Wells 21 Flog It!


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Wells 21

Antiques programme. Paul Martin and experts Anita Manning and Will Axon are at Wells Cathedral in Somerset. A pair of paintings by an amateur prove a big hit in the saleroom.


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Today, we're in the ancient city of Wells in Somerset, first granted a royal charter by King John in 1201.

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It's officially been a city since 1205, and what a wonderful location for us

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to unearth some unwanted antiques.

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Welcome to "Flog It!".

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At the heart of this ancient, unspoilt market town is the cathedral,

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our magnificent valuation day venue, and later on in the programme,

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I'll be taking you on a whistle-stop tour and I can't wait.

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But first, well, I can't wait to see what's in all of these bags and boxes.

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As you can see, the locals have turned out in force today.

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We've brought them into the cloisters where it's lovely and warm because it's biting cold outside.

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But somebody today could be going home with a lot of money and it could be you

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because you've got a big smile on your face.

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We'll look inside there later.

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It's our job to find the best antiques, put them into auction and hopefully make a small fortune.

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'Two people always eager to get going are our lead experts, Anita Manning and Will Axon,

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'both highly experienced valuers and auctioneers.

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'They are guaranteed to root out interesting objects.'

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Look at that. They are a bit big for me, I reckon. That's wonderful.

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You see, Scotland invented football. Did you know that?

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'Well, before we get the ball rolling, here's what's coming up...

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'Will discovers that beauty is in the eye of the beholder...'

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-I mean, I don't really like it, so...

-I know.

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That's where we disagree. I like it, you don't. That's antiques!

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Everyone's got different opinions.

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'..Anita spots the best in show...'

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-These dogs are a pair of, I think, they are fox-haired terriers?

-That's right.

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'..and there's a shocker in the sale room.'

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There was something there, wasn't there?

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I think it's time we got everybody to the tables. Let's get on with the show.

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What a fabulous turnout. Everybody is seated inside. We've got our work cut out today.

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Let's get on with the valuations, and it looks like Will Axon is our first expert at the blue tablecloth.

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Let's take a closer look at what he's spotted.

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'And it's two fierce looking bronze dragons brought along by Brian and Ann.'

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-Well, I hope they've got the Addams Family theme tune playing over this bit...

-That's right.

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..because when I look at these, I'm thinking dark, Gothic dining room, high-backed chairs

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and perhaps, sort of, a couple of ghostly figures at the table.

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-Yeah.

-But are these something that are on your dining table at home?

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-I'm not trying to insinuate that you are anything like the Addams Family, of course.

-No, no.

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-But are these on your dining table at home?

-They were there for about a year.

-OK.

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-And then, Ann, you weren't keen on them, were you?

-I don't like them.

-Right.

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-So it was Brian who bought them, was it?

-It was indeed.

-Yes.

-Where did you get them from, Brian?

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-A very small antique fair about 20 years ago.

-OK.

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-I suppose, for want of a better word, it's a winged dragon, isn't it?

-That's right, yeah. That's true.

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With a fairly decent size catch in its jaws.

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-A good weight to them would suggest that perhaps they are made of bronze.

-Right.

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-I don't know, did you buy them as bronze at the time?

-I bought them as bronze, yes. Hopefully, you know.

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I think that's right.

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I mean, you've got a bit of obvious areas here where the patination for the bronze has worn away.

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You do get that sometimes when bronze is over-cleaned or just handled.

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Just holding this one now, as I am, I'm having a bit of a brainwave.

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-I'm wondering whether these were actually chamber sticks.

-Oh, right.

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Because what I'm thinking is, if they were originally designed as a pair,

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-you'd expect them to be opposing pairs.

-You would.

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So his tail is scrolled to the right, you would expect this tail to be scrolled to the left

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so they would sort of mirror each other.

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But having, sort of, naturally lifted them up like that, it kind of lends itself, the design,

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-to perhaps being carried about as a chamber stick.

-Oh, yeah, yeah.

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I'm not sure I'd like to go to sleep with this fellow on my bedside table though,

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-maybe when you woke up, he'd soon get you out of bed. So you bought them, right, OK.

-Yeah.

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You bought them as bronze, they are. You bought them having a bit of age, I think they are late 19th century.

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-So what do we need to make to get your money back, the money you spent 20 years ago?

-Yeah.

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-It was about £50.

-About £50, 20 years ago. Well, the market's gone up, down, up, down since then.

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How do you feel if we sort of estimate them at £50 to £80? Are you happy with that?

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-That'd be fine, yeah. Be lovely.

-Happy with that. You don't mind what I value them at, do you?

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-No, I don't mind.

-You just want them out of the house. So let's put them at £50.

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-I'll fix the reserve at £50.

-Right.

-Cos you forked out for them, it's not like you inherited them

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-and they stand you in at nothing.

-No.

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£50 fixed reserve and I think, at that, they've got to be worth it.

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And, Ann, what have you got your eye on to spend the £50 on?

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I'd like a nice piece of Deco or a little piece of Clarice Cliff.

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-Ah, you notice the LITTLE piece of Clarice Cliff. How about a big bit of Clarice Cliff?!

-Yes, please.

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I don't know if we'll be able to get that far,

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-but let's hope we get some money into the Art Deco/Clarice Cliff fund for you.

-Oh, please.

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'Well, I'll keep my fingers crossed for you too, Ann, and we'll find out later how you get on.

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'Next, something's caught my eye.'

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John, this is a fascinating book.

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It's leather bound, it's a little volume that, let's say,

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a site foreman would have used in the construction industry.

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-How did you come by it?

-It'll be one of my grandfathers.

-Was he in the building industry?

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Not as I know of. I've never checked what he actually did, but it's just come down through the family.

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It's just been in the family a long time. Incidentally, it's that size, and you know why it's that size,

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because it has been used by a site foreman or a carpenter...

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-Yes.

-..to go in the top pocket.

-That's it, yes.

-In the jacket, hasn't it?

-Yes.

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-What I love is the title. I love my wood, I'm a wood worker.

-I know that.

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-We've seen you on the programme.

-And you brought this in for me?

-Yes.

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OK, this is Measuring Made Easy To The Meanest Capacity.

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-So basically this book is designed to save you money.

-That's right.

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And it's absolutely fascinating.

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-I didn't think books like this existed. It's even got the prices of timber, as well, hasn't it?

-Yes.

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Sawyers selling wood in London, for instance, selling oak by the length, a 50 foot length.

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Ash, a 50 foot length.

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This is really quite a nice little comprehensive guide to actually buying wood

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in its cut and felled form.

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-It looks like, here, the date it was printed. It was published in 1850.

-1850.

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And the condition is excellent, apart from the spine and obviously a little bit of use.

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So why are you selling this?

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Well, I've got a daughter and two granddaughters and they won't want it

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so it's surplus to requirements.

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-They're not going to take up carpentry, are they?

-Somebody else might enjoy it.

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We're going to find a very small market for this, the minority market, the woodworkers

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and the tree lovers.

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-But I think it might have a value of around £40 to £60.

-Yeah, it could do.

-Are you happy with that?

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-I'd be happy with that, yes.

-Can we put it into auction with a reserve of £20?

-We can, yes.

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-That would be nice.

-And see what happens.

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'I love old books like that and I really hope that it measures up in the sale room.

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'Meanwhile, Will is valuing Pearl's Victorian silver.'

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As auctioneers, anything silver, anything jewellery,

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what we like to see is a fitted case. It's a sign of quality.

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And in the case, first I thought there could be a necklace, a diamond set, pearl or something,

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but opening it up we see there's a really nice-quality

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Victorian silver fork and spoon.

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Is this something that you've gone out and bought or is this an inheritance?

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-It's more of an inheritance.

-OK.

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-It's come down through the family.

-Right.

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If I flip this spoon over quickly,

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we can see that there are actually some initials.

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I've had a close look.

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They're invariably hard to read. They try and make them as swirly and as curly as they can,

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but I think there's an "H" in there somewhere.

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Would that sort of tie in with the family history?

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-My name is Hodges, Pearl Hodges.

-OK.

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It's got to be an "H," then.

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And I'm almost certain that this would have been given as a christening gift.

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So that solves that mystery a bit. That's nice.

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I'm going to flip the spoon back over in its case

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and I'm just going to point out the hallmarks to you, there.

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We have the standard set of Victorian hallmarks.

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We've got Victoria's head here.

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We've got the date letter there of "G."

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And I see on the other one we've got a date letter of "F."

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So they're a year apart.

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I think it's 1881, 1882, but that doesn't detract from them.

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That doesn't mean they're a sort of matched set, you know.

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One might have been made in December, the other in January.

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Then the leopard's head,

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so they're from the London Assay Office.

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Then we've got the lion here,

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that's telling us that it's silver.

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And then I think we've got the maker's mark here. "RM" over "EH."

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So I think it's Martin Hall and Company, I think they traded as.

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And the pieces themselves - I think they're beautifully decorated.

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Are they something that you like, or have you brought them because you don't like them?

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No, I like them, but it's just not been used, sat in the drawer.

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The fact that they haven't been used

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contributes to the fact that they are in pristine condition.

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This sort of lovely, foliate etching and chasing, here,

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of these sort of ferns...

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Beautiful, and not worn at all,

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because they haven't been over-cleaned.

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-They've been in this case.

-I haven't cleaned them.

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What's nice about these is that they are genuine.

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This is as they were made at the time.

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And, like I say, the fitted case just adds something to it.

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-Silver dealers, jewellery dealers - they love a fitted case.

-Mm.

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I'm going to give you a valuation now. I hope you haven't booked a round-the-world cruise...

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-Not yet!

-..on the back of this. Not yet!

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-But I see these as a sort of £40-£60 lot. I don't know how you feel about that.

-That's fine.

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-You're happy with that?

-Yeah, yeah.

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-So what do you feel about having no reserve on these?

-That's good.

-Yeah?

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-I don't mind. I just want them to be sold.

-You just want them gone?

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Pearl, thanks for bringing them in.

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Lovely name, by the way, I had to say. Beautiful name

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And a lovely piece you brought in and I look forward to selling them for you.

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'Will and I aren't the only ones busy valuing. Anita's got a table full.'

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Welcome to "Flog It!"

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-and thank you very much for bringing along this little collection of objects.

-My pleasure.

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-Can you tell me, where did you get them?

-Well, some of the vesta cases came from my father.

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How he got hold of them, I don't know.

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The two items here were...

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My ex-wife's aunt died, they were going to throw them in the skip

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and I said no way were they going in the skip.

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The others I seem to have acquired over the years, but don't ask me where they came from, I've no idea.

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-So you developed the collecting habit?

-Yes.

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But recently they've just been stuck in the drawer and I feel that's a waste.

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-If somebody, a collector likes them, wants them, yeah.

-You're happy to pass them on?

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-I'm happy to pass them on.

-Now is the time, Norman.

-Yes.

-Let's have a look at the collection.

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We have a mixture here of silver vesta cases.

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-And vesta cases are little boxes where we keep our matches.

-That's right.

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-We have silver ones, we have white metal ones.

-Yes.

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If we look at this one here, this is a fairly standard vesta box.

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We open it up, we can see our silver hallmark...

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..the hinge is good, it's in good condition, although it does need a wee bit of er...

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-TLC.

-TLC. And we have this edge here, which we use for striking the match.

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My favourite is this one here.

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Yes.

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There were manufactured, in Victorian times,

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-novelty vesta boxes.

-Right.

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They didn't necessarily need to be fine silver ones

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and this is an example of this

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where we have Gladstone here.

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People will be interested in him even although he's not silver.

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These two items here are matchbox holders

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-and they are silver, and this one here is oriental silver.

-Yes.

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-So quite a nice collection here. I feel we should put these as one lot.

-Right.

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Now, the silver buyers love that, when they see lots of items together in one lot

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because they feel that they might get them for a job lot price.

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We hope that they won't go for that, we know that they won't, we will protect them with a reserve price.

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I think we want to be putting them in maybe...

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..50 to 80, 60 to 80.

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Now, I know that sounds cheap for a quantity of items,

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but we've got to take into consideration

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that some of them are base metal and there are some of them which are tired and not in good condition.

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We do have ones which, with a wee clean, would look well.

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I think, maybe, if we put them in £60 to £80,

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-with a reserve of £60 firm.

-Yes.

-Firm.

-Firm, yes.

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-How do you feel about that?

-Yes, that would be fine. Yes.

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-I personally think that they will go further than that.

-Right, yes. Yes, that sounds...

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-And the reserve will protect them.

-That's right, yes.

-Shall we go for it?

-Definitely.

-Definitely.

-Flog it.

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Let's flog it!

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'It's no secret I'm an animal lover

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'and like many people I try to encourage wildlife in my garden,

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'but with over 60 million people in the UK,

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'there's increasing pressure for space.'

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In fact, here in the West Country in the last 20 years

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there's been the biggest population growth in the UK.

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So, what does that all mean? Well, it means more roads, more traffic,

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more traffic accidents, more pollution, more housing estates.

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And all this is taking away the natural habitat of the animal.

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The result, wildlife is in trouble.

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'This wildlife rescue centre helps 4,000 injured and orphaned wild animals annually.

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'It's the only one in the south-west that's open 24 hours a day, seven days a week all year round.

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'With a small team of staff and volunteers, founder Pauline Kidner

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'is the driving force behind the whole operation.'

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I bet you never have a moment to yourself, do you?

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Not at this time of year, no, definitely.

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-It's pretty full-on, is it, 24/7?

-Yeah, it is. Once we get the badger cubs in

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we know that it's the start and it's going to be followed by

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all sorts of birds and animals right the way through to the autumn now.

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-Sleepless nights for you? Are you up every few hours at the moment?

-With these we have been, yes,

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because they came in really tiny. The smallest of these was only 55 grams

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-when they came in two weeks ago.

-Tiny, isn't it?

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Very, very tiny. So, yeah, it is every two to three hours.

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How old is that little badger cub?

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This little one's three weeks old now.

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How did you come by these, cos that's unusual? You don't see them

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-out of the ground till they're three months old.

-That's right.

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They came from North Wales. They've had some floods up there. We think the sett got flooded.

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And Mum moved them out and put them into a steel drum

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and some people discovered them there crying.

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They did the right thing. They left them to see if Mum came back. Unfortunately she didn't.

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-There's three of them?

-There's three siblings, two girls and a boy.

-You've given them names?

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Yes. The two girls are Lavender and Saffron

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and the little boy here is Nutmeg.

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-So named after spices, then?

-That's right.

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We try and do themes each year!

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-You're going to miss him, aren't you?

-Yeah! You do, but it's funny.

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-People say, "How can you bear to let them go?" The whole idea is to get them back to the wild...

-Of course.

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-So the best time is to take them to their release sites and know you've done the job right.

-Oh!

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-I bet there's a tear in your eye...

-There is, yeah, yeah.

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-They literally have taken over your whole house.

-Yeah, but it's an unusual kitchen.

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It is, isn't it? And an unusual bathroom as well.

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-Having a bath and then you've got to share it with the otter!

-THEY LAUGH

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-Can we have a tour and see what else you've got on-site?

-Yes, certainly.

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'You need dedication and a passion for wildlife to work here.

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'It's estimated that one million animals are killed or injured on British roads each year,

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so places like this are vital and they aren't cheap to run.

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It costs £1,000 a day.

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And this is the hospital room, so where animals would come

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to be assessed in the first instance

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and then sorted out as to which pen they need to go to.

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This is lovely, actually. This is a lovely long-tailed tit

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and we actually had quite a few of those in last year

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when we had the hot weather. They're so pretty.

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-Do their nests fall apart in the hot weather?

-That's the only thing I can think of.

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They actually make a fantastic nest. It consists of about 3,000 feathers

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and then they strand it all together with cobweb strands.

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I think in the dry weather perhaps that's what made them fall apart.

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-A lot of nests dry out, don't they?

-They do, yeah.

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-They break up and fall apart.

-So pretty.

-Cor, you're tiny!

0:18:190:18:24

-What's in there?

-Underneath all the paper is a hedgehog.

0:18:240:18:28

-And we've had about 100 of these in.

-What's his story?

0:18:280:18:32

Well, this one actually was just found out in the garden

0:18:320:18:34

and we're always worried when they're underweight at this time of year.

0:18:340:18:38

-And, of course, that's...

-Is it safe to pick him up?

0:18:380:18:41

It is, but that shows you how they've got

0:18:410:18:43

the one muscle that they pull right up so that they can disappear inside.

0:18:430:18:47

-So a little defence mechanism.

-That's right.

0:18:470:18:50

-And then out he comes.

-He looks about the right weight?

0:18:500:18:53

Yes, he is. He's put weight on since he's come in

0:18:530:18:55

and he's had a good check-up. To be quite honest,

0:18:550:18:58

when there's a query we like things to come in,

0:18:580:19:00

as we can always check them and then put them back.

0:19:000:19:03

But it's always the thing to remember,

0:19:030:19:05

nocturnal animal out during the day, there's a problem and vice versa.

0:19:050:19:09

That's always the first that you should flag up.

0:19:090:19:11

-If it's out at the wrong time of day...

-There's a problem. Pick him up. Rescue.

0:19:110:19:15

-What else is in here?

-Bats. We've got one actually over here.

0:19:150:19:18

We're actually very lucky in Somerset that we have every single one of the 16 species in Somerset.

0:19:180:19:24

People don't realise just how tiny they are.

0:19:240:19:28

Don't say nasty things to me.

0:19:300:19:33

Look at the fantastic little feet that they hang up by there.

0:19:330:19:37

This is the inner ear - the tragus - that you can see there, which is sticking up,

0:19:370:19:41

and the long ears that you know can pump and then come up

0:19:410:19:45

really, really high when it's ready to move.

0:19:450:19:47

Long-eared ones have got the largest eyes, cos they use their eyes

0:19:470:19:51

as part of their hunting. Most of the others rely totally on echolocation.

0:19:510:19:55

Yeah. Beautiful as well.

0:19:550:19:57

Absolutely beautiful. Look at that!

0:19:570:20:00

Ssh!

0:20:110:20:12

HE LAUGHS

0:20:120:20:13

Now, you said you have permanent residents here, don't you?

0:20:160:20:20

You've got some foxes. These are here for good?

0:20:200:20:23

Yeah, they are. These are resident ones.

0:20:230:20:25

Other people have reared them as pets and we just keep them here.

0:20:250:20:30

It's a nice big pen for them. There's five in here with plenty of room.

0:20:300:20:34

-They look really healthy. Look at their coats.

-They've got their winter coats. They're fabulous.

0:20:340:20:39

-That's Marie.

-Hi, Marie!

-If you want to just go in and say hello.

0:20:390:20:43

We'll just stand at a distance so that we don't frighten them.

0:20:430:20:47

-Come on, Paul, see whether they'll take from you.

-Hi, Marie. Hello.

-Now, stand back.

0:20:470:20:51

-I like their little log cabins.

-Oh, it's very posh.

0:20:510:20:54

-This is all Marie's efforts.

-Come on, Bazzy.

-Basil!

0:20:540:20:59

Doesn't quite trust me yet.

0:21:020:21:04

There you go.

0:21:060:21:07

Oh, she's trying to bury it, look. "I'll have that later."

0:21:070:21:11

-She doesn't want the others to have it.

-No.

0:21:110:21:14

So fascinating. I think there's too many of us around

0:21:160:21:19

-and we're spooking them. Pauline, thank you.

-That's all right.

0:21:190:21:22

I'll let you carry on feeding the foxes, because obviously they know you as well.

0:21:220:21:27

-Great. Thanks very much. Hope you've enjoyed...

-Oh, I did. I've absolutely loved it.

0:21:270:21:31

-..being at Secret World. Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:21:310:21:33

Well, what a marvellous day I have had here. It's really put a smile on my face

0:21:390:21:43

being so close to nature and it just makes you realise

0:21:430:21:46

how important British wildlife is.

0:21:460:21:49

We've got our first four items. Now we're taking them off to the sale.

0:22:000:22:04

And this is where we are putting our valuations to the test,

0:22:150:22:20

Tamlyn & Son in the heart of Bridgwater.

0:22:200:22:22

Now, I know our owners are inside right now feeling really nervous.

0:22:220:22:25

It's OK for you at home - you can sit back, relax, have a cup of tea and put your feet up

0:22:250:22:28

and enjoy the action, but for that lot, it's a roller-coaster ride, so let's get on with the action.

0:22:280:22:33

'We're in safe hands with auctioneer Claire Rawle.

0:22:350:22:38

'Remember, though, when you are buying or selling at auction, you have to pay commission

0:22:380:22:42

'and here it's 16% plus VAT.

0:22:420:22:45

'So, let's kick things off with the bronze dragons.'

0:22:450:22:48

Good luck, that's all I can say. Hopefully we'll light the sale room up.

0:22:510:22:54

We've got some continental chamber sticks in the form of mythical beasts. A nice little lot.

0:22:540:22:59

-Yes, I like these.

-A really nice lot. Why are you selling them?

-I don't like them.

0:22:590:23:03

-What, too scary?

-Yeah. Just not my thing.

0:23:030:23:07

You know, if they are your thing, they're flavour of the month right now, that's for sure.

0:23:070:23:12

Yeah, well, we were saying on valuation day, weren't we, on a darkly candlelit dining room

0:23:120:23:17

with some oak furniture, they'd look the business. A bit Addams Family, I know where you're coming from.

0:23:170:23:22

-Yes, but a nice prop.

-They are nice quality as well. They are crisply done.

0:23:220:23:26

-We'll keep our fingers crossed anyway.

-Fingers crossed. Let's see what this lot thinks, it's packed.

0:23:260:23:31

Someone is going to go home with them, surely? This is it.

0:23:310:23:34

A nice pair of decorative, late 19th-century,

0:23:340:23:37

bronze, dragon chamber sticks.

0:23:370:23:39

Nice attractive items, these,

0:23:390:23:41

they are showing to you at the back of the room,

0:23:410:23:43

lot 250 and these I have to start straight in at £135.

0:23:430:23:46

Just like that. Flavour of the month.

0:23:460:23:50

Do I see 140 anywhere?

0:23:500:23:51

At £135, are you all done, then? It goes to my bidder at 135.

0:23:510:23:56

That did light up the sale room. You have to be pleased with that.

0:23:560:23:59

-Brilliant.

-I like it when that happens.

-That's lovely.

0:23:590:24:02

They must have had commission bidders on the book

0:24:020:24:04

and they came in at the highest price and sold.

0:24:040:24:07

-Well done, you two.

-Well, thank you both very much.

-Good work.

0:24:070:24:10

'Well that's a fair old amount. I wonder if they WILL buy any Clarice Cliff. John's book is next.

0:24:100:24:17

'Fingers crossed it also does well.'

0:24:170:24:19

Remember that little, leather-bound volume I found at the valuation day at Wells Cathedral,

0:24:190:24:24

sort of mid-1800s and it said "to the meanest capacity"?

0:24:240:24:27

Well, we're just about to put it to the test and I've been joined by John, its owner

0:24:270:24:31

and hopefully for not much longer.

0:24:310:24:34

-Do you think I valued this to the meanest capacity?

-Yes, I should think that was about right.

0:24:340:24:39

It think it's better to be that way, than be too optimistic

0:24:390:24:43

as if we said it might do £80 or £100 and it struggles, then we're all a bit deflated, aren't we?

0:24:430:24:47

-We are.

-But I'd love it to do that, that's for sure.

-It would be nice.

-It would be, wouldn't it?

-Yes.

0:24:470:24:52

-Right, here we go. Are you ready for this?

-Yes.

-Let's test the market. Let's find out what it's worth.

0:24:520:24:57

Lot 310 is this little book,

0:24:570:25:00

the Practical Measurer, Or Measuring Made Easy.

0:25:000:25:03

There we are, nice, little, early book this, lot 310.

0:25:030:25:06

£12 to start it. At £12, do I see 15 anywhere?

0:25:060:25:10

The bid is with me at 12 for the Measures etc.

0:25:100:25:12

At 12 now. 15? 15, 18, 20.

0:25:120:25:15

There's a bid left on the auctioneer's book.

0:25:150:25:17

At 20.

0:25:170:25:19

Do I see two anywhere? The bid's at 20. £20, it's going to be, then.

0:25:190:25:22

Are you all done? Selling at £20.

0:25:220:25:25

Well, it's gone. We had a £20 reserve, it's gone right on it.

0:25:250:25:28

-That's OK.

-You're happy with that, aren't you?

0:25:280:25:31

-Yes. Thank you very much.

-I think we got our figures right.

0:25:310:25:34

And going under the hammer right now, a silver spoon and a fork, London touchmarks.

0:25:380:25:43

There is no reserve, Pearl, but I think this will fly away.

0:25:430:25:46

Silver's red-hot and I know Will knows what he's doing as well.

0:25:460:25:50

-Sometimes.

-You haven't got me on a knife edge with this one.

0:25:500:25:53

Oh, very good. Yeah, we agreed, didn't we? No reserve. You wanted to sell it.

0:25:530:25:58

Let it make what it makes. Silver's selling well

0:25:580:26:00

and it's a nice, tidy lot, isn't it? In its fitted case. Sweet lot.

0:26:000:26:04

All the trade are here. Let's find out what they're going to pay for it. Here we go.

0:26:040:26:08

This Victorian dessert spoon and fork,

0:26:090:26:12

little silver ones, in their fitted case.

0:26:120:26:15

And I start them straight in at £65. At 65. Do I see 70 anywhere?

0:26:150:26:20

-Pearl, we're in!

-At £65. At 65.

0:26:200:26:22

It's going to go to my bidder then. Are you all done in the room?

0:26:220:26:27

-At £65.

-Maiden bid.

0:26:270:26:29

-Straight in, straight out. Hammer's gone down.

-Thank you very much.

0:26:290:26:32

-Price of silver is rocketing. Pearl, well done.

-Thank you.

0:26:320:26:35

What a good result.

0:26:350:26:38

So far so good. Next up, I've just been joined by Norman

0:26:380:26:41

and we have a collection of around 14 mainly vesta cases.

0:26:410:26:45

You must be a bit of a collector, then, surely?

0:26:450:26:48

Well, when my dad died I found some in his things and the rest just appeared.

0:26:480:26:55

-They gravitate towards you, that's what happens.

-I don't know where they came from.

0:26:550:26:59

-Hey, look, not a lot of money for 14 items, £50-£60.

-They're not all silver.

-No, some of them are though.

0:26:590:27:06

-Not all silver and some not in the best of conditions.

-OK.

-But we have some interesting ones there.

-OK.

0:27:060:27:11

-So this is a good trade lot then.

-Yes.

-A really good trade lot.

0:27:110:27:14

Let's find out what they think, they're here today with a packed room. It's very exciting.

0:27:140:27:18

Let's do it, shall we? Here we go.

0:27:180:27:20

Lot 145, little mixed lot here,

0:27:200:27:22

various vesta cases, matchbox holders and a nail buffer.

0:27:220:27:26

Nice little mixed lot -

0:27:260:27:29

oh, and this one I have to start straight in at £210.

0:27:290:27:33

Something pretty in there.

0:27:330:27:35

£210, it is. At 210, do I see 220 anywhere?

0:27:350:27:40

-I thought it was a lot of lot.

-£210, then.

0:27:400:27:43

At 210, it looks like it's going to my bidder, then, are you all done?

0:27:430:27:47

-I don't believe it!

-Straight in at £210.

0:27:470:27:51

A wee bit conservative.

0:27:510:27:54

-Come and buy me.

-Well, it was, wasn't it, really?

0:27:540:27:57

But there was something there that somebody wanted, one of those items.

0:27:570:28:01

-It could have been that matchbox holder that was Chinese silver.

-That's right.

0:28:010:28:05

-So we had one or two interesting ones there.

-Yeah. Well done.

0:28:050:28:08

-Thank you for bringing that in...

-Thank you.

-..and not throwing it away.

0:28:080:28:12

Putting it in the right place at the right time. If you've got anything like that, we'd love to see it.

0:28:120:28:17

Bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:28:170:28:19

You too could have a surprise in an auction room just like this.

0:28:190:28:22

Log on to the BBC website at bbc.co.uk/flogit.

0:28:220:28:25

Follow the links, all the information will be there

0:28:250:28:28

and hopefully it will be near a town not far away from you.

0:28:280:28:32

'So that's it for our first visit to the sale room

0:28:320:28:34

'so let's head back to the city of Wells for that tour I promised you earlier.'

0:28:340:28:38

They say size doesn't matter and if you're talking about the city of Wells, it couldn't be more right.

0:28:490:28:53

Wells is the smallest city in England - however, architecturally and aesthetically,

0:28:530:28:59

it packs a real punch and according to the locals, it's the best kept secret in Somerset.

0:28:590:29:04

So come with me and I'll show you why.

0:29:040:29:06

One of the first unusual features you might spot here are two water-filled gullies

0:29:070:29:13

that run down both sides of the High Street.

0:29:130:29:15

They look like drains but they aren't. However, they are a clue to how the city got its name.

0:29:150:29:22

Because of these - the wells.

0:29:240:29:25

Three pools that are the source of the water that actually runs down the High Street out there.

0:29:250:29:32

Now, it may look tranquil on the surface but believe me, there is a lot of pressure there

0:29:320:29:37

because around 40 gallons of water, on average, are produced every second.

0:29:370:29:42

Now, if you work that out that's around four million gallons of water per day, which is quite incredible.

0:29:420:29:50

If you look closely enough, you can actually see the bubbles coming up from the bottom.

0:29:500:29:54

You can see how much pressure is down there.

0:29:540:29:56

As well as being an important water source for the local community, natural springs like these

0:30:040:30:09

have always been the focus of spiritual interests since, well, pre-history really.

0:30:090:30:16

Stone-age flints and Roman pottery have been found all over this area

0:30:160:30:21

but the earliest recorded example of a religious building to be found here, well, that's a Roman mausoleum

0:30:210:30:28

and it's thought that that settlement was quite small.

0:30:280:30:31

It wasn't until a Saxon king, Ine of Wessex,

0:30:310:30:35

founded a minster church here back in 704 that the town really took off.

0:30:350:30:41

Today the wells are in the grounds of the Bishop's Palace.

0:30:430:30:46

It's a magnificent palace set in 14 acres of gardens that's been home to the bishops

0:30:460:30:50

of Bath and Wells for 800 years.

0:30:500:30:53

It dates from the early 13th century

0:30:560:30:59

and it's the most perfect and complete surviving example of its type.

0:30:590:31:03

There have been over 50 bishops of Bath and Wells over the years

0:31:140:31:17

but I think there's one that has made more of an impact on the city than most.

0:31:170:31:22

Back in the 15th century, Bishop Beckington was responsible for several important buildings

0:31:220:31:27

and here is just one example.

0:31:270:31:29

It's known as the Bishop's Eye and it really is the gateway to the Bishop's Palace.

0:31:290:31:34

But I think Beckington's greatest contribution to the people of Wells

0:31:340:31:38

has to be providing them with fresh water.

0:31:380:31:41

He devised a mechanism, back in 1451, to get water from the wells, which is over in that direction,

0:31:410:31:46

to the centre of the market place, which is just down here.

0:31:460:31:50

Moving on from the market place,

0:31:510:31:53

this is the quaintly named Penniless Porch.

0:31:530:31:57

It's where the beggars used to congregate.

0:31:570:32:00

The city of Wells is a conservation miracle.

0:32:010:32:04

Its historic heart has been preserved almost intact since the Middle Ages

0:32:040:32:09

and there are no finer examples than this.

0:32:090:32:12

Vicars' Close. In 1348, Bishop Ralph of Shrewsbury

0:32:120:32:17

founded a college so that the Vicars Choral,

0:32:170:32:19

the cathedral choir, could all live together.

0:32:190:32:22

Now, initially, they lodged out there amongst the townsfolk where they could succumb to temptation,

0:32:220:32:28

so in order to keep them in line, so they couldn't get up to any mischief, he built this place.

0:32:280:32:33

Now, it's a street that comprises of 42 small, little houses, one up and one downs,

0:32:330:32:38

and also, a communal hall where they could all eat in.

0:32:380:32:42

Now, interestingly enough, this is now the only totally complete medieval street in England

0:32:420:32:49

and more fascinating than that, it's the oldest continuously inhabited medieval street in Europe.

0:32:490:32:56

Now, that takes some beating, doesn't it?

0:32:560:32:59

And for me, well, I've never been in such a place where there is such a sense of connection to the past

0:32:590:33:05

where time has just, literally, stood still.

0:33:050:33:08

And it has, it really has, it's remarkable.

0:33:080:33:14

Not a lot has changed. Little front gardens have been added.

0:33:140:33:18

Not a lot - as you can see, there's not a lot of space there.

0:33:180:33:21

And also the chimney stacks have been raised somewhat.

0:33:210:33:24

Now, that's to take away the smoke from the winter fires so that it wouldn't ruin the choir's voices.

0:33:240:33:32

Isn't that fascinating?

0:33:320:33:34

I just love this.

0:33:340:33:35

CHORAL MUSIC

0:33:350:33:38

Another addition was the Chain Gate.

0:33:380:33:40

This beautiful, high-level walkway allowed the clergy to enter

0:33:400:33:44

the cathedral from the Vicars' Close without getting their feet or robes wet.

0:33:440:33:49

It also prevented them bumping into the less savoury residents of Wells.

0:33:530:33:57

And finally, the jewel in the crown of these ancient streets and magnificent buildings

0:34:060:34:11

has to be Wells Cathedral itself.

0:34:110:34:13

Just look at it there. It is so inspiring.

0:34:130:34:15

It is an architectural delight that ticks all the boxes

0:34:150:34:18

and it's the first English cathedral of its kind to be designed in the Gothic style back in 1180.

0:34:180:34:25

And the magnificent west front that we're looking at now, circa 1230,

0:34:250:34:29

boasts the largest gallery of medieval sculpture you will find anywhere else in the world.

0:34:290:34:35

And looking at it here, with the sun shining down on that soft stone,

0:34:350:34:39

those yellow ochres just grinning through in this sunlight

0:34:390:34:42

really, really beckons you in. It is so inviting.

0:34:420:34:45

And from the bottom here

0:34:450:34:47

in the lower orders, you've got in these niches

0:34:470:34:50

lots of biblical themes,

0:34:500:34:53

rising up to kings and bishops, then through to an order of angels,

0:34:530:34:56

and then you see the 12 apostles,

0:34:560:34:59

and then right at the very top, Jesus Christ.

0:34:590:35:02

That is just incredible, isn't it? It really is.

0:35:020:35:06

You could just stand here for hours

0:35:060:35:08

admiring such wonderful architecture.

0:35:080:35:10

Inside is no less spectacular.

0:35:150:35:18

The scissor arches are unique,

0:35:180:35:20

taking master mason William Joy ten years to build.

0:35:200:35:24

They were a medieval engineering solution

0:35:240:35:27

to a very real problem of sinking tower foundations.

0:35:270:35:31

And there is the famous Wells Clock,

0:35:330:35:36

which has what is considered to be the second oldest clock mechanism

0:35:360:35:40

in Britain and probably the world.

0:35:400:35:41

It's still in original condition and it still works.

0:35:410:35:45

The mechanism was made in about 1390

0:35:450:35:48

and the clock face

0:35:480:35:49

is the oldest surviving original of its kind anywhere.

0:35:490:35:53

You'll also find the tombs of those influential bishops,

0:35:560:36:00

Beckington and Ralph,

0:36:000:36:01

who made such an indelible mark on the city.

0:36:010:36:06

Well, I think you'll have to agree with me, this is a truly remarkable city,

0:36:150:36:18

extremely rich in medieval architecture, and I've thoroughly enjoyed my time here

0:36:180:36:23

and I hope it's inspired you to come and look for yourself because it just is a great day out.

0:36:230:36:29

What a marvellous day we're having at Wells Cathedral. The sun is starting to beam through

0:36:360:36:42

these wonderful stained glass windows, creating a kaleidoscope of colour,

0:36:420:36:46

but I had to come to this viewing gallery to look at that scissor arch.

0:36:460:36:50

Look at the beautiful perspective of the cathedral, looking right down the nave.

0:36:500:36:54

Our experts are working flat out down there.

0:36:540:36:57

Well, Sharon, thanks for coming along today

0:36:570:36:59

and bringing what I think is actually the oldest thing I've seen today.

0:36:590:37:04

-Oh. Very good.

-Without taking into account the marvellous building we are in at the moment.

0:37:040:37:10

But I know what it is, do you have any ideas?

0:37:100:37:14

Well, I've looked up on the internet and I know it might be Whieldon ware.

0:37:140:37:17

-Right. Yes.

-It might be tortoiseshell ware.

0:37:190:37:22

-OK.

-But I don't know anything about the date or...

-Right. No problem.

0:37:220:37:28

Without attributing it directly to Thomas Whieldon, it is certainly what we would call Whieldon type.

0:37:280:37:34

-Yes.

-Thomas Whieldon, his life basically spanned the 18th century.

0:37:340:37:39

He was born around 1720 and went on through the 18th century.

0:37:390:37:44

Now, he was well known for experimenting with glazes

0:37:440:37:49

and the magic word, tortoiseshell,

0:37:490:37:52

which is spot on for describing what we have here.

0:37:520:37:56

-This is what we would call a tortoiseshell glaze.

-Yes.

0:37:560:38:00

I'm going to flip it over, because people might say,

0:38:000:38:03

I've never seen a tortoiseshell with splashes of green, blue and yellow,

0:38:030:38:07

but if I flip it over and we look at the back, I mean, that's great, isn't it?

0:38:070:38:11

That sort of naive, tortoiseshell, experimental glaze

0:38:110:38:14

really shines out on the back, which is a shame actually,

0:38:140:38:18

because the back can be more interesting than the front.

0:38:180:38:21

But I'll spin it back over and have a look at the front,

0:38:210:38:24

because we've got this, as you say, nice sort of tortoiseshell glaze

0:38:240:38:28

and the plate itself has this rather nice,

0:38:280:38:31

I suppose it's almost a sort of basket weave moulding, isn't it?

0:38:310:38:35

-Yes.

-It's almost a basket weave moulding edge

0:38:350:38:39

and then this sort of scalloped rim.

0:38:390:38:41

-I want you to tell me now how you have come by it and why you have brought it along today.

-Right.

0:38:410:38:46

I've got a tea rooms, and I set it up 23 years ago

0:38:460:38:50

and I was looking for some old china to put on a shelf around the top.

0:38:500:38:55

I know the sort of thing, yes.

0:38:550:38:57

-And my husband's grandmother, who was 104, she had a pile of plates and she said, take these.

-Yeah.

0:38:570:39:03

-And this was one of them, but it was actually covered in mud.

-Really?

0:39:030:39:07

And water scale, because she used to keep plants on it in the conservatory.

0:39:070:39:14

I think the plants might be why the glaze has flaked slightly.

0:39:140:39:17

There is a bit of crazing on the glaze and water doesn't necessarily mix...

0:39:170:39:21

-It was in a terrible state.

-Was it?

0:39:210:39:23

You've done really well to get it up to this condition.

0:39:230:39:26

I would say, I'm going to avoid the 80 to 120 estimate,

0:39:260:39:31

I'm going to come in a little bit under that, if that's OK with you.

0:39:310:39:34

I'm going to say sort of 50 to 80.

0:39:340:39:36

-How do you feel about that?

-Yes, that's fine.

-Is that OK?

-Yes. Yes.

0:39:360:39:41

Now we come to the point of reserve. Would you be happy

0:39:410:39:44

-to just see where it ends up?

-Yes, I'm happy with that.

0:39:440:39:47

-I don't really like it, so...

-That's where we disagree. I like it, you don't.

0:39:470:39:51

But hey, that's antiques.

0:39:510:39:53

Cherie, I'm always interested to see pictures on "Flog It!"

0:39:560:39:59

and I particularly like this little pair of dog portraits.

0:39:590:40:03

Could you tell me, where did you get them?

0:40:030:40:07

Well, they were bequeathed to my husband by a very dear friend

0:40:070:40:11

about 30-odd years ago and we have always enjoyed looking at them

0:40:110:40:17

and when they were in his cottage, we always admired them

0:40:170:40:20

and they looked really superb in his little olde worlde Dorchester cottage.

0:40:200:40:25

We've really enjoyed having them, looking at them,

0:40:250:40:28

and a lot of people have said how well they have been painted.

0:40:280:40:32

So, they've been part of your life for a considerable amount of years.

0:40:320:40:36

Tell me, why do you want to sell them?

0:40:360:40:38

We have a modern house and it's decorated in the modern style

0:40:380:40:43

and these pictures just don't fit any more

0:40:430:40:46

and they have been in my secretaire drawer for about five years now.

0:40:460:40:50

-It's time to pass them on.

-Yes.

0:40:500:40:55

They are both signed and we can see the signature in the corner here.

0:40:550:41:01

-It's J A Wheeler.

-Yes.

0:41:010:41:04

Now, I am not familiar with that artist's work,

0:41:040:41:07

but I see that you have a document here with details of him.

0:41:070:41:11

Can you tell me a bit about the artist?

0:41:110:41:17

Well, as far as I know, he was born in Cheltenham

0:41:170:41:20

and he came to live in Bath

0:41:200:41:22

and I think he painted most of his work in Bath after the Army,

0:41:220:41:26

he was in the Army first of all, and then he went on from there.

0:41:260:41:31

He's a self-taught artist, I believe.

0:41:310:41:33

These dogs are a pair of, I think they are fox-haired terriers.

0:41:330:41:37

-That's right, yes.

-They are very realistic.

0:41:370:41:42

-They are very, very detailed and they are very well executed.

-Yes.

0:41:420:41:47

If they were coming to me, without research and just looking at them,

0:41:470:41:52

I would probably estimate them 150 to 250.

0:41:520:41:58

-OK.

-Would you be happy to put them in at that price, 150 to 250?

0:41:580:42:03

I should think so.

0:42:030:42:04

-Will we put a reserve on them?

-Oh, yes, please. Yes.

-We'll put the reserve at the bottom estimate.

0:42:040:42:11

-Yes.

-£150.

-Yes.

-But they are well worth that and they may well fly.

0:42:110:42:16

Will you be sad to let these go?

0:42:160:42:19

Yes, we will, but it's going for a good cause.

0:42:190:42:24

My grandson or daughter is due in a few days

0:42:240:42:29

and we have a 20-month-old grandson,

0:42:290:42:31

so this will go towards their university fees.

0:42:310:42:36

-Oh, that's wonderful. You're a wonderful granny.

-Oh, thank you!

0:42:360:42:42

'What a lovely lady, and I'm sure those dogs will find a new home.

0:42:420:42:46

'Time for one more valuation, Roger's collection of shot and powder flasks.'

0:42:460:42:52

OK, Roger, you've brought in this nice collection here.

0:42:520:42:55

-You are aware of what they were used for, aren't you?

-Yes.

0:42:550:42:58

-I mean, we've got powder flasks and we've got shot flasks.

-Shot flasks.

-Exactly.

0:42:580:43:03

Powder ones usually in the copper. You would calibrate how much powder was going to go into your musket,

0:43:030:43:09

into your black powder musket. And with the shot, once you'd put your powder away you would have

0:43:090:43:14

to come out with your shot bag and put the shot in there as well.

0:43:140:43:17

Damp it down, load up, take aim and fire

0:43:170:43:20

and fingers crossed, the bullet goes that way and not that way!

0:43:200:43:25

-Tell me, how have you come by this? Are these things that you were buying?

-No.

0:43:250:43:30

-It was one of my uncles, he was a builder and he dabbled in antiques.

-Yes?

0:43:300:43:34

All different, nothing specific, just different things,

0:43:340:43:37

but when he died, it passed to one of my brothers.

0:43:370:43:40

-And when my brother died...

-Passed it on to you.

0:43:400:43:44

Yes. And they've been in the cupboard ever since. You know, as usual.

0:43:440:43:48

-The old story. We hear it all the time. Some are going to be worth more than others.

-Yes.

0:43:480:43:54

I think these nicely embossed leather ones here, for example this one here,

0:43:540:43:59

this is a bit up my street, coming from the racing part of the world.

0:43:590:44:03

We've got what looks like a huntsman here, blowing his horn,

0:44:030:44:07

and perhaps leaping over some sort of ditch or dyke,

0:44:070:44:11

and down here at the bottom, which is what interested me, we've got the Hawksley & Co mark for the makers.

0:44:110:44:18

-Right.

-Now they are a good firm of makers,

0:44:180:44:20

they are sort of at the top end of the makers for this type of thing

0:44:200:44:24

so that's going to help that one along.

0:44:240:44:26

-This one has got the James Dixon mark on the bottom.

-Right.

0:44:260:44:30

Again, that's nice, and it's got sort of dead game,

0:44:300:44:32

typical sort of country house still life, that sort of thing,

0:44:320:44:36

because these were military as well as, shall we say, people who were huntsmen.

0:44:360:44:42

-Yes.

-Who were shooting, or black powder shot sportsmen.

-Yes.

-Exactly.

0:44:420:44:46

So I've been looking at these and what sort of price they've been making recently

0:44:460:44:50

and you know, the market for these has narrowed somewhat, shall we say.

0:44:500:44:55

-Yes.

-They're not such wide appeal.

0:44:550:44:58

I'm thinking £20, £30 apiece, and I'm just thinking out loud here, but what do you think?

0:44:580:45:03

Shall we keep them as one lot, or split them down the middle

0:45:030:45:06

and put the leather ones together and the copper ones together?

0:45:060:45:10

-I'd be happy splitting them, really.

-Yes, I think so.

0:45:100:45:13

There is one train of thought - keep them together and there's a lot there for your money.

0:45:130:45:17

-Or split them up, then you give people the option.

-Yes.

0:45:170:45:20

Do they want to go for just the one or do they want to go for both?

0:45:200:45:23

Let's live dangerously and split them so we've got four copper ones,

0:45:230:45:27

four leather ones. We'll split the reserve, £100 fixed on each.

0:45:270:45:31

-How does that sound?

-£100 reserve on each.

-On each.

-Yeah, right.

0:45:310:45:34

So we'll be looking at 100, 150 as an estimate, fixed at 100.

0:45:340:45:38

I think they should do a little bit more than that,

0:45:380:45:41

-but let's price them sensibly. All right?

-Fair enough.

0:45:410:45:44

-Let's shake on it.

-OK.

-Well done, Roger.

-Cheers.

0:45:440:45:46

This is Eve, one of our production co-ordinators. Hi, Eve.

0:45:480:45:51

-Hello.

-Love the hair colour today.

-Thank you very much.

0:45:510:45:55

Constantly changing!

0:45:550:45:57

Cheryl, Dave, welcome to "Flog It!".

0:46:020:46:05

And thank you so much for bringing in this interesting lot of pharmaceutical items.

0:46:050:46:12

Do you collect this type of thing?

0:46:120:46:14

Yeah, I do. I'm very interesting in it.

0:46:140:46:16

I'm a pharmacy technician, so it's part of my profession.

0:46:160:46:20

It's beginning to take over the house a bit.

0:46:200:46:22

Are you fed up with it, Dave?

0:46:220:46:24

Not entirely, but it is getting there.

0:46:240:46:27

Why do you want to sell them?

0:46:270:46:29

I've got a daughter who was a pharmacy student. She's 21 this year.

0:46:290:46:34

She wants a designer handbag.

0:46:340:46:36

She did say she didn't want me to sell my things,

0:46:360:46:39

but I want to get her a nice designer handbag.

0:46:390:46:41

We're hoping to get the handle at least.

0:46:410:46:43

Oh, that's wonderful. Now, we'll look at the bottles first of all.

0:46:450:46:49

They are Victorian, and these two are of particular interest

0:46:490:46:54

because they are Bristol blue and people love that colour.

0:46:540:46:59

And another added element

0:46:590:47:01

is that we do have the names of the ingredients on the bottles,

0:47:010:47:07

and people like that.

0:47:070:47:08

This item, which is a piece of treen, we can see that this

0:47:080:47:13

would have been the container for yet another medicine bottle.

0:47:130:47:18

I find this box quite interesting.

0:47:180:47:21

"Glycerine cocaine pastilles."

0:47:210:47:24

That's a bit scary.

0:47:240:47:26

But we must remember that cocaine was used

0:47:260:47:30

for medicinal purposes in the 19th century.

0:47:300:47:34

And a little set of weights for a pharmacist to weigh out the measurements of the ingredients.

0:47:340:47:40

Is that the same sort of age as...?

0:47:400:47:41

These are all Victorian. A little later here.

0:47:410:47:46

And your box, a little later.

0:47:460:47:49

But they make a marvellous group.

0:47:490:47:52

Can we look at this, which I love to pieces?

0:47:520:47:56

It's a little leather case.

0:47:560:47:59

The name on the front, "R J Church," the name of the pharmacist.

0:47:590:48:04

And if we look inside, we see this group of bottles in the fitted case.

0:48:040:48:10

Now, this would have obviously been carried by the pharmacist or a doctor

0:48:100:48:16

-when they were going to their patients.

-How old, do you think?

0:48:160:48:20

I would say that that's probably the late 19th, early 20th century.

0:48:200:48:25

Tell me, where did you get these bottles, Cheryl?

0:48:250:48:28

-I get them off the internet, mostly.

-Do you help your wife in the search, Dave?

0:48:280:48:33

Yeah, I do most of the searching on the net and we go to the odd antiques or collectors' fair.

0:48:330:48:39

-You've been pulled in!

-I've been coerced, yeah!

0:48:390:48:42

I would put it into two lots first of all.

0:48:420:48:45

I would put this as a group,

0:48:450:48:48

your bottles, your weights and this pastille box

0:48:480:48:53

in one lot and I would put your little case as a separate lot.

0:48:530:48:58

I would put in an auction estimate of 100-200. Keep it wide.

0:48:580:49:04

-That's good.

-With perhaps a reserve of £80 on it.

0:49:040:49:09

Again, I'm being very conservative.

0:49:090:49:11

On your little bottle group,

0:49:110:49:14

I would say an estimate of 80-120, with a reserve of perhaps 65.

0:49:140:49:22

-Would you be happy to put it through at that?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:49:220:49:27

And let's hope you can get more than just the handle

0:49:270:49:30

-for your daughter's designer bag.

-Get the clasp as well!

0:49:300:49:33

Let's hope we have a good result at auction.

0:49:330:49:37

Here's what's going under the hammer...

0:49:370:49:39

So we're back in Bridgwater with auctioneer Claire Rawle

0:49:430:49:46

and the hustle and bustle of the sale room.

0:49:460:49:49

Gosh, it is full, isn't it? That's a good sign.

0:49:510:49:54

Hopefully they are all here to buy and put their hands up to bid on our lots. Fingers crossed.

0:49:540:49:59

Whatever you do, don't go away, this could get really exciting.

0:49:590:50:02

So let's crack on with the sale

0:50:020:50:05

and keen to sell her Whieldon plate is Sharon.

0:50:050:50:08

-Good luck.

-Thank you.

-The Whieldon tortoiseshell plate.

0:50:080:50:12

-It's 18th century, it's a nice lot, but I know you've added now a reserve, haven't you?

-That's right.

0:50:120:50:16

Our Will likes no reserves.

0:50:160:50:18

-Well, yes, I always try to twist a few arms.

-You do, don't you?

0:50:180:50:21

I think you're right in doing that. You've got to protect it. If you love it, protect it.

0:50:210:50:26

-Sharon was all with me to let it go no reserve.

-Were you?

-Yes. My husband, he's the sensible one.

-Ah!

0:50:260:50:32

-We're the gamblers, he's the banker.

-Hopefully we'll get that top end.

0:50:320:50:36

Let's find out what the bidders think,

0:50:360:50:38

because at the end of the day, it is all down to them.

0:50:380:50:41

-We can speculate and pontificate, but...

-The proof is in the selling.

-And the pudding. This is it.

0:50:410:50:46

Lot 430 is this late 18th, early 19th-century Whieldon type plate,

0:50:460:50:52

and it's being shown to you at the back of the room

0:50:520:50:55

in the cabinet there and I have to start this one away at £40. At 40.

0:50:550:51:00

I have 40, do I see 42 anywhere?

0:51:000:51:02

The bid is with me at 40. At 40 for the plate.

0:51:020:51:06

At 40 it is then. Are you all done? Selling to my bidder at £40.

0:51:060:51:10

It's gone on that reserve. You did the right thing.

0:51:100:51:13

-Yes.

-You did the right thing, yeah, exactly.

-Phew!

0:51:130:51:17

Good luck with the tea room. That's all I can say. Great place.

0:51:190:51:22

Hoping the bidders' diagnosis will be favourable, it's the assorted pharmaceutical items.

0:51:230:51:29

Cheryl and David, it's great to see you again.

0:51:290:51:31

Hopefully now we can make some chemistry in the auction room.

0:51:310:51:34

Well, we should be with the lot we've got,

0:51:340:51:37

the pharmaceutical items. We've got two lots.

0:51:370:51:39

We split it up. So we've got the group.

0:51:390:51:41

There's quite a bit going on, but the first lot coming up is the little suitcase,

0:51:410:51:45

the leather one, which has a lot of contents, doesn't it?

0:51:450:51:48

It's a wee beauty. It's absolutely lovely. Most unusual.

0:51:480:51:51

Let's hope the bidders find this and fall in love with it as well.

0:51:510:51:54

This is the first one to go under the hammer. Here we go.

0:51:540:51:58

This late 19th, early 20th century fitted leather case

0:51:580:52:02

with the pharmacy bottles.

0:52:020:52:04

And I've got 55 here. At 55. Do I see 60 anywhere?

0:52:040:52:08

60. Five. 70. Five.

0:52:080:52:10

80 at the back of the room.

0:52:100:52:12

At £80. Now five anywhere?

0:52:120:52:14

At £80 it's going to be, then. Are you all sure and done?

0:52:140:52:17

Selling, then, at £80.

0:52:170:52:19

It's gone. Hammer's gone down.

0:52:190:52:21

-First one.

-80. Yeah, yeah.

0:52:210:52:24

We're looking at a reserve of £65 for this lot,

0:52:240:52:26

but we would like a little bit more.

0:52:260:52:28

A set of pharmaceutical weights and there's some chemist bottles.

0:52:280:52:32

And I start straight in at £90. At 90.

0:52:320:52:35

-Yes!

-We've done it.

-Do I see five anywhere?

0:52:350:52:37

At £90 now. Five.

0:52:370:52:40

At £90, then. It's going to go to my bidder by the look of it at £90.

0:52:400:52:45

Wow! That's good, isn't it? That's very, very good.

0:52:450:52:49

They liked the bottles

0:52:490:52:51

-better than the little suitcase.

-It's the blue glass ones.

0:52:510:52:54

-Yeah. And I gather all the money is going towards a designer handbag, am I right?

-You are.

0:52:540:52:58

-For you?

-No.

-For your daughter?

0:52:580:53:00

-21st.

-Oh, what a lovely present.

-Pharmacy student.

0:53:000:53:03

Now, depending on where you shop, that could be the handle or half a bag or a quarter...

0:53:030:53:07

-Deposit.

-A deposit!

0:53:070:53:10

But a big chunk towards it nonetheless.

0:53:100:53:12

Going under the hammer right now, or should I say in the firing line,

0:53:150:53:18

it is Roger with four powder flasks and four shot flasks,

0:53:180:53:22

-split into two lots, valued by Will.

-Yes.

0:53:220:53:24

But since the valuation date, Roger has been keeping us on our toes

0:53:240:53:28

-because you have changed the value twice.

-Twice.

0:53:280:53:33

-You rang the auctioneer and said, "I want a bit more money."

-Yes.

-So you put it up to what?

-140.

0:53:330:53:37

-140. And then you called her again in the last few days and you dropped it.

-To 130.

0:53:370:53:43

Were you put under pressure to do that or did you have a re-think?

0:53:430:53:46

No, I looked on the internet and compared the prices and then just...

0:53:460:53:51

But listen, they are yours at the end of the day and you can decide what to do with them

0:53:510:53:55

and it gets me out of a stink because if they don't sell, it's your fault!

0:53:550:54:00

-Right. OK.

-Can't be fairer than that, can we?

0:54:000:54:03

Let's see if we hit the target. Here we go, this is it.

0:54:030:54:06

Moving on to lot 175, the first of the powder flasks.

0:54:070:54:11

These are the copper ones, some by Dixon & Sons.

0:54:110:54:14

There are four altogether in the lot, 175,

0:54:140:54:17

and I have to start away at...£100.

0:54:170:54:22

£100.

0:54:220:54:23

Do I see 110 anywhere?

0:54:230:54:25

110, 120, 130.

0:54:250:54:27

We've sold them.

0:54:270:54:29

At 130, do I see 140 anywhere?

0:54:290:54:32

At £130 then, the bid is in the room. All done at 130.

0:54:320:54:36

You were right, Roger. If you'd left it at 140 you'd have got 140,

0:54:360:54:39

because they went on your new reserve.

0:54:390:54:41

And now the next lot, the shot flasks.

0:54:410:54:44

-You've been tampering with the reserves here as well. You did the same thing?

-Well...

0:54:440:54:48

-Tampering.

-Tampering, yes.

-Went up to 140.

-Back down again.

-Back down, 130.

-130.

0:54:480:54:55

-And I'm going to stick my neck out and predict a 130 hammer price here.

-Yeah.

0:54:550:54:59

19th-century leather shot flasks. There we are.

0:54:590:55:02

There's one by Dixon & Sons in there,

0:55:020:55:04

there's four altogether in the lot, 220,

0:55:040:55:06

and start away, I've got £90.

0:55:060:55:09

At £90, do I see 100 anywhere?

0:55:090:55:11

See if we can get the same bidder going in the doorway.

0:55:110:55:14

Now 100. At £90, do I see 100?

0:55:140:55:17

-Come on.

-We're struggling.

-Are you all sure in the room at 90?

0:55:170:55:21

No, they have to stay with me, I'm afraid.

0:55:210:55:23

We got rid of half.

0:55:230:55:25

The leather ones obviously weren't for him, but we didn't even get to the 100 that I said.

0:55:250:55:30

So, you're in the clear, I can't even blame you. So, 50%.

0:55:300:55:33

'That's auctions for you!

0:55:330:55:35

'But Roger still sold half the collection for £130

0:55:350:55:39

'and keeps the rest.

0:55:390:55:41

'Next up, Cherie's dog paintings. She couldn't make it,

0:55:410:55:44

'but before the sale, she called the auction room

0:55:440:55:47

'and raised the reserve from £150 to £200.'

0:55:470:55:51

I think these are a lovely pair of oils. The artist has form, and this is his subject,

0:55:520:55:58

he's good on hunting, he's good on dogs, horses and so on. I like these, I think they'll do very well.

0:55:580:56:03

It's a shame Cherie can't be here, but she is actually on holiday in Peru,

0:56:030:56:07

-so she's enjoying herself.

-Lovely.

0:56:070:56:10

But we won't be ringing her up, will we, to tell her that they've gone?

0:56:100:56:14

She'll be trekking somewhere and won't have a signal!

0:56:140:56:17

Look, good luck anyway, this is it.

0:56:170:56:19

355, John Arnold Wheeler, the pair of terrier portraits.

0:56:200:56:25

Nice little portraits these.

0:56:250:56:27

In the back cabinet there, so lot 355,

0:56:270:56:29

and I have to start these straight in at £300.

0:56:290:56:33

Nice. That's what I like to hear.

0:56:330:56:35

-No messing about.

-No messing.

0:56:350:56:37

-450. 500.

-The dog lovers are here.

0:56:370:56:41

520, 550, I'll take 580.

0:56:410:56:44

580. Got to go 600. 620? 620.

0:56:440:56:47

-Highest price of the day.

-Looking for 650.

0:56:470:56:50

650 on the back telephone. 680.

0:56:500:56:53

700? 700.

0:56:530:56:55

The Jack Russell lovers are here in force, or at least on the telephone.

0:56:550:57:00

800. 800 on the back telephone.

0:57:000:57:02

At £800, now 50 anywhere?

0:57:020:57:04

-And there's another phone.

-850 here. 900?

0:57:060:57:09

900 with Kate. At 900. Now 950?

0:57:090:57:11

-950?

-That's astonishing.

-He's back again.

0:57:110:57:16

At 950 it is then. Are you all sure and done? At 950.

0:57:160:57:21

I am very happy with that.

0:57:210:57:23

I think we should get on the phone. That is an amazing result.

0:57:230:57:26

That's top money for that artist. I tell you what, somebody paid a lot of money for that.

0:57:260:57:30

-He was a Bath artist, so we're selling it in the right area.

-Locally.

0:57:300:57:35

The great thing is, all that money is going towards her grandchildren's university fees

0:57:350:57:39

-so she's already building up a pot fund for that.

-Isn't that wonderful?

-Yes.

0:57:390:57:43

Thinking ahead for the future for the rest of the family.

0:57:430:57:46

Because it would have been their inheritance, so they're being looked after.

0:57:460:57:50

-It's a good thing to do.

-Yes, and it's a wonderful result.

-£950. That is incredible!

0:57:500:57:55

It's all over for our owners, in fact, the auction has just stopped, just like that.

0:58:000:58:04

There's a buzz in the room. Some of the lucky bidders

0:58:040:58:06

are now collecting their lots and going home very happy.

0:58:060:58:10

And I think all our owners have gone home happy,

0:58:100:58:12

especially Cherie with the two portraits of the Jack Russells, selling for a whopping £950.

0:58:120:58:20

I hope you are enjoying this moment, Cherie, and I hope everybody else has enjoyed today's show.

0:58:200:58:24

Join me again soon for many more surprises, but until then, from Bridgwater, it's goodbye.

0:58:240:58:29

Paul Martin and the Flog It! team visit the beautiful city of Wells. The medieval splendour of Wells Cathedral is the valuation-day venue, where experts Anita Manning and Will Axon cast their experienced eye over an array of antiques and collectibles. Anita discovers a pair of paintings by an amateur artist that prove a big hit in the saleroom, while Will targets an interesting collection of shot and powder flasks. Presenter Paul also takes a journey around the historic centre of this ancient city, which according to the locals is the best-kept secret in Somerset.