In Living Memory Flog It: Trade Secrets


In Living Memory

Antiques series. Mark Stacey explains the appeal of a piece of 20th century commemorative china, while Philip Serrell and Charlie Ross investigate collectable cars.


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Transcript


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Welcome to the show that helps you to get in the know

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when it comes to buying and selling antiques and collectables.

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-Price-wise, any idea?

-Not really, no.

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-Good gracious, I never knew that.

-Wow!

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We have got well over ten years of "Flog It!" behind us,

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that is literally hundreds of shows

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with thousands of your items sold in auction.

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So if there is something you need to know,

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you will more than likely find it right here, on Trade Secrets.

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The 20th century has seen great changes both socially and

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culturally that have occurred within our lifetime or that

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of our parents. Or grandparents.

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And we see many objects that turn up at our valuation days

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that reflect those changing times.

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So in today's show, we're taking a close look at objects that

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were made within living memory.

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Coming up, our experts take us on a trip down memory lane.

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We have got Beatles - Paul McCartney and John Lennon.

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I actually got them signed.

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Thomas reveals a hidden passion.

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Thomas is a Barbie doll.

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You are, though. Come on, let's face it.

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I thought it was fabulous. It really was a really good thing.

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Charlie and Philip fulfil a boyhood dream.

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Arriving at the Aston Martin works

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in an Aston Martin being driven by a James Bond look-alike.

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And we reveal the secrets of the modern collectables market.

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Well done.

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-3,000.

-Well done.

-Thank you. Gosh!

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It's funny how an item can evoke memories - the place where

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you got it, the person who gave it to you, the moment in time.

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And all of those things can make an item made in living memory

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highly collectable.

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Collectors' items are bought

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on memory, they are bought on feeling.

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If you remember having the Corgi James Bond as a boy, then

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that brings back memories, which is why you want to have it now.

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-Yes!

-80 quid.

-Very good.

-That's good.

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I think that does encourage people to bid a little bit more,

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pay something for an item which is reminiscent of their own

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childhood, definitely.

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Yes! What a result!

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I remember as a child,

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queuing up with great excitement for the first Star Wars film.

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And some of those early figures, particularly the rarer ones,

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in mint condition with their original boxes,

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are starting to make serious money.

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A good 20th century collectable will reflect the age

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that it was made in,

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whether that's the '20s, '30s, the '50s, the '60s or the '80s.

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So go for things within their own period,

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which you personally have fallen in love with.

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And at our valuation days, we see many seemingly ordinary

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objects that evoke nostalgia for these eras.

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I think it is either a picnic box or a gramophone.

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I'm going to open it up and have a look.

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It's a gramophone. Tell me all about it.

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Well, it was my gran's, she used to play it when I was a young lad.

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The favourite one of hers was Davy Crockett by Max Bygraves.

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# Davy, Davy Crockett

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# King of the wild frontier. #

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-Yeah.

-I remember it.

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People are quite fascinated by old record players, even those ones

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from the 1950s, like this one, are fascinating bits

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of kit, really.

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But people then have to be that old to remember playing

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music on one of these things as a child.

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Even me, I say, can remember winding up a gramophone

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and playing records.

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It's quite good quality.

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I haven't been able to see here

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a maker's name. Have you any idea?

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No idea whatsoever.

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I don't think it's an HMV

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because I think HMV had their names on the playing head as well.

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Look for rarity. Most are made by HMV or Columbia or whatever.

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Try and find a name that you haven't heard of. Look it up.

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Think, "Well, there were many of these made,"

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therefore, by definition, providing it is of a reasonable quality,

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it will make more money than a standard object.

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There is a needle case on the corner there.

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-The winder has lost its handle, I think.

-Yes.

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-But it is in good condition.

-Yeah.

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There is a little bit of rusting around the catch,

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but the chrome here is in super order.

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Condition is very important because it needs to look nice.

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If you're going to have it sitting on a table in your drawing

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room, you don't want to have bits hanging off it.

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If this record player hadn't been working,

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to restore it would cost more than it was worth in the first place.

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# One, two, three o'clock... #

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I would rather think we'd let it take its course, really,

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in the sale room.

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Don't put a reserve on it and let's say goodbye to it,

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and we'll be excited once it gets above a tenner.

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-If it makes a tenner.

-Oh, it will make more than that.

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This is the portable gramophone.

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And I have got competing bids here to £50.

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50, straight in, top-end, yes!

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-They are going up, aren't they?

-Yeah. You see, it is a big hit.

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£55. I'm going to sell in the room then at 55.

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60, new bidder. 65.

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It seemed the bidders knew something Charlie didn't.

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85.

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90. 90 in the centre, then.

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Any advance on £90?

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The hammer has gone down. £90.

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I'd say that's twice what it would've done a year ago.

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Twice your valuation.

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Wrong again.

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I was very surprised at the time.

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But looking back, I think it came with six records.

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And I have a cunning suspicion that there might have been

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a bit of rare vinyl in there that added to the price.

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That great result proves music can really stir emotions.

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But for Philip Serrell, one item in particular takes him

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on a memory merry-go-round.

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Now, I'm not exactly going to tell you how old I am, but I am

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of a certain age.

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And I am of that certain age when in the 1960s and you went on holiday,

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you went to seasides. And seasides would have fairgrounds.

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And fairgrounds had rides.

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And rides had these lovely painted boards in front of them.

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Now, I think this is probably earlier than '60s.

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I think this might be '30s or '40s,

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but it is just a cool thing. I love this.

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I bought this this year from an antique shop,

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and I think it cost me 60 quid or something.

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And I bought it for two reasons.

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One, it sort of does remind me of those childhood holidays.

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And two, I just think it is a bit of fun.

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And it is something that...

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Well, it just appeals to my sense of humour, really.

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# Barbara Ann Ba-Ba-Ba, Ba-Ba-Barbara Ann. #

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But perhaps the things that most take us back are toys,

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and there is a huge collector's market for these.

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What a toy name to conjure with.

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And Barbie, well, you know, the most iconic doll

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of, I'd say, the post-war era, isn't it?

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Fascinating.

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If you are a collector of dolls

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or of toys,

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I think you want the best of the best.

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This Barbie was the best

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of the best. It was tremendous.

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Tell me, how did you come by this almost mint Barbie?

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It was a present to me in 1963 from my auntie,

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whose next-door neighbour brought it back from Canada.

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Nobody else had one that I knew of so that is why it is still in the box.

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I've never seen the like of this Barbie, with its three wigs.

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I thought it was fabulous. It really was a really good thing.

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Very rare.

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Of course, early Barbie, early Cindy,

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those are the best to collect.

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-It would have had a cellophane cover to it.

-Yes.

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-Which is gone, unfortunately.

-Yeah.

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-But I would suggest we put it in at £80 to £120.

-Yes.

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We fixed the reserve at 80.

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And I wouldn't be surprised if it made £150.

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-I really wouldn't.

-Really?

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It's the stuff of childhood, and apparently of Thomas's dreams, too.

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Thomas is a Barbie doll. You are, though. Come on, let's face it.

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You specialise in lots of things like this, don't you?

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Collectors' things.

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We have a sale room which sells toys,

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so I see lots of things coming up in the Barbie doll world, etc.

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So I am a little bit excited.

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But I don't want to come over like I'm excited about selling dolls.

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At £30. At five.

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40. Five.

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50. Five.

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60. Five. 70. Five.

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80. Five if you like. At 80 here.

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At £80, you all sure, now then?

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Lady's bid at £80. You all done?

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-On estimate, well done.

-Good.

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At least somebody will appreciate it.

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-Oh, yeah.

-Yeah, I'm pleased.

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I was disappointed at the £80.

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And maybe this Barbie should have been in a proper doll sale.

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And I think maybe it could have made more money.

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Of course, today, with online bidding,

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wherever dolls are sold, they will be found by the serious collectors.

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Dolls are ever popular. There is something for everyone.

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-£580, who could have predicted that?

-Beautifully made.

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The doll world is massive.

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If you want to collect baby dolls, big dolls, Barbies...

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It's up to you, really.

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You need to find your niche, and then from that niche,

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you pick the best of the best.

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You've brought three very pretty young ladies along with you.

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If you want to start collecting antique dolls,

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the ones that you are most likely to come across

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are the porcelain-headed variety, produced in the 19th century.

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You brought a little friend here.

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She has got a bisque porcelain head, which is

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typical of dolls made from the late 19th and early 20th century.

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So she is 100 years old.

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What are our experts' tips for budding collectors of dolls?

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Look at the quality of the head.

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The rarity of the mould that the head is made from.

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If it is a rarer number, the better.

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If you look at the back of the necks of the doll,

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it will usually tell you all you want to know.

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So we have got Heubach Koppelsdorf and then a number

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and "made in Germany" underneath.

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The best tip for collecting dolls -

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go for the one with the weirdest expression.

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This is a most disturbing object you have put in front of me.

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I think she is quite scary.

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-I think she is scary as well.

-With a trembly tongue.

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I couldn't sleep at night if they were in my house.

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The other thing to look at is the eyes.

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These eyes are weighted so when you lay them down, they go to sleep.

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When you bring them up, their eyes come up.

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This really will scare you. The eyes open and she comes alive.

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The colours of the eyes as well.

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It is always good to have blue-eyed dolls.

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People always love blue-eyed girls.

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-She has lovely blue eyes, just like yourself.

-Thank you very much.

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Condition is all-important.

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If the head has a crack on it, a chip or any damage,

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to be honest, I'd leave it alone.

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I'm afraid eyelashes have gone.

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Also, costumes as well. It's the clothes.

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Are they in the original clothes? Has the hair been cut?

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Cos the hair does get cut by beastly children snipping away.

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It is museum quality. The condition is very, very good.

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And I would say they are the original clothes as well.

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So if this is the area of collecting for you,

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which makers' names should you look out for?

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You could be buying German dolls made by Simon & Halbig,

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Armand Marseille.

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Then you could collect French dolls by Jumeau

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and earlier dolls in France, which are just super, super quality,

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made in the late 19th century, early part of the 20th century.

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You can pick up a good quality doll for around £150,

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but values vary.

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The highest price so far recorded was for almost four million pounds.

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But if you are thinking of entering this field,

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Thomas has a few words of warning.

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The doll market is the worst market in the world.

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Cos after a view, their limbs, head, hair, everywhere,

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and the doll collectors will come in,

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they'll pick up a porcelain-headed doll and, if it's really good,

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they might get a little pencil out and draw a line down the doll

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so it looks like a hairline crack so the next person viewing it...

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thinks it's broken!

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It's not just nostalgia for our childhood that makes us

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spend our money, we are all touched by the momentous,

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historical events we have lived through.

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So items connected to these memories can have just as much appeal.

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If items are associated with a particular event,

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it may mean that they will have more significance.

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But on the other hand,

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it may mean that they are produced in greater quantities.

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And because of that, will be less rare and less valuable.

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For example, a royal wedding.

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Every newspaper - "Special, souvenir issue"

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for the wedding of Charles and Diana,

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William and Kate or whoever.

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As soon as it becomes an object to be collected, you might as well burn

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it, it will never be worth anything, because everybody thinks,

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"Oh! I'll keep that."

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And there's no point.

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But it is not all about the value,

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some people like commemorative items.

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I like this one particularly because it is for Halley's Comet,

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which last appeared in 1986.

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So certainly within my living memory.

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And I know how exciting it was then, waiting for it to appear.

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Wedgwood, of course, capturing the market,

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got a designer called Richard Guyatt to produce a commemorative mug.

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This is exactly the same shape as you would have found a royal

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wedding mug, but what the designer has done is produced it

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in this almost sort of '30s graphics,

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with this sort of writing.

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And it says, "Return to Earth every 76 years - 1986."

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And then he has put the next time it is due to appear -

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so 2062, 2138, 2214.

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And underneath, they have got,

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"To mark the return of Halley's Comet," and you have got the trajectory

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of the comet as it goes through the solar system.

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I'm also quite a fan of Star Trek, so this sort of thing appeals to me.

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They only made 2,000 of these, so it is a limited edition. This is 610.

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And actually, it comes with the original label that says

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that as well.

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But I just like it for its design element.

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I think this could be quite a collectable item in the future.

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BIG BAND MUSIC

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It is almost impossible to predict what will become a collectable,

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but items that an older generation hung onto,

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which once seemed insignificant, can now be highly sought after.

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An amazing collection of the risque sort of theatre land

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from the 1920s right through to the 1950s.

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Obviously, they are not yours. Whose were they?

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-Well, they were Val's uncle's, actually.

-OK.

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He died some 20 years ago and Val was the next living relative.

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And when we cleared the house out, we looked in the attic

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and we found these.

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-Hidden away.

-Hidden away.

-A sordid past.

-A sordid past.

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Magazines, generally, are

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an auctioneer's nightmare.

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They tend to come in vast numbers and,

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generally, worth almost nothing.

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The earliest one that we have is 1927 - the Folies Bergere.

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Now, if we have a look at this one here,

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this one is particularly interesting because of one person.

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There she is. Josephine Baker.

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She was one of the first ever black strip dancers or naked

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dancers at the Folies Bergere.

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She was very well known

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and has gone down in history as one of the best ever.

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And whenever we get something at auction that is

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revolutionary in its time, a little bit risque,

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they are really sought after today, because they are a collectors' item.

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-Yes.

-When it was done, nobody thought it would have any relevance,

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nobody thought it would be a collectors' item in the future.

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In the same way, actually, as

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the front page of the Times newspaper,

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when the Titanic sunk.

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At the time when that was printed,

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nobody thought it would be of any value.

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Today, it is worth thousands of pounds.

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Valuing this sort of thing is very, very difficult.

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-I mean, we have got hundreds, haven't we?

-Yes.

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Some of them are worth less than a pound.

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That has got to be worth something like £30, £40 on its own.

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So if we put an estimate of £100 to £150 on them...

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Now, I do hope that somebody with a real passion for theatre

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history will go for these.

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There is some interest here.

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And we start the bidding at...

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100. 120.

0:17:390:17:42

-130. 140.

-Top-end.

0:17:420:17:44

Commission bid at £140.

0:17:440:17:46

50, will you? Commission bid at 140.

0:17:460:17:48

It's with me on the book. Are you all done?

0:17:480:17:52

Do you want to take a second look? No?

0:17:520:17:56

It's on the book then and we are selling at £140.

0:17:560:17:59

-Yes, hammer's gone down! That was great, good valuation.

-Brilliant.

0:17:590:18:02

Brave man.

0:18:020:18:04

-£140, happy?

-Yes, lovely, that's great.

0:18:040:18:07

Whenever anything reminds people of when times, in their own mind,

0:18:070:18:12

are better, it is bound to create these lovely,

0:18:120:18:17

warm feelings of nostalgia, and that is where the collectors'

0:18:170:18:20

market comes from for this sort of thing.

0:18:200:18:22

Now, our parents and our grandparents have marvellous

0:18:220:18:25

tales to tell about their youth, and some of the things they have owned

0:18:250:18:29

speak volumes, as David Fletcher knows.

0:18:290:18:33

Now, my grandmother, like so many people of her generation

0:18:330:18:36

and background, had quite conservative taste, really.

0:18:360:18:38

My grandmother was born in 1900, so she was a Victorian.

0:18:380:18:43

So what made her buy this? It's glamorous,

0:18:430:18:46

it's a bit glitzy, it's quite sexy, I suppose, and it

0:18:460:18:51

speaks of its period.

0:18:510:18:53

I would've said this would have been bought in about 1934, 1935.

0:18:530:18:57

Well, my theory is that my grandmother, who was a great

0:18:570:19:01

filmgoer, had been to see one of Busby Berkeley's films,

0:19:010:19:05

42nd Street perhaps,

0:19:050:19:07

and had been so impressed by the glamour of that,

0:19:070:19:11

by the way it took us all away from that really rather depressing

0:19:110:19:15

period of time, the 1930s, with all the economic problems that

0:19:150:19:18

people were struggling with at that time.

0:19:180:19:20

And she thought, "Well, I'll pop into my local china shop

0:19:200:19:23

"tomorrow and see if I can find something that reminds me

0:19:230:19:26

"of that film."

0:19:260:19:27

'Luxurious settings, spectacular dance routines, set to the rhythm

0:19:270:19:31

'of inspiring music in scenes never before attempted on stage or screen.'

0:19:310:19:36

This is one of a pair.

0:19:380:19:39

It is by a very minor German factory,

0:19:390:19:43

but it speaks of its period.

0:19:430:19:46

And I remember this when I was a young boy,

0:19:460:19:49

sitting on the mantelpiece in my grandmother's house,

0:19:490:19:52

with the other one at the other end of the mantelpiece.

0:19:520:19:55

And in that sense, I grew up with this, really.

0:19:550:19:58

I'm not really sure that I actually like this, although I am

0:19:580:20:03

interested in the Art Deco period, the 1930s and cinema of the 1930s.

0:20:030:20:07

So in that sense, it has a value to me.

0:20:070:20:10

It doesn't have a great financial value.

0:20:100:20:12

But it and its pair are two items I would never sell.

0:20:120:20:17

But if you do want to sell, auctioning an item

0:20:190:20:22

at a relevant moment in history can make all the difference.

0:20:220:20:25

And James couldn't believe what turned up at a valuation day

0:20:250:20:28

in 2012.

0:20:280:20:30

There are certain things in history that everybody wants to

0:20:300:20:35

get their hands on. I think the World Cup is one.

0:20:350:20:39

But I think very close behind that is an Olympic torch.

0:20:390:20:44

The Olympic year, what a time to sell it.

0:20:440:20:47

And to get a London Olympic torch, you could not find a better time.

0:20:470:20:52

Fantastic.

0:20:520:20:53

This was, obviously, for the London Olympics of 1948.

0:20:530:20:58

There were 20 of them made and each person would have

0:20:580:21:01

kept their individual torch as a souvenir of their leg.

0:21:010:21:06

The 1948 London Olympics were known as The Austerity Games.

0:21:060:21:11

The event was crucial

0:21:110:21:12

in lifting spirits during the post-war gloom.

0:21:120:21:15

What is it doing here, in the centre of Coventry?

0:21:150:21:18

My father used to run, but I'm sure he'd have told me

0:21:180:21:20

-if he'd been a stage bearer in the Olympics.

-Gosh, yes.

0:21:200:21:23

We kept a pub and it probably came into his possession

0:21:230:21:26

from someone coming into the pub and perhaps selling it some time ago.

0:21:260:21:30

So do you think somebody paid off their bar bill with this,

0:21:300:21:32

swapped it for a pint of beer or paid off their slate?

0:21:320:21:35

-It could have been something like that.

-Gosh!

0:21:350:21:37

And with the Olympics still in everybody's mind, I thought

0:21:370:21:40

it was an appropriate time to perhaps sell it.

0:21:400:21:43

The Olympic torch was fairly easy to value

0:21:430:21:46

because if you look online and you look at the records, and there were

0:21:460:21:50

Olympic torches from 1948 selling at £1,500 to £2,000, complete.

0:21:500:21:55

Um,

0:21:550:21:57

but this one had the burner missing.

0:21:570:22:00

I think that should have contained an inner section.

0:22:000:22:03

-It must've had a burner or something.

-Must have done.

0:22:030:22:06

Generally, a piece lacking, an integral,

0:22:060:22:09

an important part of it will make a huge difference to the value.

0:22:090:22:14

But I think it is a great time to sell it.

0:22:140:22:17

We should put an auction estimate of 600 to £1,000.

0:22:170:22:20

-Gosh.

-All right?

-Yeah.

0:22:200:22:22

That's not bad for something that looks like a toilet plunger, is it?

0:22:220:22:27

Not at all. It certainly isn't.

0:22:270:22:29

It may have looked like a plunger to James,

0:22:290:22:32

but the auctioneer had high hopes for it.

0:22:320:22:33

We have already got some fan lines booked.

0:22:330:22:35

We have got quite a bit of interest in it.

0:22:350:22:37

And I am confident that we are going to well exceed the estimate.

0:22:370:22:40

Let's hope we can break a record with this one.

0:22:400:22:44

Have you purposely saved it for this year?

0:22:440:22:47

Did you think about selling it last year?

0:22:470:22:48

-No, last year I thought about making a table lamp out of it.

-Did you?

0:22:480:22:53

-I'm glad I didn't.

-No, exactly.

0:22:530:22:56

The Games of the 14th Olympiad, commission bids on the book,

0:22:560:23:01

and I am going to start it at 1,050.

0:23:010:23:04

-1,050.

-Fabulous!

0:23:040:23:06

-1,050.

-That's our top end, isn't it?

-It is.

0:23:060:23:10

1,100 there. 1,150 I've got. 1,200?

0:23:100:23:13

1,200. That clears my commission bids at 1,200. Do I hear 1,250?

0:23:130:23:18

There's a couple people on the phone now. It is out of the room.

0:23:180:23:21

-It is backwards and forwards to the phone.

-14.

0:23:210:23:25

Let's go in hundreds. 15 now.

0:23:250:23:27

-I don't believe it.

-16. 17.

0:23:270:23:31

18.

0:23:320:23:34

19.

0:23:340:23:36

-Gosh.

-2,000.

0:23:360:23:38

Go 22.

0:23:390:23:41

24.

0:23:410:23:43

26.

0:23:440:23:46

28.

0:23:460:23:49

3,000.

0:23:490:23:52

32.

0:23:520:23:53

34.

0:23:550:23:57

-32 on this phone.

-I just love these moments.

0:23:590:24:01

At 3,200. Is there any further advance?

0:24:010:24:04

It's going to be sold, £3,200.

0:24:040:24:07

-Yes! Hammer has gone down.

-Well done.

0:24:070:24:10

-3,000.

-Well done.

-Thank you.

0:24:100:24:13

I thought it might make the 1,500, but it did brilliantly.

0:24:140:24:17

That certainly was an iconic and symbolic item.

0:24:200:24:24

And the sale was certainly something to behold.

0:24:240:24:27

And there is a lesson for us all there -

0:24:270:24:29

selling something at exactly the right time can pay dividends.

0:24:290:24:33

Now you may not have an Olympic torch hidden away at home,

0:24:330:24:36

but it is worth considering looking for items that are related to a big

0:24:360:24:40

event or an anniversary that is coming up soon.

0:24:400:24:43

If you are interested in modern collectables, keep

0:24:430:24:46

this check list in mind.

0:24:460:24:47

Everyday objects can have hidden value

0:24:480:24:50

if they strike a chord with the bidders.

0:24:500:24:53

The most collectable toys are those with their packaging

0:24:530:24:56

and accessories intact.

0:24:560:24:59

And keep in mind that commemorative pieces aren't always collectable.

0:24:590:25:03

Look for the rarer items that mark historic events.

0:25:030:25:06

We see many toy cars and much motoring memorabilia

0:25:100:25:14

at our valuation days.

0:25:140:25:15

But love it or hate it, what is it that makes these things

0:25:190:25:22

so collectable and potentially so valuable?

0:25:220:25:25

"Flog It!" regulars Charlie Ross

0:25:250:25:27

and Philip Serrell are lovers of antiques and collectables,

0:25:270:25:30

but they also have another shared passion - classic cars.

0:25:300:25:33

And I am not talking about the toy variety.

0:25:330:25:36

SONG: "Goldfinger"

0:25:360:25:40

So they went to Aston Martin to explore OUR love affair with

0:25:400:25:44

a British legend that every big boy dreams of being part of.

0:25:440:25:49

Well, Charlie, here we are.

0:25:490:25:51

Fantastic! Gosh.

0:25:510:25:53

Arriving at the Aston Martin works in an Aston Martin being

0:25:530:25:58

-driven by a James Bond look-alike.

-Odd Job!

0:25:580:26:02

I'm so looking forward... What got you into Astons, Charlie?

0:26:020:26:05

I'll tell you what, when I left school, my first day of work,

0:26:050:26:09

my boss said, "I've got to pick up something. Come with me."

0:26:090:26:13

Went downstairs, what car did he have? An Aston Martin DB4.

0:26:130:26:16

Oh, heaven, heaven, heaven!

0:26:160:26:18

And we picked up his other car, so I had to drive the DB4 back home.

0:26:180:26:23

For me, it all started in the 1960s, waiting to see Goldfinger.

0:26:230:26:26

-And I just fell in love with it.

-Honor Blackman!

0:26:260:26:29

I fell in love with her as well, but that is another story, Charlie.

0:26:290:26:32

-Who have we got to see?

-Kingsley.

-Kingsley is the man.

0:26:320:26:35

# Goldfinger

0:26:350:26:39

# He's the man The man with... #

0:26:400:26:43

-Kingsley.

-Good morning.

-Charlie Ross.

-Good to meet you.

0:26:430:26:46

-Philip, Kingsley, how are you?

-Very well, thank you.

0:26:460:26:49

So, clearly, there are no new Astons here, these are all...

0:26:490:26:52

In this particular area, everything here is what we class as heritage.

0:26:520:26:55

-This is the second-hand department, is it?

-No, no, no!

0:26:550:26:58

Some of these are better than new.

0:26:580:27:00

This is where non-current cars are serviced, repaired, rebuilt,

0:27:000:27:05

whatever. Whatever is needed.

0:27:050:27:07

Kingsley, can you tell us about the history of Aston Martin?

0:27:070:27:10

This company was originally formed as Bamford

0:27:100:27:12

and Martin back on the 13th of January, 1913.

0:27:120:27:16

But of course, the big significant point for Aston Martin really was

0:27:160:27:19

when David Brown bought the company in 1948.

0:27:190:27:23

So, if you look at a '60s Aston, it has got DB, which is David Brown.

0:27:230:27:26

And that's really... He has left us with that legacy, hasn't he?

0:27:260:27:28

Absolutely, that has carried on through the company

0:27:280:27:31

all the way through the years.

0:27:310:27:32

For me, Astons have always been an iconic shape.

0:27:320:27:36

With one exception.

0:27:360:27:38

And in the '70s, they became for a short while very angular,

0:27:380:27:42

-didn't they?

-Oh, yes, the Lagonda.

0:27:420:27:44

-And is that...?

-Yes.

-You've got one.

0:27:440:27:45

It looks like it should have been out of Thunderbird or something.

0:27:450:27:48

I think you have to go back to understand why we did that.

0:27:480:27:51

This is when Concorde went into service.

0:27:510:27:54

And you think about how Concorde looked.

0:27:540:27:56

And the company really needed to make a new, bold statement.

0:27:560:28:00

It needed to go out into the world.

0:28:000:28:01

So in 1976, at the Earls Court Motor Show,

0:28:010:28:04

the car was shown for the first time.

0:28:040:28:06

And over 600 of these have been built since then.

0:28:060:28:10

Really, I suppose I became aware of Astons in a way with

0:28:100:28:13

James Bond, so it is all in... That is where the living memory thing is.

0:28:130:28:16

Bond and Aston, they sit side-by-side, don't they?

0:28:160:28:19

They do, and always will do.

0:28:190:28:20

-The Silver Birch.

-The Silver Birch with black trim, yes, absolutely.

0:28:200:28:25

Yeah, no, it's very much a sign of a DB5, that is.

0:28:250:28:29

-Now, Charlie, if one of these came into "Flog It!"...

-Yes.

0:28:290:28:31

..what would you tell them it is worth?

0:28:310:28:33

-Because you sell these, don't you?

-I do sell these.

0:28:330:28:35

I have sold one or two, and we got a million for a DB5

0:28:350:28:40

in Pebble Beach, California - £600,000, £700,000.

0:28:400:28:44

It's unbelievable the way they have gone up in the last few years.

0:28:440:28:49

# Live and let die

0:28:490:28:51

# Live and let die

0:28:540:28:56

# Live and let die. #

0:28:580:29:00

Well, gentlemen, this is our heritage showroom.

0:29:000:29:03

This is where we have all of our heritage cars for sale

0:29:030:29:06

and we also hold events here as well.

0:29:060:29:08

-What about this?

-Ah, well, this is a DB6.

0:29:080:29:11

This is a DB6, but it is a very special one,

0:29:110:29:13

-because it was owned by Paul McCartney.

-Oh!

0:29:130:29:15

The added provenance here would add a huge amount to the

0:29:150:29:18

value of that car, knowing who owned it.

0:29:180:29:20

-You can always make condition but you can't make history.

-No.

0:29:200:29:23

Something very different over there.

0:29:230:29:27

-Ah!

-Radford Estate. It is a DB6 Shooting Brake.

0:29:270:29:30

There were 20 DB Shooting Brakes that were made,

0:29:300:29:33

19 of which are left.

0:29:330:29:34

The first car that was built was built for Sir David Brown.

0:29:340:29:38

I am told he went into the Felton workshops there and said,

0:29:380:29:41

"I would like to take my dogs round the estate,

0:29:410:29:43

"I don't want to put them in the back,

0:29:430:29:45

"do you think you could devise an estate car for me?"

0:29:450:29:47

They put the dogs on the bench, measured their tails

0:29:470:29:49

and everything else And went away and sorted it all out.

0:29:490:29:52

And once one car is built, it sets a trend

0:29:520:29:54

and the owner wanted another one and another one and so it went on.

0:29:540:29:59

It's not, may I say, a thing of beauty.

0:29:590:30:01

Ah, but it is like a person with character - they take a

0:30:010:30:04

while to get to know, but once you know them, it endures for longer.

0:30:040:30:08

These characterful cars command astronomical prices.

0:30:090:30:13

But there is an area of collecting more accessible automobilia.

0:30:130:30:17

And even Aston Martin is in on the act.

0:30:170:30:20

And the thing is, Charlie, if you can't afford the real thing,

0:30:200:30:24

-this is the area of collecting to get into.

-Yeah.

0:30:240:30:27

And this tells me a lovely story, you know.

0:30:270:30:29

When I was a kid, in about 1960 something,

0:30:290:30:32

my dad bought me a Scalextric set.

0:30:320:30:34

And I loved it and I loved it and I loved it.

0:30:340:30:36

But I've always wanted one of these.

0:30:360:30:38

And about five years ago, I found one of these in a box.

0:30:380:30:41

It cost me 300 quid.

0:30:410:30:42

-300 quid.

-£300?!

-Yeah.

-That's extraordinary.

0:30:420:30:46

But the thing is, for everybody at home,

0:30:460:30:48

if you can get one of these, get it in a box.

0:30:480:30:50

-So what is your toy, Charlie?

-Ah, my favourite.

-Really? Oh.

0:30:500:30:55

-How about that? Now look at that.

-That has got everything.

0:30:550:30:58

-This has got the whole lot. It's got a wonderful ejector seat.

-Boing!

0:30:580:31:02

We have got machine guns at the front here,

0:31:030:31:06

which come in and out like that.

0:31:060:31:08

We have got that wonderful iconic device that would shoot outside

0:31:080:31:13

and shred your tyre

0:31:130:31:14

when someone was trying to move alongside you.

0:31:140:31:16

We've got the gun shield in case anybody is shooting at you.

0:31:160:31:19

The thing is, if you put that into auction,

0:31:190:31:21

you'd estimate it between, I don't know, 50 and 150.

0:31:210:31:24

But if you've got a collection of these and this is the only

0:31:240:31:26

one you haven't got, it's worth £1,000, isn't it?

0:31:260:31:29

-Absolutely.

-But look at all the others.

-There is so much stuff here.

0:31:290:31:32

Car badges, there is a gold stick pin with a diamond in it.

0:31:320:31:36

There's something for everybody's pocket, isn't there?

0:31:360:31:38

-That's the key thing.

-You don't have to have Aston Martin.

0:31:380:31:42

There's car badges of every car that has ever been made.

0:31:420:31:46

And the less number that were made, the rarer.

0:31:460:31:49

-Absolutely right.

-And probably the more valuable.

-Absolutely.

0:31:490:31:52

Dig around in your boot fair, look for these things.

0:31:520:31:55

# He loves gold! #

0:31:550:31:58

The chrome is going a bit here.

0:31:580:32:00

Yeah, well, I wonder where we can take that for restoration.

0:32:000:32:02

-We are probably in the right place.

-I would think.

0:32:020:32:04

-We could take this back to Kingsley.

-Yeah! Absolutely.

0:32:040:32:07

Still to come, we reveal the benefits of having rock solid

0:32:220:32:25

provenance.

0:32:250:32:26

This letter here. I mean, if I look at it, it's rather...

0:32:260:32:29

Handwritten by Lucie Rie.

0:32:290:32:31

It's not often you get a chance to buy a piece like that

0:32:310:32:34

with that letter of provenance.

0:32:340:32:36

James discovers a thriller of a tale about the King of Pop.

0:32:360:32:40

-It was him?

-It was Michael Jackson!

0:32:400:32:42

And this was a photograph I got from Michael as well.

0:32:420:32:46

And we discover the secrets of making riches

0:32:460:32:49

from 20th century buys.

0:32:490:32:51

We've got a northern artist in a northern sale room

0:32:510:32:54

with northern collectors. You can't fail, really.

0:32:540:32:57

What a great investment!

0:32:570:32:59

As well as having wonderful stories,

0:33:060:33:08

antiques bought within living memory may often come

0:33:080:33:11

with solid provenance,

0:33:110:33:13

and this can make all the difference to their desirability.

0:33:130:33:16

All provenance is, it's something's passport.

0:33:160:33:18

It tells you where it has been all of its life.

0:33:180:33:20

Collectors, you know, want to make sure,

0:33:200:33:23

if they are paying a lot of money for something, that there is proof,

0:33:230:33:26

whether it is photographic or written evidence.

0:33:260:33:30

But you can't go from word-of-mouth,

0:33:300:33:31

somebody saying, "Oh, I bought it from such-and-such gallery."

0:33:310:33:35

You need a little more tangible evidence than that.

0:33:350:33:37

Because provenance can make such a potential difference to the

0:33:370:33:40

value of an item, it is always a good idea to keep a record

0:33:400:33:44

of where family possessions came from, assuming you know.

0:33:440:33:47

Talk to relatives, rummage around in boxes of old paperwork

0:33:470:33:51

looking for invoices, bills of sale and receipts.

0:33:510:33:54

And also photographs.

0:33:540:33:56

And if you find anything, keep it in a safe place.

0:33:560:34:00

In 2011, we'll discover just what a difference having this

0:34:000:34:04

kind of provenance can make.

0:34:040:34:06

Simon, you have brought in this really striking studio

0:34:060:34:09

pottery bowl for us to look at today. And I see also a letter.

0:34:090:34:13

Tell me, how does that pertain to the bowl?

0:34:130:34:15

Well, the letter is from the artist, who is Lucie Rie,

0:34:150:34:19

who wrote it to my late aunt following a visit that my aunt

0:34:190:34:23

had made to the V&A, and had seen a bowl that was very similar to this.

0:34:230:34:27

-Yes.

-Written to Lucie and asked her if it was for sale.

0:34:270:34:32

The letter says, "The bowl is not for sale,

0:34:320:34:34

"but I can make you another one."

0:34:340:34:36

-Amazing.

-And this is her reply, and that is the bowl that she made.

0:34:360:34:40

Here on the base, we can see a nice studio pottery marked for Lucie Rie.

0:34:400:34:45

Lucie Rie really is one of the main names in the studio pottery.

0:34:450:34:50

And what is most noted about Lucie's pieces

0:34:500:34:53

is this very sort of flared rim standing on this almost tiny

0:34:530:34:58

little foot. Bowls of hers can get up to this sort of size, you know.

0:34:580:35:02

And if you are talking a bowl that sort of size,

0:35:020:35:04

you are talking many thousands of pounds.

0:35:040:35:06

I'm growing to like it more and more.

0:35:060:35:08

Are you? There we go. Well, it is quite an important piece, actually,

0:35:080:35:11

in the sort of whole history of British studio pottery.

0:35:110:35:14

I mean, she is one of the sort of Premier League names.

0:35:140:35:16

And this letter here, I mean, if I look at it, it's rather...

0:35:160:35:20

Handwritten by Lucie Rie.

0:35:200:35:22

"The exhibition is not for sale,

0:35:220:35:23

"I could make a similar one for you, it will never be the same.

0:35:230:35:27

"Should you consider it, do ring me and come and see me."

0:35:270:35:31

Well, that is typical of Lucie Rie.

0:35:310:35:33

She was well known for taking guests into her studio.

0:35:330:35:36

It is also dated 1982, I see.

0:35:360:35:39

It really just almost topped it off beautifully, really.

0:35:390:35:44

It shows Lucie Rie's involvement in the piece. And it's lovely.

0:35:440:35:48

It just gives a real insight into the person behind the object,

0:35:480:35:52

which again, the collectors like

0:35:520:35:54

to get under the skin of designers and makers.

0:35:540:35:56

Unfortunately, what they are not looking for is damage,

0:35:560:36:00

and there is a rather nasty hairline crack.

0:36:000:36:03

The mantra is with porcelain, ceramics - condition,

0:36:030:36:07

condition, condition.

0:36:070:36:08

And I think when I put the estimate on the piece, I have to say,

0:36:080:36:12

at 100, 150, and I was probably being a bit mean with hindsight.

0:36:120:36:17

But auctioneer Claire Rawle knew because of the letter

0:36:170:36:19

the pot was destined to create fireworks in the sale room.

0:36:190:36:23

She has an appeal worldwide and she is now very expensive

0:36:230:36:28

and very collected.

0:36:280:36:29

Well, let's find out what the bidders think

0:36:290:36:31

cos this is a name to go for.

0:36:310:36:33

And it's going under the hammer right now.

0:36:330:36:34

And I have to start straight in at £200.

0:36:340:36:40

At 200, do I see 220 anywhere?

0:36:400:36:43

-At £200.

-Straight in.

-220.

0:36:430:36:45

250 with me.

0:36:450:36:46

280 on the telephone. At 280.

0:36:460:36:50

Do I see 300? At 280.

0:36:500:36:53

-300.

-Excellent.

0:36:530:36:55

-320.

-There's two telephone bidders, that is what we wanted.

-350.

0:36:550:36:59

Fighting this out.

0:36:590:37:00

-380.

-See, the purists know exactly what to go for.

0:37:000:37:04

Imagine if it were perfect.

0:37:040:37:06

No. 420 on the first telephone here.

0:37:060:37:08

At £420.

0:37:080:37:10

At 420, you all sure? At 420...

0:37:100:37:14

Yes, £420. Simon,

0:37:140:37:17

top, top money. Put it there.

0:37:170:37:19

That's brilliant.

0:37:190:37:20

The letter. The letter did it.

0:37:200:37:23

You know, a good price really,

0:37:230:37:24

certainly bearing in mind it wasn't a massive piece and it was damaged.

0:37:240:37:28

But I think whoever bought it would have been chuffed

0:37:280:37:30

because it is not often you get a chance to buy

0:37:300:37:33

a piece like that with that letter of provenance.

0:37:330:37:35

The bowl, had it been on its own without the letter,

0:37:350:37:38

would have sold perhaps for about 100, because people expect...

0:37:380:37:40

She was quite prolific and people expect to find

0:37:400:37:43

items in perfect order.

0:37:430:37:44

So having that letter with it, I think, for a collector,

0:37:440:37:47

that really boosted the interest and the price.

0:37:470:37:49

We prefer it on "Flog It!" when art is marked or signed.

0:37:510:37:55

And the signature of a good artist can be valuable in its own right,

0:37:550:37:59

particularly if the person in question is a household name.

0:37:590:38:02

Lowry.

0:38:020:38:03

A typical scene showing sort of the industrial northern landscape.

0:38:030:38:08

LS Lowry, June 22, 1953.

0:38:080:38:12

How did you come by this?

0:38:120:38:14

We found this in a box of books about the Manchester Ship Canal.

0:38:140:38:18

We found it inside one of the books.

0:38:180:38:19

Where, in an auction room, in a junk shop?

0:38:190:38:22

-It was in a car-boot sale.

-How long ago?

0:38:220:38:25

-About three years ago.

-And how much did you pay for it?

0:38:250:38:28

We only paid... It was certainly less than five pounds

0:38:280:38:30

for the whole box of books, and this was just something inside.

0:38:300:38:34

His signature isn't that rare.

0:38:340:38:36

Later in life, when the he was producing limited edition prints,

0:38:360:38:39

he was signing things all day long.

0:38:390:38:41

And I think he even got to a stage where he charged you

0:38:410:38:44

a few quid just for a signature.

0:38:440:38:46

So the signature isn't rare.

0:38:460:38:47

On the side of a limited edition print,

0:38:470:38:50

his signature would make it work between five and £1,500.

0:38:500:38:53

I think you could put this into auction with

0:38:530:38:55

a value of £80 to £120.

0:38:550:38:57

-Wow.

-That would be superb, wouldn't it?

-That's very good.

0:38:570:39:01

Signature. It's 50. Yes, we're off.

0:39:020:39:04

60. 70. Are you 80? 90.

0:39:040:39:07

Perhaps even 100?

0:39:070:39:08

Yes, 100 on bid there.

0:39:080:39:10

And ten. And 20 now.

0:39:100:39:12

And 30. 140.

0:39:120:39:14

150. 160.

0:39:140:39:16

170. 180.

0:39:160:39:18

Are you 90? 190 then I am selling.

0:39:180:39:20

For £190... Thank you.

0:39:200:39:24

Done. £190!

0:39:240:39:26

Not bad for a five-pound purchase.

0:39:310:39:33

But signatures can be easily faked,

0:39:350:39:37

so provenance in this field will always stand you in good stead.

0:39:370:39:41

This is a real thriller. Sorry to start on that, I couldn't resist it.

0:39:410:39:45

-I was going to say, "Is it bad?" I don't know.

-It's dangerous.

0:39:450:39:49

-It's a great thing to have on "Flog It!".

-Thank you so much.

0:39:500:39:53

It is a powerful image. It is great to see it signed.

0:39:530:39:56

The thing that was so good about that was it was huge!

0:39:560:40:00

It was... You could not miss who that autograph was from.

0:40:000:40:05

You look at that and it has got a Michael Jackson image on a Michael

0:40:050:40:08

Jackson poster with a great big, wonderful Michael Jackson signature.

0:40:080:40:12

What's the story?

0:40:120:40:14

Well, my wife and I moved down, after 30 years in the army,

0:40:140:40:17

we moved down south to Hampshire.

0:40:170:40:19

We befriended a Portuguese couple who lived across the road.

0:40:190:40:24

They approached me one day, saying, "David, I won't see you for two weeks,

0:40:240:40:27

"cos we have some VIPs coming here and I've signed this secrecy document

0:40:270:40:32

-"not to say who it is."

-That was him?

0:40:320:40:34

-It was Michael Jackson!

-No!

0:40:340:40:36

I didn't know at the time, but Tony'd had a word with him and said,

0:40:360:40:39

"David and Jenny, they love your music

0:40:390:40:41

"and they've been unable to see you."

0:40:410:40:43

He says, "Look, Tony, I'm going to sign this for David and Jenny."

0:40:430:40:46

And this was a photograph I got from Michael, as well.

0:40:460:40:49

That was taken with Tony's family.

0:40:490:40:51

Provenance is so important with autographs.

0:40:520:40:55

It's very easy to get conned on autographs.

0:40:550:40:59

So, any time when you've got somebody who can say,

0:40:590:41:03

"This is who he was with, this is why he was there,

0:41:030:41:06

"this is the photograph of him being there,

0:41:060:41:09

"and this is the provenance of where it came from." Brilliant!

0:41:090:41:11

Can't get any better than that.

0:41:110:41:14

Now, a Michael Jackson signed poster, it's got a great image.

0:41:140:41:18

It's a fantastic size.

0:41:180:41:22

And, in a way, one of the things that makes it genuine

0:41:220:41:25

-is the fact that it's been signed and personalised to you.

-Yes.

0:41:250:41:30

-But, that is against it in terms of value.

-Of course it is.

0:41:300:41:34

Because not everyone wants a Michael Jackson signature

0:41:340:41:38

with David written on the front.

0:41:380:41:40

It's something that I think is worth £300 to £500.

0:41:400:41:43

-Fantastic. Absolutely.

-Let's give it a chance. I'm sure it should do well.

0:41:430:41:47

MUSIC: "Bad" by Michael Jackson

0:41:470:41:50

Michael Jackson was an important figure,

0:41:520:41:55

so his autograph is really quite important

0:41:550:41:59

and probably a good one to get

0:41:590:42:02

if you're an autograph collector

0:42:020:42:05

of the entertainment industry.

0:42:050:42:07

What can we say? Michael Jackson, iconic figure of the 20th century.

0:42:070:42:12

Will you start me at £200?

0:42:160:42:18

260.

0:42:180:42:19

280.

0:42:190:42:20

I'll take 10. 290.

0:42:200:42:23

300.

0:42:230:42:25

£300.

0:42:260:42:28

With you, sir, at £300.

0:42:280:42:32

Good.

0:42:340:42:35

That's a very good price. With your name on it.

0:42:350:42:40

All done at 300? 300.

0:42:400:42:42

-Anita's done really well.

-She has.

0:42:420:42:45

It's most valuable when he's most well known,

0:42:450:42:47

when he's most in the media.

0:42:470:42:49

And, of course, when he passed away,

0:42:490:42:52

that's when he was most in the media.

0:42:520:42:55

I reckon that was probably worth more THEN than it is now.

0:42:550:42:58

But if you want to make a profit from selling signatures,

0:43:020:43:06

there's one rock'n'roll band that will always make you money,

0:43:060:43:10

IF the autographs are right.

0:43:100:43:12

He's collecting Mecca.

0:43:120:43:13

We've got Beatles Paul McCartney and John Lennon.

0:43:130:43:16

And so our first question is - how do you know that they're real?

0:43:160:43:20

Because I actually got them signed.

0:43:200:43:22

I was there with my autograph book as they turned up to a pop concert.

0:43:220:43:27

Number 971 now. The two 1960s autograph albums,

0:43:270:43:31

-including John Lennon.

-The Beatles' autographs should sell that alone.

0:43:310:43:35

At 840. 860 on the other telephone.

0:43:350:43:37

-£860 now.

-Gosh!

0:43:370:43:40

860 is bid, on the other telephone, against you on the internet. At £860.

0:43:400:43:45

At £860. It's going to be sold.

0:43:450:43:48

All done at 860.

0:43:480:43:51

-Yes!

-My goodness!

-£860.

-That's just lovely.

0:43:520:43:56

Pretty good result? But James thinks it could've been even better.

0:43:570:44:02

Three Beatles without John Lennon, what are they worth? £1,000?

0:44:020:44:07

You add John Lennon, it doubles it.

0:44:070:44:10

If it's on a rare photograph that isn't part of a press release,

0:44:100:44:16

then you can double it and treble it again.

0:44:160:44:19

Because you've got the image, you've got the look as well as the signatures.

0:44:190:44:23

If the signatures were on the front, brilliant,

0:44:230:44:25

if it was on the back of the photograph, it doesn't make any difference at all.

0:44:250:44:30

So, what are the dos and don'ts of collecting autographs?

0:44:300:44:34

Do find an area that fascinates you

0:44:340:44:37

and do buy the very best that you can.

0:44:370:44:40

Do try to find out the provenance of the autographs

0:44:400:44:44

because this is the thing which will authenticate it.

0:44:440:44:48

And do beware of fakes and facsimiles.

0:44:480:44:52

Another 20th century collectable worth looking out for is technology.

0:44:540:44:58

In our lifetimes, we've seen huge advances in this field

0:44:580:45:02

and with such a glut of gadgets on the market,

0:45:020:45:05

collectors are always looking out for that little added extra.

0:45:050:45:09

-Does this set up belong to you?

-No, it doesn't.

0:45:090:45:12

It belonged to my late brother.

0:45:120:45:14

He was a very keen photographer.

0:45:140:45:16

Do you know what date he bought it?

0:45:160:45:18

Yes. He bought it in 1951.

0:45:180:45:20

OK. And do you know how much he paid for it, as well?

0:45:200:45:24

He paid £125 for it.

0:45:240:45:26

How do you know that?

0:45:260:45:27

Unfortunately, I haven't got the receipt with me, this morning.

0:45:270:45:30

That's how I was aware how much it cost, how much he paid for it

0:45:300:45:35

and when he bought it.

0:45:350:45:37

He's obviously decided to pay that little bit extra for a good name.

0:45:370:45:41

The Leica name is one that is well collected.

0:45:410:45:45

'Leica are particular collected

0:45:450:45:47

'because they were pioneers'

0:45:470:45:50

in camera design.

0:45:500:45:52

It was 1913, I think, that the first prototype came out.

0:45:520:45:55

And the idea was, quite simply,

0:45:550:45:57

to make a small, lightweight, compact camera

0:45:570:46:01

for taking landscape photographs.

0:46:010:46:03

What it was reacting against were those big Victorian plate cameras

0:46:030:46:07

where you had to lug 100 things with you,

0:46:070:46:10

you had to put a towel over your head, you've got a phosphorus flash.

0:46:100:46:14

What they wanted - small, compact, affordable and good quality.

0:46:140:46:19

That's why they're important in the history of cameras.

0:46:190:46:21

-Date-wise, you say he bought it in 1951.

-Yes.

0:46:210:46:25

-So he would have probably bought it new.

-I would think so. Yes.

0:46:250:46:28

Because I've had a look at the serial number which is how you date the cameras, the Leicas.

0:46:280:46:34

-And it's dating at 1950.

-Oh, so it was new!

0:46:340:46:38

-Ties in nicely, doesn't it?

-Yes.

0:46:380:46:40

So, the fact that one owner, fresh to market,

0:46:400:46:42

that's two boxes ticked as far as a collector is concerned.

0:46:420:46:45

The more important bits here are going to be the camera itself,

0:46:450:46:49

the lens that's already with it,

0:46:490:46:51

and then you've got the spare lens and the original box,

0:46:510:46:54

which is a nice touch, and again, that does add value.

0:46:540:46:56

If I said to you, can we put it in sale at £200-300...

0:46:560:47:00

-would you be happy with that?

-Yes, I would.

0:47:000:47:03

That would be very nice.

0:47:030:47:05

Fortunately, Dorothy found the receipt

0:47:050:47:08

and added it to the lot.

0:47:080:47:10

-You've got the original receipt.

-I have.

0:47:100:47:12

That's always a nice touch when you're selling things.

0:47:120:47:15

-Just adds a bit of provenance to something and people like that.

-Yes.

0:47:150:47:19

I can start the bidding here at 120 on the book, with a bid at 120.

0:47:190:47:23

Is it 130 now? 130. 140. 140. 150.

0:47:230:47:28

150. 160. 170. 180. 190. 200.

0:47:280:47:31

210. 200 on my left. At 200.

0:47:310:47:33

I'm going to sell it at £200. Is there any further advance?

0:47:330:47:36

It's going to be sold. Are you done?

0:47:360:47:39

Yes. We got it away. £200.

0:47:390:47:41

-Happy?

-Yes!

-Dorothy, Dorothy, you're not saying anything.

-Yes.

0:47:420:47:46

I'm very happy. Thank you very much.

0:47:460:47:48

-Got me worried then.

-I'm very happy.

0:47:480:47:50

When it comes to cameras, like I've said, Leica really is the top name.

0:47:500:47:54

I mean, you're talking Premier League, there.

0:47:540:47:57

And the collectors will pay a lot of money for the right camera.

0:47:570:48:01

And when I say "the right camera",

0:48:010:48:03

I'm talking pre-war for a start, before mass production,

0:48:030:48:06

say prototypes or short production runs of a certain model.

0:48:060:48:09

I think the Leica Lexus, a very small number made.

0:48:090:48:13

At auction, you're talking half a million pounds.

0:48:130:48:18

I mean, that is big money for a camera.

0:48:180:48:20

If you want to invest in something produced during YOUR lifetime,

0:48:240:48:28

very modern items can be surprisingly valuable.

0:48:280:48:31

And as Philip discovered in a valuation day in Stockport,

0:48:310:48:35

the right place, time and subject matter

0:48:350:48:37

can create magic in the sale room.

0:48:370:48:39

Tell me, what do you know about these, then?

0:48:390:48:42

-What's the artist's name?

-Well, it's Trevor Grimshaw.

-Trevor Grimshaw?

0:48:420:48:47

-He's a local artist. Lived in this area, lived in Hythe.

-How local?

0:48:470:48:52

He lived in Hythe, which is probably about seven or eight miles from here.

0:48:520:48:56

Until I went to that valuation day, I've got to hold my hand up,

0:48:560:48:59

Grimshaw was not a man that I'd heard of.

0:48:590:49:02

Philip phoned me from the valuation day, and he said,

0:49:020:49:05

"I've got two drawings here by a fellow called Trevor Grimshaw.

0:49:050:49:08

"Tell me all about him."

0:49:080:49:10

Well, Trevor Grimshaw is one of the leading artists

0:49:100:49:13

of the Northern area, I suppose.

0:49:130:49:15

He was a Stockport-based artist, born in 1947,

0:49:150:49:18

and he was an extremely talented draughtsman -

0:49:180:49:21

very accurate, fine pencil drawing.

0:49:210:49:24

He was very fond of the industrial landscape

0:49:240:49:26

as all the Northern school were inspired by Lowry, et cetera.

0:49:260:49:30

But these ones were the best I've ever seen.

0:49:300:49:32

Did you buy them in a gallery?

0:49:320:49:34

No, we went to his house and we bought them at his house.

0:49:340:49:38

I had a bit of a connection with Trevor

0:49:380:49:41

as I had some insurance business with his family.

0:49:410:49:44

So, you were an insurance agent to Mr Grimshaw.

0:49:440:49:47

What period of time was this?

0:49:470:49:50

This was in...dating from the late '70s to 2000 and something.

0:49:500:49:56

But, we decided, one Christmas, we'd buy something a bit different.

0:49:560:50:00

So, we thought, let's get each other a picture.

0:50:000:50:02

The thing that I liked about the two, was that you had the one

0:50:020:50:06

with the train and the other one with the landscape,

0:50:060:50:08

and I think, for me, it was a little bit out of period,

0:50:080:50:12

because the train looked very much like it was Art Deco

0:50:120:50:16

and I think this chap painted in the 1980s, 1990s.

0:50:160:50:19

I mean, these are trying to be what? '30s? '20s or '30s?

0:50:190:50:22

They're depicting Northern scenes,

0:50:220:50:25

how they were, with the chimneys and the smoke.

0:50:250:50:28

-You know, and the canals.

-So, Stacia, what did you pay for this one?

0:50:280:50:32

For this one, it was £150 and this one was 100.

0:50:320:50:36

I would put an estimate on this one of 800-£1,200.

0:50:360:50:40

This one I think is a little bit less.

0:50:400:50:42

And we should perhaps put 600 to 900 on it.

0:50:420:50:45

But I wouldn't be surprised if these went and made £2,000, £2,500.

0:50:450:50:51

Northern artists are massively, massively sought after.

0:50:510:50:56

And you are going to just the right place to sell these.

0:50:560:50:59

We've got a Northern artist in a Northern sale room with Northern collectors.

0:50:590:51:04

And if you tick those three boxes, you can't fail, really.

0:51:040:51:08

Adam was also pretty confident these were going to fly.

0:51:100:51:13

I've sold loads of Grimshaws,

0:51:130:51:14

but those were probably the best I've seen

0:51:140:51:16

and the biggest I've seen, so I'm really excited about them.

0:51:160:51:19

-And how are we on the value?

-Just right, just where you want them.

0:51:190:51:22

Enough to promote them, to entice people to bid on them.

0:51:220:51:25

That's it, "I've got a chance. At 800, I've got a chance."

0:51:250:51:27

Everybody's queuing up to bid £800 for them

0:51:270:51:30

and no-one's going to get them anywhere near.

0:51:300:51:32

They're going to be four figures each, without a doubt.

0:51:320:51:34

950 here, I'll take £1,000 in the room.

0:51:370:51:40

At 950, take 1,000, and 50.

0:51:400:51:41

1,150, 1,250, 1,300 in the room now.

0:51:430:51:47

1,300, I'll take 50.

0:51:470:51:49

1,350. 1,400. 50.

0:51:490:51:52

1,500...

0:51:520:51:54

2,400, 2,500.

0:51:540:51:57

2,600, 2,700.

0:51:570:52:00

-2,800, 2,900.

-Pity you didn't buy a few more.

0:52:000:52:04

£3,800 for the first one, is there 3,900?

0:52:040:52:07

£3,800, are you all done on the first one now?

0:52:090:52:13

£3,800.

0:52:130:52:15

Thank you very much.

0:52:170:52:18

£3,800. Let's see what the second one does.

0:52:180:52:22

-What a great investment.

-27, the next one.

0:52:220:52:25

Onto 609.

0:52:250:52:27

It's the next Trevor Grimshaw industrial landscape with canal.

0:52:270:52:31

You've got 600. I've got 800 to start. I'll take 20. 820.

0:52:310:52:36

840, 860, 880, 900,

0:52:360:52:38

and 20, 960, 980, 1,050, 1,150, 1,250.

0:52:380:52:43

In the room, 1,250. 1,300, 50, 1,400, 50.

0:52:430:52:48

1,500, 50, 1,600? 1,550.

0:52:480:52:52

At 1,550, 1,600, and 50.

0:52:520:52:57

Pleased?

0:52:570:52:59

2,300, 2,400,

0:52:590:53:03

2,500, 2,600,

0:53:030:53:06

2,700, 2,800.

0:53:060:53:10

2,700 this time, at 2,700.

0:53:100:53:14

-Try not to be disappointed.

-That's not a bad guess, is it?

0:53:140:53:17

2,800, we are back on. 2,800, it's not over, 2,900, 3,000.

0:53:170:53:22

It's still going.

0:53:220:53:24

2,900 this time.

0:53:240:53:26

At £2,900, are you done?

0:53:260:53:29

Thank you very much.

0:53:300:53:33

-I never expected that.

-No.

-£6,700!

0:53:330:53:38

That's what we call a great "Flog It!" surprise.

0:53:380:53:41

-I think we paid 250.

-250.

-Is that what you paid?

-Yes, yeah.

0:53:410:53:44

-For the two?

-For the two, yes.

0:53:440:53:47

I was surprised that they made quite that much.

0:53:470:53:50

I did think that they might make a couple of thousand each,

0:53:500:53:52

based on similar ones that we've had.

0:53:520:53:54

But there was lots of buyers for these and they were all private collectors.

0:53:540:53:58

They're a passionate bunch and they all want to own the best possible works.

0:53:580:54:02

People like to be reminded of home.

0:54:020:54:05

So, if you come from the North and you buy Northern art,

0:54:050:54:08

you might not necessarily live there,

0:54:080:54:10

but it's an area of collectability

0:54:100:54:12

that just reminds you where you come from.

0:54:120:54:14

He seems to get missed a lot by people.

0:54:140:54:16

Quite often we get people come in,

0:54:160:54:18

having bought his at charity shops and car-boot sales,

0:54:180:54:20

he's one of the major ones, that I suppose

0:54:200:54:23

if you're out there bargain hunting, you might just have a chance.

0:54:230:54:26

Look for very fine quality draughtsmanship

0:54:260:54:29

and for trains and for gloominess and for Northern industrial

0:54:290:54:33

and his signature's quite often hard to make out. Have a punt.

0:54:330:54:37

There's an area that you might make a few pounds.

0:54:370:54:39

So, here's a few things to remember

0:54:420:54:44

if you're interested in collectables made in living memory.

0:54:440:54:48

Provenance is key.

0:54:480:54:50

It can make the difference between pounds and pence if you're selling.

0:54:500:54:54

If you're into gadgets, look for those manufactured

0:54:540:54:57

before mass production made them commonplace.

0:54:570:55:00

And even if you've never heard of them,

0:55:000:55:02

an artist whose work perfectly captures a time and a place

0:55:020:55:06

could prove a fantastic investment.

0:55:060:55:08

There's nothing quite like childhood

0:55:140:55:17

to evoke all sorts of wonderful memories, especially a toy as iconic

0:55:170:55:21

as the one Caroline showed Catherine Southon

0:55:210:55:24

at a valuation day in Chippenham back in 2005.

0:55:240:55:27

Caroline, this is what I like to see. Toys in their original boxes.

0:55:270:55:31

Now, you and I are probably

0:55:310:55:33

a little too young to remember Muffin the Mule on TV.

0:55:330:55:36

But certainly he was an important character for children

0:55:360:55:40

of the 1950s and early '60s on BBC One.

0:55:400:55:42

How did Muffin the Mule come into your family?

0:55:420:55:46

He's either my mum's or my dad's. They both had one,

0:55:460:55:49

-so we've got another one up in the attic somewhere.

-Something like this,

0:55:490:55:52

they're probably not as popular as they once were

0:55:520:55:55

about ten years ago when the toy market was a bit stronger.

0:55:550:55:58

But, nevertheless,

0:55:580:55:59

I think you should still ask about £60-80 at auction.

0:55:590:56:03

I don't think my parents were very fond of Muffin the Mule,

0:56:030:56:06

but we had to downsize and clear out the attic,

0:56:060:56:09

so I think they were just keen to make some space

0:56:090:56:11

and see it go to a good home.

0:56:110:56:13

Caroline had outgrown childhood playthings,

0:56:140:56:17

and her parents wanted to help her raise some money

0:56:170:56:20

to invest in grown-up toys.

0:56:200:56:22

I started rowing in 1997, I went to college here in Oxford

0:56:220:56:27

and my friend who rowed persuaded me to go along

0:56:270:56:30

and do a couple of training sessions.

0:56:300:56:32

I think we had three outings and then we raced, and we won the race

0:56:320:56:35

and I just fell in love with the sport from that moment on.

0:56:350:56:39

But rowing is an expensive hobby

0:56:390:56:41

so off to the market Muffin trotted.

0:56:410:56:44

We've had one on the show before and we sold it for £90.

0:56:440:56:46

So, fingers crossed we can get a little bit more today.

0:56:460:56:49

It should do. What worries me slightly,

0:56:490:56:51

I don't know if there's that many toy buyers here.

0:56:510:56:53

There doesn't seem to be a lot of them.

0:56:530:56:55

There's not many toys, I think it's about the only toy here.

0:56:550:56:58

It might be a little bit lost, that's the only thing that worries me,

0:56:580:57:01

but it would've been nice if it had been displayed with all the strings showing.

0:57:010:57:04

Hanging up somewhere near the rostrum!

0:57:040:57:06

Anyway, let's hope someone's picked it out of the catalogue. Here we go.

0:57:060:57:10

This is it.

0:57:100:57:11

And 531, Moko Muffin the Mule

0:57:110:57:14

in his original box, articulating joints.

0:57:140:57:18

-And apparently, it's just coming back onto the television.

-It is.

0:57:180:57:22

I didn't know that.

0:57:220:57:25

Absolutely fantastic and I have got commission bids,

0:57:250:57:28

so it makes life ever so easy. I'll start the bidding at £90.

0:57:280:57:32

-Oh, that's excellent.

-At £90, at 90, I'll take five.

0:57:320:57:36

At £90, at 90.

0:57:360:57:38

Five anywhere else?

0:57:380:57:40

At £90, then. It's going to a good home. At 90, all done.

0:57:400:57:45

Yes! 90 quid! What are you going to do with the 90 quid?

0:57:450:57:48

-I'm saving towards a sculling boat.

-It's a start.

-It's all contributing.

0:57:480:57:51

I did want to use the money from the show to buy a sculling boat,

0:57:570:58:01

but they're very expensive. Probably a couple of thousand pounds

0:58:010:58:05

and so, the £90 that we got from Muffin the Mule didn't go that far.

0:58:050:58:08

So with the money I made, I bought these blades. They were £395.

0:58:080:58:12

The £90 from "Flog It!" probably bought me this much.

0:58:120:58:18

It's always a pleasure to hear

0:58:210:58:23

that "Flog It!" was able to help out - albeit in a small way.

0:58:230:58:27

If you've got any unloved toys you want to sell

0:58:270:58:29

or any other antiques or collectables for that matter, you know where to come.

0:58:290:58:33

Well, that's it for today's show, so go on, go out there, have fun,

0:58:330:58:37

buy some antiques and join us again soon for more Trade Secrets.

0:58:370:58:41

Presenter Paul Martin and the Flog It! team offer some trade secrets on what makes a good modern collectable. Mark Stacey explains the appeal of a piece of 20th century commemorative china, while Philip Serrell and Charlie Ross investigate collectable cars - the real McCoy, as opposed to the toy variety.


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