Cardigan 1 Flog It!


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Cardigan 1

The Flog It! team are at Rhosygilwen Mansion just outside Cardigan in the west of Wales. Paul Martin is joined by experts Christina Trevanion and Charlie Ross.


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Today we're near the fabulous coastline of Cardigan Bay,

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stretching north into Ceredigion and south into Pembrokeshire.

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Much as I'd love to stand here all day embracing this marvellous Welsh countryside,

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they wouldn't let me get away with that!

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There are too many antiques waiting to be valued inside. Welcome to Flog It!

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The town of Cardigan has been a port since the early Middle Ages.

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Its importance stems from its strategic position on the River Teifi,

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the gateway to the fertile Teifi Valley.

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We've certainly got an army of followers here today.

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They have turned out in force at the Rhosygilwen mansion,

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all hoping their treasures will be worth a small fortune

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when we take them to auction. Who will it be? Stay tuned to find out!

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It may even be this wonderful bus.

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So tickets, please! Let's start our journey.

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Leading the Flog It troops to find out what people have brought along

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are our team of experts headed up by Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion.

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Coming up, we've got a show full of weird and wonderful things!

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Look at that! That's a surprise. I didn't know that was going to happen!

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Good lord, that's quite wacky, isn't it?

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It's a bit of an acquired taste.

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Yes.

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We incur a casualty.

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She's been through the wars. Tell me what happened there.

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She was all right when I left this morning.

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-When I undid it, she was in two pieces.

-Oh, no!

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And will a hoard of Indian silver translate into a stack of British pounds?

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I'm just hoping they like Indian silver in Wales!

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We kick off with Christina and that broken statue.

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But it isn't on its own.

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Fiona has a group who've all had to put up with a few knocks in their time.

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We've got a jolly band of fellows here. They look like they're having a good time.

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-They do.

-Where are they from?

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They were my grandmother's. I don't know where she got them from.

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She wasn't very careful with them and most of them have got something broken.

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-Right.

-My mother reckoned she was just clumsy!

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-Right.

-My mother hated them, actually!

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-Did she?

-She couldn't wait for me to have them!

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-They're a real...

-Are you fond of them?

-I love him.

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-I love the colours on them. They're fabulous.

-Really bright, aren't they?

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-Gorgeous.

-The detail's good. But they are awful dust collectors!

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-I bet.

-Dreadful.

-Nightmare to clean.

-Yes.

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Some of them aren't very clean.

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I don't blame you. They are very fragile.

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-Sadly, we've got damage pretty much across the board.

-Yes.

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That's one of the first things as a valuer, establishing a value on these,

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-it's very difficult because of the damage throughout.

-Yes.

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Down here we've got a hand, and a bit of a broken bottle here.

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They've just had a good time, I think, they've had a good old party.

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Surprisingly, when I looked at them I thought they made a good group.

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But actually, they're all by different factories.

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-Right.

-So we've got this pair here.

-Right.

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We've got some nice marks here.

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This tells us they're by a German factory called Sitzendorf.

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Right.

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They're beautifully enamelled. When you pick them up, they're heavy.

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So nice heavy porcelain.

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But unfortunately...

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-Yes, I know!

-She's been through the wars. What happened there?

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-She was all right when I left this morning!

-Oh, no!

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And I did wrap her up but when I undid it, she was in two pieces.

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-Whether it had already been broken and my grandmother had mended it at some point.

-Very possible.

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The good news is, yes, it's damaged,

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but it's a nice clean break so it could be restorable.

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It's OK. So we've got these two figures here.

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These, I think, are the best quality-wise.

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-I love this chap.

-So do I.

-He's wonderful, isn't he?

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He's a boozy fellow.

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-What's his name?

-Landlord.

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The Landlord. So a nice character figure.

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And what's even better is that I can just picture him in a gentleman's study

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as a figurine, and as soon as the wife's gone or the family's gone,

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he gets out his figurine and has his tot!

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-He's not a figure any more, he's a decanter!

-Gorgeous, isn't it?

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It's wonderful. I love it.

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As a decanter to a decanter collector, he could be really quite interesting.

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Yes.

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Then this pair of figures here.

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We've got a fruit seller and her gentleman partner.

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They're a matched pair.

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They didn't start life together.

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Not as exciting, possibly, as these.

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I think, at auction,

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we have to bear in mind the condition issues.

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-But I think we're still looking in the region of 100 to £200.

-Good!

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-Would you be happy to sell them at that value?

-Yes.

-Brilliant.

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-Let's flog it!

-Save the dusting!

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Hopefully the bidders will relish the idea of getting their hands on this motley bunch

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and give them the opportunity to live another day.

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Next, Charlie's talking to Terry who has an interesting collection of Indian silver.

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Terry, have you been shopping?

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Just a little bit!

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Have you bought them yourself or inherited them?

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No, I bought them on the internet.

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-On the internet?

-Over the last year or so.

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-Gosh. What was the first bit you bought?

-I think the jug.

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The jug. Is that your favourite bit?

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-It is, actually.

-Yes.

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Do you have any connection with India? It's Indian silver.

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The only connection I've got is that my mother and her side of the family came from India.

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Right. Have you been yourself?

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I've been twice and I'm going again the week after the auction.

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-I'm going to find my grandfather's grave in Calcutta.

-Gosh!

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-He was a train driver.

-Really? How fascinating.

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-When did he die?

-I think he must have died in the early '70s.

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-Well post-Raj.

-Well post-Raj.

-Yes.

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This is mostly Raj, isn't it? Nearly all of it.

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It is, I think all of it is Raj period.

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I would think most of this is between 1920 and 1940?

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-I'd say some pieces are...

-Some earlier?

-18-something.

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-Late 1800s.

-You think they go to the 19th century?

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It's interesting to try and guess from the influence which part of India they might have come from.

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This has a sort of Buddhist influence down here.

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I wonder if it's nearer to Ceylon down the bottom there.

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-Yeah.

-I think this one, your favourite piece,

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I think if I took the handle away, took the snake away there,

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I would struggle to know that was Indian and not Middle Eastern.

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Yes, it looks a bit Arabic.

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It does. The top here looks very Arabic.

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And the flowers.

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-So we need to raise some money, don't we?

-We do.

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-Help you with the flight.

-We sure do.

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-Assuming you're not rowing there.

-No, a slow boat.

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I've looked through, weighed some of it.

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I think we should be safe at 150 to £200.

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-I'm happy with that.

-150 to 200.

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Reserve 150. A bit of auctioneer's discretion.

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-See you on the day.

-OK.

-Let's get enough for the whole flight.

-Flog it!

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Yes, flog it!

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It's a tricky one to value, but I think Charlie is quietly confident.

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We'll find out later if it's well placed.

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Flog It valuation days are very busy, so when people are selected for filming,

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they often have to wait a while.

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I can't resist having a good peek at what they've brought in!

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There are several tables dotted along here.

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This is the holding bay.

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This is where all our owners that haven't been filmed yet are waiting to be filmed.

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Who owns the ostrich egg?

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Wow, look at that!

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That certainly is a present from down under.

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We think so. It was a present to my father, who was a surgeon.

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It was a present from a patient who wanted to thank him.

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There's a kangaroo actually carved onto the shell of the egg.

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Do you know something? I think that with this emu and that kangaroo,

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and the whole thing with these wonderful over-the-top pieces of glass,

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I think it will find its way back to Australia. I really do.

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Yes.

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Let's hope the bidders will want to snap them up.

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People bring a variety of antiques to our valuation days

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but there's nothing that gets me quite so fired up as furniture.

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I was so excited to see this next item that

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I intercepted Holly before she had a chance to get inside.

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Thank you so much for bringing in a piece of Welsh furniture.

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You've made my day. Cos this is what it's all about, regional things.

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Wherever we go,

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it's always nice to see something that's made in the vicinity.

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And this chair was made all over Wales,

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even on the Welsh borders around Herefordshire, as well.

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-Do you know much about it?

-Not a huge amount at all.

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I knew it was Welsh oak and that's it.

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It doesn't get any better than Welsh oak. You know that.

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All hand-sawn and it's all pegged.

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Can you see that?

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-See these little pegs?

-Oh, yes.

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All dowels driven right through a mortise and tenon,

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so all of these stretchers,

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there's a little tenon in there that sits into a mortise and to hold it

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tight, a hole's drilled through there

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and then a dowel is knocked through.

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-Gosh. A lot of work goes into them.

-Yeah.

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But it stops the joint from moving. And look at that.

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Look how tight it is.

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You couldn't even put a cigarette paper in that joint, could you?

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This is a lovely thing to have, all these pegs showing.

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But this chair has never been fiddled with because,

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if you turn it upside down, can you see it's as dry as a bone there?

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-Yes.

-If that's been polished,

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it means it's been polished to match in with polished

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sections of these stretchers, so the seat wouldn't be original.

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But looking at this, it's as honest as the day it was made,

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and that's a lovely thing to have,

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because I date this chair to the latter part of the 18th century.

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-I'd say this is circa 1780, 1790.

-Gosh.

-Yeah, I would, honestly.

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So, value. How much did this chair cost you?

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I think it was about £60. Certainly no more than that.

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Well, I think we could safely say let's put this into auction

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at a value of £120 to £180, and I think she'll double her money.

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-That's fantastic.

-We'll put a reserve of £100 on.

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This will come in handy to anybody that loves Welsh furniture.

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There's plenty of people here in Wales who'll buy this

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because they'll make up a set around the kitchen table.

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And it doesn't matter if it slightly mismatches another one of the style.

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It may not have these lovely flattened bobbin turnings,

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but that doesn't matter.

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-Harlequin sets look really good.

-Yes.

-And they're full of character.

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And it will last somebody another 200 years because it's so practical

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and functional.

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-Yeah?

-Very pleased.

-See you at auction.

-Thank you.

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First, Christina is chatting to Gary

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who's inherited a piece of Swiss sophistication.

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Here we've got your chronograph Swiss wrist watch.

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Tell me, where's it come from?

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I had it from my father, actually, going back 15, 16 years ago.

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-Right.

-He never used it. So he said to me one night when I was with him,

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he showed me a lot of watches and I said I'd have that one.

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-Have that one or that one.

-Yes.

-OK.

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So tell me, was Father sporty?

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Not really, no.

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Tell me why would he have wanted a chronograph movement?

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A chronograph movement, as you know, is a stopwatch.

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-Was he into the horses, maybe?

-No, no, no.

-Running?

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-Nothing like that?

-Only cars and lorries.

-Cars and lorries.

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-Maybe he used it to time his lap circuits or something.

-Maybe!

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You never know.

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So it's a rather nice example.

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As we can see from the dial, we've got a subsidiary minutes dial here

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which times up to 30 minutes.

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We've also got a seconds dial here.

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And the way that it works, as you probably know,

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is that we start it there, see the red hand ticking away nicely there.

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Then we can stop it. We can restart it.

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And then stop it.

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-And then we can restart it completely.

-Yes.

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It's fantastic. Very, very controllable, isn't it?

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It's got a nice clear dial.

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Not much damage on the dial. A few scratches on the face.

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But nothing serious.

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If we turn it over...

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we've got a nice mark which says 18k and 750.

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That's indicative of 18-carat gold.

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-It would be nice if the strap was gold!

-It would be!

-But sadly it's not.

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We can see here that this gold plate is wearing off the strap.

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The base metal is coming through on that strap there.

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We've got some serial numbers down here.

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-Unfortunately we can't pin it down to an absolute factory...

-No.

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..without opening the back, but the back is very delicate, a very thin sliver of gold

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and I'd be reluctant to take the back off.

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However, it is a Swiss movement.

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The Swiss, as you know, renowned for fantastic watch making.

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Yes.

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I think in the open market today, we'll be looking at an auction valuation of about 200 to £300.

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-How do you feel about that, Gary?

-The more, the merrier!

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Well, it may well fetch more on the day

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but if we put it any more it'll look quite pricey compared to other chronograph watches on the market.

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OK? So happy to sell it at 200 to 300.

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-Yes.

-Let's set the reserve at 200 firm. Try and get as much as we can for you.

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-OK.

-Perhaps put the money towards a new watch for you!

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Good. Thank you.

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Over in Carmarthen, the sale room is starting to fill up.

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Commission rates here are on a sliding scale,

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starting at 17.5% for items under £150,

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down to 10% for items over £3,000.

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Here's what's going under the hammer.

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Fiona's figurines might have been injured in service, but perhaps they'll find a new lease of life.

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Hopefully the bidders will appreciate Terry's collection of exotic silver

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and provide him with passage back to India.

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Holly's beautiful Welsh oak chair that I've fallen in love with.

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Lastly, Gary's Swiss watch.

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It might be lacking a gold strap, but will its quality still shine through?

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Wielding the gavel today is auctioneer Nigel Hobson.

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Time is now definitely up, not for my watch, but for Gary's watch.

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-Lovely thing. It was your father's.

-I've got another one.

-That was his as well, was it?

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-You love this as well.

-Yes, and it's a chronograph so hopefully it'll get there.

-It's a very good watch.

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-Yes.

-Not many of them made.

-Let's hope we get a decent surprise.

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-I hope so!

-I hope so.

-Let's find out. Here we go.

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261. The mid-20th-century Swiss 18-carat gold

0:16:080:16:13

chronograph gentleman's wrist watch.

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A good-looking watch, ticking away nicely.

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The case is marked 18 carat.

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A nice-looking watch. Interest here with me on the book

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-means I can start the bidding straightaway at 200.

-Brilliant.

0:16:240:16:27

-220 I've got. £220 on the book.

-It's gone.

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Let's hope we get another bid.

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At 220.

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At 220. May I say 240 now?

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240. 260.

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At 260.

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260. Against you in the room. Against you online at 260.

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Bidding on the book now at 260.

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At 260. Selling it. On the book, then, at £260.

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Sold! Good estimate. Very good.

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-Happy?

-Yes, very happy, actually.

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Brilliant. Well done. Well done.

0:16:590:17:01

Christina was spot-on there, but has she got the measure of those figurines?

0:17:010:17:06

This sale is being conducted by Nigel's colleague, Geoff Thomas.

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Well, it's the moment of truth, Fiona.

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Let's hope the damage doesn't put the buyers off.

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Collectors are fussy, but maybe they just might go for this.

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-You just don't know. We've got 100 to £200.

-Yep.

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And a slightly lower reserve

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to take into account that damage.

0:17:250:17:27

Let's see what the bidders think. Here we go.

0:17:270:17:32

Lot 365, a group of porcelain continental figures.

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Lot 365. Start me at 100.

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80?

0:17:430:17:44

50? £50 I've got. 50. 60.

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70. 80. £80.

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It's going. It's going!

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At £80 I'm bid.

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At £80. 90 is it? All done, then?

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All done at £80.

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-Well done.

-£80 - and they were very broken!

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I wonder if someone will restore them.

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-Inevitably.

-Yeah.

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Now, I'm starting to get cold feet about our next item.

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I keep saying bring lots of furniture in,

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we love seeing furniture.

0:18:180:18:19

Bless Holly, she did just that - a lovely Welsh regional chair.

0:18:190:18:23

It's about to go under the hammer. Fingers crossed. I'm really nervous.

0:18:230:18:28

I know everybody in the trade keeps saying,

0:18:280:18:30

"Brown furniture is on its knees and it's a good time to buy".

0:18:300:18:32

OK, it is a good time to buy,

0:18:320:18:34

but hopefully it's going to be a good time for you to sell.

0:18:340:18:37

-Yes.

-This has got personality.

-It has.

-It's got great personality.

0:18:370:18:40

Let's see what happens.

0:18:400:18:42

A late-18th century Welsh oak single chair. Lot 184.

0:18:440:18:50

What should I ask for this one? Start me at 180.

0:18:500:18:54

150.

0:18:540:18:55

£100 I'm bid. £100 I've got. 100. At 100.

0:18:550:18:58

120. 140. At 140. 160. 180.

0:18:580:19:02

-At 180 bid. At 180.

-Brilliant.

-At 180. 200 do I hear now?

0:19:020:19:06

At 180. 200.

0:19:060:19:08

200. 220 with me. 220. At 220 bid.

0:19:080:19:11

At 220. 40 is it now? At 220.

0:19:110:19:15

-They like it.

-Yes.

-40 is it, then?

0:19:150:19:17

At 220. I'll let it go, then.

0:19:170:19:20

With me at £220. All quiet.

0:19:200:19:22

Hammer's gone down. £220. Not bad, top end.

0:19:220:19:27

Amazing!

0:19:270:19:28

I was really, really frightened

0:19:280:19:30

because the furniture had just come in and there were half a dozen

0:19:300:19:33

chairs before our lot, a mixed lot, a harlequin set, £180, six of them!

0:19:330:19:40

That one did £220. I'm ever so pleased.

0:19:400:19:42

What a lovely artisan piece!

0:19:420:19:44

Next up, will Terry's silver provide him with the passport he's hoping for?

0:19:480:19:53

The pressure is on. Terry has just joined me and expert Charlie Ross.

0:19:530:19:57

We need the top end of that valuation. £200-plus.

0:19:570:20:01

Because Terry is off to India. He's worked out the price of the flight.

0:20:010:20:05

440 quid. And you're going next week?

0:20:050:20:08

-Yes.

-Got the visa?

-Yes.

-He hasn't got the ticket yet. We're waiting on the result of this silver

0:20:080:20:14

to go under the hammer, Charlie.

0:20:140:20:16

A lot of Indian silver here. It's a shame it's not hallmarked or dated.

0:20:160:20:21

-It would fly through the roof, wouldn't it?

-Yes.

0:20:210:20:24

It's quite tricky. I've done one piece of Indian silver before on Flog It

0:20:240:20:29

which went really well. So I'm hoping they like Indian silver in Wales!

0:20:290:20:35

We're going to find out right now. Let's see what it's worth.

0:20:350:20:39

245 is a collection of 19th- and early 20th-century

0:20:400:20:45

Indian silver items.

0:20:450:20:47

20-odd ounces there. What do we say? About £200 here?

0:20:470:20:50

150 to go, then, surely? £150 I'm bid.

0:20:500:20:54

-150. 160, may I say?

-That's good.

0:20:540:20:57

At 150. In the room at 150.

0:20:570:20:59

160 online. 170.

0:20:590:21:02

Are we going to get that top end?

0:21:020:21:04

180. 190.

0:21:040:21:07

-200, may I say?

-Might be going business class!

0:21:070:21:10

220.

0:21:100:21:12

240, may I say? 240 online. 260.

0:21:120:21:16

260. 280, may I say?

0:21:160:21:19

260 in the room. Against you on the internet at 260. In the room.

0:21:190:21:22

At £260.

0:21:220:21:25

-Well done.

-That's fantastic.

0:21:260:21:27

Well done, you. Well bought.

0:21:270:21:30

Yes, well bought. Well valued!

0:21:300:21:32

Thank you, sir!

0:21:320:21:35

What a successful first visit to the auction. But before we go back to the valuation day,

0:21:350:21:41

I discovered more about a Welsh tradition that's more universal than we might first think.

0:21:410:21:47

The River Teifi forms a natural border

0:21:550:21:58

between the counties of Ceredigion and Carmarthenshire.

0:21:580:22:01

About seven miles in from the mouth of the river in Cardigan

0:22:010:22:05

is the pretty village of Cenarth, famous for its falls and its salmon.

0:22:050:22:10

In the 12th century, a visitor to the village noted that an extensive fishery existed on the rocks

0:22:130:22:19

where the salmon leapt as they migrated upstream.

0:22:190:22:21

But this river is also famous for the unusual but traditional way

0:22:210:22:25

in which those salmon were caught.

0:22:250:22:27

For hundreds of years, the fishermen here had used a coracle

0:22:300:22:35

and it's probably only one of three rivers in the world where coracles are still used

0:22:350:22:40

for salmon fishing with a net.

0:22:400:22:42

Coracles were once common all over the British Isles.

0:22:430:22:46

Julius Caesar is said to have first come across one

0:22:460:22:49

when he invaded Britain back in 55 or 54 BC.

0:22:490:22:53

Nowadays, you'll only find the craft in a few areas.

0:22:530:22:56

One of them is Shropshire on the English/Welsh borders.

0:22:560:23:00

The other is right here in Wales.

0:23:000:23:02

Every area had its own unique type of coracle made from local materials

0:23:060:23:11

and designed for the particular conditions of the local river and its use.

0:23:110:23:15

But the basic construction style would have been very similar.

0:23:150:23:20

As you can see, it's simply made of a basket-like construction.

0:23:220:23:25

Interwoven laths that give it its strength, its cohesion.

0:23:250:23:29

Traditionally they were completely round and covered with animal hide.

0:23:290:23:33

The size of the hide would dictate the size of the vessel.

0:23:330:23:37

The hair would be on the inside, the skin on the outside.

0:23:370:23:40

You'd use the fat to help waterproof it.

0:23:400:23:43

For the last 200 years here, they've been covered in cotton

0:23:430:23:47

and painted with a pitch.

0:23:470:23:49

The pitch does two things. It tightens the cotton and also makes it waterproof.

0:23:490:23:54

The wood used on the laths is a willow and hazel wood,

0:23:540:23:59

woods that are plentiful in the area.

0:23:590:24:01

But the most important thing is, with these little craft,

0:24:010:24:04

is the bottom has to be flat because it works within three inches of water.

0:24:040:24:08

This little craft will actually hold three times my bodyweight.

0:24:080:24:13

It's so simple.

0:24:130:24:14

At the end of the day, all you do is pick this thing up,

0:24:140:24:18

put it on your shoulder and walk home.

0:24:180:24:20

Fascinating!

0:24:200:24:22

Over the years, fishing licences were not renewed and sadly the coracle is now a rare sight.

0:24:220:24:27

But this important symbol of Welsh heritage is part of a worldwide tradition.

0:24:280:24:33

I've come to the National Coracle Centre in Cenarth to meet Martin Fowler

0:24:330:24:37

who is going to show me some of the coracle's foreign relatives.

0:24:370:24:41

What a fabulous place! I guess my first question has to be,

0:24:440:24:49

when and where did the coracle style of boat originate?

0:24:490:24:52

Although most people associate them with Wales, I think the Middle East is where they actually started.

0:24:520:24:58

We're looking at the first forms of water transport

0:24:580:25:01

from the first civilisations of the world, really.

0:25:010:25:04

You've got different examples from around the world.

0:25:040:25:07

-Can I see the one from North America?

-Yeah, sure.

0:25:070:25:09

It's a lot smaller than I would have thought.

0:25:110:25:13

-Yes...

-Then again it depends on the size of the animal. The hide.

0:25:130:25:18

-North American Indians...

-Buffalo?

-Buffalo hide.

0:25:180:25:22

At one time, there were thousands of buffalo on the plains of North America.

0:25:220:25:26

-They've left the tail on!

-They always did. It's interesting

0:25:260:25:30

because this is the only one I know of where they've covered it the opposite way

0:25:300:25:34

with the hair on the outside and the skin on the inside.

0:25:340:25:39

They left the tail on so they could pull it up the bank,

0:25:390:25:42

tie it to something.

0:25:420:25:44

But when you use this, you kneel and paddle, exactly the same as we would use a coracle here.

0:25:440:25:49

But with the tail here,

0:25:490:25:52

when you went downriver, the hair would always go with the water.

0:25:520:25:56

So instead of putting grease on it, they left it exactly how the animal kept dry.

0:25:560:26:00

-Yes.

-And that's why I think everywhere in the world, people came up with the same ideas

0:26:000:26:06

but all independently.

0:26:060:26:08

This is just so remarkable.

0:26:080:26:10

The whole afternoon has opened my eyes to boat-building with a difference!

0:26:100:26:15

It really has. Martin, thank you so much for showing me round the museum.

0:26:150:26:19

It is open to the public. It's got to be unique. Possibly the only one in the world.

0:26:190:26:23

-I think so.

-It's well worth a visit. Long may it continue.

-Thank you.

0:26:230:26:27

It's been really fascinating to see how the simple idea like a basket-like boat

0:26:320:26:37

has cropped up all across the globe from the earliest of times.

0:26:370:26:40

It's a real testament to man's ingenuity and determination

0:26:400:26:44

to overcome the limits of his environment.

0:26:440:26:46

It's rather bizarre to think this village in Wales is one of the very few places

0:26:460:26:51

in which you'll still see these coracles at work.

0:26:510:26:54

Back at our valuation day in Rhosygilwen mansion,

0:27:020:27:05

people are still pouring in with all manner of fascinating and quirky items.

0:27:050:27:09

And the emu egg that I spotted earlier has caught Christina's attention.

0:27:090:27:14

-It's wacky!

-Are you going to value it?

-I think so.

0:27:150:27:18

I keep looking at it on my own going... It's one of those things.

0:27:180:27:23

-I'll have a good look.

-That'll go back to Australia.

-Do you think?

0:27:230:27:27

-Definitely.

-I hope so. Imagine shipping it!

-What are you going to put on it?

0:27:270:27:31

I've no idea!

0:27:310:27:33

-No idea!

-Have a good think.

-I will. I'll come back to you on that one!

0:27:330:27:37

I look forward to what she's got to say about it once she's done some research.

0:27:390:27:43

First, let's see what Charlie thinks about an unusual item belonging to Leon.

0:27:430:27:48

This, I think, is fantastic. Where did it come from?

0:27:480:27:51

It came from my wife's family.

0:27:510:27:54

-In 1970-something she was given it by her gran.

-Yeah.

0:27:540:27:59

She was moving house and couldn't take it with her.

0:27:590:28:02

She's had it ever since.

0:28:020:28:03

So was Granny a high liver?

0:28:030:28:07

-I suspect so, yes.

-Yeah.

-Knowing her family!

0:28:070:28:10

It smacks of that era, of what I call the Charleston era,

0:28:100:28:14

the Deco era. It's pure Art Deco.

0:28:140:28:17

It's got a cocktail shaker.

0:28:170:28:19

Champagne glass.

0:28:190:28:20

Cocktail glasses.

0:28:200:28:22

A brandy balloon.

0:28:220:28:24

All the things I love in life! Fantastic.

0:28:240:28:27

Except for one thing.

0:28:270:28:29

-And that, of course, is...

-The cigarettes.

0:28:290:28:31

-The dreaded cigarettes.

-We haven't got any.

0:28:310:28:34

This would have had, I would have thought, the best Balkan Sobranie cigarettes,

0:28:340:28:39

-the coloured ones.

-Yes.

-Pink ones, black ones, mauve ones.

0:28:390:28:44

It would have looked absolutely stunning on a bar.

0:28:440:28:48

Quite stunning. It's not brilliantly made, I have to say.

0:28:480:28:51

But it's very Deco, even the shoulder of the barman

0:28:510:28:58

has a Deco angle about it, which I love.

0:28:580:29:01

Where's it been? Have you had it on display?

0:29:010:29:04

No. We bring it out occasionally at parties to see if people can guess what it is.

0:29:040:29:09

-How many people guess what it is before they pull it up?

-Not many! Not unless they've seen one.

0:29:090:29:14

I think it's just a super statement of the time.

0:29:140:29:18

I don't think it's worth a lot of money. Are you hoping for a fortune?

0:29:180:29:22

No. I'm surprised how much you like it.

0:29:220:29:24

I love it. But we shouldn't get carried away with regards value.

0:29:240:29:30

Because I like it, doesn't mean it's worth a few hundred quid.

0:29:300:29:33

I'd like to sell it without reserve, to be honest.

0:29:330:29:37

-I would expect it to make somewhere between 20 and £40.

-Fair enough.

0:29:370:29:43

I think I'll take it home!

0:29:430:29:44

No, no. We'll take it to auction. Thanks for bringing it along.

0:29:440:29:49

Christina is pleased to have bumped into Vicky

0:29:510:29:54

because she is very partial to a bit of jewellery.

0:29:540:29:57

-I see you're a brooch fan.

-Yes.

-I'm a brooch fan.

-Yes.

0:29:590:30:03

-And you've brought a brooch in to show us today.

-I have.

0:30:030:30:06

-Tell me who it belonged to.

-It was handed down in the family.

0:30:060:30:10

I presume it belonged to my grandmother and then my mother

0:30:100:30:13

and then it came to me.

0:30:130:30:15

-Goodness me, that is a very long pedigree history.

-Yes.

0:30:150:30:19

The brooch dates to around 1880, 1890, something like that.

0:30:190:30:23

-Would that tie up with great-granny's dates?

-My mother was born in 1896.

0:30:230:30:29

-Right.

-So that would tie in.

-It would, wouldn't it? OK.

0:30:290:30:32

So we've got this wonderful star motif here, which is

0:30:320:30:36

absolutely fantastic.

0:30:360:30:37

It's actually made of glass.

0:30:370:30:39

The glass would've been made in layers, like a glass sandwich,

0:30:390:30:43

and then they would've carved it to produce this wonderful stellar,

0:30:430:30:47

or star effect here.

0:30:470:30:48

-It's trying to be hard-stone agate.

-Only trying.

0:30:480:30:52

It's trying, yes, it's trying very hard.

0:30:520:30:54

And it would've been much more costly material to produce this in.

0:30:540:30:58

It would've been a mourning brooch originally and we can see that

0:30:580:31:01

because it's got the plaited hair of somebody in the back of it.

0:31:010:31:04

-Yes.

-Might that have been great-granny's?

-I hope so.

0:31:040:31:08

-I wish I had a name, but unfortunately I don't.

-OK.

0:31:080:31:11

Now, the Victorians were very involved with their mourning.

0:31:110:31:14

They really did mourn pretty much everything.

0:31:140:31:17

When Victoria lost Albert, she went into deep mourning

0:31:170:31:19

and all Victorians had to follow suit.

0:31:190:31:22

And this was classic of that time.

0:31:220:31:25

You carried a piece of them with you in your everyday life.

0:31:250:31:28

-I think it's quite a charming memento.

-Absolutely, it really is.

0:31:280:31:32

And, of course, from the front, you wouldn't know it at all.

0:31:320:31:36

I think this yellow metal here,

0:31:360:31:38

having studied it quite carefully, is actually gold plate.

0:31:380:31:42

So it's a cheap brooch, it's mock agate and it's gold plate,

0:31:420:31:46

not real gold.

0:31:460:31:47

You said that. THEY LAUGH

0:31:470:31:51

Now, here we come to the crunch point.

0:31:510:31:53

I'm not going to get too excited at this stage.

0:31:530:31:56

Sadly, I think, because it's a bit tired

0:31:570:32:01

and because some people get a little bit squiffy about having

0:32:010:32:06

mourning pieces and having someone else's hair

0:32:060:32:09

in the back of their brooch, which is why so often now we see them empty,

0:32:090:32:14

that I think the value really is going to be relatively low.

0:32:140:32:19

Well, that's all right. It's just staying at home in a box

0:32:190:32:22

so it might as well go to the auction.

0:32:220:32:23

If it doesn't get the reserve, then I'll keep it.

0:32:230:32:26

-Either way, I'm happy.

-Good.

0:32:260:32:28

OK, well, I think at auction, we'd be looking at putting

0:32:280:32:30

an estimate of £20 to £30, something like that,

0:32:300:32:34

and hopefully we can find it a new home with someone who will wear it.

0:32:340:32:38

-Exactly.

-So what about a reserve?

0:32:380:32:40

Generally, we tend to put the reserve at the bottom end of the estimate.

0:32:400:32:43

-Yes. I think I'm going to be cheeky and put a reserve of 30.

-30?

-Yes.

0:32:430:32:48

-Gosh, OK. So that means we have to put the estimate at £30 to £40.

-Yes.

0:32:480:32:52

OK. Which is being a bit optimistic, obviously.

0:32:520:32:55

I think it might be slightly optimistic,

0:32:550:32:57

-but I'm willing to give it a go and hopefully...

-Yes.

0:32:570:33:00

Well, I won't get too excited and I don't mind either way,

0:33:000:33:03

so that's the best way to be, really.

0:33:030:33:05

Exactly, yes. Well, let's keep our fingers crossed and let's go for it.

0:33:050:33:09

-OK.

-All right!

-Thank you.

-You're welcome.

0:33:090:33:13

On a good day, I think it could do it, but as Christina suggested,

0:33:130:33:16

it might well be a tricky sell.

0:33:160:33:19

Now it's my turn to have a go at a valuation.

0:33:190:33:23

I've taken a bit of time out to come into the refreshments marquee

0:33:240:33:27

and there's lots of staff on hand and lots of jolly good cakes.

0:33:270:33:32

I'm chatting to Louise who's joined me over a cup of tea!

0:33:320:33:35

We're out of the oak room where it's all going on, a hive of activity.

0:33:350:33:39

Our experts are nearly through the day.

0:33:390:33:41

-It's been a jolly good day.

-It has.

-Really has.

-Very interesting.

0:33:410:33:45

Let's talk about Popeye. There's no mistaking this character!

0:33:450:33:48

-No.

-Big fan of Popeye. Olive! Can we see if he still works?

0:33:480:33:53

Yes. I haven't wound him for a while.

0:33:530:33:55

-He has been through the wars, Louise.

-He has.

0:33:550:33:58

Where did you find him?

0:33:580:34:00

He was in a piece of furniture, a chest of drawers.

0:34:000:34:04

-He was tucked in the back of the drawer.

-A bonus!

-It was a bonus!

0:34:040:34:07

It's amazing what people leave in things they put into auction.

0:34:070:34:11

Oh, look at that! That's a surprise!

0:34:110:34:14

I didn't know that was going to happen!

0:34:140:34:16

I thought his arms were going to move

0:34:160:34:19

and he'd go like, "I'm Popeye, the sailor man." Eating all the spinach.

0:34:190:34:22

Unfortunately, he's lost his pipe.

0:34:220:34:25

-That's sad, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:34:250:34:26

-If you were a Popeye enthusiast, you could easily make one.

-Yes.

0:34:260:34:30

It's those little pieces that disappear.

0:34:300:34:33

-But he's still working. He's got one or two dents and bruises.

-Yes.

0:34:330:34:38

His face has seen better days.

0:34:380:34:41

You've also got the original box with "Popeye" on it.

0:34:410:34:44

There's a picture there of him with his pipe.

0:34:440:34:46

-It was an oversized pipe, wasn't it?

-Yes.

-It was.

0:34:460:34:50

Isn't that lovely? It's got here "Made in 1929".

0:34:500:34:54

Gosh, that's early, isn't it?

0:34:540:34:56

Very early. Look at the squint in one eye!

0:34:560:34:59

He was like that.

0:34:590:35:01

So, that lucky find, I think, translates

0:35:010:35:05

into something like £40 to £60.

0:35:050:35:09

Were you thinking along those lines?

0:35:090:35:11

Yes, I thought 40, 40-ish, I thought.

0:35:110:35:14

Condition is everything for the collectors.

0:35:140:35:16

Is it best to leave him for the new owner to clean up?

0:35:160:35:19

Yes. Yep. We'll put him into auction as he is.

0:35:190:35:22

As you say, let the new owner clean him up.

0:35:220:35:24

-And maybe pull out some of the dents in the arms.

-Yes.

0:35:240:35:27

That's possible. If he was in exceptionally good condition,

0:35:270:35:31

museum quality, and the box was in fabulous condition as well,

0:35:310:35:35

-that would be worth around £150 to £200.

-Gosh!

0:35:350:35:38

-That's how rare it is.

-But he's still fun.

-He's still fun.

0:35:380:35:42

We might be pleasantly surprised. It might exceed 40 to 60.

0:35:420:35:45

-You never know.

-That would be nice.

-It would be.

0:35:450:35:48

Can't wait to see what the auctioneer thinks. "What has Paul done here?"

0:35:480:35:52

I bet he laughs. He'll probably say, "It's worth a tenner!"

0:35:520:35:55

But once he winds Popeye up and does this,

0:35:550:35:59

"Showing here, lot number whatever, here we go."

0:35:590:36:03

-That's got to get the bidders going, hasn't it?

-Definitely!

0:36:030:36:07

'We'll find out in a few minutes.'

0:36:090:36:11

Remember that egg? Christina has now had more time to digest it!

0:36:110:36:15

Let's see what she says to Robin and Kathleen.

0:36:150:36:18

This is the most bizarre thing I've ever seen!

0:36:180:36:20

What's it doing here? How did you get it?

0:36:200:36:23

-This was, we believe, a gift to my father.

-Right.

0:36:230:36:27

He was an ear, nose and throat surgeon

0:36:270:36:29

and this was a present to him from a patient

0:36:290:36:33

for an operation that he'd done to their satisfaction.

0:36:330:36:38

Do you think Dad was pleased with the gift?

0:36:380:36:41

I don't know. The egg was on display for all of my younger childhood,

0:36:410:36:48

so I imagine he was pleased, yes.

0:36:480:36:50

When I saw you sitting at the table, I thought,

0:36:500:36:54

"Good lord, that's quite wacky!" It really is.

0:36:540:36:57

It's obviously Australian connotations.

0:36:570:37:01

It's got this wonderful emu's egg here,

0:37:010:37:03

carved with a kangaroo and an emu.

0:37:030:37:05

Like the figures on the base.

0:37:050:37:07

And it's raised on this fantastic central leafy palm tree that we have here.

0:37:070:37:13

With foliage round the bottom.

0:37:130:37:16

Then we've got these Vaseline glass trumpets here.

0:37:160:37:24

To go either side.

0:37:240:37:26

Obviously it's an epergne,

0:37:260:37:27

made to accommodate some floral things out of these trumpets here.

0:37:270:37:33

To go on a sideboard to be displayed with its back against the wall.

0:37:330:37:37

The decoration is to the front.

0:37:370:37:39

So, as an epergne, these Vaseline glass trumpets

0:37:390:37:45

are particularly well made, with this crimped rim here.

0:37:450:37:49

And this trailed glass detail here.

0:37:490:37:52

I'm wondering if maybe these were added to it

0:37:520:37:56

when it was in this country.

0:37:560:37:58

-Right.

-Maybe they've mounted this at a later date

0:37:580:38:01

because it was such a curiosity.

0:38:010:38:04

The Victorians were into their curiosities and wacky things.

0:38:040:38:08

Maybe they mounted it slightly later

0:38:080:38:12

to create a wonderful Victorian epergne.

0:38:120:38:15

I think it would be a bit of an acquired taste...

0:38:150:38:19

-Yes.

-..shall we say - to put it politely!

0:38:190:38:22

I think we might be limited with our buyers on it.

0:38:220:38:25

We have to think of what market we're selling to.

0:38:250:38:28

I think at auction, we might be looking in the region of £100 to £200.

0:38:280:38:34

But it's such a wacky thing, it could make an awful lot more.

0:38:340:38:37

-We might be in for a surprise.

-That would be lovely!

0:38:370:38:41

I've no idea what the bidders may make of it.

0:38:410:38:44

So let's find out!

0:38:440:38:46

Joining Robin and Kathleen's emu egg epergne

0:38:460:38:48

we have Popeye the sailor man!

0:38:480:38:52

A very early example that isn't in the best nick,

0:38:520:38:55

but it'll attract attention!

0:38:550:38:56

And the Art Deco barman

0:38:560:38:59

who dispenses cigarettes.

0:38:590:39:00

There's that pretty Victorian mourning brooch belonging to Vicky.

0:39:020:39:06

It really is a curious selection that's very difficult to evaluate.

0:39:080:39:11

But we're about to find out if our experts are right.

0:39:110:39:15

And to start, in the spotlight, is Charlie and the Art Deco cigarette dispenser.

0:39:160:39:21

First under the hammer.

0:39:210:39:23

What a great thing! Why do you want to sell it?

0:39:230:39:25

It's been in the cupboard for years and everybody we know that's been to parties have seen it.

0:39:250:39:30

It's lost its fun factor.

0:39:300:39:34

Just need a couple of smokers. Actually, it doesn't need a smoker.

0:39:340:39:37

-Somebody with a bar.

-Someone with a bar. A cocktail bar in the corner!

0:39:370:39:41

Shaped like a boat!

0:39:410:39:43

Exactly!

0:39:430:39:44

-Little bell on the boat.

-Just the job!

-Captain!

0:39:460:39:49

Gin and tonic?

0:39:500:39:52

Good luck, both of you. It's going under the hammer now.

0:39:520:39:57

319 is the Art Deco cylindrical yellow metal cigarette box.

0:39:570:40:02

What do you say? Rather fun.

0:40:020:40:04

What's it worth? £50 away on that?

0:40:040:40:06

50. You've seen it in the cabinet. 50?

0:40:060:40:09

It's fun. 30? 20 only.

0:40:090:40:11

At 20. 30, may I say? At 20 only.

0:40:110:40:14

Would help if he went up in fives, not tens!

0:40:140:40:17

25. At 25. 30, may I say?

0:40:170:40:20

At 25 only bid. May I say 30 now?

0:40:200:40:22

At £25 only. Can I say 30?

0:40:220:40:25

-30.

-That's better.

0:40:250:40:28

-Where are all the hands?

-At 40. Only at 40. Any more?

0:40:280:40:32

Finished with it at £40.

0:40:330:40:36

-Hammer's gone down at £40.

-Estimate 30 to 50.

-Spot on!

0:40:370:40:41

-That's all right, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:40:420:40:44

-Happy with that?

-Happy with that one.

0:40:440:40:46

And we had a laugh looking at it. It put a smile on our faces.

0:40:460:40:50

'Now, will we manage to do the same for Vicky's brooch?'

0:40:520:40:55

-Vicky, you're up next.

-Yes.

-With the mourning brooch. £30 to £40.

0:40:550:41:00

There's the part for the hair at the back, as well.

0:41:000:41:03

It's a nice little thing, actually, if you collect this kind of thing.

0:41:030:41:06

Absolutely.

0:41:060:41:08

Let's find out what the bidders think right now.

0:41:080:41:10

The Victorian overlay glass leaf design pin brooch.

0:41:100:41:15

Pretty pin brooch with the woven hair panel to the back.

0:41:150:41:19

What's that worth, little memorial brooch? £50?

0:41:190:41:22

50 for it. Surely.

0:41:230:41:25

30 to put me in, then. 30.

0:41:250:41:27

-Oh, 20 then, somebody.

-Come on.

0:41:280:41:31

-It's worth that.

-20 I'm bid here.

0:41:310:41:34

At 20. Who says 30 now? At 20 only.

0:41:340:41:36

At 20. 5. 25.

0:41:360:41:39

30 may I say? At 25. You want 30, madam? At 25 only.

0:41:390:41:43

At 25. At 25. 30, is it? At £25 only.

0:41:430:41:47

May I say 30 on the brooch? No more?

0:41:470:41:49

-It's not going to sell, is it?

-No, well, I'll take it home and love it.

0:41:490:41:54

-Not to go then, I'm afraid.

-Take it home and love it.

-Exactly.

0:41:550:41:59

I just think, unfortunately, because they are quite heavy,

0:41:590:42:02

they're difficult to wear

0:42:020:42:03

and some people are a little bit squeamish about mourning brooches.

0:42:030:42:07

So I think take it home, love it, wear it.

0:42:070:42:10

-And it's quite nice that it's staying in the family.

-Exactly.

0:42:100:42:14

Just short of 30, but Vicky wasn't willing to let it go for any less.

0:42:140:42:18

And quite right, too.

0:42:180:42:19

He's been in a cupboard for 15 years.

0:42:210:42:23

You know who I mean. Ready, Louise?

0:42:230:42:26

# Duh-duh, Popeye! #

0:42:260:42:28

HE LAUGHS

0:42:280:42:29

I hope there's some Popeye fans here amongst the bidders today.

0:42:290:42:33

We have a great crowd here. I haven't seen anybody playing with him.

0:42:330:42:37

Here we go. Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:42:370:42:40

Here we are. 403, we've got Popeye.

0:42:410:42:45

One of my heroes of all time.

0:42:450:42:47

Popeye the sailor man.

0:42:470:42:49

This one's Japanese. I don't think Popeye was originally.

0:42:490:42:52

This is a Japanese plastic clockwork figure of Popeye

0:42:520:42:56

-in a bit of a dilapidated box.

-Yeah, but he's lovely, isn't he?

0:42:560:43:01

What do we say for Popeye?

0:43:010:43:04

You've had a look at him. What's he worth? £50 away?

0:43:040:43:08

50, surely? 20 to get on, then.

0:43:080:43:11

20. 30 I've got with me at 30. At 30. May I say 40?

0:43:120:43:17

On Popeye at £30 only.

0:43:170:43:19

At 30. 40, is there?

0:43:190:43:21

40. At 40. 50 is it now?

0:43:210:43:25

At 40. No more at 40 for Popeye?

0:43:250:43:27

Selling against you all, then. All happy at £40.

0:43:270:43:31

Yes, sold it.

0:43:320:43:34

Brilliant! I'm happy! I thought it was going to struggle.

0:43:340:43:38

-It seemed to.

-Muscles, that's what it is!

0:43:380:43:41

Popeye did the business for us! Thank you so much!

0:43:410:43:45

Popeye is about to set sail on more adventures. I'm pleased about that!

0:43:460:43:51

Now time to see if that emu egg epergne appeals to any of our bidders.

0:43:510:43:55

We've been working our socks off. Now we're going to work on an egg!

0:43:570:44:01

Kathleen and Robin's egg!

0:44:010:44:03

A wonderful emu egg. We have £100 to £200 on this.

0:44:030:44:05

This could be a real sleeper.

0:44:050:44:08

It could do anything.

0:44:080:44:10

We can't talk about it any more. It's now really down to the bidders.

0:44:100:44:15

Do they want to SHELL out a lot of money for this egg?

0:44:150:44:19

It's going under the hammer!

0:44:190:44:21

Lot 391. The Vaseline glass-mounted table centre epergne.

0:44:210:44:26

It features the emu egg.

0:44:260:44:29

Little emu and kangaroo figures as well. Very unusual.

0:44:290:44:32

Vaseline glass flutes. An unusual thing.

0:44:320:44:36

What do we say for it? Some interest with me. Lot 391.

0:44:360:44:41

-I can start the bidding at 80. 100.

-Brilliant.

-110. 120.

0:44:410:44:48

At 120. At 120 on the epergne, at 120.

0:44:480:44:52

May I say 130 online.

0:44:520:44:54

140 on the book. 140. 150.

0:44:540:44:58

150 online. 160 still here with me.

0:44:580:45:00

160.

0:45:000:45:02

170.

0:45:020:45:03

-180.

-We're getting there!

-180.

0:45:030:45:06

With me on the book. 190 online.

0:45:060:45:08

200.

0:45:080:45:10

220, may I say? At £200. 220 online.

0:45:100:45:14

240 on the book.

0:45:140:45:15

-240.

-Commission bids and internet bids.

0:45:150:45:18

280.

0:45:180:45:19

280 with me. 280. 300 now online.

0:45:190:45:23

-Brilliant!

-320. 320.

-More like it!

-320.

0:45:230:45:27

340, may I say? 320.

0:45:270:45:29

On the book at 320. Against you online. Make no mistake,

0:45:290:45:32

the bid is with me. At 320. Any interest in the room?

0:45:320:45:36

-340 back in online.

-Ooh!

-340.

0:45:380:45:40

360 still here with me. 360.

0:45:400:45:43

360. 380, may I say?

0:45:430:45:45

At £360 I'm bid.

0:45:450:45:48

On the book at 360. Selling against you online.

0:45:480:45:51

All happy?

0:45:510:45:52

At £360.

0:45:520:45:55

-Fantastic. Well done!

-Brilliant!

0:45:560:45:58

-And that was a present to Dad as well?

-It was, yes.

0:45:580:46:01

-A gift to my father.

-Thank you, Father!

0:46:010:46:03

-It reached a good price.

-It did, yes.

0:46:030:46:06

-The condition was very good.

-Yes.

-An unusual thing.

0:46:060:46:10

I hope it's gone back to Australia where it belongs.

0:46:100:46:13

-Yes.

-It would be a nice trip.

0:46:130:46:15

Thank you for bringing it in and looking after it.

0:46:150:46:18

The custodian for all these years! That's all we are to antiques.

0:46:180:46:21

They outlive us and go round and round. A wonderful item.

0:46:210:46:24

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:46:240:46:27

It's all over. The auction has finished.

0:46:330:46:36

One minute it's lights, camera, action,

0:46:360:46:38

and complete mayhem as to what will happen.

0:46:380:46:40

Lots of excitement. And then a vacant room.

0:46:400:46:43

Bidders queuing to pay for their lots behind me.

0:46:430:46:46

A great day. Robin and Kathleen's emu egg stole the show for me,

0:46:460:46:50

almost doubling its estimate.

0:46:500:46:52

I hope it goes back to Australia. I hope you've enjoyed today's show.

0:46:520:46:56

Join us again for more surprises, but from Carmarthen it's goodbye!

0:46:560:47:01

The Flog It! team are at Rhosygilwen Mansion just outside Cardigan in the west of Wales. Paul Martin is joined by experts Christina Trevanion and Charlie Ross in a hunt for hidden gems amongst all the antiques brought along by members of the public. Highlights include an early Popeye figure, an unusual Victorian table decoration and a collection of Indian silver. Paul also finds out more about the Welsh coracle.