Winchester 8 Flog It!


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Winchester 8

Antiques programme. Experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion accompany Paul Martin to the Guildhall in Winchester for valuations.


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Hello and welcome to the Guild Hall in the stunning city of Winchester, England's ancient capital.

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Today we're hoping to unearth some treasures from this massive queue!

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So come on, you lot! Are you ready to flog it?

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What a fabulous queue we've got here today,

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even if the weather is a little bit inclement. Here are our experts,

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Christina Trevanion and James Lewis, a font of knowledge!

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They've all come here to ask that all-important question...

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What's it worth? Exactly!

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Stay tuned, because there will be one or two surprises today.

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Somebody will go home with a lot of money and they don't know it yet and it's our job to find it.

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So let's get the doors open and get the show on the road.

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'Coming up on today's programme - Rita introduces Christina to an old friend.'

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-What's her name?

-Fanny Tinker.

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'James goes down memory lane.'

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My thoughts go back to my grandfather telling me the stories of the navy.

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'And I go in search of the next generation of art stars.'

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Creative imagination!

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'So it's over to the valuation tables we go

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'and Christina's first off the starting block with Rita's exquisite pearl brooch.'

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-Is this a relative of yours?

-It was a relative of my husband.

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-Right, OK.

-It belonged initially to his great grandmother.

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So that would about tie in with the date.

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-Yes.

-We pretty much know exactly when it dates from. There's a nice date of 1853 on the back. Wonderful.

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-So it came down from your husband's grandmother?

-Yes.

-And do you know if she ever wore it?

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-No, I don't, no.

-And do you ever wear it?

-Not at all.

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What a shame! It's such a beautiful brooch. You've got this wonderful gold scroll around here.

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-A nice gold scroll border. Somebody mentioned you've had it tested as gold.

-I have.

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-And it looks like it's 18-carat.

-They didn't say it was 18-carat, just that it was gold.

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-OK.

-There's no hallmark on the back.

-That's absolutely right.

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That's not unusual for this sort of date. We wouldn't expect one.

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Oh, I expected it to have and I thought it may be pinchbeck, but it's tested as gold.

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-So we've got the nice gold border and then lovely freshwater seed pearls.

-Yes.

-Pearls, unfortunately,

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were supposed to symbolise tears in the Victorian era. Do you know if this was a mourning brooch?

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I don't know really very much about it at all.

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-If we look at the back, it gives us a little more information.

-Yes.

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There's a wonderful inscription and it tells us that this lady on the front was probably...

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-Fanny Tinker.

-And where did she live?

-Lower Broughton.

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-Do we know where Lower Broughton was?

-No, I thought it was in the suburbs of Manchester,

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-but I'm not sure about that.

-OK. We hope this is dear Fanny here.

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-And this is her in her prime of life because she looks quite healthy.

-She does.

-It's a beautiful brooch.

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It's a crime that it's not being worn and loved. I think at auction

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we'd probably be looking somewhere in the region of maybe £200-£300.

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-How does that sound to you?

-That's fine.

-If we put it forwards

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with an estimate of £200-£300 and hope somebody will wear it,

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we'll probably give it a reserve of about £200 on it

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-and hope we can find it a nice new home.

-That would be fine.

-Super.

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-And what will you put the money towards?

-I have a granddaughter getting married in June.

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-I thought it might go towards the flowers.

-A wonderful idea.

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-Huge congratulations. A good party to look forward to!

-Yes!

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That's wonderful news.

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'Let's hope Fanny Tinker manages to tickle someone's fancy when she goes up for auction.

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'On the other side of the room, it looks like Cecilia and Andy have commandeered James's table

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'with their maritime-themed pictures.'

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Thank you so much for bringing these wonderful little etchings into Flog It today.

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-They're great examples of a local artist's work.

-Yes.

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Tell me, are they family pieces or from a car boot sale...?

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-They are family pieces.

-They are?

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They belonged to my grandfather. He was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy.

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-Right.

-And we think he may have known Rowland Langmaid.

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Why do you think that? Tell me.

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We know that Langmaid was in Africa at some point.

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Also my grandfather was in Africa and he was arrested.

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-He used to go fairly brown when he was in the sun.

-Right.

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-He was arrested for being a black man drinking in a white man's bar.

-You're joking!

-It's true.

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-They had to send for his commander to prove he was actually white.

-No?!

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-Yes.

-He used to go so brown and with the white suit...

-Oh, how ridiculous!

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-What a comment on the times, eh?

-Yes.

-My grandfather was in the Royal Navy

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and that's why, as soon as I see naval pictures, my thoughts go back to my grandfather, sitting with him

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telling me stories of the navy. And these are classic naval scenes.

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If you're looking at engravings and etchings that are marine subjects,

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-the first name that comes to mind is William Wyllie.

-That's right.

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But Langmaid was a pupil of his and worked under him.

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He was an official artist for the Royal Navy. He was a seaman in the First World War

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and was onboard HMS Agamemnon.

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He did a lot of the official sketches of the landing parties.

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Here we have a sailing ship in full sail and the little yachts at the front.

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-This scene here, is this a London scene?

-No, it's Portsmouth.

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I think it's called Leaving Portsmouth and that is the tower.

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-At Sally Port.

-At Sally Port.

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-This one is probably the best image.

-Yes.

-Luckily, it's also in the best condition.

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Here we've got a very serious water mark straight across the front.

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-I think this one is pretty much a goner.

-Yes.

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We almost ignore this one. Here we've got a little bit of foxing, a little water damage,

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but generally reasonable condition.

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-So I'm going to value them as a two, not a three.

-Yes.

-Yes.

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They make £50-£70 each, something like that.

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So if we put an estimate of £100-£150 on all three,

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-and we need to protect them with a reserve. £100?

-Yes.

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-The auctioneer has a bit of discretion, so if he gets 90, he'll still let them go.

-That's fine.

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Let's take them along and see how they do. It's the perfect place to sell them.

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'We'll be back to see if those Portsmouth prints make waves in just a moment.

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'Sticking with the maritime theme, as I dip into the queue and look at a rather rare artefact

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'that Dilys has brought along.'

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-I'm not sure if it's a ship's log or is it...

-A captain's journal?

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-Yeah.

-I don't think there are any latitudes or longitudes or any sailing destinations.

-No.

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-He's going through an inventory of guns here.

-That's right.

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-And the cannons.

-Yes.

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-And the names of personnel.

-Yes.

-I think this is absolutely fascinating, I really do.

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-I'd like to know more about it.

-Yes.

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-This needs a lot of research and a lot of looking at.

-It does.

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We need to start with the name of the vessel and the date.

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-The date is 1715.

-It's 1715.

-Definitely 1715.

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-It's not in a wonderful condition.

-It's in pretty good condition for its age.

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-The spine is in very good condition.

-Yes, that's true.

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-I shall take this away...

-Yes?

-..and let someone else have a quick look and we'll come back to you.

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We'll do a little bit of research and hopefully give you some news and put it into auction.

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'I'll be back to give Dilys's maritime journal a proper valuation a little later on in the show.

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'But first, it looks like Christina has sniffed out a real gem

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'with Jennifer's silver snuff box.'

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-This is the most lovely silver snuff box you've brought in.

-Thank you.

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-Where has it come from?

-It comes from my father's side of the family.

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I inherited it when my mother passed away.

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I believe it belonged to my grandmother, who was widowed very young with three small children.

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-She later met somebody else and I think this belonged to him.

-Right.

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-Sadly, he passed away before they got married.

-Well, the box itself

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is a little bit of a mystery. If we look on the cover,

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it says, "Presented to Horace Hague, Head Warden 'A' Group, Doncaster Civil Defence,

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-"by his colleagues, 19th July, 1945."

-Yes.

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-Do we know who Horace Hague was?

-I think it was this gentleman.

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-So he was held in very high regard by his colleagues.

-I think so.

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-But 1945 is slightly misleading.

-It is.

-If we look on the inside,

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being silver, if we open it up,

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we've got the most wonderful hallmark for Birmingham.

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We've got the anchor. We've also got a date letter.

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-In this case, it's a capital D, which is indicative of 1852.

-Yes.

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And we've also got the maker's initials - ES. That's actually Edward Smith.

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He was registered in 1826

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and he went through to about 1863.

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-So that fits in perfectly with our 1852 date.

-Yes.

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He was known for making what we call small works - little boxes, vinaigrettes -

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so slightly confusing that we've got quite a late inscription on what is a very Victorian box.

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It could well be that they've had the original inscription removed

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and had this inscribed at a later date, 1945.

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-I think at auction we might be looking somewhere in the region of £100-£200.

-Wow.

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This inscription might put a few people off, but hopefully we'll find someone that is more forgiving.

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-Perhaps it'll go back to Doncaster.

-Perhaps it will!

-You never know.

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With all this internet bidding, you never know!

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-So why are you selling it?

-I inherited quite a lot of trinkets

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-from my mother. She was a bit of a squirrel.

-Oh, was she?

-Yes.

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-I collect cut glass and silver-topped boxes and bottles.

-OK.

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So I'd like to sell it and perhaps buy something for my collection.

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That's a great idea. You can add to your collection.

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-I think £100-£200 with perhaps a firm reserve of £100.

-Lovely.

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'Priced to sell! That snuff box is certain to give Jennifer

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'enough cash to expand her cut glass collection.'

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'Now, James seems to be making a big fuss

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'over the item that Jackie and Paul have brought along.'

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-Thanks so much for bringing what has to be the biggest piece of Moorcroft I have seen in years.

-Lovely.

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-Is it a family piece?

-Yes.

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-It was my mum's and she died, what, about 26 years ago?

-26 years ago.

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26 years ago. Obviously, it was left to us then.

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I think it must be between 50 and 60 years minimum.

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Yeah. Let's turn it over because that will tell you lots of information.

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We've got "W Moorcroft, potter to HM the Queen".

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OK. And it's "WM". It's the WM script mark, "made in England" mark,

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so it is about that sort of date.

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-Late '40s, '50s.

-I see.

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It's a wonderful shape, that globular shape.

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-It's beautiful.

-Anemone pattern. The colours are super.

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We see a lot of Moorcroft, so I won't go on about the history

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because we've heard it... What's that I've tipped out? A rubber band?

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-Probably.

-What do you keep in there?

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When my daughter comes round, she puts her poodle's coat in there.

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-A poodle's coat?

-And the dog lead.

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-And three balls that it plays with.

-Oh, no.

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-What if the poodle wants its balls?

-It bounces up and down, hoping to get high enough.

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-I hope it can't.

-No, definitely not.

-Dear me!

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You need to find another big vase.

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-That's right.

-Because this is a wonderful piece of art pottery.

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This pattern started in 1938.

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From 1939 to 1945, during the war,

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there was a restriction on the use of colours

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because the last thing you wanted was somebody in a ceramics studio

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-using your cobalt oxide to make a blue glaze when it could be going to the war effort.

-That's right.

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After the war when the restrictions were lifted on the use of colour,

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you get a lot of rather strange combinations of colour,

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-so it's a classic of its time.

-Yes.

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-So you obviously watch Flog It.

-Yes, all the time.

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You know your values. What do you think it's worth?

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We're hopeful that it might be worth around 1,000.

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-OK...

-But obviously, we'd like to know from you as well.

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-I think that's a lot.

-You do?

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I'd like to put an estimate of 400 to 600

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-which is a lot less than you were hoping.

-Hmm.

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But...

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We could put 5 to 8.

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-What do you think?

-I think £1,000 for it is too high.

-Right.

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-I don't think... Goodness me, would I love to be proved wrong!

-Yes.

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-I'd be jumping up and down.

-I would love you to be proved wrong.

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-We're selling it really because it's our golden wedding coming up.

-OK.

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We want to do a rather large party.

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I don't know. Could we sort of do something like 7 to 8?

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It's your vase, it's your thing and you have to be happy with it. Why don't we put 7 to 9?

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-That would be lovely.

-7 to 9.

-That would be fine.

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I think we're really pushing it,

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but let's put an estimate of 700 to 900,

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a reserve of 7, and if it doesn't make that, you'll have to tone your party down a bit.

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-That's fine.

-That sounds lovely.

-Is that all right?

-Yes.

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'Join me as I head over to a magnificent stately home

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'for the ultimate art and history indulgence.'

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I often imagine one day I'm going to be lord of the manor and own a great big stately pile like this.

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Look at that. Isn't it magnificent? It's what dreams are made of.

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But sadly, this dream comes to a crushing end when you realise the price tag involved,

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but for one Hampshire woman, her dream became a reality and it didn't cost her a penny.

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I'm here to find out exactly how she pulled it off.

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'Kerry Bignell is the house steward for the National Trust property, Mottisfont Abbey,

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'a former medieval priory nestling in the heart of rural Hampshire.

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'Dating all the way back to 1201, this place is simply bursting with history.

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'Eight years ago, after turning her back on London and her career in TV,

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'she successfully applied for the post of conservation assistant

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'and was handed the keys to this place where she has since worked her way up to house steward.'

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Kerry, I've got to say, I really do love your work space. Look at that.

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What a fantastic backdrop! What's the best thing about living in such a house?

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Not just the building, but the grounds, the wildlife. We're surrounded by ducks.

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You're always using your imagination because you're thinking what was happening then.

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-Walking through the previous owners' footsteps?

-Yes.

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Trying to imagine how they felt about the place as well.

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You do hear odd things at night.

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-I bet you do.

-And I don't think it's the heating.

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I've heard a lady's voice a number of times at the front door of the apartment,

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saying, "Hello, hello," and other people have heard it as well.

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-But there's no ill feeling with it.

-No.

-It's got a wonderful, happy feeling, this place.

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It's very serene, very tranquil.

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What type of experience do you hope the public get from coming here?

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-Very, very enjoyable.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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I hope they can become passionate about the place like I have.

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I'm going to go off and explore for myself and take it all in because there's just so much history here.

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-Please do.

-Thank you for having a chat with me.

-You're welcome.

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Mottisfont was originally an Augustine priory,

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but during the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the 16th century, the place was completely demolished.

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Little of the Tudor building that replaced the abbey remains today,

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but evidence of the past can still be found if you look carefully.

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Here, in the Cellarium, for example, you can see remnants of the former abbey

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and the lower two storeys of this staircase date back to the Tudor period.

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This epic room which runs along the south front of the house is the Long Gallery, installed in the 1740s

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by Mottisfont's third wave of occupants, the Barker-Mills family.

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They set about remodelling the house into the form that we see today, on the outside at least.

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But it's Mottisfont's last private owner, Maud Russell,

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who made the biggest impression on the inside of this magnificent house.

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She had a wonderful eye, wonderful taste as well.

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In 1934, Maud, along with her husband Gilbert, took up residence at Mottisfont.

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Maud was a real patron of the arts and enjoyed using this place as the backdrop to her lavish parties,

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inviting some of the biggest creatives of the day,

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people like photographer Cecil Beaton, artist Rex Whistler

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and other members of the Bright Young Things set.

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Maud quickly embarked on a major transformation,

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adding a wing to the west front before injecting a real sense of glamour to the interiors

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with elegant, neo-classical style decorations.

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Oh, gosh, just look at this!

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That's spectacular. If one room in this house really captures Maud's creative flair, it's this one.

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This was formerly the grand entrance hall, but Maud had much loftier plans.

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She commissioned artist Rex Whistler to completely transform this space

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into this wonderful, vaulted drawing room that you see today.

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This technique is known as trompe l'oeil, "trick of the eye", and it's all illusionistic paintwork.

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It's incredibly clever.

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It's bending perspective and vanishing points to create depth where there is no depth.

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Here's an example. The curtains are real, but the swags and the pelmets are all faux.

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These Corinthian columns are not right either. It's very clever.

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Up there is a little message that Rex has left. He was painting this room on the 3rd of September, 1939,

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the day that England declared war on Germany.

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But the project was by no means plain-sailing.

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There was a lot of creative tension between Maud and Whistler.

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Here on this magnificent panel, look at the detail here.

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At the bottom, you've got some gauntlets which were tied together.

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They're Whistler's gloves.

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It's said that the ropes around them show the constraint that he felt across the whole of this project.

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He must have spent months painting this and it must have cost Maud an absolute fortune,

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but being an artist, he had a sense of irony, a sense of humour,

0:21:280:21:33

because he's left a paint pot on the top of that Corinthian column.

0:21:330:21:38

Look up there on that capital, there's a pot and a brush.

0:21:380:21:41

All I want to do is get a large pair of stepladders, climb up there and grab that,

0:21:410:21:47

but you can't because it's not real.

0:21:470:21:50

There's no disputing the awesome impact their joint venture has had on this place.

0:21:570:22:03

They've transformed this room, a blank canvas, into an astonishing work of art.

0:22:030:22:08

You can see how Maud really stamped her personality on this place

0:22:100:22:15

and, as you wander around, you can still feel her presence here today.

0:22:150:22:19

She was a real one-off and her offbeat behaviour certainly set local tongues wagging.

0:22:190:22:25

She was even said to have kept a live crocodile in the nursery.

0:22:250:22:29

Whether rumour or real, one thing's for sure, she certainly made a lasting impression.

0:22:290:22:35

We've got our first four items. Now we're taking them off to the sale.

0:22:460:22:49

Let's hope the bidders will want to snap them up.

0:22:490:22:52

'We've travelled the few miles up the road to Andrew Smith and Sons in Itchen, Stoke, for our auction.'

0:22:550:23:01

I love to see an auction room filling up. There's a buzz in the air and the sale hasn't started.

0:23:040:23:10

Our lots are about to go under the hammer. There could be some big surprises.

0:23:100:23:16

-On the rostrum, two auctioneers - Nick Jarrett and Andrew Smith.

-Last time at £100...

0:23:160:23:22

'All auction houses charge a seller's commission and here at this one it's 15% plus VAT.

0:23:220:23:29

'Before the auction kicks off, I catch up with Andrew Smith

0:23:290:23:34

'about a small discrepancy he's discovered with Rita's gold brooch.'

0:23:340:23:38

-What do you think of this?

-Charming. A quintessential Victorian piece.

0:23:400:23:45

Unfortunately, we think it's gold, but it's not hallmarked.

0:23:450:23:49

So we have it as yellow metal.

0:23:490:23:52

Our experts have put £200-£300 on this for 18-carat gold with seed pearls.

0:23:520:23:58

So it is gold, but technically we can't say it's gold. OK.

0:23:580:24:02

-We're right with the seed pearls?

-Oh, yes.

0:24:020:24:05

-Happy with the valuation?

-Yes. The reserve has been increased since you last saw it.

0:24:050:24:11

Is that down to you or the owner?

0:24:110:24:14

That is down to the owner. It still, we think, will sell at the new guide price, £300-£400.

0:24:140:24:21

-We just have to work harder.

-There's nothing like an easy ride in an auction room.

0:24:210:24:27

-You'll earn your commission!

-Yes.

0:24:270:24:30

'So let's see just how much that missing hallmark matters as Rita joins me

0:24:300:24:36

'to see her brooch go under the hammer.'

0:24:360:24:39

-Look at the suntan since the valuation day! Where have you been?

-I've been to Tenerife!

-Fantastic!

0:24:390:24:45

-Sunshine all the way.

-Do you go every year?

-Yes, I do.

-Oh, lovely.

0:24:450:24:50

-Why are you selling this brooch?

-I've had it more than 50 years and never worn it. It's time to go.

0:24:500:24:57

The auctioneer loved this. Let's see if the bidders do.

0:24:570:25:01

The rather lovely brooch here.

0:25:010:25:04

Fanny Tinker.

0:25:050:25:07

I have to start you to clear bids at £200.

0:25:070:25:12

220 can I say?

0:25:120:25:15

At 220. 240. 260. 280. 300.

0:25:170:25:20

-Oh!

-We've done it.

-Oh, Rita!

0:25:200:25:24

At £300. Anybody else in at 300?

0:25:240:25:26

At £300.

0:25:290:25:32

-Well done! We just did it.

-Just made it.

0:25:330:25:36

Just made it! In the nick of time as well.

0:25:360:25:40

-Fantastic.

-Is that more holiday money funds?

-No, I've got a granddaughter getting married

0:25:400:25:46

-so funds are needed.

-Exactly. What's her name?

-Helen.

-Helen.

0:25:460:25:51

-She's getting married to who?

-Matt.

0:25:510:25:53

-Oh, brilliant. Congratulations.

-Congratulations, yes.

0:25:530:25:57

'Christina was spot on and I reckon that £300 will buy Rita a pretty spectacular hat

0:25:570:26:03

'for her granddaughter's special day.

0:26:030:26:07

'Let's see if James' valuation stacks up as those Rowland Langmaid etchings come up for auction.'

0:26:080:26:15

-They are quality.

-They are.

-Why are you selling them?

0:26:150:26:19

Well, I didn't have much room and I found them in the cupboard after my husband passed away.

0:26:190:26:25

-The children don't want them.

-They'd look good on anybody's wall!

0:26:250:26:30

-They certainly would. Great quality.

-And hopefully a good price.

0:26:300:26:35

-If they don't sell well here within striking distance of Portsmouth, they won't sell anywhere!

-No.

0:26:350:26:41

We're in the right place. Let's see what the bidders think.

0:26:410:26:44

This is the Rowland Langmaid etchings.

0:26:460:26:51

I have three commission bids. One telephone?

0:26:510:26:54

I'm going to start the bidding at £200. Is there 220 in the room?

0:26:540:26:58

-Good.

-Big smile on Andy's face.

0:26:580:27:01

Yes.

0:27:010:27:02

240. 260? At £240, commission bid.

0:27:020:27:05

Any more? At £240. Are you all done?

0:27:080:27:11

-That's a very good result.

-Very good.

-Happy?

-Yes!

0:27:150:27:20

-What will you put the money towards?

-A family meal.

-Tonight?

-Yes.

-Good.

0:27:200:27:24

-It'll be a special day. A day to remember.

-Well worth coming.

0:27:240:27:29

'A double estimate result. Cecilia and Andy looked delighted.

0:27:290:27:34

'So far, so good, but will fortune continue to point in our favour with Jennifer's silver snuff box?'

0:27:360:27:42

-Jennifer, this was your mother's and your grandmother's.

-I believe so.

-No emotional attachment?

0:27:440:27:50

-Don't get me started!

-I'm playing devil's advocate.

0:27:500:27:55

I wouldn't be selling it. I just wanted to quiz you about that.

0:27:550:28:00

-Well, I've got lots of bits...

-Other things.

-..that my mum left me.

0:28:000:28:05

I don't collect these things. I do collect other things.

0:28:050:28:10

Nevertheless, this is quality and quality always sells. Here we go.

0:28:100:28:15

A Victorian snuff box.

0:28:150:28:17

Start me at £100 for it.

0:28:170:28:20

£100? £100? 80, then, if you like.

0:28:200:28:24

£80 I have. At £80. 85.

0:28:240:28:27

90. And 5.

0:28:270:28:29

-100.

-Brilliant.

-110.

0:28:290:28:31

120.

0:28:310:28:34

130. 140. 150.

0:28:340:28:37

160. 170?

0:28:370:28:40

- £160 and selling. - Yes!

0:28:400:28:43

At £160.

0:28:430:28:45

£160, then, for the last time.

0:28:450:28:48

-The hammer's gone down. £160.

-Yes.

-That's a good result.

-It is.

0:28:500:28:55

Excellent, well done.

0:28:550:28:56

'Let's hope the same holds true for James's valuation skills

0:28:580:29:01

'as Jackie and Paul's Moorcroft is up next.'

0:29:010:29:04

Hello. Thank you for bringing such good quality on to the show.

0:29:060:29:10

-Why are you selling this, Paul?

-We have four daughters and you can't split it four ways.

0:29:100:29:16

The money will go to a nice party for the whole family, which would split it between the whole family.

0:29:160:29:22

-That's one way of dividing it.

-That's what we'd like to do.

0:29:220:29:26

-James, let's hope we get the top end of your estimate.

-I hope so.

0:29:260:29:30

It's a great vase. It's such a wonderful size and shape.

0:29:300:29:34

The colour is good, so it's got everything in its favour.

0:29:340:29:38

Let's find out what the bidders think. Good luck.

0:29:380:29:42

This is the large Moorcroft vase showing there.

0:29:420:29:47

We have a commission bid. I'll start at £550.

0:29:470:29:52

That's a bit low.

0:29:520:29:54

Commission bid at 550. Is there 570?

0:29:540:29:57

570.

0:29:580:30:00

600. And 20.

0:30:000:30:02

650. 670.

0:30:020:30:05

Commission bid's out. 670 in the room. Is there 700?

0:30:050:30:09

700.

0:30:110:30:12

-There's somebody in the room.

-Yeah.

0:30:120:30:15

770? £750 straight down the middle. Is there 770?

0:30:150:30:20

At £750 then and selling...

0:30:200:30:22

-We're selling.

-At £750 for the last time...

0:30:220:30:28

-It's gone.

-Great.

-That was good, wasn't it?

-Lovely.

0:30:280:30:31

Well done. That is a relief, isn't it? It was close.

0:30:310:30:35

-There was a lot riding on that.

-Nothing like a bit of tension in the saleroom.

-I was always confident.

0:30:350:30:42

'It was a slow climb, but £750 is a decent result for Jackie and Paul.

0:30:430:30:48

On the last 10 years of the show, we've seen wonderful works of art passing through our valuation doors

0:30:560:31:02

and many have sold for huge amounts of money.

0:31:020:31:05

This was John Thomas Peel and he was a Victorian British artist.

0:31:050:31:12

-I would like to put this in at £800-£1,200.

-£800-£1,200?

0:31:120:31:16

David Cox is a renowned English landscape artist.

0:31:160:31:20

He's very well sought after and you're looking in the region of about £4,000-£6,000.

0:31:200:31:27

-They are both helpfully signed AA Glendening.

-At £6,100.

0:31:270:31:32

Yes! £6,100. Spot on valuation, Elizabeth.

0:31:320:31:36

Just imagine if we're still making the show in 10, 20, 30 years' time.

0:31:360:31:40

What kind of art will we see coming through the valuation doors?

0:31:400:31:45

And what prices will they command?

0:31:450:31:48

To give us a hint of the next generation of art stars,

0:31:480:31:52

I've come here to the prestigious Winchester School of Art.

0:31:520:31:56

'Founded more than 130 years ago, Winchester School of Art joined

0:31:590:32:04

'the University of Southampton in 1926 and today is still regarded

0:32:040:32:09

'as one of Britain's leading art and design institutions.'

0:32:090:32:13

What distinguishes this from many other art schools is

0:32:150:32:19

it tries to meet the creative demands of tomorrow by investing in the youngsters of today.

0:32:190:32:25

It does that by luring some of the best teaching talent in the world to come and pass on their skills.

0:32:250:32:32

'But to get a real inside scoop, I'm off to meet John Gillett, the Director of Research.'

0:32:320:32:39

The art school has a really good pedigree. It's been around 130 years.

0:32:390:32:45

Back then it would have been a highly academic institution,

0:32:450:32:49

-full of people learning how to draw.

-Yes.

-More about skills than ideas.

0:32:490:32:54

Ideas are the most important thing about what people come out with now.

0:32:540:32:59

We're much more of an institution about ideas than any particular craft, and advances in technology

0:32:590:33:06

-and particularly digital media that have made that shift possible.

-Yeah.

0:33:060:33:13

In a way, though, that's great that it's changing, as art should do.

0:33:130:33:17

-Oh, yes.

-Pushing frontiers.

0:33:170:33:19

'Competition for the 1,200 places on offer is pretty tough,

0:33:230:33:27

'so those who win through really are the cream of the creative crop.'

0:33:270:33:32

I'm doing my final major project on independent cinema.

0:33:380:33:42

My inspiration is everyday life.

0:33:450:33:48

People think a design is just a texture, just a colour, a stripe. It's so much more.

0:33:480:33:54

My work at the moment is really trying to find out more about advertising as a science.

0:33:540:34:00

That inspires me, that you can use something as old as cloth to tell a story. As simple as two threads.

0:34:000:34:07

'I have to admit that when I was an art student, my workload wasn't taxing! That's not the case here.

0:34:120:34:19

'So what's life like as an art student really all about these days?'

0:34:190:34:26

Emma, tell me what's going on here. Where's the inspiration?

0:34:260:34:30

Well, I look at the separation between art and life and I do performance art.

0:34:300:34:36

It's just using everyday objects to react and see how it would move.

0:34:360:34:41

I was looking at balance and the way that my body would change trying to walk with a stack of shoes.

0:34:410:34:48

-With half a dozen!

-Yeah! Doing something you do in everyday life,

0:34:480:34:52

-but with this uncertainty.

-I can see what you're getting at.

0:34:520:34:58

I did a performance where I stacked them live, starting from nothing and doing it.

0:34:580:35:04

-Doing the art process live. I want to get them bigger.

-Do you?!

0:35:040:35:09

I want a really big doorway so that my head's almost touching it

0:35:090:35:14

and just stand there and balance on them.

0:35:140:35:17

That's what it's all about - creative imagination. You've got it in abundance!

0:35:170:35:22

I can't remember working this hard. This lot are continuously assessed for their three years on the course

0:35:280:35:35

and they're expected to balance work experience with their studies.

0:35:350:35:39

But their biggest challenge has to be the final degree show. It really is make or break time.

0:35:390:35:45

It's a chance for them to showcase their creative talents.

0:35:450:35:49

There is non-stop workload. Real pressure to perform to your best.

0:35:540:35:59

I managed to win a competition and one of the designs will be sold at Liberty.

0:35:590:36:06

I've applied for jobs in LA, New York...

0:36:060:36:09

There's a lot to do, but if you're organised, we all do get it done.

0:36:090:36:14

I've been completely blown away by the talent, the vision and the passion that the students have.

0:36:180:36:26

I just hope their future is rosy and they don't suffer for their art, but flog it for a small fortune.

0:36:260:36:34

Let's catch up with our experts back at the valuation day.

0:36:410:36:44

Shirley, on my table here, I've never had a Ferrari, an Alfa Romeo,

0:36:480:36:52

the creme de la creme of all the car makes, and you've brought them in.

0:36:520:36:57

-That's fantastic.

-Yes.

-Thank you very much. Where have they all come from?

0:36:570:37:01

-They're my husband's.

-Does he know you've brought them here?

-Yes.

-Phew!

0:37:010:37:06

His brother was in the air force and he used to buy 'em when he came home. He was a bit older than him.

0:37:080:37:14

-They're all presents to... What's your husband's name?

-Ken.

-To Ken, OK.

0:37:140:37:18

As you probably know, we've got a collection of Dinky toys,

0:37:180:37:23

the great name in die-cast vehicles.

0:37:230:37:26

It was one of the first factories to produce die-cast, collectors' vehicles.

0:37:260:37:31

The majority, apart from these two, are Dinky.

0:37:310:37:34

Now, Dinky was set up in 1934 and proved very, very popular.

0:37:340:37:39

And these are classic, 1930s, racing vehicles, if not slightly earlier.

0:37:390:37:44

But these particular ones are actually post-war, so we're looking at about post-1945, 1950,

0:37:440:37:50

for the Dinky vehicles especially.

0:37:500:37:54

This set of racing cars is wonderful. Which is Ken's favourite?

0:37:540:37:58

-This one. This is the Maserati.

-The Maserati?

0:37:580:38:01

Yeah, he used to fly 'em down the school, I think, when he took 'em to school.

0:38:010:38:06

-Have races.

-So he's played with them which is what they were bought for. Fantastic.

0:38:060:38:11

We've got two Corgi ones here which look very, very similar.

0:38:110:38:15

The reason that they look so similar is because Corgi saw how successful Dinky was

0:38:150:38:21

and Corgi established its factory in South Wales in direct competition with Dinky.

0:38:210:38:26

They chose the name Corgi, because it's the national Welsh dog.

0:38:260:38:31

So a wonderful collection, but there are a couple of things that worry me here.

0:38:310:38:37

The first is that we've got some replacement tyres here.

0:38:370:38:40

We've also got one that hasn't got a tyre at all. We've got a bit of a missing tyre there.

0:38:400:38:46

And in places, some have been retouched and repainted, so that is all going to affect the value.

0:38:460:38:52

I think we're probably looking somewhere for the group in the region of £60 to £100 at auction.

0:38:520:38:58

-Right.

-So how do we feel about that?

-Yeah, that's OK.

-All right.

0:38:580:39:02

So if we put an estimate of £60 to £100

0:39:020:39:06

and we'll put a firm reserve of £60, so they won't go for any less than £60 if they sell...

0:39:060:39:11

-Yeah.

-Are you going to get the money or Ken?

-Ken's going to get the money.

-Good.

0:39:110:39:17

-He'll put it towards his classic Norton he's restoring.

-Is that right?

0:39:170:39:21

-Yes.

-Brilliant. We'll sell these in aid of Ken's restoration fund.

0:39:210:39:26

Hopefully, he can get that motorbike back on the road and it doesn't end up a three-wheeler like this one.

0:39:260:39:32

'Next up, it seems that James has a thing or two to teach John

0:39:340:39:38

'about the unusual selection of pottery he's brought in with him.'

0:39:380:39:42

John, I have to say, whenever I'm looking at the Flog It queues,

0:39:420:39:47

I'm always trying to find the most unusual, quirky objects.

0:39:470:39:51

-Yeah, I love quirky.

-I love quirky. I AM quirky!

0:39:510:39:55

But you've got a really interesting selection. Let's start with this.

0:39:550:40:00

-Tell me about that.

-Well, I bought that about a year ago on the internet.

0:40:000:40:06

-Right. What did it cost you?

-£70.

-OK.

0:40:060:40:09

-I don't know if you know very much about Blue John.

-Not a great deal.

0:40:090:40:14

It's mined in North Derbyshire and it's the only place in the world that you get this Blue John,

0:40:140:40:20

purple and white coloured quartz.

0:40:200:40:23

-So it IS Blue John?

-Well...

0:40:230:40:25

Ah. Because Blue John is so sought after, they're faking it.

0:40:250:40:30

-Really?

-There is another...

-How can you tell?

-Well,

0:40:300:40:35

there's a very similar vein of similar stone and it's in China.

0:40:350:40:40

-OK?

-Oh...

0:40:410:40:43

-But they inject it with a purple dye and...

-Thank you(!)

0:40:430:40:47

-And this little bowl...

-Is what that is.

-..never saw Derbyshire.

0:40:470:40:52

-It might have landed at East Midlands Airport.

-OK.

0:40:520:40:57

-It's a fake, I'm afraid.

-Thank you(!)

0:40:570:41:00

-You would have been buying a piece of Blue John ware for £400 or £500, but £70 bought you...

-I thought...

0:41:000:41:07

-..worth 40.

-My luck couldn't last that long. I'm gobsmacked.

0:41:070:41:12

Those are really what I thought were interesting. In particular, that one. Tell me the history.

0:41:120:41:19

Well, I bought that from a bric-a-brac stall 10 years ago

0:41:190:41:23

along with the other two items. He quoted me £30

0:41:230:41:28

-and I thought it was a must have.

-Yeah.

-I had to have it.

0:41:280:41:32

I just think all three are incredible.

0:41:320:41:36

I've since seen an expert. He thinks it's Roman.

0:41:360:41:41

-Etruscan?

-He's not too sure. He's never seen anything like that.

0:41:410:41:45

-I think that's an Etruscan shape, slightly pre-Roman.

-Really?

0:41:450:41:50

-I think it's 200-300 BC.

-Right.

-That's my gut reaction.

0:41:500:41:56

-It's Attic ware, which is black-coated...

-I have heard of that.

-..terracotta.

0:41:560:42:00

These sort of Etruscan pots are, in my opinion, some of the best shapes ever made. I love them.

0:42:000:42:06

Just look at that.

0:42:060:42:09

I mean, the actual design.... You know when you've got a leaning spout, it drips everywhere?

0:42:090:42:15

-What a wonderful design to have it leaning back.

-I never thought of that. Is that why?

-For oil, probably.

0:42:150:42:22

I think it's an oil vessel. This is probably...

0:42:220:42:27

looted, I should think, from an Etruscan tomb. They would put oil and they'd put water

0:42:270:42:33

and food dishes in the tomb.

0:42:330:42:36

-Well, it wasn't me.

-No, I'm sure. Probably a hundred years ago.

0:42:360:42:40

A wonderful piece of history and a lovely object.

0:42:400:42:44

The two glass vases, I think they're Roman.

0:42:440:42:47

They're probably 100 AD, 200 AD. I think they'll do well.

0:42:470:42:52

-I don't think they'll be life-changing...

-No.

0:42:520:42:55

But it's additional pocket money.

0:42:550:42:58

I think it'll be £100-£150.

0:42:580:43:01

-Could we have a reserve, please?

-£100, fixed and firm?

-Yes, please.

0:43:010:43:05

-If it doesn't make that, have them back.

-I don't mind taking them home again.

0:43:050:43:11

-£100.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:110:43:14

'We'll be back to see if John's Etruscan pottery reaches James' firm £100 reserve in a little while.

0:43:160:43:22

'But first I'm rejoining Dilys and Tricia to give them the lowdown on Dilys's maritime journal.'

0:43:230:43:30

Dilys, Tricia, I'm back.

0:43:300:43:32

I got our lovely Ann Anderson to get onto the computer.

0:43:320:43:37

There's good news and bad news. The not so good news is that 1771 was the tonnage, not the date.

0:43:370:43:45

OK? We're looking at the vessel The Dover, but there were several.

0:43:450:43:50

It's 1834, 1835, 1836. That's the dates we've seen.

0:43:500:43:54

Still early 1900s. It's a roll call of all the personnel onboard.

0:43:540:44:00

-Right.

-Paying passengers as well.

0:44:000:44:03

It is interesting. There's a lot going for it.

0:44:030:44:07

I don't think it's a log book as such, standard issue from the Royal Navy.

0:44:070:44:13

It's more of a personal thing that somebody's done themselves.

0:44:130:44:18

-It's really complicated, isn't it?

-Yes.

-You look at it one way and think it's just an inventory.

0:44:180:44:25

-But you've enlightened me quite a bit.

-Value, it's a really hard thing to put a price on.

0:44:250:44:33

I think, if it's all right with you, we should let the auctioneer establish...

0:44:330:44:40

-Oh, I would be very interested.

-We send this to the auction room.

0:44:400:44:44

-If he finds the right people...

-And as I say, you've got to find the right person for it.

0:44:440:44:51

-I'm not the right person.

-Well, I'm really excited.

0:44:510:44:55

We'll hoist it up the flagpole and see if anybody salutes it, shall we?

0:44:550:45:00

-We'll get the auctioneer earning his few bob.

-All right, then, yes.

0:45:000:45:04

-We'll do that.

-Thank you so much.

0:45:040:45:06

'That journal was a tricky item to value, so we'll just see how it does

0:45:070:45:13

'when it goes under the hammer a little later.

0:45:130:45:17

'It's over to Christina now as Stella fills her in on the history of her Royal Doulton heirloom.'

0:45:190:45:25

-You've brought in this rather lovely Doulton jug to us.

-I have, yes.

0:45:250:45:30

-You seem to know quite a lot about it.

-A little bit.

0:45:300:45:35

My grandmother told me a small amount about where she got it from.

0:45:350:45:39

I believe it was her sister gave it to her when she passed away.

0:45:390:45:45

And it's always been with my grandmother until she died about five years ago

0:45:450:45:50

-and then she passed it down to me.

-OK.

-I'm not so keen on the colour.

0:45:500:45:56

I'm not so keen on the colour, so it has been...

0:45:560:46:01

It's a very Victorian colour.

0:46:010:46:03

A sort of olive green and the cobalt blue.

0:46:030:46:07

-It's a very Victorian combination.

-Yes.

-Not as appealing today.

0:46:070:46:11

The shell detail is typically a Victorian motif.

0:46:110:46:16

It's stoneware.

0:46:160:46:18

-Yes.

-Which Doulton specialised in.

0:46:180:46:20

We know it's Doulton because we've got a wonderful mark on the bottom.

0:46:200:46:24

It's actually got its date as well, which is 1875, so we can tell exactly when it was made.

0:46:240:46:30

It's also got a wonderful signature.

0:46:300:46:33

Although it reads FAB, it is actually Frank Butler.

0:46:330:46:39

I believe he was a deaf mute,

0:46:390:46:41

-but he made some beautiful things.

-He really did. To be able to make this is quite spectacular.

-It is.

0:46:410:46:48

He was obviously incredibly talented and he's put his initials to this.

0:46:480:46:54

I think this is quite a lovely piece. Unfortunately...

0:46:540:46:58

-It's a little bit damaged. My grandmother did that.

-Did she?

0:46:580:47:03

By accident. She'd had it for that long and knocked it one day. A tiny chip from the top of the rim.

0:47:030:47:11

-I think she had a restoration on it.

-She has. She's had it provisionally restored and that helps there,

0:47:110:47:17

but we have got this damage, which will affect the value.

0:47:170:47:22

Doulton collectors do like to have things in good condition.

0:47:220:47:26

-Yeah.

-So very sad to see that, but, having said that,

0:47:260:47:30

-it's amazing really that the handle is still in good condition.

-Yes.

0:47:300:47:36

I think it's really lovely. We have to take into account this damage in the estimate.

0:47:360:47:41

If it was perfect, I would say you're probably looking at about £100-£200.

0:47:410:47:47

In this condition, we might be looking more in the region of £50.

0:47:470:47:52

-Yes...

-Maybe if we put an estimate of £40-£60

0:47:520:47:56

-with a firm reserve of 40.

-That's fine.

0:47:560:47:59

-How would you feel?

-That's fine. I'm not so keen on it myself.

0:47:590:48:04

Let's hope we can find somebody who is keen on it.

0:48:040:48:08

-That'll be lovely.

-Thanks so much.

0:48:080:48:11

Let's get that and our other items wrapped up and sent off to auction.

0:48:140:48:18

And here's a quick reminder of what we're taking.

0:48:180:48:20

'It's back to the sale room as we get our next batch of lots to go under the hammer.

0:48:240:48:28

'It's Stella's Frank Butler jug up first with a brand new estimate and reserve.'

0:48:320:48:37

-Good luck, both of you. Stella's very nervous!

-I am!

0:48:370:48:42

Family heirloom going under the hammer. Doulton, that jug.

0:48:420:48:46

-The Butler.

-It's got the name.

-But will it get one hundred or will it get one hundred and fifty?

0:48:460:48:53

That would be nice, wouldn't it?

0:48:530:48:55

This is what auctions are all about. There's such an electric atmosphere. I'm really feeling it today.

0:48:550:49:01

The Doulton Lambeth stoneware ewer.

0:49:020:49:06

Start me at 120. 120? £100, then.

0:49:070:49:10

£100? 80 to get it going.

0:49:100:49:13

£80 I have, thank you. And 5. 90.

0:49:150:49:18

And 5. 100.

0:49:180:49:20

-And 10.

-It's sold.

-130.

0:49:200:49:23

140. 150.

0:49:260:49:27

160. 170. 180. 190?

0:49:270:49:30

£180 and selling.

0:49:320:49:35

-- Is there 190?

-Fantastic.

-- My daughters are getting that!

0:49:350:49:40

Last time at £180.

0:49:410:49:44

-Yes! £180. Well done. Above the estimate.

-Brilliant.

0:49:450:49:49

-That's good news.

-Fantastic.

-And the daughters are getting the money?

0:49:490:49:53

Yes, Katy and Lucy. I've got to say Lucy, because she and her friends watch us on the telly.

0:49:530:49:59

-Yes, it'll go to them.

-Brilliant. And get something for yourself!

-Hopefully!

0:49:590:50:05

'A fantastic outcome, easily beating the top end of Christina's estimate.

0:50:050:50:11

'Now for a priceless slice of ancient history - John's Roman pottery.'

0:50:120:50:18

John loves his Roman artefacts. We've got a few, haven't we?

0:50:180:50:23

-We have.

-A couple of glass bottles and the pottery. And John doesn't want them to go for next to nothing.

0:50:230:50:30

I've upped the fixed reserve to 150 and it's now valued at £150-£200.

0:50:300:50:36

I wouldn't want to let it go for less than 150, either.

0:50:360:50:40

-Whether it will or not... If we were here bidding, I'd pay 150 for it.

-Yeah.

0:50:400:50:46

-But whether there's anybody in the room that likes it as much...

-We've got three items.

0:50:460:50:52

There's a lot of lot! We'll find out what the bidders think.

0:50:520:50:56

This is so exciting. Let's find out what that lot think.

0:50:560:51:00

This is the Roman terracotta flagon.

0:51:020:51:04

Start me at £150 here. £150?

0:51:060:51:09

100, then, if you like. £100?

0:51:120:51:14

-80 to get it going, surely.

-Oh, come on.

0:51:140:51:17

£70, thank you. And 5? At £70.

0:51:170:51:21

75. 80. And 5. 90.

0:51:210:51:24

And 5? At £90. Any more? At £90.

0:51:240:51:27

95 we have. And 100. And 10.

0:51:290:51:32

110. 120. 130.

0:51:320:51:36

140. 140.

0:51:360:51:38

-One more bid.

-140. 150?

0:51:380:51:40

At £140. Is there 150?

0:51:420:51:44

At £140. Any more?

0:51:440:51:47

-He's not selling, is he?

-At £140, are you sure?

0:51:470:51:51

For the last time, I'm sorry, we are so close there.

0:51:510:51:55

Just under that reserve.

0:51:550:51:58

-Sorry about that.

-That's OK.

-You wanted to keep it.

-I don't mind!

0:51:580:52:03

'Those Roman artefacts missed their reserve by just £10.

0:52:050:52:09

'John did seem somewhat relieved! He didn't want to let them go for nothing.

0:52:090:52:16

'So let's get cracking as it looks like our lot is just about to go under the hammer.'

0:52:160:52:21

-No boys in sight here, Christina and Shirley.

-Yeah, girl power.

0:52:210:52:25

-You girls like your cars.

-Absolutely.

-Maseratis, Mercedes?

-I'll have one of each, please!

0:52:250:52:31

-You can - one of these little toy ones!

-At a fraction of the price!

0:52:310:52:35

Any chap would buy you a toy one.

0:52:350:52:38

The boys would like the Sunbeam possibly and the Alfa Romeo.

0:52:380:52:42

-Nice little collection. Why is hubby selling them?

-He's had them for 50 years. They've been in a cupboard.

0:52:420:52:48

-And he's into classic motorbikes.

-So the money will go towards some bike repairs.

0:52:480:52:53

-Yeah, a Norton Dominator he's restoring at the moment.

-Is he?

-Yeah.

0:52:530:52:57

What do you get out of it? You're standing here for him.

0:52:570:53:01

We'll have a nice holiday. He's paying for that.

0:53:010:53:04

Good luck. You could say this lot is top gear. Here we go.

0:53:040:53:08

This is the Dinky toys.

0:53:110:53:13

Good collection here.

0:53:130:53:16

We have a good collection of commission bids -

0:53:160:53:19

-one, two, three, four.

-Oh!

-Wow!

-There's a bit of interest.

0:53:190:53:23

I'm going to start the bidding at £250. Is there 260 in the room?

0:53:230:53:27

Look at my husband's face!

0:53:270:53:29

At £250, commission bid. Is there 260?

0:53:290:53:32

At £250 then...

0:53:320:53:34

260 we have. Commission bids are out now. At 260 to the net.

0:53:350:53:39

280. Make it 300?

0:53:390:53:42

300 we have. And 20?

0:53:420:53:44

At £300 then. Any more? At £300...

0:53:460:53:50

At £300 and selling. £300.

0:53:500:53:54

For the very last time...

0:53:540:53:56

There he is over there. He's got a big grin on his face!

0:53:560:54:00

-Brilliant.

-They certainly did race out, didn't they?

-Yeah, fantastic.

0:54:000:54:04

-Gosh!

-Well done.

0:54:040:54:06

'It's the item now I've been waiting for - Dilys' maritime journal.

0:54:080:54:12

'Before the hammer goes down, I'm off for a quick chat

0:54:120:54:16

'with auctioneer Andrew Smith to see if he can shed any light.'

0:54:160:54:20

My eyes lit up when I came across this. What do you think?

0:54:200:54:24

I think this is fascinating. The detail in there is superb.

0:54:240:54:29

-It just gives you a real sort of snapshot of life onboard.

-Maritime history.

0:54:290:54:34

It belongs to Dilys. I found it so hard to put a price on this. I'll leave it up to you.

0:54:340:54:40

We're very comfortable with £300-£500. We hope to get interest.

0:54:400:54:45

We've done a lot more research since then, which we've put on the 'net and in the catalogue.

0:54:450:54:51

It's a journal written by a Captain Chambers. It spans three or four of his ships in about 1804 onwards.

0:54:510:54:59

And it goes into details of what they have onboard.

0:54:590:55:03

-It's a thing I can visualise somebody buying and developing a book or film from it.

-Now you're talking!

0:55:030:55:09

It all started here. This is the next blockbuster movie.

0:55:090:55:14

Don't go away. This is going under the hammer in just a moment.

0:55:140:55:18

'So let's see if Dilys' journal clocks up an award-winning result

0:55:180:55:23

'as we rejoin her and her friend Tricia in the sale room.'

0:55:230:55:28

Dilys and Tricia, thank you for bringing that in. Made my day.

0:55:280:55:32

I've got high hopes for this. I had a chat to the auctioneer.

0:55:320:55:37

He's done a little more research and hopefully it's created a lot of interest.

0:55:370:55:43

-Has it really?

-Isn't that good?

-Oh, has it?

-It's all down to you!

0:55:430:55:47

Oh, this is very interesting, this little maritime book.

0:55:490:55:54

Captain Chambers' book here.

0:55:540:55:56

£200? 200 do I have? Thank you.

0:55:590:56:01

And 10 can I say now? At £200.

0:56:010:56:04

210. 220 on the 'net. 230.

0:56:040:56:08

-240.

-This chap's keeping his paddle in the air. That's what we like.

0:56:080:56:12

At £230, then. 240.

0:56:130:56:16

-Oh, he's out now. He's not that determined!

-250.

0:56:160:56:21

-260.

-He's back in!

0:56:220:56:25

270. 280.

0:56:250:56:27

290. 300.

0:56:270:56:29

And 20? Lost you...320.

0:56:300:56:32

340. 360. 380.

0:56:320:56:36

400. And 20.

0:56:360:56:38

440. 460.

0:56:380:56:41

-480. 500.

-This is getting good!

0:56:410:56:44

600 on the 'net now. And 20? At £600 it is.

0:56:450:56:49

On the 'net at 600. Last chance at 600.

0:56:490:56:53

That's what we like to see. £600!

0:56:530:56:56

-Well done! Thank you so much for bringing that in!

-I'm so glad I did!

0:56:560:57:02

-Oh, what a lovely moment!

-Yes.

0:57:020:57:04

-Wonderful.

-That's what it's all about. Finding things like that.

0:57:040:57:08

You saw it immediately and said, "This could be worth quite a bit."

0:57:080:57:13

-And it's been in the bureau for 30 years.

-If you've got anything like that tucked away,

0:57:130:57:19

bring it along to a valuation day. It could be you standing here.

0:57:190:57:23

-Sadly, we've run out of time, but, Dilys, haven't we had a marvellous time?

-We have!

0:57:230:57:30

-It's been wonderful.

-I hope you enjoyed the show. Join me again,

0:57:300:57:34

but until then it's goodbye!

0:57:340:57:37

Experts James Lewis and Christina Trevanion accompany Paul Martin to the Guildhall in Winchester for valuations. Amid all the bags and boxes they discover a mourning brooch with a curious past and some truly ancient Etruscan pottery. But it's a maritime journal that gives Paul the biggest pause for thought.

Paul also heads off to uncover the next generation of art stars on a visit to the prestigious Winchester School of Art.