinted.

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And, obviously, it was never taken out during the rain,

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because it hasn't got any runs or stains on it.

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It's always quite a surprise when maps survive well

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because, of course, you can imagine them being opened up

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and folded out and studied and maybe got wet and folded away,

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and so, clearly, this one was one that wasn't used a great deal.

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What I do find absolutely extraordinary

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is this wonderful plate here, which is so decorative,

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explains the routes of Paris,

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and then you've got these two emblematic figures either side,

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and the royal coat of arms here.

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Lovely, lovely piece.

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Kath had also brought to the valuation day

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a quarter of a Bradshaw map of canals,

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and David put it together into one lot with the map of Paris,

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an estimate of £80-£120 for the pair.

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-We've got some interest here, and I can start at £200 bid.

-Oh, lovely.

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210. 220. 230. 240. 250.

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260. 270. 280. 290. 300. 320.

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This was a lovely lot brought to us by the King of "Flog It!",

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David Barby, who is such a wonderful man and a great valuer.

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Very talented, very knowledgeable.

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But it was a very rare occasion here

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of him really underestimating something.

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380 bid. Any more now? 400. 420. 440.

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-This is very good.

-420, then.

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£420. Are you all done, then, at 420?

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Finished at 420.

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-Oh, that's good.

-Gosh, I never expected that.

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-Nor was I. I don't think you were either.

-I said double.

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-I said double.

-You did.

-You did.

-You did.

-Yes.

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-Gosh, that's wonderful.

-Little bit of commission to pay.

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But what will you spend all that money on?

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Well, we've got our first grandchild on the way at the end of August.

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-Have you?

-It's going to be Grandma's indulgence.

-Rather.

-It is, isn't it?

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David was surprised at the sale result,

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but the lesson here is not to underestimate an antique map,

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as there is a huge market for them,

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particularly for one like Kath's, in such exquisite condition.

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But what else would a well-heeled traveller of yesteryear

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have needed to take on holiday?

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Well, a travel guide, of course,

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and Mark Stacey had the privilege of valuing a wonderful set.

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Well, they have just gone from loft to loft.

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You've inherited them from a relative or something like that?

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Yes. Yes, my great-grandfather.

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-So, they've been in the family quite a while?

-Oh, yes. Yes.

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Whenever you come across items like this that have been hidden away,

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I want to go to every house in the country

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and start rummaging through people's draws and cupboards and attics,

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because there's a wealth of stuff out there that we don't know about,

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and we prove this on every "Flog It!" valuation day.

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You've got about 27 volumes here,

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and if we just take one of my favourite ones,

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which is Spain and Portugal, and each one is similar, in a way.

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-When we open it up, we find a little map of the country in question.

-Yes.

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And then we have the title of the book.

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The Modern Traveller. Popular Description.

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And the various countries of the globe.

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-Each one is dated either 1824, 1825 or 1826.

-Yes.

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And, in some cases, you know, when you look at the others,

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we've got four volumes of India, we've got Russia,

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we've got all of the Far East,

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as well as a lot of countries in Europe.

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And then it gives you a whole history of the countries

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that you are actually researching.

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So, this is almost an early 19th-century equivalent

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-of the internet, isn't it, for travellers?

-It is!

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This would undoubtedly have been for the middle classes.

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To buy a set of books like this,

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you would have had to have been quite a wealthy person.

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They were beautifully leather-bound.

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There were illustrated maps there. Those were not a cheap item to buy.

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I would say, if we were putting these in for auction,

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we ought to be looking at something like...

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£400.

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£400?

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-£400?! Right.

-Is that good? Is that good news?

-That's amazing!

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Course you love it.

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I mean, when somebody brings something in that, you know,

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they've been queueing up many hours to have looked at

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and you can say to them it's worth X amount

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and there's a lightning, you know,

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it's almost like that sort of chocolate box moment

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when the face lights up, it's wonderful.

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But was Mark's faith

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in the strength of the travel collectables market well placed?

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What did Will Axon, who wielded the gavel, think?

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Anything to do with travel and typography is always well received.

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There are a lot of collectors,

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because I think it is just an interesting subject.

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You know, this is the world we live on, so why not learn about it?

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They've got the look. The decorators will love these.

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Well, I've got a couple of hopeful bids here that I'll bypass those,

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and we start already at 260, 280, 300, I'm bid on commission.

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-Sold them.

-Yes.

-320. 340. 360. 380. 400.

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420. 440. 460. 480.

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500. 520. 540. 560. You're in now by 10.

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At £560, in the room now. 560. At 560. My bid is out.

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All done, then, are you sure, at £560?

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Sold.

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-Brilliant! How about that?

-Thank you.

-Well done.

-That's brilliant.

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-Thank you.

-See your little face!

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I think the estimate was spot-on

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and I think the selling price was spot-on.

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Yeah, I think everyone should be happy all round, really.

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Fine auctioneer, wasn't he?!

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Will was never one to undersell himself,

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but the quality of Pauline's collection of travel guides

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was clear for all to see.

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Not all travel-related items which make it to our valuation days

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immediately scream quality.

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It's always worth looking in a battered old suitcase,

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because you do not know what you will find.

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Now, on first appearances,

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it looks like you've brought along a rather tatty case.

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-Shall we have a little look inside?

-Yes.

-By all means.

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There we are.

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We have a beautiful selection

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of tortoiseshell and silver dressing accessories.

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When I think of this,

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I think of Orient Express or something like this.

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I mean, this is really beautiful.

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This is not the average ladies' handbag, is it?

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It's not something that we find. But it actually belonged to you...

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-My great-aunt.

-Your great-aunt.

-My Great-aunt Ida.

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-And do you think she ever used it? Did she ever travel?

-Oh, yes.

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She was married to a captain in the Army.

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When he retired, they did a lot of travelling.

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She was a multi-linguist and travelled all over the world.

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-Oh, right. So, she was a pretty special lady.

-Oh, she was.

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-And she would have taken this around with her?

-Yes, we believe so.

-Yes.

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I mean, it's a wonderful set.

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We've got mirrors, we've got brushes, we've got a shoehorn.

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Now, each one, I can see, looks like it's hallmarked.

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-Yes, we believe they are.

-And hallmarked silver.

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Birmingham mark, and the letter Y,

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and that would date it to around the 1920s.

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The sort of people that would probably go for an item like this,

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they could either be silver dealers who'd be looking for

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good quality pieces of silver with tortoiseshell on,

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or they could be interior designers.

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Now, these interior designers and, indeed, dealers,

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would be looking for a good name sometimes on the suitcase,

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so it's always worth, when you get a suitcase,

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having a good old look around the rim

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to see if they've got some nice retailers' names on.

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Perhaps Mappin & Webb, something like that.

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It is genuine tortoiseshell, but it's pre-1947,

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so it's something that we are allowed to sell.

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It's a smart thing and I would be happy to put an estimate on

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of 100-150, with a £70 reserve.

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-How does that sound to you?

-It's fine, thank you.

-Happy to see it go?

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-Yes.

-He's VERY positive!

-He is.

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Catherine was clearly taken with Mike and Anne's case,

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but did the bidders fall in love?

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I'm bid £180 for it. At 180. 190. 200. 210. 220.

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230. 240. 250.

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At £250.

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At 250 here.

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Finished, then, at £250. Quite sure at 250?

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-It's a good price.

-Yeah!

-It found its level.

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-Yeah. That was nice.

-That's good.

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A great result for Mike and Anne.

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Travelling boxes and cases are a popular collecting field

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and we see lots of them on the show, and they often do well,

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but how do you spot one of quality?

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James Lewis is the man in the know.

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If the outside is good,

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then you open the lid and all the jars are there as well,

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then that's really nice to see.

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Look at that. Fantastic! We now know what this was used for.

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It's a travelling box. Probably made 1840 to 1860.

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It's likely that it would have been owned

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by somebody of some social standing,

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because to actually afford to travel at all,

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you'd have had to have had a fair bit of income.

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Here we've got boxes, and if you hold the box lid up to the light...

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-you see it's got holes through it?

-Oh, yes.

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And that's so that whatever was inside didn't go mouldy.

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So, with holes, we know it was something that would have been wet.

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-Oh, yes.

-So, that's likely to be for the toothbrush.

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At £360 sitting here. At 360. At 360, are you done?

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GAVEL BANGS

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-£360.

-Wonderful.

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And it isn't just James who can spot a winner.

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I came across a glorious travelling case

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which perfectly captured its period.

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This kind of thing would have been around in the 1920s.

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-The age of the motor car. The golden age.

-Yes.

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-Cars were first introduced in the early 1900s.

-Yes.

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-Out went the canvas baskets, out went the wicker baskets.

-Yes.

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-Because everything was horse-drawn then.

-Yes.

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In came the leather travel ware.

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-You had to be quite wealthy to have something like this.

-I'm sure.

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I was over the moon to discover the case had a hidden secret.

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-Ah, look at that. This is where...

-If you go in here...

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-..the diamond necklace goes.

-Well...

-Oh, come on. Is there one?

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-I wish there was!

-Oh, look at it. It's exquisite.

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Absolutely exquisite.

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When it came to the auction, did Anthea's 1920s travelling case

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struggle without the addition of a diamond necklace?

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600 right there. 620. 650? 650. 680.

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700. 720. 750. 780. 800.

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-(800!)

-820. 850. 880. 900.

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At £900 in the middle there. 920?

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At £900 I'm bid.

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At £900. Going 20? No. At £900.

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-GAVEL BANGS

-£900!

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-I can't believe that.

-Yes!

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The next time you see what appears to be a battered old case,

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remember, it's worth having a closer look.

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Now, not all travel-related items we see on "Flog It!"

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have been used for holidays.

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Some have travelled far and wide for different reasons.

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It's an Attaboy, isn't it?

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An Attaboy is a trade name, it's a hat company, or a range of hats

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made by the Denton Hat Company of Stockport, Manchester.

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Of course, Stockport the home of hat making.

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They even have a hat museum there. Did you know that?

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So, let's have a look at it. Let's get that lid off there.

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-This is the sort of salesman sample, I think, really.

-I see.

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And salesmen would have taken it out,

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because it's small enough to carry around, and say, "Believe it or not,

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"this miniature Attaboy is half the size of an ordinary Attaboy hat."

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-So, you've got an idea of what it'll make.

-What it would be.

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Isn't that cute?

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I suppose you could have had any amount of small hats like that

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in your salesman's kit - it would have made it a lot easier

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hawking them round the streets, through the rain and the wind,

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on public transport,

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trams and horses and carriages and things like that.

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So, I can imagine there was a real need for salesmen's samples,

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and they were made to exactly the same specification and quality

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so that you could show your potential buyer,

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look at the detail, look at the quality,

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and what you're going to get is a full-size version.

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I think that's dead cute.

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And it serves a purpose for me because, of course,

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-now I'm getting on a bit, I've got one of these bald spot.

-Oh!

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That will cover it just nicely.

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Unfortunately, it's got a bit bigger since then, so...

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..I think I might need the full-sized hat now!

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So, why are you selling it? I suppose cos it's in the loft.

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Yes. We're trying to get rid of quite a lot of things.

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Well, that will free up a load of room, won't it(?)

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I know, this is it!

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-Um, it's not worth a lot.

-I know.

-We know.

-We know that, but...

0:16:560:16:59

-Great fun, though.

-I know.

-It's not all about the value.

0:16:590:17:02

-It's a novelty thing, isn't it?

-It's a curiosity.

0:17:020:17:05

It's about what you've got and the story you can tell.

0:17:050:17:08

-So, I think it will make £20-£40.

-Yeah? Quite surprised.

0:17:080:17:12

-Fingers crossed.

-Yeah!

0:17:120:17:13

INDISTINCT SPEECH

0:17:130:17:15

It wasn't just Adam who was taken with the Attaboy.

0:17:150:17:19

The auctioneer was rather fond of it too.

0:17:190:17:21

I know that my opinion counts for nothing,

0:17:210:17:23

but I think this is one of the most delightful lots in today's sale.

0:17:230:17:26

It really is. It's a real little gem.

0:17:260:17:29

It's always nice when an auctioneer is fond of your item,

0:17:290:17:33

as it's always depressing when they don't like it.

0:17:330:17:35

It's happened both ways.

0:17:350:17:36

But he was really a great fan of this hat

0:17:360:17:39

and he did his real very best in talking it up,

0:17:390:17:41

and I think the fact that he liked it so much

0:17:410:17:43

undoubtedly rubbed off on the bidders.

0:17:430:17:46

40 bid. 40. A real little beaut. At 40.

0:17:460:17:50

40 I'm bid. 50. £50.

0:17:500:17:53

-60.

-60.

-60 bid. £60.

0:17:530:17:56

70 with me. £70.

0:17:560:17:58

5 again now. At £70. A delightful little lot.

0:17:580:18:02

75. 80. 80 bid.

0:18:020:18:05

-Go on.

-£80.

-That's good.

0:18:050:18:07

-Final call.

-Great.

-On the book at £80.

0:18:070:18:10

I didn't think we'd get that.

0:18:100:18:12

I thought we was going home with it.

0:18:120:18:13

-80.

-£80. The hammer's gone down.

-Great.

0:18:130:18:17

Even though it was £20-£40 and made, I think, £80,

0:18:170:18:21

which is an awful lot of money for it, really,

0:18:210:18:23

when you look at other comparable examples,

0:18:230:18:26

it's right up my street, that sort of thing.

0:18:260:18:28

It's right up my street too, Adam,

0:18:280:18:31

and I wasn't surprised it sold so well.

0:18:310:18:33

The Attaboy had rarity and an enthusiastic auctioneer on its side.

0:18:330:18:38

A winning combination.

0:18:380:18:39

Other things to think about when buying travel-related collectables.

0:18:410:18:44

Check that all-important condition.

0:18:440:18:47

Well-kept pieces fetch good prices.

0:18:470:18:49

-Oh, that's good.

-Gosh, I never expected that.

0:18:490:18:52

And if you're buying a case that comes with extras,

0:18:520:18:55

make sure they're all there.

0:18:550:18:57

It will seriously affect the price if any components are missing.

0:18:570:19:00

Now, "Flog It!" regulars are always on the lookout

0:19:060:19:08

for intriguing items to add to their own collections,

0:19:080:19:11

and Michael Baggott boasts a fine piece

0:19:110:19:14

that had sailed the seven seas.

0:19:140:19:16

I mean, I'm not a great maritime collector.

0:19:160:19:19

I've got no associations with the sea.

0:19:190:19:22

But a couple of years ago, I went to an auction,

0:19:220:19:24

ostensibly to buy some silver,

0:19:240:19:26

and I found this beastie in the saleroom,

0:19:260:19:30

and it's a bit of naive art.

0:19:300:19:33

And it's something that tells a story,

0:19:330:19:35

because the carving that's been done on it

0:19:350:19:38

has been done at sea by a sailor,

0:19:380:19:40

probably in the middle of the 18th century.

0:19:400:19:43

He's found coconut and ivory and mother of pearl -

0:19:430:19:47

very exotic things - to inlay the face on the head of the cane.

0:19:470:19:51

And then he's gone and basically engraved the ship he's on.

0:19:510:19:55

His initials - to say it's his cane.

0:19:550:19:58

But then he's passed onto another seaman, who's added a mermaid

0:19:580:20:02

and a whale.

0:20:020:20:03

And then he's probably had it for 20, 30 years,

0:20:030:20:07

and passed it on to another sailor. Who has then added his ship.

0:20:070:20:10

And further down, you've got all the different animals and beasts

0:20:100:20:14

the sailor would have seen at the various ships

0:20:140:20:18

and ports that he landed.

0:20:180:20:21

This cane's probably going to date anywhere from about 1740 up to 1780,

0:20:210:20:27

when it was originally carved and the figure inlaid in.

0:20:270:20:31

Some of the engraving might be as late as 1800-1820.

0:20:310:20:35

And I don't think you could get anything more personal

0:20:350:20:38

and more related to the sea, and the personal experience of a sailor

0:20:380:20:42

on board an 18th and 19th century sailing ship.

0:20:420:20:46

It's a little mini-social history of early maritime life

0:20:460:20:50

during the Georgian era.

0:20:500:20:52

Wonderful thing. And a rare survival.

0:20:520:20:55

Sooner or later,

0:20:590:21:01

all British travellers make their way to the coast.

0:21:010:21:04

And when they do, there's only one place to hang out - the beach hut.

0:21:040:21:09

Having a swim in the sea is one of the great pleasures

0:21:090:21:12

of coming to the seaside.

0:21:120:21:13

And it all took off really in the early 18th century

0:21:130:21:16

when doctors encouraged their patients to have a

0:21:160:21:19

dip in the saltwater to improve their general health and well-being.

0:21:190:21:23

Early bathers were encouraged to bathe naked.

0:21:230:21:26

But that wasn't as straightforward as it sounds.

0:21:260:21:29

It wasn't appropriate to have people walking naked along the beach.

0:21:330:21:37

So a more discreet solution was needed.

0:21:370:21:39

Bathing machines, which were basically beach huts on wheels,

0:21:390:21:43

were invented to provide the occupant with the modesty,

0:21:430:21:46

and as a way of getting from the top of the beach down to the water.

0:21:460:21:49

But fashioned changed, and by the turn of the 20th century,

0:21:490:21:53

it became acceptable to wear a bathing costume and be seen in it.

0:21:530:21:57

But people still needed a place to change in.

0:22:020:22:05

And the answer was static beach huts.

0:22:050:22:07

These soon became a sought-after accessory to any seaside holiday.

0:22:070:22:12

Nowadays, these brightly-painted beach huts are an iconic symbol

0:22:120:22:17

of the Great British seaside resort.

0:22:170:22:20

We tend to take their presence for granted.

0:22:200:22:22

So I'm here to find out a little bit more.

0:22:220:22:25

And the person to tell me is Dr Catherine Ferry -

0:22:290:22:32

a seaside historian who is an expert on beach huts.

0:22:320:22:35

Do you have a beach hut yourself?

0:22:350:22:38

Oh, I wish I did. I don't. I feel a bit of a fraud admitting that.

0:22:380:22:42

But there's something that appeals to me

0:22:420:22:44

about these tiny buildings on the margin between the land and the sea.

0:22:440:22:49

They could get blown away but they're bright and cheerful.

0:22:490:22:51

-You know, I love that.

-They do put a smile on your face.

0:22:510:22:54

-What a backdrop we've got.

-They do.

0:22:540:22:56

-With the golden sunshine.

-Exactly.

-It keeps you snug.

0:22:560:22:59

On some of our summer's days, you know, you want to be in there

0:22:590:23:02

-if the sun doesn't come out.

-You do.

0:23:020:23:03

I think that's why the British love them so much.

0:23:030:23:05

Because when the rain comes down,

0:23:050:23:07

it doesn't matter cos you just go inside and make yourself cosy.

0:23:070:23:10

And you can look out at all the other poor people

0:23:100:23:13

walking on the prom in the rain.

0:23:130:23:14

-But you're snug inside your hut.

-You spent months on the road

0:23:140:23:17

going on virtually a tour of the coast of England.

0:23:170:23:21

That's right. And I did actually count the beach huts as I went.

0:23:210:23:25

OK, come on. Let's hear it.

0:23:250:23:28

I counted just over 19,000. But I think I missed a few.

0:23:280:23:34

Actually, that's quite a surprisingly low number,

0:23:340:23:37

because there's so much interest in beach huts these days

0:23:370:23:40

that you imagine that there's going to be hundreds of thousands of them.

0:23:400:23:43

-I like the brightly painted ones.

-So do I.

0:23:430:23:45

-They remind me you of a stick of rock.

-They do.

0:23:450:23:48

-They put a big smile on your face.

-They're so, so summery, aren't they?

0:23:480:23:51

-Yes.

-Even in the winter, they look summery.

0:23:510:23:53

-Yeah, I think that's what it's all about, don't you?

-Yep.

0:23:530:23:56

Beach huts aren't just places to relax in,

0:23:560:23:58

they're also highly sought-after pieces of real estate.

0:23:580:24:02

Prices have rocketed in recent years,

0:24:020:24:04

with some in popular locations now selling for well over £100,000.

0:24:040:24:09

So I'm keen to have a look inside a hut and meet some of the owners.

0:24:090:24:13

Christine and Iain, this is the life, isn't it?

0:24:150:24:18

-Just the business.

-Sun shining down on us outside your own beach hut.

0:24:180:24:23

What could be better? Well, apart from a chocolate biscuit.

0:24:230:24:26

-There we go.

-Do you mind?

0:24:260:24:28

THEY LAUGH

0:24:280:24:29

So, how long have you had this one?

0:24:290:24:31

We've had it six months. We moved to Brighton last October.

0:24:310:24:35

We decided we'd like to retire by the sea.

0:24:350:24:38

And you thought, yep, can't get any closer to the sea than this.

0:24:380:24:41

-That was us.

-It's just there.

0:24:410:24:42

I come down when the weather's nice, like this.

0:24:420:24:45

If it's windy then I just sit in the hut.

0:24:450:24:47

Just inside, out of the wind. Otherwise, out here.

0:24:470:24:50

-Sandwiches, food, wine, Champagne...

-Oh, lovely.

0:24:500:24:54

-You know, just have a lovely time.

-It's no wonder you look so happy.

0:24:540:24:58

-It's a good life.

-I've got to try some of this.

0:24:580:25:01

-I've got to try some of this.

-You have to.

0:25:010:25:03

So, where's that Champagne then?

0:25:030:25:05

-Coming up.

-It's chilling down right now.

0:25:050:25:07

Well, I've got to say, this definitely is the life.

0:25:160:25:19

I've just had a fascinating insight into what life is like

0:25:190:25:22

owning a beach hut.

0:25:220:25:24

And I can honestly say, if I lived anywhere near the coast,

0:25:240:25:27

I would definitely invest in one of these.

0:25:270:25:30

And my dogs, they would absolutely love it.

0:25:300:25:33

Still to come, Charlie Ross stumbles across the weird and wonderful

0:25:400:25:44

on a visit to Blackpool.

0:25:440:25:46

It's quite extraordinary to me that thousands of people will

0:25:470:25:52

queue and pay money to see a vicar in a barrel.

0:25:520:25:54

And a collection oozing Hollywood glamour crosses

0:25:560:25:58

Catherine Southon's path.

0:25:580:26:00

-Clark Gable.

-Is that Clark Gable? Wonderful.

-That's right.

0:26:000:26:03

And here we have Cary Grant on Santa Monica Boulevard.

0:26:030:26:06

It's often the case that an object travels a long way

0:26:100:26:13

before finally finding a home.

0:26:130:26:16

And that's certainly true of an item that's of great

0:26:160:26:19

sentimental value to expert David Fletcher.

0:26:190:26:21

A friend of mine, who is a book dealer in Bedford,

0:26:210:26:25

telephoned me about six or seven months ago

0:26:250:26:28

and said, was I related to a chap called Fred Fletcher?

0:26:280:26:32

Might he be an ancestor of mine? I thought, funnily enough,

0:26:320:26:35

my grandfather was called Fred Fletcher.

0:26:350:26:37

And he said, "Well, I think I've got his diary."

0:26:370:26:41

So I popped down to his shop in a state of some excitement,

0:26:410:26:44

as you might imagine, really.

0:26:440:26:46

When I got back, I was fascinated when I sat and read it.

0:26:460:26:49

It describes a journey he makes between December 1916

0:26:490:26:54

and April 1917.

0:26:540:26:57

We did know that he was in the Royal Army Medical Corp

0:26:570:27:00

and that he travelled to Mesopotamia.

0:27:000:27:03

And on the way, he called in at Cape Town, Durban and Bombay.

0:27:030:27:10

And he describes his experiences in some detail.

0:27:100:27:15

He says he has one hell of a time in Cape Town.

0:27:150:27:18

He obviously thoroughly enjoyed himself there.

0:27:180:27:21

And he arrives in due course in Basra.

0:27:210:27:25

And he says at that stage, on Friday 6th April...

0:27:250:27:30

"Today, for the first time since I have been in the army,

0:27:300:27:33

"I have done some work that counts.

0:27:330:27:36

"All day, from 6.00am to 8.00pm, 100 of us have been loading

0:27:360:27:40

"and unloading wounded on and off hospital ships."

0:27:400:27:43

So he's a medic and he feels what he went there for has suddenly

0:27:430:27:48

happened, really.

0:27:480:27:51

But there's a very, very poignant ending to this diary.

0:27:510:27:56

And this occurs in the last entry, which is

0:27:560:28:00

written on Friday 20th April.

0:28:000:28:03

And he says, "At last I can say I am settled."

0:28:030:28:07

And he goes on to say, "All I want now is a letter."

0:28:070:28:12

And at the same page in that diary,

0:28:120:28:14

there's the front of an envelope, that's all that remains,

0:28:140:28:18

addressed to him. It's originally sent to India,

0:28:180:28:21

but it's been forwarded to him in Mesopotamia.

0:28:210:28:24

I have no proof of this, but I'm certain refers to the fact that

0:28:240:28:30

his brother had been killed a few days earlier on the Western Front,

0:28:300:28:35

in France.

0:28:350:28:38

I know that Tom, his brother, died on St George's Day, April 23rd.

0:28:380:28:44

And the letter has a Bedford postmark of April 27th.

0:28:440:28:48

And the diary finishes there.

0:28:480:28:50

Not another word's written.

0:28:500:28:52

You can just imagine the feelings that this young man had,

0:28:520:28:56

on the other side of the world, learning all those miles away

0:28:560:29:00

that his brother has been killed.

0:29:000:29:02

So, this was a remarkable buy for me.

0:29:030:29:07

And obviously one I treasure very much.

0:29:070:29:09

In 1846, when the railways arrived in Blackpool,

0:29:170:29:20

people started flocking there for their holidays.

0:29:200:29:23

Aside from the Pleasure Beach, the Illuminations and the Tower,

0:29:230:29:26

there was a whole host of theatrical entertainments to be enjoyed.

0:29:260:29:30

Flog It! regular Charlie Ross has a notion that theatrical ephemera,

0:29:300:29:34

as a collecting field, is on the way up.

0:29:340:29:37

I've had a love of the theatre from a very early age.

0:29:420:29:45

I can remember being taken the West End aged eight,

0:29:450:29:48

seeing My Fair Lady and being completely thrilled

0:29:480:29:52

by the whole experience.

0:29:520:29:54

And from that, I started doing am-dram myself.

0:29:540:29:59

Through that I've become interested in the ephemera side of it as well.

0:30:070:30:11

Great thing about theatrical ephemera, it touches everybody.

0:30:110:30:15

We've all got a favourite film or favourite show.

0:30:150:30:18

I don't think there's anybody that isn't excited by a certain

0:30:180:30:23

sphere of this.

0:30:230:30:24

I've come to Blackpool to see the most extraordinary collection

0:30:310:30:35

of theatrical ephemera put together by the late Cyril Critchlow.

0:30:350:30:39

Cyril Critchlow was a remarkable man.

0:30:410:30:43

He was a magician, an impresario, he put together wonderful shows.

0:30:430:30:48

He ended up with his own museum.

0:30:480:30:50

And sadly passed away in 2008.

0:30:500:30:54

After his death, his daughter Pat

0:30:540:30:57

and librarian, Tony Sharkey, went through all

0:30:570:31:00

this ephemera, which was kept in, I think, five or six garages.

0:31:000:31:05

All these items are now put together in Blackpool Central Library.

0:31:050:31:09

And that's where I'm going.

0:31:090:31:11

We were amazed by how much he had. We knew he was an avid collector.

0:31:170:31:21

When we put Cyril's collection together,

0:31:210:31:23

-we made 179 volumes, just of archival material.

-How many?!

0:31:230:31:26

179?

0:31:260:31:28

I'd love to see just one or two things from the collection.

0:31:280:31:31

Take a look at this.

0:31:310:31:33

This is Blackpool's first summer season programme.

0:31:330:31:37

There's something unusual about that programme.

0:31:370:31:40

It's...well, there it says "souvenir cotton programme."

0:31:400:31:43

So that links the cotton industry with Blackpool.

0:31:430:31:47

Blackpool's visitor heartland is the Lancashire cotton industry.

0:31:470:31:50

It's right on Blackpool's doorstep.

0:31:500:31:52

And when they came to Blackpool, as the wakes week started

0:31:520:31:55

and they were able to start spending a full week in Blackpool,

0:31:550:31:58

-they knew how to spend their money.

-Yeah.

0:31:580:32:00

And they wanted to be entertained while they were here.

0:32:000:32:03

The good thing, from our point of view,

0:32:030:32:05

it's still in perfect condition.

0:32:050:32:06

If you have a paper one and somebody folds it,

0:32:060:32:09

it falls to bits fairly quickly, doesn't it?

0:32:090:32:11

-It's a talking point.

-So, you know, that is...yes.

0:32:110:32:14

And how proud you'd be to go home and say,

0:32:140:32:16

"I've got a cotton programme."

0:32:160:32:18

How wonderful. That's splendid.

0:32:180:32:20

How many people would come here?

0:32:230:32:24

I mean, not just presumably the Opera House, other theatres as well?

0:32:240:32:28

Blackpool would have a full-range of entertainments.

0:32:280:32:30

In the '30s, Blackpool was claiming 7 million visitors a year.

0:32:300:32:34

-7 million!

-And all of those people, of course,

0:32:340:32:37

would want to be entertained in the evening.

0:32:370:32:39

-That's a huge number of people.

-It's a huge number of seats to fill.

0:32:390:32:43

Providing a massive amount of income.

0:32:430:32:45

-The income that came into the town was considerable.

-Yeah.

0:32:450:32:49

-But the expenditure on glamorous shows was also considerable.

-Yeah.

0:32:490:32:53

Of course, there's many aspects to Blackpool's entertainment culture.

0:32:530:32:57

Once side... Maybe not totally acceptable today,

0:32:570:33:02

but it was Blackpool's sideshow culture.

0:33:020:33:05

Which was vast.

0:33:050:33:06

-Which was very considerable.

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:09

-Who have we got here?

-Here we've got Harold Davidson.

0:33:090:33:14

-A vicar!

-He's a vicar. He's a discredited vicar.

-Oh, dear.

0:33:140:33:19

-He's the former rector of a parish in Norfolk.

-Yeah.

0:33:190:33:22

He ended up exhibiting himself in a barrel on the promenade in Blackpool.

0:33:220:33:27

HE LAUGHS

0:33:270:33:28

Crikey! Look at the number of people!

0:33:280:33:31

It's quite extraordinary to me that thousands of people will queue

0:33:320:33:37

and pay money to see a vicar in a barrel.

0:33:370:33:40

-This was the reality of Blackpool's sideshow culture.

-Bizarre.

0:33:400:33:43

Very bizarre.

0:33:430:33:44

I think from a collection point of view, what is one looking for?

0:33:440:33:48

Fame, one's looking for rarity.

0:33:480:33:50

And this is obviously as rare as a show could get.

0:33:500:33:54

Where else will you see a picture like that? Nowhere else.

0:33:540:33:58

-We've looked at Blackpool's sideshows.

-Yes.

0:34:000:34:02

But Blackpool in the '40s and '50s attracted major Hollywood stars.

0:34:020:34:06

-Yeah.

-And sometimes they went nowhere else.

-Judy Garland.

0:34:060:34:10

"The only concerts in the British Isles..."

0:34:100:34:13

-So she didn't go to London.

-She came to the Opera House.

0:34:130:34:15

She didn't go to the West End.

0:34:150:34:17

-Crikey.

-She didn't go anywhere else. She came to Blackpool.

0:34:170:34:20

And that's where the people were.

0:34:200:34:22

Once some major stars started to come, others

0:34:220:34:26

followed in their footsteps.

0:34:260:34:28

That's Mae West. The thing that really took my eye here

0:34:280:34:34

is that it's signed. That makes all the difference.

0:34:340:34:37

Something like that is worth hundreds of pounds now.

0:34:370:34:39

People collect these things.

0:34:390:34:41

And the thought that somebody stood in a queue, got the signature,

0:34:410:34:44

met the person...

0:34:440:34:45

Blackpool does do, and did do, glamour.

0:34:480:34:51

-At the very, very top level.

-At the very top level.

0:34:510:34:55

As well as your Northern seaside humour,

0:34:550:34:57

as well as your Blackpool sideshows...

0:34:570:35:00

-A huge mixture, isn't it?

-It's a huge mixture.

0:35:000:35:03

Cyril's left us a legacy that shouts Blackpool,

0:35:030:35:07

-that we feel really proud of.

-Yes.

0:35:070:35:09

Having seen the collection, now what I want to do is find out

0:35:110:35:15

more about the man behind the collection - Cyril Critchlow.

0:35:150:35:18

Who better to tell me about him than his daughter Pat?

0:35:180:35:23

And where better to meet her than right on the seafront itself?

0:35:230:35:26

He started when he was very young,

0:35:280:35:30

doing magic tricks when he was about nine.

0:35:300:35:32

He came to Blackpool with my grandparents, his mother and father.

0:35:320:35:38

And he took great interest in magic at that point.

0:35:380:35:41

So, yeah, anything that was around, he'd travel and buy it.

0:35:420:35:46

Anybody who knew him would go and see all this stuff in his garage.

0:35:460:35:50

Including my grandchildren.

0:35:500:35:51

-Really?

-And there was always something mega in there.

0:35:510:35:54

Or something really interesting.

0:35:540:35:56

It must have been a huge, huge loss for Blackpool when he died.

0:35:560:35:59

-He must have been very well known.

-I think so.

0:35:590:36:01

Yeah, he was very well-known.

0:36:010:36:03

If you ever went out to the shops or anything, he'd be a good two hours

0:36:030:36:06

coming back, because he used to talk to everybody and anybody.

0:36:060:36:09

And now, thanks to you and Tony,

0:36:090:36:11

-his memory lives on through that amazing collection.

-It does, yeah.

0:36:110:36:14

That is fantastic, really.

0:36:140:36:16

-He would have been so proud of that.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:36:160:36:19

-Shall we go for a swim?

-I think so.

0:36:190:36:21

THEY LAUGH

0:36:210:36:23

Who doesn't like to be beside the seaside

0:36:310:36:33

or explore great open spaces,

0:36:330:36:36

wander the streets of cities and towns - home and abroad?

0:36:360:36:40

And let's face it, we all like to bring back souvenirs.

0:36:400:36:43

But how do you distinguish the tourist tat from the hidden gems?

0:36:430:36:48

Well, here are a few tips.

0:36:480:36:50

Most souvenirs are what my mother would have called frippery.

0:36:500:36:54

Penny dreadfuls. And don't have quality.

0:36:540:36:59

If you can buy something from a region that's just got

0:36:590:37:02

a little bit of quality...

0:37:020:37:04

It'll cost you more, but it will be well worth collecting.

0:37:040:37:08

Don't just buy something because it's got Ramsgate on it.

0:37:080:37:11

That's not going to help.

0:37:110:37:13

Goss is certainly the big name in crested china.

0:37:140:37:17

That's the one you'd go for. Obviously, other lesser makers

0:37:170:37:21

copied what Goss was doing and achieving.

0:37:210:37:24

But really, you go by the rarity of the object.

0:37:240:37:27

Or possibly the rarity of the crest.

0:37:270:37:29

Buy something that's hand-painted. Classic example.

0:37:290:37:32

Go down to the West Country, some wonderful potteries down there.

0:37:320:37:35

Buy an original piece of pottery with a signature on it.

0:37:350:37:38

We had Troika. And these were made as souvenirs

0:37:380:37:43

to be bought in Cornwall.

0:37:430:37:45

So I don't think that we should scoff at holiday souvenirs,

0:37:450:37:50

we should always have a second look at them

0:37:500:37:52

because very often they can be of quality.

0:37:520:37:55

And they can be desirable.

0:37:550:37:57

When I think of souvenirs - paperweights, crested china

0:37:570:38:01

and stuffed donkeys cross my mind.

0:38:010:38:03

But something altogether more exotic found its way to Michael's table.

0:38:030:38:08

Obviously when you see something that you haven't seen in the normal

0:38:080:38:12

course of events at a Flog It! valuation day

0:38:120:38:15

you get very excited.

0:38:150:38:16

When you find it's by a very big and important maker,

0:38:160:38:19

doubly so, so I was thrilled to see it.

0:38:190:38:23

Where on earth did this, dare I say it, grotesque little fellow come from?

0:38:230:38:28

Just out of a box at a charity sale that I went to,

0:38:280:38:32

with some other little bits and pieces.

0:38:320:38:34

It was unusual, it was cheap, so I thought, "I'll have that."

0:38:340:38:38

-When you say it was cheap, hopefully not more than a fiver, was it, or...

-No.

0:38:380:38:42

Something in my brain is saying a couple of pounds with some

0:38:420:38:46

other little bits, that's all.

0:38:460:38:47

Couple of pounds, well, I think a couple of pounds is all right for it.

0:38:470:38:51

It is a gourd, a hardened bean pod,

0:38:510:38:55

I mean, variously you get gourd shaped pods in India and China,

0:38:550:38:59

the whole of Southseast Asia, really.

0:38:590:39:01

Somebody's grown this

0:39:010:39:03

and then I think somebody has had a go at making it a bazaar object.

0:39:030:39:08

Possibly sold to a tourist.

0:39:080:39:11

But the tourist that bought this would probably have been shopping in about 1880.

0:39:110:39:17

There's always the Victorian taste,

0:39:170:39:19

remember we're at a time before film, before television,

0:39:190:39:23

bringing back objects that were extraordinary,

0:39:230:39:26

that they could remember from their trip but also describe the exotic locations they'd been.

0:39:260:39:32

And they've come back to England

0:39:320:39:34

and they've got this thing and they've thought,

0:39:340:39:36

"What the devil can I do with this?"

0:39:360:39:40

And they have taken it into a silversmith's who have been

0:39:400:39:44

really ingenious and they have fitted this silver foot

0:39:440:39:49

in the form of a leaf, but we have the hallmarks there are for London, 1878.

0:39:490:39:55

And they have followed the naturalistic design

0:39:550:39:58

and they have a vine leaf going up the side and a scroll

0:39:580:40:02

and they have put a pepper pot top on it.

0:40:020:40:05

The most interesting thing, though, is the maker's mark.

0:40:050:40:09

It's a very important London firm of jewellers called Giuliano.

0:40:090:40:14

This is done by Carlo Giuliano. He's incredibly sought after.

0:40:140:40:18

And quite an important Victorian maker.

0:40:180:40:21

He was an Italian trained under Castellani in London,

0:40:210:40:24

and he did some work for the leading Victorian jeweller,

0:40:240:40:28

Robert Phillips, before setting up on his own and certainly

0:40:280:40:32

while his silver is very niche is jewellery now is extremely popular.

0:40:320:40:37

It's considered to be amongst the finest of the 19th century work in this country.

0:40:370:40:41

It's a question of price.

0:40:410:40:44

What do you think is a fair return on your couple of pounds?

0:40:440:40:47

What do you think it is worth?

0:40:470:40:48

I am hoping it is worth a couple of hundred or something like that.

0:40:480:40:54

A couple of hundred? I don't want to disappoint you, Julie, so I wont.

0:40:540:40:59

We'll put it into auction for 1,000 or £1,500.

0:40:590:41:04

-We'll put a reserve of £1,000 on it.

-£1,000?

-£1,000.

0:41:050:41:11

Carlo Giuliano's work in jewellery is incredibly

0:41:110:41:16

sought after and rare, his work in silver is even rarer.

0:41:160:41:20

In terms of putting an estimate on it

0:41:200:41:23

I did know of slightly similar but smaller objects by Giuliano

0:41:230:41:27

that had sold at auction and they have sold at 700, 800, £900.

0:41:270:41:33

This being a larger example I thought

0:41:330:41:35

we would have no difficulty whatsoever it in 1,000 or

0:41:350:41:38

£1,500 for it and secretly I was hoping it might do over 2,000.

0:41:380:41:42

So, was Michael's confidence well placed?

0:41:420:41:46

-At 860 on the book. At 860.

-That's a good start.

0:41:460:41:49

880, at 880 now. At 860. At £860. 880 anywhere now?

0:41:490:41:54

At £860? You sure now then?

0:41:540:41:57

At £860? You all sure at 860...

0:41:570:42:01

I said just then it was a great start but it was also the end.

0:42:030:42:07

It was the end. Why?

0:42:070:42:10

All along I thought, because it is so it is a specialist type thing, isn't it?

0:42:100:42:15

It's not something everyone could live with.

0:42:150:42:17

Put it into a specialist silver sale because I promise you that is worth £1,000.

0:42:170:42:22

All day long.

0:42:220:42:24

It was obviously very disappointing when it did not sell.

0:42:240:42:27

Sometimes you need the right person to understand an object.

0:42:270:42:32

A lot of collectors of silver would look at that

0:42:320:42:35

and think 1,000 or 1,500 was a lot of money,

0:42:350:42:38

if you collect Giuliano jewellery you think it is an absolute bargain.

0:42:380:42:45

Michael was disappointed the gourd did not find a new owner,

0:42:450:42:48

but he was right that the name Guiliano can make big money.

0:42:480:42:51

In 2011 a stunning gold enamel engraved pearl necklace

0:42:510:42:55

by Giuliano sold at auction for around £55,000.

0:42:550:43:00

If Julie still has her wacky souvenir I think

0:43:000:43:03

she should try her luck again at a specialist sale.

0:43:030:43:06

If you do, remember to put a reserve on it.

0:43:060:43:10

Now, a souvenir from a little closer to home caught David Fletcher's attention.

0:43:100:43:16

You have got which you a.. gizmo, really.

0:43:160:43:20

Yes.

0:43:200:43:21

If I can unscrew it there... we have...a pen.

0:43:210:43:29

Not a fountain pen but a dipper.

0:43:290:43:32

At the other end, of course, a paper knife.

0:43:340:43:37

One other thing which I suspect is going to be the case is that

0:43:380:43:42

if I look through this little hole at the end I am going to see

0:43:420:43:46

a black and white photograph.

0:43:460:43:48

Items like this were bought as souvenirs, they were affordable.

0:43:490:43:54

If you went away on a charabang in the 1920s or you have gone

0:43:540:43:59

away on a train in the 1890s to the seaside and you had a Mum at home

0:43:590:44:05

and you wanted to buy a souvenir, something to take back to her, you

0:44:050:44:08

could go out and buy one of these and it would not break the bank.

0:44:080:44:11

I am sure that when you saw this you thought, "I've got to go to Hastings!"

0:44:110:44:15

We went last year!

0:44:150:44:17

This type of magnifying device is known as a Stanhope.

0:44:170:44:22

Because it was invented by the third Earl of Stanhope.

0:44:220:44:25

-Who, quite honestly hadn't got much to do with his time.

-No.

0:44:250:44:29

He was probably very thrilled with it and I must say it is miraculous.

0:44:290:44:33

It didn't really have any purpose, they were just novelties,

0:44:330:44:36

just bits of fun.

0:44:360:44:38

And they related to a particular resort

0:44:380:44:43

and there was a scene in that resort and if you have been there

0:44:430:44:47

you took it home, it was a logical thing to do.

0:44:470:44:50

This isn't going to make the earth, but it is good fun

0:44:500:44:53

-and I would like to suggest an estimate of 30 or £50.

-That is OK.

0:44:530:44:57

-Go ahead.

-We will go ahead and I will see you both at the auction.

-Lovely. Thank you.

0:44:570:45:04

The question is, will this lot about your love this?

0:45:040:45:08

Let's find out. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:45:080:45:11

What did he say? 22? 24, 26 standing now.

0:45:140:45:19

28, 30, 32, 34, 36, £36. Are we all done at 36?

0:45:190:45:25

36, do I see 38? Selling at £36.

0:45:250:45:31

It's gone! £36.

0:45:310:45:33

Collectors of Stanhopes today, it must be said,

0:45:350:45:39

are fairly or relatively few and far between.

0:45:390:45:42

They're by no means the most syllable of all collectable

0:45:420:45:45

items but they are collected by people who are buying on a budget.

0:45:450:45:49

I don't think it will prove to be good investments, necessarily,

0:45:490:45:54

but they might be.

0:45:540:45:55

It may just be worth punting a pound or two if you see one.

0:45:550:45:59

I agree, Stanhope should not be overlooked as a collecting field,

0:45:590:46:02

They're an affordable an. interesting entry-level item for those

0:46:020:46:06

who want to start collecting.

0:46:060:46:08

Stanhopes were added to all kinds of useful objects,

0:46:090:46:11

like walking canes and cigarette holders as well as being

0:46:110:46:14

made into purely decorative pieces.

0:46:140:46:17

Personally I think they are fascinating and the images

0:46:170:46:20

they contain remainders of long lost landscapes and city scenes.

0:46:200:46:25

Kathryn also spotted a collection that whisked back to another

0:46:260:46:30

place and time.

0:46:300:46:31

Now I love to see a good selection of ephemera

0:46:320:46:35

and that is what we have here. The lovely bit of social history.

0:46:350:46:39

Where has it all come from? Tell me the story.

0:46:390:46:41

My grandfather went to America in 1954 to visit his cousin.

0:46:410:46:45

He was a 73 and had never been abroad, never been out of the country.

0:46:450:46:49

I do not think he had ever been out of Lancashire or Yorkshire at that time.

0:46:490:46:53

And he went out on the ship called the SS Flanderer. He went to New York

0:46:530:46:59

and flew from New York to LA, he had never flown before in his life.

0:46:590:47:04

-To travel at his age, you said he was 70...?

-He would have been 73.

0:47:040:47:09

That is a big thing, at that time, if you think whisking back

0:47:090:47:12

to the '50s, this was like a movie star thing.

0:47:120:47:15

-He was so excited, I was a small boy.

-It was a big adventure.

-It was a huge adventure.

0:47:150:47:19

Absolutely.

0:47:190:47:21

It wasn't really common as it is now in the 1950s for people to

0:47:210:47:25

travel and travel really across to America,

0:47:250:47:29

it was really only the rich, the very wealthy who were

0:47:290:47:34

making their way over to America and travelling extensively.

0:47:340:47:37

And he went out on the Flanderer and these are the menus.

0:47:370:47:42

They look very grand don't they?

0:47:420:47:44

That was second-class, what was first class like?

0:47:440:47:47

He came back on a ship in December 1954,

0:47:470:47:50

called the Saxonia and that ship was brand-new in 1954 and launched by

0:47:500:47:55

Lady Churchill, there is a booklet there telling you all about it,

0:47:550:47:58

which he brought back with him as well.

0:47:580:48:00

It was interesting to look at the brochures that were

0:48:000:48:04

produced at the time, looking at the fashion, the furniture,

0:48:040:48:07

the way that the actual ship was dressed.

0:48:070:48:11

But also what I loved was the postcards that he had,

0:48:110:48:14

he had an amazing collection of postcards

0:48:140:48:16

which his grandfather bought when he was over in America.

0:48:160:48:19

It was interesting to see how Hollywood looked then

0:48:190:48:22

and how it looks now.

0:48:220:48:25

-They're so colourful.

-There are a lot of pictures of film stars houses.

0:48:250:48:29

Here we have Will Rogers, and the Nelsons.

0:48:290:48:34

-Clark.

-Clark Gable.

0:48:340:48:36

And here we have Cary Grant on Santa Monica Boulevard.

0:48:360:48:40

The value was in the fact that it was a great collection,

0:48:400:48:45

it was not only the postcards from the '50s it was

0:48:450:48:50

also about the travel in the '50s so it was really an entire story

0:48:500:48:56

and I think the fact that it was all really beautifully documented

0:48:560:49:01

and it was in superb condition.

0:49:010:49:03

That was wonderful.

0:49:030:49:05

Now, I think we should put it in auction with an estimate of

0:49:050:49:08

2 or £300, and a fixed reserve of £200.

0:49:080:49:12

Which means we won't sell it below that.

0:49:120:49:15

A fascinating collection,

0:49:150:49:16

certainly deserving the top end of its estimate.

0:49:160:49:19

-What did the bidders think?

-£100 to start me. 100 to go.

0:49:190:49:26

-110, 120, 130, 140.

-He's keen!

0:49:260:49:30

He hasn't put his bidding card down.

0:49:300:49:33

170, 180, 190, 200, £200 there.

0:49:330:49:38

In the middle of the room at £200. Anyone else want to come in?

0:49:380:49:42

I can sell it then at £200. I am selling it for 200.

0:49:420:49:46

It's got £200 and that chap over there was very, very keen.

0:49:460:49:51

He did not put his bidding paddle down.

0:49:510:49:53

I wanted, I am going home with it.

0:49:530:49:56

-I just wish there was someone else in the room doing the same!

-I know.

0:49:560:49:59

Yes, John, unfortunately it always takes two bidders to get top dollar.

0:49:590:50:04

I think the gent that won that what got himself a bargain.

0:50:040:50:08

That's auctions for you.

0:50:080:50:09

Not all modern souvenirs from sunny climbs will fit snugly

0:50:090:50:14

into your hand luggage as Adam Partridge discovered.

0:50:140:50:17

You have brought this handsome Murano sculpture in today,

0:50:170:50:21

can you tell me much about it?

0:50:210:50:23

About 25 years ago I was in Italy on business

0:50:230:50:26

and a colleague and I went on a boat to Murano and had a look at it and bought one each.

0:50:260:50:33

They're lovely. We've never regretted buying it.

0:50:330:50:36

Murano is an island off Venice which has been famous for glass

0:50:360:50:40

making for probably 1,000 years.

0:50:400:50:42

Since the 10th century.

0:50:420:50:44

And in the last hundred years in particular it's been a great

0:50:440:50:47

area for tourists, holiday,

0:50:470:50:49

souvenir hunters etc to bring back colourful paperweights,

0:50:490:50:53

vases, they had a whole range of glass produced by Murano.

0:50:530:50:56

-This is heavy, how did you get it home?

-It was shipped home, thankfully.

0:50:560:50:59

-I know you carried it in today in a holdall.

-£93 excess baggage if we brought it by plane.

0:50:590:51:05

Was it really? Do you mind me asking how much it was?

0:51:050:51:08

-Just about £800.

-£800. So a couple of million Lira?

0:51:080:51:12

Indeed. I spent a couple of million. First and only time I've ever spent 2 million!

0:51:120:51:16

I see a lot of Murano glass coming through the salerooms

0:51:160:51:18

but it is always smaller pieces, vases and things like that.

0:51:180:51:22

I've never seen anything as impressive as this from Murano

0:51:220:51:25

-so it is really a great object to see.

-It is lovely.

0:51:250:51:29

What was unusual about this, it was all clear for a start at it

0:51:290:51:32

was a very distinctive and unusual piece of modern glass, not really my

0:51:320:51:37

cup of tea but I was quite excited to see an unusual piece of Murano.

0:51:370:51:41

-Presumably you want your money back and a bit more?

-I would hope so.

0:51:410:51:45

I would hope so as well. I think £800 is probably the top end of what it is worth in an auction.

0:51:450:51:51

When I saw it I thought six or £800 but it is lovely.

0:51:510:51:55

-Does it have a name?

-It is called Adam. After yourself.

0:51:550:51:59

That is very kind. It's a handsome chap.

0:51:590:52:02

It's very nice to have the Murano seal on here, the stamp

0:52:020:52:05

and signature on the front there, which is

0:52:050:52:08

Rosine and his first name was Loredano Rosine.

0:52:080:52:12

The pieces that are signed and designed, those are the ones

0:52:120:52:16

that have the best chance of appreciating in value.

0:52:160:52:19

We don't want you to lose money so you will want a reserve on this.

0:52:190:52:22

I think I would want the reserve to be what I paid for it before,

0:52:220:52:25

-there is no point in selling it if I will make a loss.

-I quite agree. I wouldn't do that either.

0:52:250:52:29

We'll put a deserve of 800 which I think is the top end

0:52:290:52:32

but fingers crossed, we will see what happens.

0:52:320:52:34

Bob and I didn't exactly see completely eye to eye,

0:52:340:52:37

I would have estimated that at five or £6-£800 rather than £800-£1,000.

0:52:370:52:42

But Bob was insistent on wanting the £800.

0:52:420:52:45

I actually thought this probably isn't going to sell.

0:52:450:52:49

We'll see you at the auction, Adam.

0:52:490:52:51

Who was proved right, Bob or Adam?

0:52:510:52:53

When the Murano souvenir went under the hammer.

0:52:530:52:56

An important piece of modern glass, very seldom on the market.

0:52:560:53:01

I have interest. I can start this at £650. 650, 650,...

0:53:010:53:08

-It's above your valuation already.

-Stop it, Bob!

0:53:080:53:13

800 with you, sir. 800.

0:53:130:53:16

-800.

-It's sold.

-Yeah.

-800.

0:53:160:53:20

-But I can sell, are you quite sure? All done at £800?

-Done.

0:53:200:53:26

You've got your money back.

0:53:260:53:27

Bob was extra victorious. When it made the 800,

0:53:280:53:31

he said, "I could do your job much easier than you!"

0:53:310:53:33

So congratulations, Bob, on making me look like an idiot.

0:53:330:53:37

I think it was a fair price, a very strong price.

0:53:370:53:41

Perhaps in time to come that might prove to be an investment

0:53:410:53:44

but I think it will take a few years.

0:53:440:53:46

You can't win them all

0:53:460:53:47

but luckily for Bob there was one very determined bidder in the room.

0:53:470:53:51

What should you consider when shopping for mementos on holiday?

0:53:540:53:58

The best things in life are free. Well, fairly inexpensive.

0:53:580:54:02

Travel brochures and postcards from your trip may cost you a few

0:54:020:54:06

pounds today but could prove very valuable in the future.

0:54:060:54:11

Always keep an eye out for the weird and wacky,

0:54:110:54:14

but if you are selling at auction sniff out a specialist

0:54:140:54:16

sale and always protect your prized possession with a reserve.

0:54:160:54:21

And if you are thinking of starting a holiday themed collection

0:54:210:54:24

you can't go far wrong with a Stanhope.

0:54:240:54:27

These are charming, inexpensive souvenirs that make a perfect

0:54:270:54:30

starting point for those who are new to antiques.

0:54:300:54:34

I hope we have shown you that not all holiday mementos are cheap

0:54:410:54:44

tourist tat, some in fact are serious collectors pieces.

0:54:440:54:49

There's one high-end souvenir which is a particular favourite of Maine.

0:54:490:54:53

Tunbridge ware.

0:54:530:54:54

Over the years we have valued a fair bit of it on the programme

0:54:540:54:57

-and it often fetches memorable prices.

-All done at £400.

-400 quid!

0:54:570:55:04

The hammer's gone down, 400 quid, good estimate.

0:55:040:55:07

Tunbridge ware is deserving of the prices it

0:55:070:55:10

achieves as it is a quality antique, handmade by master craftsmen.

0:55:100:55:14

The wooden wares were originally produced as a sideline

0:55:160:55:19

by woodworkers, working in the vicinity of Tunbridge Wells

0:55:190:55:22

to sell to the spa town visitors.

0:55:220:55:25

Some believe the earliest examples were brought in from London.

0:55:250:55:29

The Tunbridge ware items were a popular souvenir,

0:55:290:55:32

you must think of Tunbridge Wells, the wonderful spa town

0:55:320:55:35

in the 18th and 19th century, the fine folk would go there to take

0:55:350:55:40

the waters, and when you go on holiday you want to bring a souvenir back.

0:55:400:55:44

So they would buy these boxes, caddies,

0:55:440:55:50

and I think there is reference to these things in the books

0:55:500:55:54

and letters of that time,

0:55:540:55:57

talking about the beautiful little boxes, the wondrous boxes.

0:55:570:56:01

The popularity of Tunbridge ware with the tourists who

0:56:030:56:06

flock to the town meant that by the mid-18th-century specialist

0:56:060:56:10

manufacturers had sprung up in the area.

0:56:100:56:13

Over the centuries different techniques were employed

0:56:130:56:16

in the decorating of the wares.

0:56:160:56:17

Early examples were often painted or print decorated.

0:56:170:56:21

But later, the more well-known techniques of marquetry,

0:56:210:56:25

parquetry and mosaic work were adopted with up to 150 different

0:56:250:56:29

varieties of native and exotic woods being used to create glorious pieces of Tunbridge ware.

0:56:290:56:35

Little bit of wood, tulipwood satinwood, Boxwood, ebony,

0:56:350:56:38

the most wonderful stringing details in this geometric pattern

0:56:380:56:42

which has been coloured beautifully.

0:56:420:56:44

The craftsmanship and patience to apply this pattern,

0:56:440:56:47

this geometric pattern to both sides of this little calling card box.

0:56:470:56:51

Bearing in mind the level of skill

0:56:530:56:55

and the quality of materials that went into the wares, it is

0:56:550:56:58

not surprising that today they are highly sought after collectables.

0:56:580:57:03

So what should you be aware of if you're looking to acquire a piece.

0:57:030:57:07

My advice is to do your research and look out for good makers names,

0:57:070:57:11

for example, Robert Russell.

0:57:110:57:13

Our experts have a few words of wisdom, too.

0:57:130:57:17

The most sought after are the wonderful pictorial scenes.

0:57:170:57:21

Make sure it is perfectly intact and there is no bits of veneer missing,

0:57:210:57:26

look for good quality perfect pieces and you won't go wrong.

0:57:260:57:30

Caroline is bang on. When it comes to condition,

0:57:300:57:33

Tunbridge Ware is notoriously difficult and costly to restore.

0:57:330:57:37

It's wise to look for pieces that don't need it.

0:57:370:57:40

-It's so cute, look at that!

-I know!

0:57:400:57:43

There are other things to consider, too.

0:57:430:57:46

Learn the difference between Tunbridge ware

0:57:460:57:49

from Tunbridge Wells and the Italian copies being made in Sorrento.

0:57:490:57:53

Because they are very similar

0:57:530:57:56

and to the untrained eye they are almost identical.

0:57:560:57:58

But the difference in value is hundreds of pounds per object.

0:57:580:58:01

Work out what your budget is, you might say,

0:58:010:58:04

"I will not collect across the field I might just buy Tunbridge ware stamp boxes."

0:58:040:58:09

You might buy Tunbridge ware dressing table items. The choice is fabulous.

0:58:090:58:13

It depends on how much you have to spend.

0:58:130:58:17

Always keep your eyes open for unusual shapes and designs.

0:58:170:58:22

As they will always hold their value.

0:58:220:58:24

That is it for today's show. I hope you have enjoyed it.

0:58:310:58:34

Join us again soon for more trade secrets!

0:58:340:58:37

Paul Martin and the Flog It! team take us on a journey exploring antiques and collectables from the world of travel; from holiday souvenirs to posh luggage. Expert Charlie Ross visits Blackpool to discover an all-singing, all-dancing collection of entertainment ephemera.

And Paul Martin discovers the history behind the good old British beach hut.


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