Cardigan Flog It!


Cardigan

Members of the public are invited to make money from their antiques at auction at Rhosygilwen Mansion, in the west of Wales. Paul Martin visits artist Eloise Glovier.


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Transcript


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To the north of me is Cardigan and to the south is Carmarthen

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but where I am right now just happens to be Pembrokeshire.

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Welcome to Flog It, from glorious west Wales!

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Rhosygilwen Mansion is not only a beautiful historic house,

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it's one of west Wales's most up-to-the-moment music and arts venues.

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So many people, which means so many antiques for our experts to look at.

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We've got our work cut out! We brought the queue in because it was raining earlier

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but that hasn't dampened anybody's spirits.

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This is the orangery, adjacent to the oak hall, our magnificent venue for today.

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Hopefully, we're going to make a few people very happy.

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They could go home with a lot of money. Stay tuned to find out.

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It may even be Chris and Mervyn, first in the queue. When did you get here?

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-Around 8.00am.

-In the pouring rain.

-Yes.

-Poor things.

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Let's get you in to the blue tablecloths and get the show on the road! I'll give you a hand.

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We have a selection of experts on hand to make sure everyone gets the valuations they need.

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The team is headed up by Charlie Ross...

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Do you want me out the way?

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..who can pop up in the most unexpected places!

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Sent packing!

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-But always comes up with the goods.

-What have we here?

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Everybody knows what this is!

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There isn't a person in the country who doesn't know who made that.

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So I'm not going to tell you!

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And auctioneer Christina Trevanion, who has a keen eye for jewellery.

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That's rather gorgeous as well, isn't it?

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I love that!

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-What do we think?

-It's lovely!

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-And enjoys a little speculation!

-Ooh, that's lovely.

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-Wouldn't it be nice if that was diamonds!

-Wouldn't it? Wouldn't it just?

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Goodness me.

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Later in the show, Christina comes across some real diamonds that the owner has a good reason to sell.

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-We've got a parrot that dismantles anything with stones in!

-Really?

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-He takes the stones out of everything.

-You let him out and he pecks the gems?

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Anything you're wearing, he takes the stones out!

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No! He's a diamond thief!

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And Charlie's guilty of an old auctioneer's trick.

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I think my valuation was a bit conservative, wasn't it?

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-Slap my wrist for this one!

-It was "come and buy me", as we say!

-It was.

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Christina is first at the table with Corale, and a real dazzler!

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Corale, when I saw this in the queue, my eyes lit up.

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It must have done when you first saw it. Where's it from?

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I don't know a lot about it. I picked it up at a car boot sale!

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-A car boot sale?!

-Yes, it was in amongst some junk jewellery.

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-Right.

-It just seemed to stand out.

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So I picked it up from there.

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-You saw it sparkling and thought, "That looks nice!"

-It's different.

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-It looked a different class to the other stuff.

-How much did you pay for it?

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-75 pence.

-You didn't!

-I did, yeah.

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That is amazing! That is truly amazing. I'll tell you why.

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This little piece here is, to me, just fantastic.

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It's everything that the Art Deco period was.

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It's diamond set. Did you know it was diamond set?

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-I did have it tested.

-Wonderful.

-In a jeweller's.

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They told me it was diamonds, but the valuer wasn't there.

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-So I just left it at that.

-OK.

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It has wonderful linear lines.

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It really evokes the 1920s, 1930s. What's more unusual

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is that it's actually a hair slide. It's not a brooch, which is what you'd expect it to be.

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A brooch, at this sort of period. To have a hair slide is so decadent.

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It reminds me of cocktails at The Ritz in the 1920s.

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"Just going for cocktails, darling, with my diamond pin in my hair"!

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So when we look at it, we've got the diamonds here in a flaming-torch style.

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We've got eight-cut diamonds and baguette-cut diamonds,

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which again evokes the Art Deco period.

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It's probably set in platinum with an 18-carat gold back

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although it's not marked.

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I'd like to think this sort of style is French.

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But sadly again not marked, we can't tell.

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I think this sort of style and period, it's probably a French piece.

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OK? The diamond weight isn't huge.

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But because it's so stylish, it doesn't really matter.

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It's just a really nice-looking piece.

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Corale, is it the type of thing you'd wear?

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Not really, because I've got a parrot at home that takes the stones out of everything that sparkles,

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-even slightly.

-A parrot with taste?

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Yes, very good taste, but unfortunately destroys every piece of jewellery.

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So you cannot wear it because of your naughty parrot?

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-I couldn't wear it. There'd be nothing left of it!

-Oh, dear! Well,

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if we're going to sell it at auction, valuation-wise, if you want to sell it at auction,

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we're looking in the region of 200 to £300.

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Which is a fantastic profit on your 75p, isn't it?

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Big percentage profit, I have to say.

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-It's a good morning's work, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-So shall we flog it?

-Yes, flog it!

-Brilliant!

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Let's save it from Corale's parrot and get it off to auction!

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Hello. Ooh, well-behaved!

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The one at the back's well-behaved!

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The one at the front...

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The one at the front is thinking, "Mummy, get the valuation done!"

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The earlier rain has now cleared up

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so I'm popping outside to enjoy the sun with Terry who has a couple of very rare items.

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Two fine African carvings depicting figures from the slave trade.

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Look at what's going on here. Look at this lady.

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Child on her back, legs shackled together.

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Still being made to work with a pestle and mortar, grinding corn.

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Sad, isn't it? What could be a family member trusted with a gun to go out hunting.

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Again, he can't run away, he can't do anything. His foot is clamped.

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All this is done from one solid piece of wood.

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There's nothing added to it, nothing applied afterwards.

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So this is cut from the wood in the round, typical of an African hardwood.

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Very, very dense grain.

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-You can tell how hard and heavy that wood is.

-It's quite heavy.

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It's such a difficult thing to have in your house, Terry. Why did you buy these? What's the attraction?

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I thought they were unusual. I've seen plenty of African carvings.

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-But nothing like with the slave trade.

-No. How long ago was that?

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-A couple of years ago now.

-How much did you pay for the two?

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-Around 350.

-There's a big market for this kind of thing in America. There really is.

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The museums are buying up all this slave memorabilia and it's fetching good money.

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I do know that Michelle Obama, the president's wife, collects slavery artefacts like this

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-because she's the ambassador of a museum that wants subject matter like this.

-Yes.

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Let's talk about value. You paid 350 for the pair.

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Can we put these into auction with a valuation of 350 to £450?

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-Can we keep the estimate that low so it doesn't frighten anybody off?

-Fine.

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We'll put a reserve on at £350 so you don't lose any money.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yeah, fine.

-Good.

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OK. Done.

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Terry's carvings will do well if the right people see them on the internet.

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Now, something more local. Helen has a lovely Welsh medal to show Charlie.

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-Helen, have you won this medal?

-No, I haven't.

-No?

-No,

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this is a medal I bought in a second-hand shop about five years ago.

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-Why did you buy it?

-I bought it because of my interest in Welsh mountain ponies.

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For the past 20 years it's been my interest to breed and show them.

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-Right.

-That's really why I bought it.

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-It strikes me as being of fantastic quality.

-I think it is.

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-Wonderful quality. It's got a huge weight of silver, it is silver, dating from 1911.

-Yes.

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-And you've won a few of these?

-I have won a few, yes.

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-Have you? You can't just engrave that with something?

-No!

-It would be fraudulent!

-Yes, indeed.

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-Is that why you're selling it?

-It is. Since I've had it, I've never displayed it.

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-No.

-Because it's one my ponies didn't win,

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-I'm quite happy to sell it, really.

-Yes.

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-Yeah. Well, you knew it was silver, presumably?

-I thought it was silver,

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but I didn't know how old it was until today.

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You're absolutely right it is silver because it has the traditional hallmark.

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It has a lion passant, which tells us it's silver.

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It has a little anchor, which tells us it was made in Birmingham,

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and it's got a date mark there for 1911.

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-And here it's got the makers. Mappin & Webb mean anything to you?

-No.

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Mappin & Webb, very, very famous silversmiths in Birmingham.

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-Probably most famous for making cutlery.

-Right.

-They make a lot of cutlery,

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silver and silver-plated cutlery. Mappin & Webb were everywhere in the early 20th century.

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I'm not surprised that the Welsh Pony and Cob Society used Mappin & Webb to make them

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-because they made the best quality. The quality of the horseshoe is fabulous.

-It's lovely.

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Tell me, how often do you have a show?

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In this part of the world, this part of Wales, there's lots of shows.

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In the summer you could have two or three shows a week.

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Really? Gosh!

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-How many do you have?

-I've got eight ponies at the moment.

-Eight?!

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So you need a few acres to keep them.

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What about the value of this if you don't want it? What did you pay?

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-I paid £30 for it.

-How long ago?

-About five years.

-I think you did pretty well.

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-It's probably worth about £50.

-All right.

-How does that fit?

-That sounds fine.

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Yeah. I would hope it would make that.

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-I would say if we put an estimate of 40 to £60 on it.

-Yes, that's fine.

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-All right with you?

-Fine.

-We'll put a reserve at 40.

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-Thank you very much for giving me an education.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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Fingers crossed for Helen. With her love of horses, she's a woman after my own heart.

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Before we head off to the auction, let's take another look at our lots.

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They say diamonds are a girl's best friend. Let's hope that's true for Corale, with her Art Deco hairpin.

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Terry's slavery figures will appeal to a niche market.

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But they could make a good price.

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Mappin & Webb is a top name, so Helen's Welsh Pony and Cob Society medal

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has quality as well as local interest.

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I like to see a jam-packed auction room.

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Today we're guests of Peter Francis Auctioneers and Valuers in Carmarthen.

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This is where we put our experts' valuations to the test.

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So don't go away because hopefully someone will go home with a lot of money

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and let's hope these people put their hands up and bid on our lots.

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Nigel Hodgson is our auctioneer for today. First up,

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it's Helen's silver medal. Let's see how it does.

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We're holding the reins tightly because it's just about to go under the hammer, the medal.

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The Welsh Pony and Cob Society.

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What are we looking at? Originally it was 40 to £60.

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I know you've since changed the valuation. You've done some research

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and the auctioneer says it's now 80 to 120, with a fixed reserve of £70, Charlie.

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-It's a cracking thing. Lots of local interest.

-It's fabulous quality.

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I think my valuation was a bit conservative. Slap my wrist for this one!

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It was a "come buy me", as we normally say.

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Let's see what the bidders think.

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The interesting Welsh silver Pony and Cob Society medallion.

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Made by Mappin & Webb, 1911.

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Some interest in this.

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Quite a collectable item.

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Lots of interest!

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I have a number of commission bids which allow me to start the bidding

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at 70, 80, 90, £100.

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That's what I have on the book. Three bidders. At £100.

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At £100. On the book at £100. May I say 110 now?

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At £100. £100 is on the book.

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At £100.

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-Selling on the book at 100. All happy?

-£100. The hammer's going down.

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-Bang in the middle of your valuation. Well done.

-Thank you very much.

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Twice my valuation!

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Yours would have had a nice surprise. Building up. What a lovely end.

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-That's good news!

-Thank you very much.

-Happy?

-Yes, thank you.

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-I bet all the money's going on pony feed!

-Yes, it is!

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It sold for less than £150, so Helen will pay 17.5% commission

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plus VAT.

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Next up, it's Terry with his carved figures.

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Revised valuation which we discussed with the auctioneer at the preview day.

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It's now 450 to £550 is the valuation.

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Fixed reserve at 450.

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Fingers crossed. Fingers crossed, that's all I can say!

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These are a pair of carved African ebony figures.

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Very unusually, they feature figures who are, in fact, slaves.

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Surely must be of some academic interest, these, I'd have thought.

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-Yeah, precisely.

-Very much rarer than the usual carved figures we see regularly in sales.

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What do I say for those? What are they worth to you?

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Interesting pair of figures. £500 for them?

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500?

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Surely on the pair of figures there?

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300. 300. 320, may I say? At 300.

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300. 320, may I say?

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300 on the carved figures.

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300 only. May I say 320 now?

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At 300. No more interest at £300 only.

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320, may I say? All quiet. 300.

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Any more?

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No?

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Can't be sold, I'm afraid.

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They didn't go. They didn't go.

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The interest was bubbling just over 300. Just shy of the 350 I'd said.

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But you put it up to 450.

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I think that killed it off, really.

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They're going home now. Another auction room, another day?

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-Another auction, probably.

-OK.

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-Good luck with that.

-Thanks.

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Sometimes it's wise not to frighten the bidders off with too high an estimate.

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Next, a good Flog It story.

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Corale is selling her diamond pin bought for 75 pence!

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These are stories I like. This is what Flog It's all about. Corale was car-booting amongst all that junk.

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And came up with something for 75p

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which hopefully Christina is going to turn into 200 to £300.

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-That's what we like about antiques and collectables!

-Absolutely.

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-It would be nice.

-You've got a keen eye. Did you know what you'd found?

-I knew it wasn't junk.

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Very nice thing. Like a torch, is it?

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It's very Art Deco, my favourite piece from the valuation day.

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-It's fantastic.

-Because it's so stunning and everybody likes it,

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why are you selling it?

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-I can't wear anything that sparkles.

-You'd look fabulous!

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-I've got a parrot that dismantles anything with stones in.

-That sparkles?

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-Takes the stones out of everything.

-He flies round pecking gems?

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Anything you're wearing, he takes the stones.

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No! He's a diamond thief!

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Good luck, anyway. This is unique. Let's see what they think.

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Let's find out what it's worth. Here we go.

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The white metal diamond set hair clip.

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Brilliant and baguette-cut diamonds.

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What's it worth? £200 away for that to put me in?

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-200 for the pretty brooch.

-Come on. Come on.

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150 to go, then. There it is.

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150.

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150. 160, only, may I say?

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160. 160.

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-160. At 160. 190. Two bidders online now.

-190.

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Fit it up. 200. 200, may I say?

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At 190 online. 200, may I say? Selling it on the internet.

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£200 on the phone now, at 200.

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-220 may I say? £200. 220. Online at 220.

-Ooh!

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220 online. 240. 240. 260, may I say?

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240 on the phone. At 240. 260. 260.

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280, may I say?

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260 online. 280.

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This is fantastic. £280.

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£300 I'm bid. 300. 320, may I say? At £300.

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Online. 320 on the phone. 320.

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340, can I say?

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320. At 320.

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340, may I say? 340.

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340. 360 do you want now? 340.

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Online at 340. 360 if you want.

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Selling online, then, at £340.

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-£340!

-All done at 340?

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£340.

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-Yes!

-Marvellous!

-340 quid! Well done, you two!

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-That's fantastic!

-That's good!

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All for 75p!

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-It's still out there. Just get out early and hunt for it!

-Absolutely!

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-I was so nervous. It started off so slowly!

-Yeah.

-Fantastic. Well done.

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There is commission to pay. It's a sliding scale here. It'll be a 15% commission.

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-Yeah.

-What will you put that towards?

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-More car booting?

-Probably, yes!

-I don't blame you!

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Fabulous. That's what we like to see.

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I'm on my way to meet a local artist, and as you may know by now, I'm a real art enthusiast.

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So it's always a great treat for me to meet painters in person and visit them in their studios.

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But in this case, it's a double treat

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because her studio is in the heart of this beautiful Welsh countryside.

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Look at that, it doesn't get any better for a source of inspiration.

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I'm particularly intrigued about the artist I'm going to see, Eloise Govier,

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because in my opinion, she's immensely talented.

0:19:100:19:13

Her work is intelligent, sophisticated and very powerful.

0:19:130:19:16

Yet she's still only in her mid-20s.

0:19:160:19:19

-I love your studio space.

-Thank you.

-I'm jealous! What a location! How long have you been here?

0:19:330:19:38

I grew up here. We moved when I was about five. Over the years, I've been away, but always come home.

0:19:380:19:45

A great inspiration for you in your work.

0:19:450:19:48

That's where I started, painting the landscape, because it's so beautiful.

0:19:480:19:53

-What age did you start painting?

-Professionally, only the last two to three years.

0:19:530:19:58

-As recent as that?

-Yes, but I've always painted, right from this high, a little girl.

0:19:580:20:03

I was always encouraged to express myself through painting and drawing.

0:20:030:20:07

How would you describe your work? It's very bold.

0:20:070:20:11

I describe myself as an expressionist painter. There's lots of emotional content in the work.

0:20:110:20:17

Lots of texture, bright colours. So a new expressionist is where I'd put myself.

0:20:170:20:22

-You've studied the history of art, as well.

-Yes.

-So you know exactly what's going on.

0:20:220:20:27

I know exactly what I respond to and which direction I wanted to go.

0:20:270:20:31

-Thanks to the art history background.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:20:310:20:34

Any names that you aspire to, or that you've taken influences from?

0:20:340:20:38

I've always admired Alexey von Jawlensky, a Russian painter.

0:20:380:20:44

He's used some very interesting colours.

0:20:440:20:46

There's a particular painting I like that he's done called Portrait of Alexander Sakharoff.

0:20:460:20:51

-Bright colours.

-Bright colours.

-So it's a combination of those colours

0:20:560:21:01

-against this wonderful Welsh landscape that's given you what you've got.

-Exactly.

0:21:010:21:06

I always paint from instinct.

0:21:200:21:22

Although I'm aware of what's out there,

0:21:220:21:24

I want it to come from the right place.

0:21:240:21:28

-From the gut and the heart.

-From the heart, yeah!

0:21:280:21:30

But with thought behind it.

0:21:300:21:32

Absolutely. There's a lot of emotional content in the work.

0:21:320:21:36

But I try not to labour too much over it. Then it starts becoming a bit fake.

0:21:360:21:41

The way you apply the paint with the palette knife, everything is really textured.

0:21:410:21:46

It's exceptionally bold and thick. That takes a long, long time to dry.

0:21:460:21:50

It takes forever.

0:21:500:21:53

The paint is so thick, I have a storage space upstairs

0:21:530:21:56

where we leave the paintings. I have to paint a year in advance.

0:21:560:22:00

-That's your biggest nightmare.

-The drying process. Absolutely. It's different in summer than winter.

0:22:000:22:06

-You're having exhibitions. You've just had one in Scotland.

-St Andrew's.

-A five-star event.

0:22:060:22:11

-Yes, it's still there, going really well.

-How are you being received?

0:22:110:22:15

The new work is different from my landscapes. It's all figurative.

0:22:150:22:19

So it's extreme.

0:22:190:22:21

It's very dynamic, very colourful. A lot of people find the colours inspiring.

0:22:210:22:26

-So people are responding well.

-It's a kaleidoscope of colour.

0:22:260:22:30

A sweety shop!

0:22:300:22:32

When I was growing up, I did lots of dancing. So I'm into trying to capture movement on canvas.

0:22:320:22:37

So these are some of the models. Twisting forms, like yoga.

0:22:490:22:54

Yeah, but that's nice interesting shapes.

0:22:540:22:57

It's a kinetic form of energy you're trying to capture within the pose itself.

0:22:570:23:01

Twisting forms, knotted bodies.

0:23:010:23:03

-Let's talk about how you put a picture together.

-OK.

0:23:110:23:15

-I'll keep a sketch book, a bit like a diary.

-All artists have these!

-Exactly.

0:23:150:23:19

This was a trip in France.

0:23:190:23:21

So we've got the hills and trees.

0:23:210:23:23

Then we've also got some bar scenes.

0:23:230:23:26

-Cafe society.

-Cafe scenes.

0:23:260:23:29

Things like that.

0:23:290:23:31

I'll then come home, analyse what I've been doing in the sketches,

0:23:310:23:35

then I'll approach the canvas with something like this.

0:23:350:23:39

-I paint it a fluorescent colour to start.

-Why do you do that?

0:23:390:23:44

Some artists will start with a brown or an ochre.

0:23:440:23:47

That's fine if you're doing landscapes because there's nothing worse than having bits of white.

0:23:470:23:53

But I wanted a fluorescent colour because of the contrast and because it's a phenomenal colour.

0:23:530:23:58

-The first bit of pink you put on the canvas...

-It makes you alert! It's like "Doi-ing!"

0:23:580:24:03

Yeah! The first bit of pink you put on is going to be a massive contrast.

0:24:030:24:08

-Show me some of your palette knife technique.

-OK.

0:24:150:24:19

-I have tried this before! I'm absolutely rubbish at it!

-A nice blue.

0:24:190:24:24

I love using palette knives because you can get interesting thick textures.

0:24:240:24:29

Well, I find that pretty impressive,

0:24:530:24:56

to meet somebody as young as Eloise who's so focused and committed to her art.

0:24:560:25:00

It's a real inspiration to all of us.

0:25:000:25:02

That's not the last time we'll hear that name. Eloise Govier. Watch out for it!

0:25:020:25:06

At Rhosygilwen Mansion, the team are in the thick of it!

0:25:130:25:17

Christina is enjoying Pam's collection of miniature figures and pin-head dolls.

0:25:260:25:32

-Tell me about them. Where are they from?

-They belonged to a friend's mother.

0:25:320:25:37

-Right.

-Who does a lot of knitting and peg dolls and sewing and things.

0:25:370:25:44

-Right.

-After she passed away, he didn't know what to do with them so he gave them to me.

0:25:440:25:49

So that would tie in, because we're only seeing half the article here.

0:25:490:25:55

Because these were made to have skirts on them, like this.

0:25:550:25:59

So it's possible she could have collected them with the intention of one day

0:25:590:26:04

making skirts for them. That's what they were,

0:26:040:26:07

pin-head dollies. So they'd have had a pin cushion on the bottom

0:26:070:26:10

so you could keep your pins, maybe some brooches, to pin into the skirt.

0:26:100:26:16

You have quite an array here.

0:26:160:26:18

-Do you know when she collected them?

-No, I don't.

0:26:180:26:21

They date to probably the 1930s, 1940s, something like that.

0:26:210:26:27

Some slightly earlier.

0:26:270:26:30

The most collectable ones are the Art Deco flapper ladies.

0:26:300:26:34

We've got one of those here.

0:26:340:26:37

That's fantastic that we've got one there.

0:26:370:26:40

The whole idea was that you should collect different styles of ladies.

0:26:400:26:45

We've got some Georgian ladies with their flamboyant hair

0:26:450:26:49

and flamboyant and ostentatious hats.

0:26:490:26:52

Then we've got right to the simple little Dutch girl here.

0:26:520:26:56

So they did a huge range.

0:26:560:26:59

If we look at this one, we can see the construction of it.

0:26:590:27:04

It was made in a mould. You can see it was hollow.

0:27:040:27:08

And we can see it's stamped Germany on there.

0:27:080:27:11

So they're German porcelain.

0:27:110:27:14

So I think, if we were to sell them at auction,

0:27:140:27:18

we are looking at putting them as one lot.

0:27:180:27:21

Individually, they haven't got huge value.

0:27:210:27:25

I think as a nice little collection,

0:27:250:27:28

we're probably looking somewhere in the region of maybe about £50. 50 to £70, something like that.

0:27:280:27:34

-How does that sound?

-That's nice. Sounds good, yeah.

0:27:340:27:37

OK. I know you're going to put the money towards something special,

0:27:370:27:43

as a reminder of the gentleman that gave you them.

0:27:430:27:45

Unfortunately, Brian passed away a couple of months ago

0:27:450:27:49

and he wanted some money to go to the local hospital that looked after him.

0:27:490:27:56

So I'll put the money to that.

0:27:560:27:57

That's really generous. I hope they make a lot more because that's a wonderful cause.

0:27:570:28:02

What a nice idea of Pam's.

0:28:020:28:04

I like what I see at the bottom of the bag. Look at that!

0:28:060:28:09

-Look at that. It's a gentleman's ink stand.

-Yes.

0:28:090:28:13

-Made of horn.

-It was given to me when I passed my O levels.

0:28:130:28:17

-That's an unusual present to have when you pass your O levels!

-I hate it!

0:28:170:28:22

-Who gave that to you? Dad?

-No, an aunt.

0:28:220:28:26

An aunt. And what have you done with it?

0:28:260:28:28

Nothing, really. Half-heartedly polished it, as you can see!

0:28:280:28:33

Isn't that bizarre! What a lovely present to have!

0:28:350:28:38

I enjoy looking at what people bring in. You never know what you'll find!

0:28:380:28:42

As you'll see, Charlie's found something unusual.

0:28:420:28:46

Richard, you can explain to me exactly what this is, although I think I know.

0:28:460:28:51

A pretty straightforward vertical standing boiler.

0:28:510:28:54

-Or steam engine.

-Or steam engine.

0:28:540:28:57

-It isn't a home-made object?

-I don't think so.

-It's beautifully made.

0:28:570:29:01

-I believe it's made by Bing. German.

-A German manufacturer, right.

0:29:010:29:05

Bing, Marklin, all the great names. Have you had it working?

0:29:050:29:09

It worked up until about eight years ago. I haven't started it up recently.

0:29:090:29:14

-But then it worked quite well, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:29:140:29:17

It's pretty simple. There's not much to go wrong, actually.

0:29:170:29:20

-It's complete.

-You fill it up with water. There's a water gauge on the front.

0:29:200:29:25

Yes. The burner, to me, doesn't look original.

0:29:250:29:28

No. My grandfather was a tool maker for a helicopter company.

0:29:280:29:34

-Yes.

-And he made this from a tin that was used for polishing brass.

0:29:340:29:40

-Yep. Shortened it. Cut the bottom off.

-Put a wick in it.

0:29:400:29:44

-Yes.

-And did that.

-It's ideal.

0:29:440:29:46

And he also made the safety valve because there wasn't a safety valve.

0:29:460:29:51

-Really?

-So this part here, which unscrews...

-Yes.

-If I unscrew it.

0:29:510:29:57

As I said, he was a tool maker.

0:29:570:30:00

But that's fantastically well-made.

0:30:000:30:03

He popped out into his workshop in his garage, where he had a lathe and all sorts of tools.

0:30:030:30:08

In half an hour or so, he came back and he'd made that.

0:30:080:30:12

-Filled it with water...

-I could not tell that that wasn't original.

0:30:120:30:17

-No.

-To the steam engine.

-He was a very clever man.

0:30:170:30:20

You could run all sorts of things with that.

0:30:200:30:22

-You could run a grinder, a polisher...

-Yes.

0:30:220:30:25

Fill it with water. Once the steam gets up,

0:30:250:30:29

you've got a little whistle on the side here, which you could use.

0:30:290:30:32

-May I just look at the bottom of it?

-Sure.

0:30:320:30:36

Yes, there's the date. 1916.

0:30:370:30:39

That's quite interesting that there was still time,

0:30:390:30:43

materials and inclination

0:30:430:30:46

to make something like this while the world was at war.

0:30:460:30:50

-Fighting each other.

-It's quite a statement, isn't it?

-It is.

-Are you bored with it now?

0:30:500:30:55

-No, not really, it's just that my sons...

-I don't want you to change your mind! No, no!

0:30:550:31:00

My sons are growing up. I've got a grandchild due in a week.

0:31:000:31:06

-Ooh. Good luck with that!

-Thank you.

0:31:060:31:09

So they're not interested in it.

0:31:090:31:12

Really, the only part that interests me is that little bit there.

0:31:120:31:17

-Which isn't original.

-Isn't original.

-It's interesting.

0:31:170:31:21

-What about the value of this? I was thinking it would be worth £100.

-Yes.

0:31:210:31:25

100 to £150. That's where I'd like to see the sale room estimate.

0:31:250:31:29

-Yes.

-Are you happy with that?

-I'm happy with that.

0:31:290:31:32

Yes.

0:31:320:31:33

I love that sort of thing. A real boy's toy!

0:31:330:31:37

Christina has come across a real treasure trove.

0:31:420:31:45

So, Serena, all that glitters, in this case, is actually gold!

0:31:450:31:49

-Yes!

-Fantastic. You've brought some wonderful things in to show us.

0:31:490:31:54

Let's start over here. Tell me about this bracelet here.

0:31:540:31:58

That one was my grandmother's.

0:31:580:32:00

She gave me that when I was 21.

0:32:000:32:04

I'd always admired it as a child.

0:32:040:32:07

I wore it to death.

0:32:070:32:09

Jewellery was made to be worn, so you should wear it. Wonderful.

0:32:090:32:13

It's an absolute firecracker of a pendant.

0:32:130:32:16

We've got amethysts, we've got garnets, we've got turquoise, coral, all sorts of nice things.

0:32:160:32:22

A nice smoky quartz there.

0:32:220:32:23

So it really is the firework of the jewellery world. It's magic.

0:32:230:32:28

It's got a mark on the clasp which says 750.

0:32:280:32:31

So we know it's 18-carat gold.

0:32:310:32:34

That's interesting, cos I thought it was nine.

0:32:340:32:37

Somebody said it was nine carat.

0:32:370:32:39

Well, they were fobbing you off, because it's definitely 18.

0:32:390:32:42

We know it's a quality piece because when we close it,

0:32:420:32:45

close the clasp, see how it just disappears into the link.

0:32:450:32:49

You can see it's absolutely wonderful. It melts into that link. Fantastic.

0:32:490:32:54

When did you say you had it? What date would it be?

0:32:540:32:57

-Well, that would be the '70s.

-'70s.

-That was my question. How old is it?

0:32:570:33:03

I think it's slightly older. I think probably more '60s, by the style of the chain.

0:33:030:33:08

Probably late '60s. Maybe even slightly earlier.

0:33:080:33:12

Talk me through this ring, here.

0:33:120:33:14

That is Italian.

0:33:140:33:16

That was actually made in Florence, in a gold factory in Florence.

0:33:160:33:20

-So did you choose it?

-Yes, I did.

-You did.

0:33:200:33:22

Because we've got the wonderful combination here of this yellow gold loop

0:33:220:33:28

intertwined with this white gold hoop here.

0:33:280:33:30

Typically Italian. Very stylish.

0:33:300:33:33

It's 18-carat gold. We've got 18-carat white and 18-carat yellow.

0:33:330:33:37

Which is fantastic. It just oozes style. It's wonderful.

0:33:370:33:41

OK, now, we've got these two items here. Tell me about these.

0:33:410:33:47

This one, according to my grandmother, this was her mother's.

0:33:470:33:51

Right. OK. That would make sense. Do you know what it was used for?

0:33:510:33:55

I'm not sure whether it was to do with you had things hanging off it.

0:33:550:33:59

I can't imagine hanging anything off there.

0:33:590:34:02

Well, actually, it would have been originally what we call a muff or a guard chain.

0:34:020:34:07

As a Victorian lady, you had your muff to keep your hands warm.

0:34:070:34:10

It would go through the muff and round your neck. It looks so delicate, doesn't it?

0:34:100:34:14

A nice decorative link there.

0:34:140:34:16

And the pearl-set necklace? What about that?

0:34:160:34:19

That was given to me also for my 21st by a great friend of my mother's.

0:34:190:34:24

OK. I like the way this is designed as tiny little harebells

0:34:240:34:28

with pearls issuing from the flower heads.

0:34:280:34:30

Again, it's gold. It's nine-carat gold.

0:34:300:34:34

So going over to this little lot. Talk me through these.

0:34:340:34:37

We girls in the '60s used to be given charm bracelets.

0:34:370:34:40

-Right.

-So that was from my uncle.

0:34:400:34:44

Once again, the best friend of my mother's gave me the knickers!

0:34:440:34:48

Why would your mother's best friend be giving you a pair of knickers?

0:34:480:34:53

-She had a wicked sense of humour.

-Wonderful! Let's move on to value.

0:34:530:34:57

Starting over here, your bracelet, we're looking in the region of 400 to £600 for the bracelet.

0:34:590:35:06

-Is that because it's 18 carat?

-Yes.

0:35:060:35:09

The ring, I think we're looking somewhere in the region of 200 to £300.

0:35:100:35:15

OK?

0:35:150:35:17

Then we've got this little lot here.

0:35:170:35:19

At auction we're going to be looking in the region of 250 to £300.

0:35:190:35:24

Then I would put this little lot together, on the end, as a group lot here.

0:35:240:35:30

Again, I think we're looking 500 to £700 there.

0:35:300:35:34

-Whoa!

-OK? So I think your bottom estimate

0:35:340:35:37

is about 1,300 to £1,400.

0:35:370:35:40

-All right?

-I'm amazed!

0:35:400:35:43

Pardon me while I faint!

0:35:430:35:46

So we've got quite a lot of money's-worth of gold here.

0:35:470:35:50

-We've got rather a lot!

-We have!

0:35:500:35:52

-I'm amazed! Thank you!

-You're welcome!

0:35:520:35:56

Oh, gosh! I'm overcome!

0:35:560:35:59

That lot is going to keep our auctioneer busy!

0:35:590:36:01

But before we get to the sale room, let's have another quick look

0:36:010:36:05

at what we're taking with us.

0:36:050:36:06

First, Pam's interesting and varied collection of pin-head dolls and figurines,

0:36:060:36:12

24 in total.

0:36:120:36:14

Next, we'll hope for a build-up of steam on the day for Richard's German engine.

0:36:160:36:20

And finally, Serena has brought us a cornucopia of gold.

0:36:220:36:26

Pam is up now with her little dolls.

0:36:380:36:42

-How are you feeling?

-Very nervous!

0:36:420:36:44

It's a packed sale room. Quite exciting.

0:36:440:36:46

Things have been flying out. Hopefully it's our Flog It owners' turn for things to fly out.

0:36:460:36:52

-You're selling and giving the money to charity.

-I am.

0:36:520:36:55

It's going to Cardigan Memorial Hospital.

0:36:550:36:58

OK. We've got a valuation of 50 to £70 and a fixed reserve at 40.

0:36:580:37:03

Absolutely. It gives the auctioneer a bit of discretion if he needs it.

0:37:030:37:07

But hopefully, there are so many things there it'll make it and better.

0:37:070:37:12

Let's leave it up to the bidders here in Carmarthen. Here we go.

0:37:120:37:16

You've viewed them, I'm sure. The little mixed bag. What are they worth?

0:37:170:37:21

What do you say? Interest with me. £80 away for those?

0:37:210:37:24

80? 50 to get on, then.

0:37:250:37:27

-Come on!

-30. 40.

0:37:270:37:30

-Bidding, sir? 50 now. Fresh blood.

-Great!

-60

0:37:300:37:33

on the book. 70. 80.

0:37:330:37:36

-90.

-We're back up there.

-100.

0:37:360:37:38

110. 120. 130.

0:37:380:37:41

In the room now, seated. 130.

0:37:410:37:42

140?

0:37:420:37:44

In the room. £130.

0:37:440:37:47

What a surprise!

0:37:470:37:50

He was calling for 80. They went down to 30. Back up to 50. Like a yo-yo!

0:37:500:37:55

All the money is going to the hospital. Wonderful cause.

0:37:550:37:58

Thank you, Pam.

0:37:580:37:59

Well, that one really kept us on our toes!

0:37:590:38:02

Now for that little steam engine.

0:38:020:38:05

I've been joined by Richard in the nick of time in this packed room.

0:38:050:38:09

And our expert, Charlie. Something for the boys.

0:38:090:38:12

It's a vertical steam engine which is lots of fun.

0:38:120:38:16

-Let's see what it does.

-Yes.

-Full steam ahead!

0:38:160:38:19

Early 20th-century brass and cast metal model

0:38:190:38:23

of a single-cylinder live steam stationary engine.

0:38:230:38:27

£100 for it?

0:38:270:38:29

80? At 80.

0:38:290:38:31

90. At 90. 100 in the room.

0:38:310:38:34

At 100. 110 with me. 120.

0:38:340:38:36

-130.

-This chap's here to buy it!

-Yes!

-He wants it.

0:38:360:38:40

140. At £140 I'm bid in the room. Quiet online. I sell in the room.

0:38:400:38:44

At £140.

0:38:440:38:47

-Good price. Good price. Well done.

-Good.

0:38:470:38:50

-Thank you both.

-That's OK.

-Thanks, Charlie.

-Thank you.

0:38:500:38:53

That looks like it's gone to a new home where it will be really appreciated.

0:38:530:38:59

Serena has brought in a whole jewellery box-worth of gold items.

0:38:590:39:03

Serena, you've hit the market at the right time.

0:39:040:39:07

Did you know gold is at an all-time high?

0:39:070:39:10

I knew it was doing well.

0:39:100:39:12

-But I'm not thinking how well.

-You thought you'd cash in on this?

0:39:120:39:16

No, I didn't. It was a flier.

0:39:160:39:19

Did you go round the house thinking, "That's gold!"

0:39:190:39:22

We've got a lot here. Four lots. All valued separately.

0:39:220:39:25

-I thought, "Let's see if it's worth anything."

-First lot

0:39:250:39:29

is the bracelet. 400 to 600? Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:39:290:39:33

Here goes the bracelet. We're looking at 400 to £600.

0:39:330:39:36

The 18-carat gold reeded double-link chain bracelet

0:39:380:39:41

with the ball pendant set with semi-precious stones.

0:39:410:39:45

Fingers crossed! Everything crossed!

0:39:450:39:48

34 grams altogether with the stones.

0:39:480:39:51

What do we say? 400 away.

0:39:510:39:52

400?

0:39:520:39:54

300 to start me, then.

0:39:560:39:58

300 for that. At three. 300 I've got.

0:39:580:40:00

300. 320 sitting here. All in the room.

0:40:000:40:03

340. 360.

0:40:030:40:04

380. 400.

0:40:040:40:06

-Brilliant.

-420. 440. 460.

0:40:060:40:09

480. 500.

0:40:090:40:12

520, is it? 520.

0:40:120:40:14

550. 550 standing bid. 550.

0:40:140:40:17

580, may I say? 550 in the room. Against you online.

0:40:170:40:21

-Someone else?

-Standing in the room. £550.

0:40:210:40:25

-We'll take that!

-Well done!

-£550. One down, three to go.

0:40:250:40:29

The next item is the necklace, possibly the prettiest of the lots.

0:40:290:40:33

250 to 300, or thereabouts.

0:40:330:40:37

There are two in the lot, so hopefully that'll boost it a bit.

0:40:370:40:40

-Let's see. Here we go.

-Here we go.

0:40:400:40:42

The little yellow bell flower design necklace

0:40:430:40:47

together with a box link guard chain.

0:40:470:40:51

What do you say for those? £300 for the two?

0:40:510:40:55

300 I'm bid straight away. At 300. 320.

0:40:560:40:59

340. 360.

0:40:590:41:02

-380. 380.

-£380.

-380 on the front here.

0:41:020:41:06

380. Against you online.

0:41:060:41:08

-At 380.

-Brilliant. That's over the top estimate.

-£380.

0:41:080:41:12

Yes! 380! Two down. Two more to go. Here's the next.

0:41:120:41:16

We've got this Italian ring here.

0:41:160:41:18

The heavy white and yellow gold knot ring.

0:41:180:41:22

What's that worth? Again, what do we say? 200? £200 I'm bid.

0:41:220:41:28

At 200. 220, may I say?

0:41:280:41:30

At £200. 20? Yes, at 220.

0:41:300:41:33

-240 for it?

-230.

-Bad as that!

0:41:330:41:37

240?

0:41:370:41:39

240 I've got online. Beaten you both now.

0:41:390:41:42

240. You're both out. Online at 240.

0:41:420:41:45

-While you make up your minds, it's online at 240.

-Come on.

0:41:450:41:48

250? At £240.

0:41:480:41:50

-Online and selling.

-That's mid-estimate.

0:41:500:41:53

At £240.

0:41:530:41:55

Hammer's gone down. Now the fourth item. The bracelets.

0:41:550:41:58

-There's a lot here. We're looking 500 to £700 for this lot.

-Yes.

0:41:580:42:02

-This is a bit of everything.

-Are you keeping a total?

0:42:020:42:05

Don't ask me about maths!

0:42:050:42:06

A collection of nine-carat gold and other jewellery.

0:42:060:42:11

A gate bracelet, a chain bracelet, a dress ring, a rope-twist necklace.

0:42:110:42:18

Bracelets and another necklace set with pearls.

0:42:180:42:22

What have we got?

0:42:220:42:23

£500, surely. Yes, at 500.

0:42:230:42:26

520?

0:42:260:42:27

£500 I'm bid. 520, may I say?

0:42:270:42:30

At 500. The bid is in the room at £500.

0:42:300:42:33

Any more? At 500. Is it a maiden bid?

0:42:330:42:36

First and last at £500. We're here to sell.

0:42:360:42:39

Any more?

0:42:390:42:40

Just here at £500.

0:42:400:42:43

That is absolutely fabulous! Four out of four. That's £1,670!

0:42:430:42:49

I'm going to need support!

0:42:490:42:51

Brilliant. Well done.

0:42:540:42:55

How about that? Well done, you, as well. Spot-on valuations.

0:42:550:42:59

15% commission to pay, don't forget. What are you going to do with the money?

0:42:590:43:03

-We had a big discussion.

-Who's "we"?

-My husband and I.

0:43:030:43:07

We said, "Do we go for one week in the Red Sea,

0:43:070:43:10

"or if we're really good we can go for two weeks in Crete."

0:43:100:43:13

-Ooh.

-So I think it's two weeks in Crete!

0:43:130:43:16

Brilliant. Absolutely brilliant.

0:43:160:43:19

-Enjoy it, won't you?

-We will.

0:43:190:43:21

I hope you've enjoyed today's show. We're run out of time here in Carmarthen.

0:43:210:43:25

We knew somebody was going home with a lot of money. Congratulations.

0:43:250:43:29

See you next time for many more surprises!

0:43:290:43:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:500:43:53

The Flog It! valuation day comes from Rhosygilwen Mansion just outside Cardigan in the west of Wales. Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion. Their finds include everything from diamonds to steam engines, all to be put under the hammer at the auction house in Carnarvon. Also, Paul takes time out to visit local artist Eloise Glovier.


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